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Sample records for 17-4ph stainless steel

  1. Hot Ductility of the 17-4 PH Stainless Steels

    Herrera Lara, V.; Guerra Fuentes, L.; Covarrubias Alvarado, O.; Salinas Rodriguez, A.; Garcia Sanchez, E.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms of loss of hot ductility and the mechanical behavior of 17-4 PH alloys were investigated using hot tensile testing at temperatures between 700 and 1100 °C and strain rates of 10-4, 10-2, and 10-1 s-1. Scanning electron microscopy was used in conjunction with the results of the tensile tests to find the temperature region of loss of ductility and correlate it with cracking observed during processing by hot upsetting prior to ring rolling. It is reported that 17-4 PH alloys lose ductility in a temperature range around 900 °C near to the duplex austenite + ferrite phase field. Furthermore, it is found that niobium carbides precipitated at austenite/ferrite interfaces and grain boundaries have a pronounced effect on the mechanical behavior of the alloy during high-temperature deformation.

  2. Physical and mechanical properties of cast 17-4 PH stainless steel

    The physical and mechanical properties of an overaged 17-4 PH stainless steel casting have been examined. The tensile and compressive properties of cast 17-4 PH are only influenced to a slight degree by changing test temperature and strain rate. However, both the Charpy impact energy and dynamic fracture toughness exhibit a tough-to-brittle transition with decreasing temperature - this transition being related to a change in fracture mode from ductile, dimple to cleavage-like. Finally, although the overaged 17-4 PH casting had a relatively low room temperature Charpy impact energy when compared to wrought 17-4 PH, its fracture toughness was at least comparable to that of wrought 17-4 PH. This observation suggests that prior correlations between Charpy impact energies and fracture toughness, as derived from wrought materials, must be approached with caution when applied to cast alloys

  3. Effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness of 17-4 PH stainless steel

    Fracture toughness (K/sub c/) of 17-4 PH stainless steel decreased significantly with increased hydrogen test pressure for a variety of heat treatment conditions: solution annealed, underaged, peak-aged, and overaged. Minimum toughness (13 MPa√m) was obtained with peak-aged samples tested in 69.5-MPa hydrogen; toughness was maximum (100 MPa√m) for samples tested in helium. Aging treatments increased the hardness from 28 R/sub c/ for solution-annealed material to 42 R/c/ for peak-aged material and correspondingly decreased the fracture toughness in high-pressure hydrogen (K/sub H/) from 31 to 13 MPa√m. However, increased hardness had no substantial effect on the K/sub c/ in helium. Fracture mechanism changed from predominantly ductile rupture in helium to cleavage in 69.5-MPa hydrogen, with mixed-mode fractures at lower hydrogen pressure (3.5-MPa). On the basis of these data, 17-4 PH stainless steel is not recommended for hydrogen service

  4. Alloy Shrinkage factors for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Porter, Wallace D [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine. For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted over the most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted at heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution at heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation were performed with thermal expansion obtained at heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained at cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly over-predicted.

  5. Mechanical Properties of 17-4PH Stainless Steel Foam Panels

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.; Lerch, B. a.; Hebsur, M.; Cosgriff, L. M.; Fedor, J.

    2007-01-01

    Rectangular 17-4PH stainless steel sandwiched foam panels were fabricated using a commercial manufacturing technique by brazing two sheets to a foam core. Microstructural observations and ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of the panels revealed large variations in the quality of the brazed areas from one panel to the next as well as within the same panel. Shear tests conducted on specimens machined from the panels exhibited failures either in the brazed region or in the foam core for the poorly brazed and well-brazed samples, respectively. Compression tests were conducted on the foam cores to evaluate their elastic and plastic deformation behavior. These data were compared with published data on polymeric and metallic foams, and with theoretical deformation models proposed for open cell foams.

  6. Microstructure of the heat-affected zone in 17-4 PH stainless steel

    The microstructure of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in bead-on-plate welded 17-4 PH stainless steel was studied with special reference to the roles of prior heat treatment and heat input during welding. The HAZ in solution-annealed condition consists of three different microstructural zones containing: (I) retransformed martensite and reformed austenite; (II) over-aged martensite; and (III) under-aged martensite. In aged condition the HAZ consists of zones (I) and (II), while in over-aged condition it consists almost entirely of zone (II). The HAZ in solution-annealed and aged conditions is characterised by steep gradients in hardness, while in over-aged condition it has uniform hardness throughout. A good correlation was obtained between the calculated temperature distribution in the HAZ and the observed microstructural features. (orig.)

  7. Microstructure and intergranular corrosion resistance of UNS S17400 (17-4PH) stainless steel

    UNS S17400 or 17-4PH is a precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel with many industrial applications. Quite different mechanical properties can be produced in this material by varying the aging temperature. In this work, the influence of aging temperature on the intergranular corrosion susceptibility was evaluated by electrochemical and metallographic tests. The microstructural features were investigated by X-ray diffraction, optical and scanning electron microscopy. Intergranular chromium carbide precipitation occurs in specimens aged at high temperatures, although NbC carbides were also observed. The results obtained by double loop electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation tests (DL-EPR) show that the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion resistance increases with the increase of aging temperature. Healing due to Cr diffusion in the 600-650 oC range was not observed by DL-EPR tests.

  8. Additive Manufacturing of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel: Post-processing Heat Treatment to Achieve Uniform Reproducible Microstructure

    Cheruvathur, Sudha; Lass, Eric A.; Campbell, Carelyn E.

    2016-03-01

    17-4 precipitation hardenable (PH) stainless steel is a useful material when a combination of high strength and good corrosion resistance up to about 315°C is required. In the wrought form, this steel has a fully martensitic structure that can be strengthened by precipitation of fine Cu-rich face-centered cubic phase upon aging. When fabricated via additive manufacturing (AM), specifically laser powder-bed fusion, 17-4 PH steel exhibits a dendritic structure containing a substantial fraction of nearly 50% of retained austenite along with body centered cubic/martensite and fine niobium carbides preferentially aligned along interdendritic boundaries. The effect of post-build thermal processing on the material microstructure is studied in comparison to that of conventionally produced wrought 17-4 PH with the intention of creating a more uniform, fully martensitic microstructure. The recommended stress relief heat treatment currently employed in industry for post-processing of AM 17-4 PH steel is found to have little effect on the as-built dendritic microstructure. It is found that, by implementing the recommended homogenization heat treatment regimen of Aerospace Materials Specification 5355 for CB7Cu-1, a casting alloy analog to 17-4 PH, the dendritic solidification structure is eliminated, resulting in a microstructure containing about 90% martensite with 10% retained austenite.

  9. Influence of Fluoride Content of Artificial Saliva on Metal Release from 17-4 PH Stainless Steel Foam for Dental Implant Applications

    Ilven Mutlu; Enver Oktay

    2013-01-01

    Highly porous 17-4 PH stainless steel foam for implant applications was produced by space holder technique.Metal release and weight loss from 17-4 PH stainless steel foams were investigated in fluoride added artificial saliva environment by static immersion test.An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer was employed to measure the concentrations of various metal ions.Effects of fluoride content of artificial saliva on metal release and weight loss from the steel foams were investigated.Effects of immersion time,pH value and process parameters on the weight loss and metal release were determined.Pore morphology,pore size and mechanical properties of the 17-4 PH stainless steel foams were also characterized.

  10. Effect of Aging Temperature on Erosion-Corrosion Behavior of 17-4PH Stainless Steels in Dilute Sulphuric Acid Slurry

    LI Ping; CAI Qi-zhou; WEI Bo-kang; ZHANG Xian-zhong

    2006-01-01

    The effect of aging temperature on erosion-corrosion (E-C) behavior of 17-4PH stainless steels in dilute sulphuric acid slurry containing solid particles was studied by using self-made rotating E-C apparatus. The effect of impact velocity on E-C behavior of 17-4PH steels at different aging temperatures was analyzed. Surface micrographs of the specimens after E-C test were observed by using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results showed that under the condition of the same solution heat treatment, when aging temperature ranged from 400 ℃ to 610 ℃, the hardness reached the highest value near the temperature 460 ℃. The characteristics of E-C for 17-4PH stainless steels at different aging temperatures were as follows: pure erosion (wear) was dominant, corrosion was subordinate and at the same time corrosion promoted erosion. The effect of aging temperature on E-C rate of 17-4PH steels was not significant at low impact velocity, but it was found that E-C resistance of 17-4PH steels aged near 460 ℃ was the most excellent due to the best precipitation strengthening effect of fine and dispersed ε-Cu phase. With a prerequisite of appropriate corrosion resistance, the precipitation hardening could significantly improve the E-C resistance of the materials.

  11. Data demonstrating the effects of build orientation and heat treatment on fatigue behavior of selective laser melted 17-4 PH stainless steel.

    Yadollahi, Aref; Simsiriwong, Jutima; Thompson, Scott M; Shamsaei, Nima

    2016-06-01

    Axial fully-reversed strain-controlled ([Formula: see text]) fatigue experiments were performed to obtain data demonstrating the effects of building orientation (i.e. vertical versus horizontal) and heat treatment on the fatigue behavior of 17-4 PH stainless steel (SS) fabricated via Selective Laser Melting (SLM) (Yadollahi et al., submitted for publication [1]). This data article provides detailed experimental data including cyclic stress-strain responses, variations of peak stresses during cyclic deformation, and fractography of post-mortem specimens for SLM 17-4 PH SS. PMID:26955653

  12. Susceptibility of 17-4PH stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking in aqueous environments by electrochemical techniques

    The susceptibility of a 17-4PH type steel to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in low pressure steam turbine environments was assessed using slow strain rate test at 90 Centigrade and at 1.35x10-6 seg-1. Environments tested included different concentrated solutions of NaCl, NaOH and Na2SO4. It was concluded that this steel is susceptible to SCC in 20 % NaCl and pH=3 and in 20 % NaCl pH=neutral but under cathodic polarisation. The electrochemical potential noise of the specimen was monitored during the test. The naturally fluctuations in potential were arise due to spontaneous brake protective film and were characteristics of the kind of corrosion like pit or stress corrosion cracking. After that using Fast Fourier Transformer (FFT) the noise data set were analyzed to obtain power spectral density plots which showed differences between general corrosion and localized corrosion. Polarization curves were carry out at two different rates and them showed the general behavior of the systems. (Author)

  13. Laser-based welding of 17-4 PH martensitic stainless steel in a tubular butt joint configuration with a built-in backing bar

    Ma, Junjie; Atabaki, Mehdi Mazar; Liu, Wei; Pillai, Raju; Kumar, Biju; Vasudevan, Unnikrishnan; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-08-01

    Laser-based welding of thick 17-4 precipitation hardening (PH) martensitic stainless steel (SS) plates in a tubular butt joint configuration with a built-in backing bar is very challenging because the porosity and cracks are easily generated in the welds. The backing bar blocked the keyhole opening at the bottom surface through which the entrapped gas could escape, and the keyhole was unstable and collapsed overtime in a deep partially penetrated welding conditions resulting in the formation of pores easily. Moreover, the fast cooling rate prompted the ferrite transform to austenite which induced cracking. Two-pass welding procedure was developed to join 17-4 PH martensitic SS. The laser welding assisted by a filler wire, as the first pass, was used to weld the groove shoulder. The added filler wire could absorb a part of the laser beam energy; resulting in the decreased weld depth-to-width ratio and relieved intensive restraint at the weld root. A hybrid laser-arc welding or a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) was used to fill the groove as the second pass. Nitrogen was introduced to stabilize the keyhole and mitigate the porosity. Preheating was used to decrease the cooling rate and mitigate the cracking during laser-based welding of 17-4 PH martensitic SS plates.

  14. Precipitation-Induced Changes in Microstrain and Its Relation with Hardness and Tempering Parameter in 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    Mahadevan, S.; Manojkumar, R.; Jayakumar, T.; Das, C. R.; Rao, B. P. C.

    2016-06-01

    17-4 PH (precipitation hardening) stainless steel is a soft martensitic stainless steel strengthened by aging at appropriate temperature for sufficient duration. Precipitation of copper particles in the martensitic matrix during aging causes coherency strains which improves the mechanical properties, namely hardness and strength of the matrix. The contributions to X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile broadening due to coherency strains caused by precipitation and crystallite size changes due to aging are separated and quantified using the modified Williamson-Hall approach. The estimated normalized mean square strain and crystallite size are used to explain the observed changes in hardness. Microstructural changes observed in secondary electron images are in qualitative agreement with crystallite size changes estimated from XRD profile analysis. The precipitation kinetics in the age-hardening regime and overaged regime are studied from hardness changes and they follow the Avrami kinetics and Wilson's model, respectively. In overaged condition, the hardness changes are linearly correlated to the tempering parameter (also known as Larson-Miller parameter). Similar linear variation is observed between the normalized mean square strain (determined from XRD line profile analysis) and the tempering parameter, in the incoherent regime which is beyond peak microstrain conditions.

  15. Nanoindentation hardness of 17-4PH stainless steel irradiated with 2.5 MeV per nucleon 20Ne2+ ions

    This paper reports on direst ion implantation of radioactive isotopes, such as 7Be or 22Na, that has recently been of interest as a means of surface layer activation for purposes of wear-rate measurement in material systems for which activation by conventional proton irradiation is ineffective. Though direct implantation doses anticipated for adequate wear measurement sensitivity are expected to be quite low (∼1012 cm-2), the potential for alteration of wear properties by ion damage cannot be ignored. The present work was designed to simulate 22Na implantation with non-radioactive 20Ne irradiations into specimens of 17-4PH stainless steel which had been deliberately heat treated to contain 98 vol% metastable martensite. Specimens were subjected to dose of 2 x 1012, 2 x 1013 and 2 x 1014 cm-2 of 20Ne2+, applied at a total energy of 50 MeV, giving a projected ion range (determined by TRIM-91 computations) of approximately 10μm. Nanoindentation surface hardness traverses were conducted to detect any material softening which may have resulted from ion-solid interactions within the projected range. Though doses of >1014 cm-2 produced a detectable softening (apparent as a dip in the hardness level corresponding to locations near the end of the ion range) the maximum dose for a negligible effect on nanoindentation hardness was found to be approximately 1013 cm-2, well above the doses anticipated for use in wear studies employing direct ion implantation of radioisotopes

  16. Effects of Powder Attributes and Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) Process Conditions on the Densification and Mechanical Properties of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    Irrinki, Harish; Dexter, Michael; Barmore, Brenton; Enneti, Ravi; Pasebani, Somayeh; Badwe, Sunil; Stitzel, Jason; Malhotra, Rajiv; Atre, Sundar V.

    2016-03-01

    The effects of powders attributes (shape and size distribution) and critical processing conditions (energy density) on the densification and mechanical properties of laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) 17-4 PH stainless steel were studied using four types of powders. The % theoretical density, ultimate tensile strength and hardness of both water- and gas-atomized powders increased with increased energy density. Gas-atomized powders showed superior densification and mechanical properties when processed at low energy densities. However, the % theoretical density and mechanical properties of water-atomized powders were comparable to gas-atomized powders when sintered at a high energy density of 104 J/mm3. An important result of this study was that, even at high % theoretical density (97% ± 1%), the properties of as-printed parts could vary over a relatively large range (UTS: 500-1100 MPa; hardness: 25-39 HRC; elongation: 10-25%) depending on powder characteristics and process conditions. The results also demonstrate the feasibility of using relatively inexpensive water-atomized powders as starting raw material instead of the typically used gas-atomized powders to fabricate parts using L-PBF techniques by sintering at high energy densities.

  17. The Effect of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel on the Lifetime of a Pennzane(Trademark) Lubricated Microwave Limb Sounder Antenna Actuator Assembly Ball Screw for the AURA Spacecraft

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Lam, Jonathan; Balzer, Mark; Anderson, Mark; Lo, John; Schepis, Joseph P.

    2005-01-01

    During ground based life testing of a Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Antenna Actuator Assembly (AAA) ball-screw assembly, lubricant darkening and loss were noted when approximately 10 percent of required lifetime was completed. The MLS-AAA ball screw and nut are made from 17-4 PH steel, the nut has 440C stainless steel balls, and the assembly is lubricated with a Pennzane formulation containing a three weight percent lead naphthenate additive. Life tests were done in dry nitrogen at 50 C. To investigate the MLS-AAA life test anomaly, Spiral Orbit Tribometer (SOT) accelerated tests were performed. SOT results indicated greatly reduced relative lifetimes of Pennzane formulations in contact with 17-4 PH steel compared to 440C stainless steel. Also, dry nitrogen tests yielded longer relative lifetimes than comparable ultrahigh vacuum tests. Generally, oxidized Pennzane formulations yielded shorter lifetimes than non-oxidized lubricant. This study emphasizes surface chemistry effects on the lubricated lifetime of moving mechanical assemblies.

  18. Influence of interface microstructure on the mechanical properties of titanium/17-4 PH stainless steel solid state diffusion bonded joints

    Highlights: ► Commercially pure titanium and precipitation hardening stainless steel was solid state diffusion bonded. ► Variation of temperatures and time at constant pressure were done to achieve maximum strength properties. ► Interface microstructure with mechanical properties was co-related. -- Abstract: In the present study, titanium was diffusion bonded to a type 17-4 precipitation hardening stainless steel in vacuum at different temperatures and times. Bonded samples were characterized using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction technique (XRD). The inter-diffusion of the chemical species across the diffusion interface was evaluated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Up to 850 °C for 60 min, FeTi phase was formed at the diffusion interface; however, α-Fe + λ, χ, Fe2Ti and FeTi phases and their phase mixtures were formed above 850 °C for 60 min and at 900 °C for all bonding times. The maximum tensile strength of ∼342.4 MPa and shear strength of ∼260.3 MPa along with 12.8% elongation were obtained for the diffusion couple processed at 950 °C. The thicknesses of different reaction products at the bond interface play an important role in determining the mechanical properties of the joints. The residual stress of the bonded joints increases with the increases in bonding temperatures and times.

  19. 激光立体成形17-4 PH不锈钢组织性能研究%Study on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Laser Solid Forming 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    吴晓瑜; 林鑫; 吕晓卫; 杨海欧; 陈静; 黄卫东

    2011-01-01

    对激光立体成形17-4 PH(0Cr17Ni4Cu4Nb)沉淀硬化不锈钢沉积区热处理前后的组织和常规力学性能进行了研究.光学显微镜(OM)、扫描电子显微镜(SEM)和X射线衍射(XRD)结果表明.沉积态组织主要由板条状马氏体和分布于其上和板条间少量的第二相强化质点组成.根据合金特性,推测马氏体基体上弥散析出的第二相强化质点应该为M7C3及NbC型碳化物等.靠近基材处的沉积态组织以细长的板条状淬火马氏体为主;远离基材的沉积态组织则变成粗大的板条状马氏体.沉积态试样经过固溶时效处理后,组织变为细小均匀的板条状回火马氏体,并且基体上析出了更多的第二相强化质点,这类强化质点推测应为NbC型以及M7C3,M23C6型碳化物.成形件经过热处理后,强度、硬度略微提高,而塑性则显著增加.并且其抗拉强度和塑性均高于锻棒标准,屈服强度则略低于锻棒标准.热处理前后成形件拉伸断裂均属于韧性断裂,其中M7C3型碳化物等形成的第二相质点是微观空穴和韧窝形成之源.%The microstructure and mechanical properties of as-deposited and heat-treated laser solid forming (LSF)17-4 PH (0Cr17Ni4Cu4Nb) percipitation-hardening stainless steel are investigated. The results of optic microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) show that the microstructure of as-deposited LSF 17-4 PH steel consists of lath martensite and a small quatity of the second phase strengthening particles which distribute in and between the laths. According to the characteristics of alloy, the precipitating second phase strengthening particles should be M7C3 and NbC carbides, etc. The microstructure at the bottom of the deposited LSF 17-4 PH is mainly thin lath hardened martensite, however, there are thick lath martensite at the top of the deposited one. The microstructure of heat-treated LSF 17-4 PH is thin homogeneous lath martensite and

  20. Production of 17-4PH Precipitation Hardening Stainless Steel Nozzle for Rolling Mill by Investment Casting%17-4PH沉淀硬化不锈钢轧机导槽的精密铸造

    赵竞翔; 陶小炯; 李桐; 王拓

    2012-01-01

    轧机导槽是高速线材轧机上的易损部件,采用17-4PH沉淀硬化不锈钢熔模铸造而成.该部件结构复杂、壁厚相差大,易产生缩孔、缩松缺陷;浇口处在热处理时易出现裂纹,制造工艺难度大.根据导槽零件的结构特点,优化模具设计、使用石蜡硬脂酸低温蜡制模,有效防止蜡模的变形,保证了铸件的尺寸精度和表面光洁度;通过浇注系统的优化,解决了导槽铸件的缩孔和热处理过程中的开裂缺陷,批量生产出了合格的导槽铸件.%Nozzle for rolling mill as easily failure parts for high speed wire rod mill was produced with 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel by investment casting. There exists many difficulties in the manufacturing process,and shrinkage porosity (hole) often occurs in the nozzle due to its complicated structure and obvious wall thickness difference. Meanwhile, crack can be easily generated at the runner location after heat treatment. Based on the structure characteristics of the nozzle parts, through optimizing mould design and making wax-pattern with paraffin-stearic acid low-point wax as well as silica sol shell molding, deformation can be effectively avoided, and dimension accuracy and surface roughness can be improved. The shrinkage porosity (hole) and thermal crack can be eliminated by optimizing gating system. Product-volumetric qualified castings were manufactured.

  1. Electrochemical impedance spectrometry using Inconel 690, zircaloy 4, 316Ti steel, 17-4-PH, UR52N et URSB8. Simulation in tritiated water. Tome 2

    The redox potential of 3 H2O, as well as the corrosion potentials in this medium are found, abnormally, in the trans-passive region. This is completely different from behavior in the chemical industry or in the water in nuclear powers. With such behavior, there will be breakdowns of the protective oxide layers, and in the presence of chloride there will be immediate pitting. Polarization and electrochemical impedance spectrometry curves are presented and discussed. These curves make it possible to ascertain the corrosion domains and to compare the kinetics of different stainless steel alloys. These corrosion kinetics and the corrosion potentials provide a classification of the steels studied here: Inconel 690, zircaloy 4, 316 Ti steel, 17-4-PH, UR52N et URSB8. From the results it can be concluded that URSB8 has the best corrosion resistance. (author). 13 refs., 522 figs., tabs

  2. Electrochemical impedance spectrometry using Inconel 690, zircaloy 4, 316Ti steel, 17-4-PH, UR52N et URSB8. Simulation in tritiated water. Tome 1

    The redox potential of 3 H2O, as well as the corrosion potentials in this medium are found, abnormally, in the trans-passive region. This is completely different from the behavior in the chemical industry or in the water in nuclear powers. With such behavior, there will be breakdowns of the protective oxide layers, and in the presence of chloride there will be immediate pitting. Polarization and electrochemical impedance spectrometry curves are presented and discussed. These curves make it possible to ascertain the corrosion domains and to compare the kinetics of different stainless alloys. These corrosion kinetics and the corrosion potentials provide a classification of the steels studied here: Inconel 690, zircaloy 4, 316 Ti steel, 17-4-PH, UR52N et URSB8. From the results it can be concluded that URSB8 has the best corrosion resistance. (author). 279 figs., tabs

  3. Influence of process time on microstructure and properties of 17-4PH steel plasma nitrocarburized with rare earths addition at low temperature

    17-4PH stainless steel was plasma nitrocarburized at 430 deg. C for different time with rare earths (RE) addition. Plasma RE nitrocarburized layers were studied by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer, X-ray diffraction, microhardness tests, pin-on-disc tribometer and anodic polarization tests. The results show that rare earths atoms can diffuse into the surface of 17-4PH steel. The modified layer depths increase with increasing process time and the layer growth conforms approximately to the parabolic law. The phases in the modified layer are mainly of γ'-Fe4N, nitrogen and carbon expanded martensite (α'N) as well as some incipient CrN at short time (2 h). With increasing of process time, the phases of CrN and γ'-Fe4N increase but α'N decomposes gradually. Interestingly, the peaks of γ'-Fe4N display a high (2 0 0) plane preferred orientation. The hardness of the modified specimen is more than 1340 HV, which is about 3.7 times higher than that of untreated one. The friction coefficients and wear rates of specimens can be dramatically decreased by plasma RE nitrocarburizing. The surface hardness and the friction coefficients decrease gradually with increasing process time. The corrosion test shows that the 8 h treated specimen has the best corrosion resistance with the characterization of lower corrosion current density, a higher corrosion potential and a large passive region as compared with those of untreated one.

  4. Ultrasonic Spectroscopy of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Hebsur, Mohan G.; Baaklini, George Y.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    Enhanced, lightweight material systems, such as 17-4PH stainless steel sandwich panels are being developed for use as fan blades and fan containment material systems for next generation engines. In order to improve the production for these systems, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, such as ultrasonic spectroscopy, are being utilized to evaluate the brazing quality between the 17-4PH stainless steel face plates and the 17-4PH stainless steel foam core. Based on NDE data, shear tests are performed on sections representing various levels of brazing quality from an initial batch of these sandwich structures. Metallographic characterization of brazing is done to corroborate NDE findings and the observed shear failure mechanisms.

  5. Microstructure of Welded Joints of X5CrNiCuNb16-4 (17-4 PH Martensitic Stainlees Steel After Heat Treatment

    Ziewiec A.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents rezults of microstructure (LM, TEM investigation and hardness measurments of welded joints in martensitic precipitation hardened stainless steel containing copper, subjected to heat treatment. For the aging temperature up to 540 °C even for the very long times, the microstructure of the welded joints is similar to this one at lower temerature aging. After aging at 620 °C a distinct change of the microstructure was observed. Non-equilibrium solidification conditions of the weld metal, segregation and the diffusion of copper and the elements stablilizing the austenite cause the occurrence of the reverse transformation of the martensite into austenite as fast as just 1 hour at 620 °C. TEM investigations revealed the differences in dispersion of hardening copper precipitates after aging at temperature 620 °C for 1 and 4 hours.

  6. Use of electrochemical potential noise to detect initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracks in a 17-4 PH steel

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G. [UAEM, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Salinas-Bravo, V.M.; Garcia-Ochoa, E. [Inst. de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco (Mexico). Dept. de Fisicoquimica Aplicada; Diaz-Sanchez, A. [Inst. Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Toluca (Mexico). Dept. de Materiales

    1997-09-01

    Corrosion potential transients were associated with nucleation and propagation of stress corrosion cracks in a 17-4 precipitation-hardenable (PH) martensitic stainless steel (SS) during slow strain rate tests (SSRT) at 90 C in deaerated sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions, Test solutions included 20 wt% NaCl at pH 3 and 7, similar to normal and faulted steam turbine environments, respectively. Time series were analyzed using the fast Fourier transform method. At the beginning of straining, the consistent noise behavior was perturbed with small potential transients, probably associated with rupture of the surface oxide layer. After yielding, these transients increased in intensity. At maximum load, the transients were still higher in intensity and frequency. These potential transients were related to crack nucleation and propagation. When the steel did not fail by stress corrosion cracking (SCC), such transients were found only at the beginning of the test. The power spectra showed some differences in all cases in roll-off slope and voltage magnitude, but these were not reliable tools to monitor the initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracks.

  7. Weldability of Stainless Steels

    It gives an outline of metallographic properties of welding zone of stainless steels, generation and mechanisms of welding crack and decreasing of corrosion resistance of welding zone. It consists of seven chapters such as introduction, some kinds of stainless steels and properties, metallographic properties of welding zone, weld crack, toughness of welding zone, corrosion resistance and summary. The solidification modes of stainless steels, each solidification mode on the cross section of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy phase diagram, each solidification mode of weld stainless steels metal by electron beam welding, segregation state of alloy elements at each solidification mode, Schaeffler diagram, Delong diagram, effects of (P + S) mass content in % and Cr/Ni equivalent on solidification cracking of weld stainless steels metal, solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, effects of trace impurity elements on solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, ductile fracture susceptibility of weld austenitic stainless steels metal, effects of H2 and ferrite content on generation of crack of weld 25Cr-5N duplex stainless steels, effects of O and N content on toughness of weld SUS 447J1 metals, effect of ferrite content on aging toughness of weld austenitic stainless steel metal, corrosion morphology of welding zone of stainless steels, generation mechanism of knife line attack phenomenon, and corrosion potential of some kinds of metals in seawater at room temperature are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  8. A stainless steel bracket for orthodontic application.

    Oh, Keun-Taek; Choo, Sung-Uk; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2005-06-01

    Aesthetics has become an essential element when choosing orthodontic fixed appliances. Most metallic brackets used in orthodontic therapy are made from stainless steel (SS) with the appropriate physical properties and good corrosion resistance, and are available as types 304, 316 and 17-4 PH SS. However, localized corrosion of these materials can frequently occur in the oral environment. This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of sizing, microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance, frictional resistance and cytotoxicity of commercially available Mini-diamond (S17400), Archist (S30403) and experimentally manufactured SR-50A (S32050) brackets. The size accuracy of Mini-diamond was the highest at all locations except for the external horizontal width of the tie wing (P SS brackets. PMID:15947222

  9. Analysis of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels with a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    Min, James B.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Raj, Sai V.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2004-01-01

    The quest for cheap, low density and high performance materials in the design of aircraft and rotorcraft engine fan and propeller blades poses immense challenges to the materials and structural design engineers. The present study investigates the use of a sandwich foam fan blade mae up of solid face sheets and a metal foam core. The face sheets and the metal foam core material were an aerospace grade precipitation hardened 17-4 PH stainless steel with high strength and high toughness. The resulting structures possesses a high stiffness while being lighter than a similar solid construction. The material properties of 17-4 PH metal foam are reviewed briefly to describe the characteristics of sandwich structure for a fan blade application. A vibration analysis for natural frequencies and a detailed stress analysis on the 17-4 PH sandwich foam blade design for different combinations of kin thickness and core volume are presented with a comparison to a solid titanium blade.

  10. Welding irradiated stainless steel

    Conventional welding processes produced severe underbead cracking in irradiated stainless steel containing 1 to 33 appm helium from n,a reactions. A shallow penetration overlay technique was successfully demonstrated for welding irradiated stainless steel. The technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel that contained 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at the same and lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking was minimal compared to conventional welding methods. However, cracking in the irradiated material was greater than in tritium charged and aged material at the same helium concentrations. The overlay technique provides a potential method for repair or modification of irradiated reactor materials

  11. Shrinkage Prediction for the Investment Casting of Stainless Steels

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine in order to obtain the actual tooling allowances. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. The numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were compared with experimental results.

  12. Corrosive-wear resistance of stainless steels for the impeller of slurry pump used in zinc hydrometallurgy process

    Li, Ping; Qizhou CAI; Bokang WEI

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents corrosive-wear (C-W) behaviors of three kinds of steels under the simulating condition of traditional zinc hydrometallurgy process by using a self-made rotating disk apparatus. Result shows that pure wear loss rate is significantly larger than pure corrosion loss rate. Under this C-W condition, the ranking of C-W resistance is S2 > S3 > S1 (S1: austenite stainless steel; S2: CD-4MCu duplex stainless steel; S3 :17-4PH stainless steel). S2 has excellent C-W resistance due to...

  13. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  14. Estudio de corrosión bajo tensión en los aceros inoxidables 17-4PH y 17-7PH en presencia de NaCl y NaOH (20 %) a 90 °C

    Gaona-Tiburcio, Citlalli; Almeraya-Calderón, Facundo; Martínez-Villafañe, Alberto

    2000-01-01

    One of the problems that affects to the electric industry is the not programmed stoppages in the power plants, due to the failure of any main component: boiler, turbine and generator. In the turbine, the combined action of a corrosive agent (humid polluted vapor) and a mechanical effort generally will result in Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). In this work the SCC susceptibility of the precipitation hardening stainless steels 17-4PH and 17- 7PH, thoroughly used in steam turbine blades of powe...

  15. Corrosive-wear resistance of stainless steels for the impeller of slurry pump used in zinc hydrometallurgy process

    Ping LI

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents corrosive-wear (C-W behaviors of three kinds of steels under the simulating condition of traditional zinc hydrometallurgy process by using a self-made rotating disk apparatus. Result shows that pure wear loss rate is significantly larger than pure corrosion loss rate. Under this C-W condition, the ranking of C-W resistance is S2 > S3 > S1 (S1: austenite stainless steel; S2: CD-4MCu duplex stainless steel; S3 :17-4PH stainless steel. S2 has excellent C-W resistance due to strong surface deformation strengthening effect of high-density dislocations of the γ phase. S3 also has excellent C-W resistance owing to high hardness and strength. However, S1 does not show good C-W resistance under strong erosion of liquid-solid slurry because of its single-phase austenitic structure and very low hardness. As a result, duplex stainless steels as well as 17-4 PH stainless steel can be used as impeller candidate materials in the zinc hydrometallurgy process due to their excellent C-W resistance and lower cost.

  16. Corrosive-wear resistance of stainless steels for the impeller of slurry pump used in zinc hydrometallurgy process

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents corrosive-wear (C-W) behaviors of three kinds of steels under the simulating condition of traditional zinc hydrometallurgy process by using a self-made rotating disk apparatus. Result shows that pure wear loss rate is significantly larger than pure corrosion loss rate. Under this C-W condition, the ranking of C-W resistance is S2 > S3 > S1 (S1: austenite stainless steel; S2: CD-4MCu duplex stainless steel; S3:17-4PH stainless steel). S2 has excellent C-W resistance due to strong surface deformation strengthening effect of high-density dislocations of the γphase. S3 also has excellent C-W resistance owing to high hardness and strength. However, S1 does not show good C-W resistance under strong erosion of liquid-solid slurry because of its single-phase austenitic structure and very low hardness. As a result, duplex stainless steels as well as 17-4 PH stainless steel can be used as impeller candidate materials in the zinc hydrometallurgy process due to their excellent C-W resistance and lower cost.

  17. Shape retention of injection molded stainless steel compacts

    LI Yi-min; K.A.Khalil; HUANG Bai-yun

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the binder composition, the powder loading, the thermal properties of feedstocks, and the injection molding parameters on the compact shape retention for metal injection molding 17-4PH stainless steel were investigated. The high-density polyethylene is more effective than ethylene vinyl acetate as a second component of the wax-based binder to retain compact shape due to its higher pyrolytic temperature and less heat of fusion. The compact distortion decreases with increasing the powder loading, molding pressure and molding temperature. There exists an optimal process combination including the powder loading of 68%, molding pressure of 120 MPa and molding temperature of 150 ℃. Under this process condition, the percentage of distorted compacts is the lowest.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  19. Stainless steels low temperature nitriding

    Nitrogen ions implantation of 316L stainless steel leads to monophasic diffusion layers, which are constituted of a solid solution (γN) fcc, metastable, nitrogen sur-saturated, and without order. This article shows that for 316L stainless steels,these layers improve the tribological properties without degradation of the corrosion resistance. (A.B.). 13 refs. 6 figs

  20. Stainless Steel Permeability

    Buchenauer, Dean A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Karnesky, Richard A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  1. Stainless steel display evaluation

    Hopper, Darrel G.; Meyer, Frederick M.; Longo, Sam J.; Trissell, Terry L.

    2007-04-01

    Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) technology is one candidate to become a low power alternative in some applications to the currently dominant, active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD), technology. Furthermore, fabrication of the AMOLED on stainless steel (SS) foil rather than the traditional glass substrate, while presenting a set of severe technical challenges, opens up the potential for displays that are both lighter and less breakable. Also, transition to an SS foil substrate may enable rollable displays - large when used but small for stowage within gear already worn or carried or installed. Research has been initiated on AMOLED/SS technology and the first 320 x 240 color pixel 4-in. demonstration device has been evaluated in the AFRL Display Test and Evaluation Laboratory. Results of this evaluation are reported along with a research roadmap.

  2. TiC-Maraging stainless steel composite: microstructure, mechanical and wear properties

    Akhtar Farid; GUO Shiju; FENG Peizhong; Khadijah Ali Shah; Syed Javid Askari

    2006-01-01

    Particulate TiC reinforced 17-4PH and 465 maraging stainless steel matrix composites were processed by conventional powder metallurgy (P/M). TiC-maraging stainless steel composites with theoretical density >97% were produced using conventional P/M. The microstructure, and mechanical and wear properties of the composites were evaluated. The microstructure of the composites consisted of (core-rim structure) spherical and semi-spherical TiC particles depending on the wettability of the matrix with TiC particles. In TiC-maraging stainless steel composites, 465 stainless steel binder phase showed good wettability with TiC particles. Some microcracks appeared in the composites, indicating the presence of tensile stresses in the composites produced during sintering. The typical properties, hardness, and bend strength were reported for the composites. After heat treatment and aging, an increase in hardness was observed. The increase in hardness was attributed to the aging reaction in maraging stainless steel. The specific wear behavior of the composites strongly depends on the content of TiC particles and their interparticle spacing, and on the heat treatment of the maraging stainless steel.

  3. Analysis of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels with a Metal Foam Care for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    Min, James B.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Raj, Sai V.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2004-01-01

    The quest for cheap, low density and high performance materials in the design of aircraft and rotorcraft engine fan and propeller blades poses immense challenges to the materials and structural design engineers. Traditionally, these components have been fabricated using expensive materials such as light weight titanium alloys, polymeric composite materials and carbon-carbon composites. The present study investigates the use of P sandwich foam fan blade made up of solid face sheets and a metal foam core. The face sheets and the metal foam core material were an aerospace grade precipitation hardened 17-4 PH stainless steel with high strength and high toughness. The stiffness of the sandwich structure is increased by separating the two face sheets by a foam core. The resulting structure possesses a high stiffness while being lighter than a similar solid construction. Since the face sheets carry the applied bending loads, the sandwich architecture is a viable engineering concept. The material properties of 17-4 PH metal foam are reviewed briefly to describe the characteristics of the sandwich structure for a fan blade application. A vibration analysis for natural frequencies and P detailed stress analysis on the 17-4 PH sandwich foam blade design for different combinations of skin thickness and core volume %re presented with a comparison to a solid titanium blade.

  4. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  5. Overlay welding irradiated stainless steel

    An overlay technique developed for welding irradiated stainless steel may be important for repair or modification of fusion reactor materials. Helium, present due to n,α reactions, is known to cause cracking using conventional welding methods. Stainless steel impregnated with 3 to 220 appm helium by decay of tritium was used to develop a welding process that could be used for repair. The result was a gas metal arc weld overlay technique with low-heat input and low-penetration into the helium-containing material. Extensive metallurgical and mechanical testing of this technique demonstrated substantial reduction of helium embrittlement damage. The overlay technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel containing 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking, although greater than for tritium charged and aged material, was minimal compared to conventional welding methods

  6. Strip casting of stainless steels

    Raabe, D.

    1997-01-01

    FLAT PRODUCTS OF STAINLESS STEELS ARE CONVENTIONALLY MANUFACTURED BY CONTINUOUS CASTING, HOT ROLLING, HOT BAND ANNEALING, PICKLING, COLD ROLLING AND RECRYSTALLISATION. IN THE LAST YEARS STRIP CASTING HAS INCREASINGLY ATTRACTED ATTENTION. IT OFFERS THREE IMPROVEMENTS IN COMPARISON TO THE CONVENTIONAL METHOD.1.) IT ALLOWS TO CAST STEEL SHEETS WITH THE SAME THICKNESS AND WIDTH AS THOSE PRODUCED BY HOT ROLLING. THIS MEANS THAT THE HOT ROLLING PROCESSIS BYPASSED. 2.) THE STRIP CAST STEEL REVEALS A...

  7. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate

  8. AEM ANALYSIS OF STAINLESS STEEL

    Ogilvie, R.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative AEM of thin films of stainless steel is presented. The X-ray data is corrected for absorption, secondary fluorescence and detector efficiency. A new form of the fluorescence correction has been derived. A modified form of the Cliff-Lorimer equations is also presented.

  9. Corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

    Platt, J A; Guzman, A; Zuccari, A; Thornburg, D W; Rhodes, B F; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1997-07-01

    The corrosion of 2205 duplex stainless steel was compared with that of AISI type 316L stainless steel. The 2205 stainless steel is a potential orthodontic bracket material with low nickel content (4 to 6 wt%), whereas the 316L stainless steel (nickel content: 10 to 14 wt%) is a currently used bracket material. Both stainless steels were subjected to electrochemical and immersion (crevice) corrosion tests in 37 degrees C, 0.9 wt% sodium chloride solution. Electrochemical testing indicates that 2205 has a longer passivation range than 316L. The corrosion rate of 2205 was 0.416 MPY (milli-inch per year), whereas 316L exhibited 0.647 MPY. When 2205 was coupled to 316L with equal surface area ratio, the corrosion rate of 2205 reduced to 0.260 MPY, indicating that 316L stainless steel behaved like a sacrificial anode. When 316L is coupled with NiTi, TMA, or stainless steel arch wire and was subjected to the immersion corrosion test, it was found that 316L suffered from crevice corrosion. On the other hand, 2205 stainless steel did not show any localized crevice corrosion, although the surface of 2205 was covered with corrosion products, formed when coupled to NiTi and stainless steel wires. This study indicates that considering corrosion resistance, 2205 duplex stainless steel is an improved alternative to 316L for orthodontic bracket fabrication when used in conjunction with titanium, its alloys, or stainless steel arch wires. PMID:9228844

  10. Stainless steel denitriding with slag

    Calculation and experimental methods were used to investigate the process of titanium nitride formation when alloying chromium nickel stainless steels with titanium. At common concentrations of titanium and nitrogen, titanium nitrides were observed to be precipitated from the melt into slag in amounts of 0.1% and more. The laboratory study of the slag influence of the process of steel refining from titanium nitrides showed that the slag containing calcium, aluminium and magnesium oxides is favourable to the denitriding of steel. In addition, the possibility of direct transition of dissolved nitrogen from the metal into the slag is revealed. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  11. Characteristics of vacuum sintered stainless steels

    Z. Brytan; L.A. Dobrzański; M. Actis Grande; Rosso, M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study duplex stainless steels were sintered in vacuum. using rapid cooling form the mixture of prealloyed and alloying element powders The purpose of this paper was to describe the obtained microstructures after sintering as well as the main mechanical properties of sintered stainless steels.Design/methodology/approach: In presented work duplex stainless steels were obtained through powder metallurgy starting from austenitic 316L or ferritic 410L prealloyed stainless s...

  12. Silicon strain gages bonded on stainless steel using glass frit for strain sensor applications

    Zhang, Zongyang; Cheng, Xingguo; Leng, Yi; Cao, Gang; Liu, Sheng

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a steel pressure sensor using strain gages bonded on a 17-4 PH stainless steel (SS) diaphragm based on glass frit technology is proposed. The strain gages with uniform resistance are obtained by growing an epi-silicon layer on a single crystal silicon wafer using epitaxial deposition technique. The inorganic glass frits are used as the bonding material between the strain gages and the 17-4 PH SS diaphragm. Our results show that the output performances of sensors at a high temperature of 125 °C are almost equal those at room temperature, which indicates that the glass frit bonding is a good method and may lead to a significant advance in the high temperature applicability of silicon strain gage sensors. Finally, the microstructure of the cured organic adhesive and the fired glass frit are compared. It may be concluded that the defects of the cured organic adhesive deteriorate the hysteresis and repeatability errors of the sensors.

  13. Microbial corrosion of stainless steel.

    Ibars, J R; Moreno, D A; Ranninger, C

    1992-11-01

    Stainless steel, developed because of their greater resistance to corrosion in different aggressive environments, have proved to be affected, however, by various processes and types of corrosion. Some of these types of corrosion, mainly pitting, is activated and developed in the presence of microorganisms, which acting in an isolated or symbiotic way, according to their adaptation to the environment, create a favorable situation for the corrosion of these steel. The microorganisms that are involved, mainly bacteria of both the aerobic and anaerobic type, modify the environment where the stainless steel is found, creating crevices, differential aeration zones or a more aggressive environment with the presence of metabolites. In these circumstances, a local break of the passive and passivating layer is produced, which is proper to these types of steel and impedes the repassivation that is more favorable to corrosion. In the study and research of these types of microbiologically influenced corrosion are found electrochemical techniques, since corrosion is fundamentally an electrochemical process, and microbiological techniques for the identification, culture, and evaluation of the microorganisms involved in the process, as well as in the laboratory or field study of microorganism-metal pairs. Microstructural characterization studies of stainless steel have also been considered important, since it is known that the microstructure of steel can substantially modify their behavior when faced with corrosion. As for surface analysis studies, it is known that corrosion is a process that is generated on and progresses from the surface. The ways of dealing with microbiologically influenced corrosion must necessarily include biocides, which are not always usable or successful, the design of industrial equipment or components that do not favor the adherence of microorganisms, using microstructures in steel less sensitive to corrosion, or protecting the materials. PMID:1492953

  14. The comparison of frictional resistance in titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets using stainless steel and TMA archwires: An in vitro study

    Syed Altaf Khalid; Vadivel Kumar; Prithviraj Jayaram

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA) archwires. Materials and Methods: We compared the frictional resistance in 0.018 slot and 0.022 slot of the three brackets - titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel - using stainless steel archwires and TMA archwires. An in vitro study of simulated ca...

  15. Nano-composite stainless steel

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Blue, Craig A.; Peter, William H.; Chen, Wei; Aprigliano, Louis F.

    2015-07-14

    A composite stainless steel composition is composed essentially of, in terms of wt. % ranges: 25 to 28 Cr; 11 to 13 Ni; 7 to 8 W; 3.5 to 4 Mo; 3 to 3.5 B; 2 to 2.5 Mn; 1 to 1.5 Si; 0.3 to 1.7 C; up to 2 O; balance Fe. The composition has an austenitic matrix phase and a particulate, crystalline dispersed phase.

  16. GFRP stainless steel hybrid cryostat

    As an instrument to measure superconducting properties (Jc,Tc,Hc) by the magnetization method, a cryostat containing the magnet that generated an external magnetic field has been developed. To ensure thermal insulation ability and structural durability, this cryostat consists of a GFRP inner vessel and a stainless steel outer vessel. Various tests were carried out to verify the sufficient performance of this cryostat. Results are presented

  17. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  18. Irradiation embrittlement of ferritic stainless steels

    The characteristics of the irradiation embrittlement of some ferritic stainless steels were examined by tensile tests. Steels selected in this investigation were classified into three groups: chi phase, precipitation hardened Fe-13Cr steels; tempered martensitic Fe-12Cr steels; and low alloy steels. The latter steels were chosen in order to compare the irradiation embrittlement characteristics with those of stainless steels. The stainless steels were superior to the low alloy steels with regard to the irradiation embrittlement (the changes in both ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and unstable plastic flow transition temperature (UPFTT)), irrespective of whether these stainless steels had chi phase precipitated structures or tempered martensitic structures. The suppression of the DBTT increase owing to irradiation results from low yield stress increase Δσsub(y) and high |[dσsub(y)(u)/dT]|, where u denotes unirradiated, in the stainless steels. The suppression of the UPFTT results from the high work hardening rate or the high work exponent and the low Lueders strain in the stainless steels. These characteristics of irradiation embrittlement in the ferritic stainless steels are thought to be caused by the defect structure, which is modified by Cr atoms. (author)

  19. Hot workability of duplex stainless steels

    Martin, Guilhem

    2011-01-01

    The Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS) are defined as a family of stainless steels consisting of a two-phase microstructure involving δ-ferrite and γ-austenite. Exceptional combinations of strength and toughness together with good corrosion resistance under critical working conditions designate DSS a suitable alternative to conventional austenitic stainless steels. Unfortunately, the relatively poor hot workability of these alloys makes the industrial processing of flat products particularly criti...

  20. Stainless steel for reinforcing bar concrete

    Where corrosion resisting reinforcing bar is required, stainless steel has been employed for many applications. The longest recorded use so far is over 75 years for a restoration project in the United Kingdom. Other areas are highway bridge decks, retaining walls, tunnels, pier and overpass structures all of which use stainless steel to prevent corrosion and extend structure life. Carbon steel rebar leads to premature failure via concrete spalling that results in excessive repair, high cost, traffic delay and commerce disruption. Selection of stainless steel is based on its corrosion resistance, strength and long life. Installed cost using stainless steel reinforcing barranges from one to fifteen percent depending on structure complexity. Life Cycle Cost calculations reveal when stainless steel reinforcing bar is factored into the design, with a life expectancy up to 125 years, the alloy is cost effective. Data will be exhibited relative to mechanical and physical properties of stainless steel compared to carbon steel rebar. Some stainless rebar applications around the World will be discussed in addition to laboratory and field test results with U-bent stainless steel specimens embedded in concrete. Comments will also be made relative to the environment, lengthened journeys, delivery delay, fuel burned as vehicles sit at idle, drilling, blasting, crushing and transport of aggregate, cement and the attendant power units to manufacture these items for reconstruction. (author)

  1. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.;

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot-welding. The...... overall assessment of the weld bonding process is made using several commercial adhesives with varying working times under different surface conditions. The quality of the resulting joints is evaluated by means of macroetching observations, tension-shear tests and peel tests. The theoretical investigation...

  2. Spectrographic analysis of stainless steels

    Two spectrogaphyic solution techniques, 'Porous Cup' and 'Vacuum Cup', were investigated in order to determine the minor constituents (Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Cu and V) of stainless steels. Iron and cobalt were experimented as internal standards. The precision varied from 4 to 11% for both spectrographic techniques, in which cobalt was used as international standard. Certified standards from National Bureau of Standards and Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas were analysed to verify the accuracy of both techniques. The best accuracy was obtained with the Vacuum Cup techniques. (Author)

  3. Interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal

    Dunwoody, John T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mason, Richard E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freibert, Franz J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Willson, Stephen P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veirs, Douglas K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worl, Laura A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Alonso [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conger, Donald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Long-term storage of excess plutonium is of great concern in the U.S. as well as abroad. The current accepted configuration involves intimate contact between the stored material and an iron-bearing container such as stainless steel. While many safety scenario studies have been conducted and used in the acceptance of stainless steel containers, little information is available on the physical interaction at elevated temperatures between certain forms of stored material and the container itself. The bulk of the safety studies has focused on the ability of a package to keep the primary stainless steel containment below the plutonium-iron eutectic temperature of approximately 410 C. However, the interactions of plutonium metal with stainless steel have been of continuing interest. This paper reports on a scoping study investigating the interaction between stainless steel and plutonium metal in a pseudo diffusion couple at temperatures above the eutectic melt-point.

  4. The comparison of frictional resistance in titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets using stainless steel and TMA archwires: An in vitro study

    Syed Altaf Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA archwires. Materials and Methods: We compared the frictional resistance in 0.018 slot and 0.022 slot of the three brackets - titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel - using stainless steel archwires and TMA archwires. An in vitro study of simulated canine retraction was undertaken to evaluate the difference in frictional resistance between titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires. Results and Conclusion: We compared the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires, with the help of Instron Universal Testing Machine. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Student′s "t" test, and post hoc multiple range test at level of <0.05 showed statistically significant difference in the mean values of all groups. Results demonstrated that the titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets of 0.018-inch and 0.022-inch slot had no significant variations in frictional résistance. The self-ligating bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the other groups. The titanium bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the stainless steel brackets.

  5. Fire resistance of stainless steel structural elements

    Gomboši, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Graduation thesis represents behavior of structural elements made from stainless steel in case of fire. The general rules according to the European standard SIST EN 1993-1-2 to determine design resistance of the steel structural element for fire conditions are presented. The main focus was to determinate behavior of stainless steel column exposed to the standard fire. Buckling resistance of the column was calculated with a simplified method from the standard SIST EN 1993-1-2. Mech...

  6. Duplex stainless steels for osteosynthesis devices.

    Cigada, A; Rondelli, G; Vicentini, B; Giacomazzi, M; Roos, A

    1989-09-01

    The austenitic stainless steels used today for the manufacture of osteosynthesis devices are sensitive to crevice corrosion. In this study the corrosion properties of some duplex stainless steels were evaluated and compared to traditional austenitic stainless steels. According to our results the following ranking was established: 23Cr-4Ni less than AISI 316L less than ASTM F138 less than 22Cr-5Ni-3Mo less than 27Cr-31Ni-3.5Mo less than 25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-N. In particular the results showed that the high-performance 25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-N duplex stainless steel, with high molybdenum and nitrogen contents, can be considered not susceptible to crevice corrosion in the human body. The duplex stainless steels have also better mechanical properties at the same degree of cold working compared with austenitic stainless steels. Hence the 25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-N duplex stainless steel can be considered a convenient substitute of ASTM F138 for orthopedic and osteosynthesis devices. PMID:2777835

  7. Preparation of precursor for stainless steel foam

    ZHOU Xiang-yang; LI Shan-ni; LI Jie; LIU Ye-xiang

    2008-01-01

    The effects of polyurethane sponge pretreatment and slurry compositions on the slurry loading in precursor were discussed, and the,performances of stainless steel foams prepared from precursors with different slurry loadings and different particle sizes of the stainless steel powder were also investigated. The experimental results show that the pretreatment of sponge with alkaline solution is effective to reduce the jam of cells in precursor and ensure the slurry to uniformly distribute in sponge, and it is also an effective method for increasing the slurry loading in precursor; the mass fraction of additive A and solid content in slurry greatly affect the slurry loading in precursor, when they are kept in 9%-13% and 52%-75%, respectively, the stainless steel foam may hold excellent 3D open-cell network structure and uniform muscles; the particle size of the stainless steel powder and the slurry loading in precursor have great effects on the bending strength, apparent density and open porosity of stainless steel foam; when the stainless steel powder with particle size of 44 tan and slurry loading of 0.5 g/cm3 in precursor are used, a stainless steel foam can be obtained, which has open porosity of 81.2%, bending strength of about 51.76 MPa and apparent density of about 1.0 g/cm3.

  8. Tritiated Water Interaction with Stainless Steel

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-05-01

    Experiments conducted to study tritium permeation of stainless steel at ambient and elevated temperatures revealed that HT converts relatively quickly to HTO. Further, the HTO partial pressure contributes essentially equally with elemental tritium gas in driving permeation through the stainless steel. Such permeation appears to be due to dissociation of the water molecule on the hot stainless steel surface. There is an equilibrium concentration of HTO vapor above adsorbed gas on the walls of the experimental apparatus evident from freezing transients. The uptake process of tritium from the carrier gas involves both surface adsorption and isotopic exchange with surface bound water.

  9. Recycle of radiologically contaminated austenitic stainless steels

    The United States Department of Energy owns large quantities of radiologically contaminated austenitic stainless steel which could by recycled for reuse if appropriate release standards were in place. Unfortunately, current policy places the formulation of a release standard for USA industry years, if not decades, away. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and various university and industrial partners are participating in initiative to recycle previously contaminated austenitic stainless steels into containers for the storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. This paper describes laboratory scale experiments which demonstrated the decontamination and remelt of stainless steel which had been contaminated with radionuclides

  10. Some properties of chromized stainless steels

    Materials used for constructions in food processing industry should meet mechanical specifications and sanitary requirements. The most often used steels AISI304 and 316L have similar mechanical characteristics but the corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel is considerably better. On the other hand the price of 316L steel is twice higher. The advantageous solution with minimal investment cost is chemical modification of stainless steel surface layer. Main directions of chemical modifications of surface layers were characterized in this paper. In this paper there were also presented effects of chromizing of steel type AISI316L in order to increasing erosion - corrosion resistance. There were analysed structures; mechanical characteristics and durability of chromized stainless steel. (author)

  11. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    Kaluzny, J. A. [Fermilab; Grimm, C. [Fermilab; Passarelli, D. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.

  12. Hydrogen compatibility handbook for stainless steels

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    This handbook compiles data on the effects of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of stainless steels and discusses this data within the context of current understanding of hydrogen compatibility of metals. All of the tabulated data derives from continuing studies of hydrogen effects on materials that have been conducted at the Savannah River Laboratory over the past fifteen years. Supplementary data from other sources are included in the discussion. Austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation hardenable stainless steels have been studied. Damage caused by helium generated from decay of tritium is a distinctive effect that occurs in addition to the hydrogen isotopes protium and deuterium. The handbook defines the scope of our current knowledge of hydrogen effects in stainless steels and serves as a guide to selection of stainless steels for service in hydrogen.

  13. Horizontal electron beam welding for stainless steels

    Stainless steel samples have been realized by local vacuum apparatus for electron beam welding applications to reactor core shell realizations. The best welding parameters have been determined by a systematic study. The welds have been characterized by mechanical tests

  14. Tritium in austenitic stainless steel vessels

    Austenitic stainless steels are normally recommended for components of hydrogen-handling equipment in applications where high in-service reliability is required. The literature leading to this recommendation is reviewed, and it is shown that AISI Type 316L stainless is particularly suitable for use in tritium-handling and storage systems. When made of this steel, the storage vessels will be extremely resistant to any degradation from tritium in both routine and accident conditions. (author)

  15. Studies of stainless steel exposed to sandblasting

    Horodek Paweł; Eseev Marat K.; Kobets Andrey G.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of sandblasting on surface and subsurface of stainless steel is investigated using variable energy positron beam (VEP), positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Samples of stainless steel were blasted using 110 μm particles of Al2O3 under different pressure and time duration. In the case of sandblasting for 90 s, the reduction of positron diffusion length depending on the applied pressure was observed. Sandb...

  16. A Duplex Stainless Steel for Chloride Environments

    Sridhar, N.; Kolts, J.; Flasche, L. H.

    1985-03-01

    This paper examines the effects of microstructural changes on the corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue resistance of a duplex stainless steel to chloride environments. The microstructural changes can be precipitation of phases such as sigma and carbides, or changes in the distribution of austenite and ferrite. The former can be important in hot forming operations while the latter is important in welding. The methods of minimizing these deleterious effects can sometimes be different from those used for austenitic stainless steel.

  17. Fracture toughness properties of duplex stainless steels

    Sieurin, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Good toughness properties in base and weld material enable the use of duplex stainless steels (DSS) in critical applications. DSS offer high strength compared to common austenitic stainless steels. The high strength can be utilized to reduce the wall thickness and accordingly accomplish reduction of cost, welding time and transportation weight, contributing to ecological and energy savings. Although DSS have been used successfully in many applications the last decades, the full utilisation in...

  18. Phase transformations in welded supermartensitic stainless steels

    Carrouge, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels have recently been introduced in the oil and gas industries to substitute more expensive duplex stainless steels for onshore and offshore tubing applications. Although easily joined by arc welding processes, the service life of the supermartensitic welded joint in corrosive environments relies to a large extent on the behaviour of the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The microstructure of the HAZ in these new materials has, until now, received little ...

  19. Behaviour of stainless steel in natural seawater

    Compere, Chantal; Le Bozec, Nathalie

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, investigations performed in natural and artificial seawater on stainless steels will be presented. They concerned studies on: biofilm formation, passive layers composition, electrochemical behaviour, localised corrosion and the evolution of these different parameters as a function of ageing time. According to literature surveys, the different aspects will be discussed. Some conclusions will be drawn concerning the actual knowledge on the behaviour of stainless steels in seawater.

  20. Characteristics of vacuum sintered stainless steels

    Z. Brytan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the present study duplex stainless steels were sintered in vacuum. using rapid cooling form the mixture of prealloyed and alloying element powders The purpose of this paper was to describe the obtained microstructures after sintering as well as the main mechanical properties of sintered stainless steels.Design/methodology/approach: In presented work duplex stainless steels were obtained through powder metallurgy starting from austenitic 316L or ferritic 410L prealloyed stainless steels powders by controlled addition of alloying elements powder. Prepared mixes were sintered in a vacuum furnace in 1250°C for 1h. After sintering rapid cooling (6°C/s using nitrogen under pressure was applied. Sintered compositions were subjected to structural examinations by scanning and optical microscopy and EDS analysis as well as X-ray analysis. Mechanical properties were studied through tensile tests and Charpy impact test.Findings: It was demonstrated that austenitic-ferritic microstructures with regular arrangement of both phases and absence of precipitates can be obtained with properly designed powder mix composition as well as sintering cycle with rapid cooling rate. Obtained sintered duplex stainless steels shows good mechanical properties which depends on phases ratio in the microstructure and elements partitioning (Cr/Ni between phases.Research limitations/implications: Basing on alloys characteristics applied cooling rate and powder mix composition seems to be a good compromise to obtain balanced sintered duplex stainless steel microstructures.Practical implications: Mechanical properties of obtained sintered duplex stainless steels structures are rather promising, especially with the aim of extending their field of possible applications.Originality/value: The utilization of vacuum sintering process with rapid cooling after sintering combined with use of elemental powders added to a stainless steel base powder shows its advantages in terms

  1. Characteristics of cold rolled stainless steel sheets

    The cold rolling of sheets of austenitic stainless steel was investigated for different temperatures and percentages of reduction. It was also established under which conditions are the mechanical strenght and the ductility improved. It was found that this improvement is related to the characteristics of martensitic transformation taking place during rolling and through the tensile tests performed in stainless steels with different degree of martensitic transformation. The results are explained on the basis of martensite participation in the stained structure. (Author)

  2. Stainless steel recycle FY94 progress report

    The Materials Technology Section (MTS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was asked to demonstrate the practicality of recycling previously contaminated stainless steel components such as reactor heat exchanger heads, process water piping and slug buckets into 208 liters (55 gallon) drums and 2.8 cubic meter (100 ft3) storage boxes. Radioactively contaminated stainless steel scrap will be sent to several industrial partners where it will be melted, decontaminated/cast into ingots, and rolled into plate and sheet and fabricated into the drums and boxes. As part of this recycle initiative, MTS was requested to demonstrate that radioactively contaminated Type 304L stainless steel could be remelted and cast to meet the applicable ASTM specification for fabrication of drums and boxes. In addition, MTS was requested to develop the technical basis of melt decontamination and establish practicality of using this approach for value added products. The findings presented in this investigation lead to the following conclusions: recycle of 18 wt% Cr-8 wt% Ni alloy can be achieved by melting Type 304 stainless steel in a air vacuum induction furnace; limited melt decontamination of the contaminated stainless steel was achieved, surface contamination was removed by standard decontamination techniques; carbon uptake in the as-cast ingots resulted from the graphite susceptor used in this experiment and is unavoidable with this furnace configuration. A new furnace optimized for melting stainless steel has been installed and is currently being tested for use in this program

  3. Tritium in austenitic stainless steel vessels

    The vessel used for the long-term storage of tritium (titanium tritide) will be of welded 316L stainless steel construction. The 316L stainless is chosen partially because of its excellent resistance, in the wrought condition, to any degradation of mechanical properties from contact with hydrogen isotopes. The work reported here was undertaken to check that the welds in the vessel would have a satisfactory response to the hydrogen isotopes. A satisfactory response has been demonstrated, leading to a general conclusion that the titanium tritide/316L stainless steel vessel combination provides an extremely reliable storage facility for the tritium

  4. High Mn austenitic stainless steel

    Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy includes, in weight percent: >4 to 15 Mn; 8 to 15 Ni; 14 to 16 Cr; 2.4 to 3 Al; 0.4 to 1 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; 0.05 to 0.2 C; 0.01 to 0.02 B; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1W; up to 3 Cu; up to 1 Si; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, the particles including at least one of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure that is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  5. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors

  6. Radiation-induced sensitisation of stainless steels

    The book contains the proceedings of a symposium on radiation-induced sensitization of stainless steels, which took place at Berkeley, United Kingdom, 1986. The purpose of the symposium was to examine the mechanism leading to inter-granular corrosion of 20%Cr/25% Ni/Nb stainless steel cladding of AGR fuel following irradiation. Nine papers are presented, of which three are theoretical, two papers are based upon corrosion studies of 20%Cr/25%Ni/Nb steel, and the remaining are concerned with compositional redistribution and its measurement. (U.K.)

  7. Ageing of cast stainless steel components

    The nuclear industry uses cast stainless steels in areas where it is paramount to ensure reactor safety. Investigations into the resistance of cast stainless steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in simulated light water reactor conditions have shown contrary to expectation, some nuclear grade steels are indeed susceptible to SCC. The paper sets out of determine whether the information available in the various life extension databanks is sufficient for the application of the various empirical and theoretical models to the relevant safety analyses or if not, to identify areas where data is deficient. (Author)

  8. Corrosion behavior of sensitized duplex stainless steel.

    Torres, F J; Panyayong, W; Rogers, W; Velasquez-Plata, D; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1998-01-01

    The present work investigates the corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel in 0.9% NaCl solution after various heat-treatments, and compares it to that of 316L austenitic stainless steel. Both stainless steels were heat-treated at 500, 650, and 800 degrees C in air for 1 h, followed by furnace cooling. Each heat-treated sample was examined for their microstructures and Vickers micro-hardness, and subjected to the X-ray diffraction for the phase identification. Using potentiostatic polarization method, each heat-treated sample was corrosion-tested in 37 degrees C 0.9% NaCl solution to estimate its corrosion rate. It was found that simulated sensitization showed an adverse influence on both steels, indicating that corrosion rates increased by increasing the sensitization temperatures. PMID:9713683

  9. Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds

    Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds has been considered difficult because of the high noise level and remarkable attenuation of ultrasonic waves. To improve flaw detectability in this kind of steel, various inspection techniques have been studied. A series of tests indicated: (1) The longitudinal angle beam transducers newly developed during this study can detect 4.8 mm dia. side drilled holes in dissimilar metal welds (refraction angle: 550 from SUS side, 450 from CS side) and in cast stainless steel welds (refraction angle: 450, inspection frequency: 1 MHz). (2) Cracks more than 5% t in depth in the heat affected zones of fine-grain stainless steel pipe welds can be detected by the 450 shear wave angle beam method (inspection frequency: 2 MHz). (3) The pattern recognition method using frequency analysis technology was presumed useful for discriminating crack signals from spurious echoes. (author)

  10. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1985-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast-duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Data from room-temperature Charpy-impact tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450/sup 0/C are presented and compared with results from other studies. Microstructures of cast-duplex stainless steels subjected to long-term aging either in the laboratory or in reactor service have been characterized. The results indicate that at least two processes contribute to the low-temperature embrittleent of duplex stainless steels, viz., weakening of the ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitation and embrittlement of ferrite matrix by the formation of additional phases such as G-phase, Type X, or the ..cap alpha..' phase. Carbide precipitation has a significant effect on the onset of embrittlement of CF-8 and -8M grades of stainless steels aged at 400 or 450/sup 0/C. The existing correlations do not accurately represent the embrittlement behavior over the temperature range 300 to 450/sup 0/C. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  11. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast-duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Data from room-temperature Charpy-impact tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 4500C are presented and compared with results from other studies. Microstructures of cast-duplex stainless steels subjected to long-term aging either in the laboratory or in reactor service have been characterized. The results indicate that at least two processes contribute to the low-temperature embrittleent of duplex stainless steels, viz., weakening of the ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitation and embrittlement of ferrite matrix by the formation of additional phases such as G-phase, Type X, or the α' phase. Carbide precipitation has a significant effect on the onset of embrittlement of CF-8 and -8M grades of stainless steels aged at 400 or 4500C. The existing correlations do not accurately represent the embrittlement behavior over the temperature range 300 to 4500C. 18 refs., 13 figs

  12. Low temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The present contribution gives an overview of some of the technological aspects of low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel. Examples of low temperature gaseous nitriding, carburising and nitrocarburising of stainless steel are presented and discussed. In particular, the...

  13. Low temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present contribtion gives an overview of some of the technological aspects of low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel. Examples of low temperature gaseous nitriding, carburising and nitrocarburising of stainless steel are presented and discussed. In particular, the...

  14. HTPro: Low-temperature Surface Hardening of Stainless Steel

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    Low-temperature surface hardening of stainless steel provides the required performance properties without affecting corrosion resistance.......Low-temperature surface hardening of stainless steel provides the required performance properties without affecting corrosion resistance....

  15. Phosphate coating on stainless steel 304 sensitized

    The stainless steel 304 can be sensitized when welding processes are applied, that causes the precipitation of chromium carbide in the grain limits, being promoted in this way the formation of galvanic cells and consequently the corrosion process. Using a phosphate coating is possible to retard the physiochemical damages that can to happen in the corrosion process. The stainless steel 304 substrate sensitized it is phosphate to base of Zn-Mn, in a immersion cell very hot. During the process was considered optimization values, for the characterization equipment of X-rays diffraction and scanning electron microscopy was used. The XRD technique confirmed the presence of the phases of manganese phosphate, zinc phosphate, as well as the phase of the stainless steel 304. When increasing the temperature from 60 to 90 C in the immersion process a homogeneous coating is obtained. (Author)

  16. Explosive Surface Hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Kovacs-Coskun, T.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the effects of explosion hardening on the microstructure and the hardness of austenitic stainless steel have been studied. The optimum explosion hardening technology of austenitic stainless steel was researched. In case of the explosive hardening used new idea mean indirect hardening setup. Austenitic stainless steels have high plasticity and can be easily cold formed. However, during cold processing the hardening phenomena always occurs. Upon the explosion impact, the deformation mechanism indicates a plastic deformation and this deformation induces a phase transformation (martensite). The explosion hardening enhances the mechanical properties of the material, includes the wear resistance and hardness. In case of indirect hardening as function of the setup parameters specifically the flayer plate position the hardening increased differently. It was find a relationship between the explosion hardening setup and the hardening level.

  17. Thermal aging of cast duplex stainless steels

    Cast duplex stainless steels of CR8M and CF8 are used in major components because of their superior characteristics, such as corrosion resistance, weldability and so on. But, these stainless steels are known to have tendency of thermal aging embrittlement after long term service. Therefore, mechanical properties have been investigated using Charpy impact specimens and fracture toughness specimens aged at 300∼400 C up to 40,000 hours. As the results, effects of thermal aging on mechanical properties of these stainless steels were identified and a good relationship between Charpy impact energy and fracture toughness was obtained. In addition, prediction method for Charpy absorbed energy and fracture toughness was established

  18. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2013-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel sau...

  19. Initial oxidation of duplex stainless steel 2205

    Donik, E.; Kocijan, A.; Jenko, M. [Institute of metals and technology, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-07-01

    Due to superior mechanical and corrosion properties of duplex stainless steels which result in weight reduction of the constructions, thus contributing to the decreases in total costs and also due to the large and versatile usage of the alloy, duplex stainless steel is gradually displacing stainless steels of the AISI 300 series. Pickling of duplex stainless steel has proven to be much more difficult than that of standard austenitic grade (AISI 300 series). There is no complete agreement in the literature on scale (high temperature oxidation) dissolution mechanism in neutral pickling solutions. During annealing, duplex stainless steel is heated in annealing furnace up to 1050 C and is kept at this temperature for some time to soften the metal in order to release the work hardening induced by hot and cold rolling. The elimination of surface defects by forming the oxide scale is required to improve the corrosion resistance. Three different techniques were used to produce thin oxide layers on polished and sputter cleaned duplex stainless steel samples. They were exposed to 10{sup -5} mb pure oxygen inside the vacuum chamber, exposed to ambient conditions for 24 hours and plasma oxidized. Oxide layers thus produced were analysed using XPS depth profiling for determination of the oxide layer's composition with depth. It was found that all techniques produce oxide layer with different traces of metallic components and with chromium oxide maximum concentration shifted towards the oxide layer - bulk metal interface. Depletion of Cr in bulk immediately below the interface was also observed. Simplified ARXPS procedure was used to corroborate thickness estimates for thinnest oxide layers. (authors)

  20. Initial oxidation of duplex stainless steel 2205

    Due to superior mechanical and corrosion properties of duplex stainless steels which result in weight reduction of the constructions, thus contributing to the decreases in total costs and also due to the large and versatile usage of the alloy, duplex stainless steel is gradually displacing stainless steels of the AISI 300 series. Pickling of duplex stainless steel has proven to be much more difficult than that of standard austenitic grade (AISI 300 series). There is no complete agreement in the literature on scale (high temperature oxidation) dissolution mechanism in neutral pickling solutions. During annealing, duplex stainless steel is heated in annealing furnace up to 1050 C and is kept at this temperature for some time to soften the metal in order to release the work hardening induced by hot and cold rolling. The elimination of surface defects by forming the oxide scale is required to improve the corrosion resistance. Three different techniques were used to produce thin oxide layers on polished and sputter cleaned duplex stainless steel samples. They were exposed to 10-5 mb pure oxygen inside the vacuum chamber, exposed to ambient conditions for 24 hours and plasma oxidized. Oxide layers thus produced were analysed using XPS depth profiling for determination of the oxide layer's composition with depth. It was found that all techniques produce oxide layer with different traces of metallic components and with chromium oxide maximum concentration shifted towards the oxide layer - bulk metal interface. Depletion of Cr in bulk immediately below the interface was also observed. Simplified ARXPS procedure was used to corroborate thickness estimates for thinnest oxide layers. (authors)

  1. Measuring secondary phases in duplex stainless steels

    Calliari, I.; Brunelli, K.; Dabalà, M.; Ramous, E.

    2009-01-01

    The use of duplex stainless steels is limited by their susceptibility to the formation of dangerous intermetallic phases resulting in detrimental effects on impact toughness and corrosion resistance. This precipitation and the quantitative determinations of the phases have received considerable attention and different precipitation sequences (σ phase, χ phase, and carbides) have been suggested. This study investigates the phase transformation during continuous cooling and isothermal treatments in commercial duplex stainless steel grades and the effects on alloy properties, and compares the most common techniques of analysis.

  2. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    To prevent hot-cracking, austenitic stainless steel welds generally contain a small percent of delta ferrite. Although ferrite has been found to effectively prevent hot-cracking, it can lead to embrittlement of welds when exposed to elevated temperatures. The aging behavior of type-308 stainless steel weld has been examined over a range of temperatures 475--850 C for times up to 10,000 hrs. Upon aging, and depending on the temperature range, the unstable ferrite may undergo a variety of solid state transformations. These phase changes creep-rupture and Charpy impact properties

  3. Stainless Steel Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Evaluation

    Switzner, Nathan T

    2010-06-01

    A nitrogen strengthened 21-6-9 stainless steel plate was spinformed into hemispherical test shapes. A battery of laboratory tests was used to characterize the hemispheres. The laboratory tests show that near the pole (axis) of a spinformed hemisphere the yield strength is the lowest because this area endures the least “cold-work” strengthening, i.e., the least deformation. The characterization indicated that stress-relief annealing spinformed stainless steel hemispheres does not degrade mechanical properties. Stress-relief annealing reduces residual stresses while maintaining relatively high mechanical properties. Full annealing completely eliminates residual stresses, but reduces yield strength by about 30%.

  4. 21 CFR 872.3350 - Gold or stainless steel cusp.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gold or stainless steel cusp. 872.3350 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3350 Gold or stainless steel cusp. (a) Identification. A gold or stainless steel cusp is a prefabricated device made of austenitic alloys or...

  5. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  6. Estudio de corrosión bajo tensión en los aceros inoxidables 17-4PH y 17-7PH en presencia de NaCl y NaOH (20 % a 90 °C

    Gaona-Tiburcio, Citlalli

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the problems that affects to the electric industry is the not programmed stoppages in the power plants, due to the failure of any main component: boiler, turbine and generator. In the turbine, the combined action of a corrosive agent (humid polluted vapor and a mechanical effort generally will result in Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC. In this work the SCC susceptibility of the precipitation hardening stainless steels 17-4PH and 17- 7PH, thoroughly used in steam turbine blades of power stations is analyzed. The specimens were tested in the presence of NaCl and NaOH (20 % to 90 °C and different pH. The CERT test (Constant Extension Rate Test was used, at 10-6 s-1 supplementing it with electrochemical noise; the aim was to identify the conditions of maximum susceptibility and the performance of the studied materials. The fractographic analysis revealed ductile and brittle fracture. Intergranular crackings, characteristic of the anodic dissolution mechanism of the material was observed. Nevertheless, the main mechanism responsible the failure was hydrogen embrittlement.

    Uno de los problemas que afecta a la industria eléctrica es el de los paros no programados en las plantas generadoras de electricidad, debidos al fallo de algún componente principal: caldera, turbina y generador. En la turbina, la acción combinada de un agente corrosivo (vapor húmedo contaminado y un esfuerzo mecánico, generalmente provocará corrosión bajo tensión (CBT. En este trabajo se analiza la susceptibilidad a la CBT de los aceros inoxidables, endurecibles por precipitación, 17-4PH y 17-7PH, ampliamente usados en alabes de turbina de vapor de centrales termoeléctricas. Las muestras se ensayaron en presencia de NaCl y NaOH (20 % a 90 °C, y distintos valores de pH. Se empleó el ensayo CERT (Constant Extensión Rate Test, a velocidades de 10-6 s-1, complementándolo con ruido electroquímico, buscando

  7. Stainless chromium-nickel steels. Chapter I

    The chemical composition is tabulated of 90 chromium-nickel stainless steels and alloys given in volume %. The values are also given of the corrosion resistance of the steels and alloys. The tables show data on the surface condition or the methods of material working, types and chemical composition of the medium where corrosion resistance tests were carried out, temperature, pressure, time of tests, corrosion rates, corrosion types, and literature references. A total of 35 references is given. (J.B.)

  8. Nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications

    Ke Yang and Yibin Ren

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have prompted the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel in medical stainless steels, the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steels, and emphatically, the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength and good plasticity, better corrosion and wear resistances, and superior biocompatibility compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel, the newly developed high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventional medical stainless steels.

  9. Experiments on cold-formed ferritic stainless steel slender sections

    Bock Montero, Marina; Arrayago Luquin, Itsaso; Real Saladrigas, Esther

    2015-01-01

    The usage of stainless steel in construction has been increasing owing to its corrosion resistance, aesthetic appearance and favourable mechanical properties. The most common stainless steel grades used for structural applications are austenitic steels. The main drawback of these grades relies on their nickel content (around 8–10%), resulting in a relatively high initial material cost. Other stainless steel grades with lower nickel content such as the ferritic steels offer the benefits of ...

  10. Amorphous stainless steel coatings prepared by reactive magnetron-sputtering from austenitic stainless steel targets

    Cusenza, Salvatore; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Stainless steel films were reactively magnetron sputtered in argon/methane gas flow onto oxidized silicon wafers using austenitic stainless-steel targets. The deposited films of about 200 nm thickness were characterized by conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetooptical Kerr-effect, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, atomic force microscopy, corrosion resistance tests, and Raman spectroscopy. These complementary methods were us...

  11. The energy benefit of stainless steel recycling

    The energy used to produce austenitic stainless steel was quantified throughout its entire life cycle for three scenarios: (1) current global operations, (2) 100% recycling, and (3) use of only virgin materials. Data are representative of global average operations in the early 2000s. The primary energy requirements to produce 1 metric ton of austenitic stainless steel (with assumed metals concentrations of 18% Cr, 8% Ni, and 74% Fe) is (1) 53 GJ, (2) 26 GJ, and (3) 79 GJ for each scenario, with CO2 releases totaling (1) 3.6 metric tons CO2, (2) 1.6 metric tons CO2, and (3) 5.3 metric tons CO2. Thus, the production of 17 million metric tons of austenitic stainless steel in 2004 used approximately 9.0x1017 J of primary energy and released 61 million metric tons of CO2. Current recycling operations reduce energy use by 33% (4.4x1017 J) and CO2 emissions by 32% (29 million tons). If austenitic stainless steel were to be produced solely from scrap, which is currently not possible on a global level due to limited availability, energy use would be 67% less than virgin-based production and CO2 emissions would be cut by 70%. The calculation of the total energy is most sensitive to the amount and type of scrap fed into the electric arc furnace, the unit energy of the electric arc furnace, the unit energy of ferrochromium production, and the form of primary nickel

  12. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-09-19

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K.

  13. Corrosion of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steels

    The corrosion behaviour of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel grades AISI 304, 316 and 321 was studied at various temperatures. Certain plasma nitriding cycles included a post-oxidation treatment. The corrosion rates were measured using linear polarisation technique. Results showed that corrosion rate increased with the plasma nitriding temperature. Minimum deterioration occurred at 653K. (author). 2 tabs., 4 figs., 10 refs

  14. Hydrogen gas embrittlement of selected stainless steels

    Hydrogen gas embrittlement of selected stainless steels: metastable 18-8, (α+γ) IN 744 and γ' or N-hardened austenites, has been investigated means of the triaxial disk pressure test at various pressure increase rates, at RT or sometimes -500C and +1000C. Test are supplemented with SEM and magnetic phase determination

  15. Stainless steel forgings for nuclear chemical plants

    This Specification covers detailed requirements for the supply of austenitic stainless steel forgings used in radioactive and corrosive areas within the Nuclear Industry. With the exception of 316S51 the materials specified are all suitable for contact with nitric acid, 316S51 being included as suitable for use in contact with sodium and other alkali metals at elevated temperatures. (author)

  16. Microbially Influenced Corrosion of Stainless Steels

    Lee, Yong Deuk; Ryu, Seung Ki; Kim Young Ho [POSCO Techanical Researh Laboratories, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-25

    Microbially Influenced Corrosion(MIC) is often a significant factor in controlling the long-term performance of most structural materials in industrial applications. This papers cover MIC mechanism and evaluation of stainless steels in soil and sea water environments. Papers also cover detection, monitoring and mitigation of MIC, biocides and treatments. (author). 28 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  17. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K

  18. CASE-HARDENING OF STAINLESS STEEL

    2004-01-01

    The invention relates to case-hardening of a stainless steel article by means of gas including carbon and/or nitrogen, whereby carbon and/or nitrogen atoms diffuse through the surface into the article. The method includes activating the surface of the article, applying a top layer on the activated...

  19. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...

  20. Irradiation creep of stainless steel in bending

    The development is described of a test to measure irradiation enhanced creep in bending of 20% cold-worked Type-316 stainless steel. The test will be irradiated in the experimental fast reactor EBR-II. The rationale used in design selection is described. The selected beam designs, the supportive tests in other stress states and the measurement techniques are described in detail. (Auth.)

  1. Irradiation creep of stainless steel in bending

    The development is described of a test to measure irradiation enhanced creep in bending of 20% cold-worked Type-316 stainless steel. The test will be irradiated in the experimental fast reactor EBR-II. The rationale used in design selection is described. The selected beam designs, the supportive tests in other stress states and the measurement techniques are described in detail

  2. Advances in the research of nitrogen containing stainless steels

    2004-01-01

    The current status of nitrogen containing stainless steels at home and aboard has been introduced. The function and existing forms of nitrogen in the stainless steels, influence of nitrogen on mechanical properties and anti-corrosion properties as well as the application of nitrogen containing cast stainless steels were discussed in this paper. It is clear that nitrogen will be a potential and important alloying element in stainless steels. And Argon Oxygen Decarbonization (AOD) refining can provide an advanced manufacture process for nitrogen containing stainless steels with ultra-low- carbon and high cleanliness.

  3. Stainless steels: general considerations and rates of crack growth

    This report describes the different types of stainless steels, and presents the laws governing the rates of crack growth for several stainless steels extensively used for the manufacture of structures in nuclear power plants. The laws are not discussed in detail in the report. After a brief review of the development of stainless steels, the main categories of stainless steels, their mechanical characteristics and corrosion resistance, are presented. Finally, the rates of crack growth are presented for various stainless steels, mainly austenitic. The study overall aim is an investigation of the cracking in the 900 MWe primary pump thermal barriers and shafts

  4. Sintering and characterization of YAG dispersed ferritic stainless steels

    The present study investigates the effect of yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) addition on the densification, mechanical, tribological and corrosion behaviour of ferritic (434L) stainless steels. The composites were sintered at both solid-state (1200 deg. C) and supersolidus (1400 deg. C) sintering conditions. Supersolidus sintering results in superior densification, hardness and corrosion resistance of both straight 434L stainless steel as well as YAG reinforced 434L stainless steels. The addition of YAG to 434L stainless steels at supersolidus sintered conditions improves the strength and wear resistance of 434L stainless steels without significantly degrading the corrosion performance

  5. Advances in the research of nitrogen containing stainless steels

    Zhongqiu ZHANG

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The current status of nitrogen containing stainless steels at home and abroad has been introduced. The function and existing forms of nitrogen in stainless steels, influence of nitrogen on mechanical properties and anti-corrosion properties as well as the application of the nitrogen containing stainless steels were discussed in this paper. It is clear that nitrogen will be a potential and important alloying element in stainless steels. And Argon Oxygen Decarbonization (AOD refining can provide an advanced manufacture process for nitrogen containing stainless steels with ultra-low carbon and high cleaniness.

  6. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Microstructures of cast materials subjected to long-term aging either in reactor service or in the laboratory have been characterized by TEM, SANS, and APFIM techniques. Two precipitate phases, i.e., the Cr-rich α' and Ni- and Si-rich G phase, have been identified in the ferrite matrix of the aged steels. The results indicate that the low-temperature embrittlement is primarily caused by α' precipitates which form by spinodal decomposition. The relative contribution of G phase to loss of toughness is now known. Microstructural data also indicate that weakening of ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitates has a significant effect on the onset and extent of embrittlement of the high-carbon CF-8 and CF-8M grades of stainless steels, particularly after aging at 400 or 4500C. Data from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 4500C are presented and correlated with the microstructural results. Thermal aging of the steels results in an increase in tensile strength and a decrease in impact energy, J/sub IC/, and tearing modulus. The fracture toughness results show good agreement with the Charpy-impact data. The effects of compositional and metallurgical variables on loss of toughness are discussed

  7. Austenitic stainless steels with cryogenic resistance

    The most used austenitic stainless steels are alloyed with chromium and nickel and have a reduced carbon content, usually lower than 0.1 % what ensures corresponding properties for processing by plastic deformation at welding, corrosion resistance in aggressive environment and toughness at low temperatures. Steels of this kind alloyed with manganese are also used to reduce the nickel content. By alloying with manganese which is a gammageneous element one ensures the stability of austenites. Being cheaper these steels may be used extensively for components and equipment used in cryogenics field. The best results were obtained with steels of second group, AMnNi, in which the designed chemical composition was achieved, i.e. the partial replacement of nickel by manganese ensured the toughness at cryogenic temperatures. If these steels are supplementary alloyed, their strength properties may increase to the detriment of plasticity and toughness, although the cryogenic character is preserved

  8. Nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications

    Ke Yang and Yibin Ren

    2010-01-01

    The adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have prompted the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel in medical stainless steels, the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steels, and emphatically, the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free stainl...

  9. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components

  10. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels

    Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-02-01

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  11. Studies of stainless steel exposed to sandblasting

    Horodek Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of sandblasting on surface and subsurface of stainless steel is investigated using variable energy positron beam (VEP, positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Samples of stainless steel were blasted using 110 μm particles of Al2O3 under different pressure and time duration. In the case of sandblasting for 90 s, the reduction of positron diffusion length depending on the applied pressure was observed. Sandblasting during 30 s leads only to the reduction of positron diffusion length to about 60 nm for all samples. Positron lifetimes close to 170 ps measured using positrons emitted directly from the source point to the presence of vacancies on the dislocation lines. SEM and AFM images show that surface roughness depends rather on pressure of sandblasting than time of exposition.

  12. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    Plasma spot wedding of ferritic stainless steels studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shieldings and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas , i. e. a 98% Ar/2% H2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joint was compared to that of resistance sport welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a large weld sport diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same. (Author) 32 refs

  13. Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    Nathaniel Steven Lee Phillips

    2006-12-12

    Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

  14. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; alumina, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure, the austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite free and essentially BCC-phase-free. A method of making austenitic stainless steel alloys is also disclosed.

  15. Tritium Depth Profiles in 316 Stainless Steel

    Torikai, Yuji; Murata, Daiju; Penzhorn, Ralf-Dieter; Akaishi, Kenya; Watanabe, Kuniaki; Matsuyama, Masao

    To investigate the behavior of hydrogen uptake and release by 316 stainless steel (SS316), as-received and finely polished stainless steel specimens were exposed at 573 K to tritium gas diluted with hydrogen. Then tritium concentration in the exposed specimens was measured as a function of depth using a chemical etching method. All the tritium concentration profiles showed a sharp drop in the range of 10 μm from the top surface up to the bulk. The amount of tritium absorbed into the polished specimens was three times larger than that into the as-received specimen. However, the polishing effects disappeared by exposing to the air for a long time.

  16. Warm compacting behavior of stainless steel powders

    肖志瑜; 柯美元; 陈维平; 召明; 李元元

    2004-01-01

    The warm compacting behaviors of four different kinds of stainless steel powders, 304L, 316L, 410L and 430L, were studied. The results show that warm compaction can be applied to stainless steel powders. The green densities and strengths of compacts obtained through warm compaction are generally higher than those obtained through cold compaction. The compacting behaviors in warm compaction and cold compaction are similar.Under the compacting pressure of 700 MPa, the warm compacted densities are 0. 10 - 0.22 g/cm3 higher than the cold compacted ones, and the green strengths are 11.5 %-50 % higher. The optimal warm compacting temperature is 100 - 110 ℃. In the die wall lubricated warm compaction, the optimum internal lubricant content is 0.2%.

  17. Diamond deposition on siliconized stainless steel

    Silicon diffusion layers in AISI 304 and AISI 316 type stainless steels were investigated as an alternative to surface barrier coatings for diamond film growth. Uniform 2 μm thick silicon rich interlayers were obtained by coating the surface of the steels with silicon and performing diffusion treatments at 800 deg. C. Adherent diamond films with low sp2 carbon content were deposited on the diffused silicon layers by a modified hot filament assisted chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) method. Characterization of as-siliconized layers and diamond coatings was performed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Fatigue fracture modes of a stainless steel

    The influence of strain hardening and martensite phase transformation on the fatigue fracture regions (pulsative tension) of a Stainless Steel type AISI 316 was investigated. This lead to the conclusion that the greater austenite strain hardening level only favours the occurrence of a brittle fracture. Also, in as much as the static induced martensite is concerned, a direct influence on the failure process was not observed, whereas, apparently, the one transformed under cyclic loading has no contribution to the rupture mechanisms. (author)

  19. Cyclic deformation of duplex stainless steels

    Mateo García, Antonio Manuel; Gironés, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels configure a family of metallic alloys that combined elevated mechanical properties with improved corrosion resistance when compared to standard austenitic grades. This excellent combination of properties leads to their use under many different applications, particularly in the fields of chemical, petrochemical, pulp and paper industries. Moreover, these applications usually involve cyclic loading, and consequently the study of fatigue properties has a great significanc...

  20. Ultrasonic examination of cast stainless steel

    We present the recent results of a program between CEA and EDF concerning ultrasonic examination of cast stainless steel. We compare the results obtained with different transducers, in particular large aperture composite transducers. We present different signal processing techniques (Spit Spectrum Processing) and image processing, developed to increase signal to noise ratio. Detection capabilities for artificial defects in different structures (equiaxed, columnar structures) are discussed. (authors). 2 refs., 15 figs

  1. Thermal ageing of duplex stainless steels

    The evolution of the mechanical properties of Mobearing anf Mo-free cast duplex stainless steels, induced by long term ageing in the range 300-400 deg C, has been studied in relation with the evolution of their microstructure. The unmixing of the ferritic Fe-Cr-Ni, solid solution by three-dimensional (sponge-like) spinodal decomposition and the precipitation of intermetallic G-phase particles are the main characteristics of this microstructural evolution

  2. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  3. Complex Protection of Vertical Stainless Steel Tanks

    Fakhrislamov Radik Zakievich

    2014-01-01

    The authors consider the problem of fail-safe oil and oil products storage in stainless steel tanks and present the patented tank inner side protection technology. The latter provides process, ecological and fire safety and reducing soil evaporation of oil products, which is a specific problem. The above-mentioned technology includes corrosion protection and heat insulation protection providing increase of cover durability and RVS service life in general. The offered technological protection ...

  4. SCC of stainless steel under evaporative conditions

    Andersen, H.; Arnvig, P.E.; Wasielewska, W.; Wegrelius, L.; Wolfe, C. [Avesta Sheffield AB, Avesta (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    Three different test methods have been used to assess the susceptibility of different stainless steel grades to SCC under evaporative and immersed conditions. The methods employed were the drop evaporation test, the wick test and a high temperature, high pressure test simulating a feedwater heater tubing application in power plants. The alloys investigated were commercially produced austenitic and duplex stainless steels varying in chemical composition, plus one copper-nickel alloy. The resistance of austenitic stainless steels towards SCC increased by increasing the content of Ni, Mo and Cr, thus the super austenitic 654SMO{reg_sign} (uns32654) did not show any cracking in any of the three tests. The super austenitic 254SMO{reg_sign} (UNS31254) revealed only slight SCC in the simulated feed water heater tubing application while the equivalent N08367 revealed severe pitting and cracking. The drop evaporation test exhibited the most severe test conditions characterized by thermally induced fatigue effects, sensibility to onset of corrosion and severe acidic conditions generated under deposits on the test specimen. Some factors in stress corrosion cracking tests such as thermal fatigue, diffusion, heat transfer and stress condition, are discussed with regard to their influence on the test results.

  5. SRS stainless steel beneficial reuse program

    Boettinger, W.L.

    1997-02-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) has thousands of tons of stainless steel radioactive scrap metal (RSNI). Much of the metal is volumetrically contaminated. There is no {open_quotes}de minimis{close_quotes} free release level for volumetric material, and therefore no way to recycle the metal into the normal commercial market. If declared waste, the metal would qualify as low level radioactive waste (LLW) and ultimately be dispositioned through shallow land buried at a cost of millions of dollars. The metal however could be recycled in a {open_quotes}controlled release{close_quote} manner, in the form of containers to hold other types of radioactive waste. This form of recycle is generally referred to as {open_quotes}Beneficial Reuse{close_quotes}. Beneficial reuse reduces the amount of disposal space needed and reduces the need for virgin containers which would themselves become contaminated. Stainless steel is particularly suited for long term storage because of its resistance to corrosion. To assess the practicality of stainless steel RSM recycle the SRS Benficial Reuse Program began a demonstration in 1994, funded by the DOE Office of Science and Technology. This paper discusses the experiences gained in this program.

  6. Preliminary Investigation of Keyhole Phenomena during Single Layer Fabrication in Laser Additive Manufacturing of Stainless Steel

    Matilainen, Ville-Pekka; Piili, Heidi; Salminen, Antti; Nyrhilä, Olli

    Laser additive manufacturing (LAM) is a fabrication technology that enables production of complex parts from metallic materials with mechanical properties comparable to conventionally manufactured parts. In the LAM process, parts are manufactured by melting metallic powder layer-by-layer with a laser beam. This manufacturing technology is nowadays called powder bed fusion (PBF) according to the ASTM F2792-12a standard. This strategy involves several different independent and dependent thermal cycles, all of which have an influence on the final properties of the manufactured part. The quality of PBF parts depends strongly on the characteristics of each single laser-melted track and each single layer. This study consequently concentrates on investigating the effects of process parameters such as laser power on single track and layer formation and laser-material interaction phenomena occurring during the PBF process. Experimental tests were done with two different machines: a modified research machine based on an EOS EOSINT M-series system and an EOS EOSINT M280 system. The material used was EOS stainless steel 17-4 PH. Process monitoring was done with an active illuminated high speed camera system. After microscopy analysis, it was concluded that a keyhole can form during laser additive manufacturing of stainless steel. It was noted that heat input has an important effect on the likelihood of keyhole formation. The threshold intensity value for keyhole formation of 106 W/cm2 was exceeded in all manufactured single tracks. Laser interaction time was found to have an effect on penetration depth and keyhole formation, since the penetration depth increased with increased laser interaction time. It was also concluded that active illuminated high speed camera systems are suitable for monitoring of the manufacturing process and facilitate process control.

  7. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Microstructures of cast materials subjected to long-term aging either in reactor service or in the laboratory have been characterized by TEM, SANS, and APFIM techniques. Two precipitate phases, i.e., the Cr-rich α' phase and the Ni- and Si-rich G phase, have been identified in the ferrite matrix of the aged steels. The results indicate that the low-temperature embrittlement is primarily caused by α' precipitates which form by spinodal decomposition. The relative contribution of the G phase to loss of toughness is now known. Microstructural data also indicate that weakening of the ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitates has a significant effect on the onset and extent of embrittlement of the high-carbon CF-8 and CF-8M grades of stainless steels, particularly after aging at 400 or 4500C. Data from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 4500C are presented and correlated with the microstructural results. Thermal aging of the steels results in an increase in tensile strength and a decrease in impact energy, J/sub IC/, and tearing modulus. The fracture toughness results show good agreement with the Charpy-impact data. The effects of compositional and metallurgical variables on loss of toughness are discussed

  8. Friction Stir Welding of austenitic stainless steels

    C. Meran

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Friction Stir Welding (FSW was applied austenitic stainless steels that is difficult to weld using FSW technique. Proper weld can be obtained by using appropriate welding parameter. In this paper, the effect of different tool rotational speeds, traverse speeds, compressive tool forces, and tool angles was investigated.Design/methodology/approach: The dimension of 3 mm x 75 mm x 150 mm two stainless steel plates were used and butt welded by FSW method using 7.5 kW vertical head milling machine. All welded test specimens were prepared perpendicular to the weld line in order to determine the mechanical properties and tested with 12 MPa/sec stress rate under stress control using a servo-hydraulic Instron 8801. Microstructure of the welding zone and macrograph of the heat affected zone was investigated by SEM.Findings: The average grain size in the SZ was between 3 and 7 μm, which is smaller than that in the BM. The average grain size in the HAZ was about 20 μm, which is half of that in the BM.Fine-grained microstructures are present the welded area. The dark bands observed in the weld zone were also detected the microstructure of the transition zone. Dark and narrow bands do not consist of pores or cavities. It was determined that these bands do not process an ultra fine-grained microstructure. They are Cr2O3 oxide layers which over the surface of stainless steels may have been ruptured during friction stir welding and may form bands inside the welding bead due to stirring.Research limitations/implications: The proper cooling system helps to prevent the stirrer tool from the deformation.Practical implications: The strength of the welded zone of AISI 304 stainless steel can be easily found by implementing welding design parameters and high quality joints can be obtained.Originality/value: This study was performed in the frame of the TUBITAK project no 106M504, „Friction Stir Weldability of Stainless Steels and Investigation of the

  9. Buckling response of ferritic stainless steel columns at elevated temperatures

    Afshan, S; Gardner, L; Baddoo, NR

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on the buckling behaviour of ferritic stainless steel columns in fire. Finite element models were developed and validated against existing test results to predict the elevated temperature non-linear response of ferritic stainless steel columns. A total of nine austenitic and three ferritic stainless steel column tests were replicated using the finite element analysis package ABAQUS. Parametric studies were performed to investigate the effects of variation...

  10. Corrosion fatigue of a superduplex stainless steel weldment

    Comer, Anthony John

    2004-01-01

    Superduplex stainless steels have superior mechanical and corrosion properties compared to austenitic stainless steels such as the grade 300 series. This is a result of a microstructure consisting of roughly equal percentages of austenite (y) and ferrite (a) and negligible inclusion content. As a result, super duplex stainless steels are increasingly being used in the offshore oil and gas industries. It is also envisaged that they will find application in the emergent renewable energy sec...

  11. Sinter-hardening process applicable to stainless steels

    M. Rosso; Z. Brytan; L.A. Dobrzański

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper was to describe sintered duplex stainless steels manufactured in sinter-hardening process and its usability in field of stainless steels.Design/methodology/approach: In presented study duplex stainless steels were obtained through powder metallurgy starting from austenitic, ferritic base powders by controlled addition of alloying elements, such as Cr, Ni, Mo and Cu. In the studies apart from the preparation of mixes, Schaeffler’s diagram was taken into consideration. Pr...

  12. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened 2205 duplex stainless steel composite

    Oladayo OLANIRAN; Peter Apata OLUBAMBI; Benjamin Omotayo ADEWUYI; Joseph Ajibade OMOTOYINBO; Ayodeji Ebenezar AFOLABI; Davies FOLORUNSO; Adekunle ADEGBOLA; Emanuel IGBAFEN

    2015-01-01

    Composites of duplex stainless steel were produced by oxide dispersion strengthening with comparatively improved mechanical properties by hot press sintering of partially stabilized Zirconia (PSZ, 3% yttria, mole fraction) dispersion in 2205 duplex stainless steels. Ceramic oxide was added as reinforcement, while chromium (Cr) and Nickel (Ni) were incorporated to maintain the austenitic/ferritic phase balance of the duplex stainless steel. The powders and sintered were characterized in detail...

  13. VISUALIZATION OF ULTRASONIC-BEAM DISTORTION IN ANISOTROPIC STAINLESS STEEL

    Claytor, T.; Kupperman, D.; Reimann, K.

    1985-01-01

    The inspection of cast stainless steel and stainless steel piping with a weld overlay is an important nondestructive testing problem in the nuclear industry. The ultrasonic inspection of these components is complicated by their coarse-grain and textured microstructure, which distorts the ultrasonic beam. The distortion of pulsed ultrasonic beams produced by conventional piezoelectric transducers mounted on stainless steel samples was measured by scanning the back surface of the samples with a...

  14. Thermodynamic calculation of phase equilibria in stainless steels

    Klančnik G.; Petrovič Steiner D.; Medved J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper two examples of thermodynamic investigation of stainless steels using both, experimental and modeling approach are described. The ferritic-austenitic duplex stainless steel and austenitic stainless steel were investigated using thermal analysis. The complex melting behavior was evident for both alloy systems. Experimentally obtained data were compared with the results of the thermodynamic calculations using the CALPHAD method. The equilibrium thermal events were also descr...

  15. Characterization of thermal aging of duplex stainless steel by SQUID

    Thermal aging is a growing concern for long-term-aged duplex stainless steel piping in nuclear power plants. Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) was used for the detection of thermal aging of SUS329 rolled duplex stainless steel and SCS16 cast duplex stainless steel. It was found that the SQUID output signal pattern in the presence of AC magnetic field applied to the specimen was sensitive to the changes in electromagnetic properties due to thermal aging

  16. Reliability analysis of structural stainless steel design provisions

    Afshan, S; Francis, P.; Baddoo, NR; Gardner, L.

    2015-01-01

    Since the establishment of the Eurocode design provisions for structural stainless steel, a considerable amount of both statistical material data and experimental results on structural elements has been generated. In light of this, the current partial resistance factors recommended in EN 1993-1-4 for the design of stainless steel elements are re-evaluated. First, following an analysis of material data from key stainless steel producers, representative values of the over-strength and the coeff...

  17. Electrochemical aspects of stainless steel behaviour in biocorrosive environment

    Electrochemical measurements have been used to evaluate and follow, to understand and control microbial induced corrosion of stainless steels. Results include seawater loop tests and laboratory-based microbiological experiments. With natural flowing seawater, impedance spectroscopy measurements have been used to evaluate and follow biofilms on stainless steel tube-electrodes. With batch cultures of single bacterial strain (Sulphate Reducing Bacteria), open-circuit potential measurements and polarization curves performed on 316 L and 430 Ti stainless steels, have shown that the corrosion behaviour of these stainless steels is mainly dependent on the sulphide content of the culture media

  18. Complex Protection of Vertical Stainless Steel Tanks

    Fakhrislamov Radik Zakievich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the problem of fail-safe oil and oil products storage in stainless steel tanks and present the patented tank inner side protection technology. The latter provides process, ecological and fire safety and reducing soil evaporation of oil products, which is a specific problem. The above-mentioned technology includes corrosion protection and heat insulation protection providing increase of cover durability and RVS service life in general. The offered technological protection scheme is a collaboration of the author, Steel Paint GmbH firm and JSC “Koksokhimmontazhproyekt”. PU foam unicomponent materials of Steel Paint GmbH firm provide the protection of tank inner side and cover.

  19. Bacterial inhibition of silver-containing stainless steels

    Chiang, W.C. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Chang, S.M.; Lin, J.D.; Tseng, I.S.; Wu, J.K. [National Taiwan Ocean Univ., Taiwan (China). Inst. of Materials Engineering

    2010-07-01

    In this study, silver (Ag) was added to AlSl 316 austenitic 2205 duplex and 430 ferritic stainless steels as a means of inhibiting bacterial contamination. Three Ag-containing stainless steels were prepared using vacuum melting techniques. The influence of the Ag addition on corrosion resistance, bacterial inhibition, and mechanical properties was investigated. A study of the Ag-containing stainless steel microstructures demonstrated that Ag precipitates as small particles on the steel matrix surface. The precipitates act as anodes in the local action cell in the presence of bacteria. Ag dissolution mechanisms from the Ag precipitates on the Ag-containing stainless steels in the presence of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were also discussed. Results of the study suggested that Ag-containing stainless steels may be used in areas where hygiene is a significant concern.

  20. Elevated temperature material properties of stainless steel reinforcing

    Gardner, L.; Bu, Y; Francis, P; Baddoo, NR; Cashell, K; McCann, F

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion of carbon steel reinforcing bar can lead to deterioration of concrete structures, especially in regions where road salt is heavily used or in areas close to sea water. Although stainless steel reinforcing bar costs more than carbon steel, its selective use for high risk elements is cost-effective when the whole life costs of the structure are taken into account. Considerations for specifying stainless steel reinforcing bars and a review of applications are presented herein. Atten...

  1. Ion nitriding in 316=L stainless steel

    Ion nitriding is a glow discharge process that is used to induce surface modification in metals. It has been applied to 316-L austenitic stainless steel looking for similar benefits already obtained in other steels. An austenitic stainless steel was selected because is not hardenable by heat treatment and is not easy to nitride by gas nitriding. The samples were plastically deformed to 10, 20, 40, 50 AND 70% of their original thickness in order to obtain bulk hardening and to observe nitrogen penetration dependence on it. The results were: an increase of one to two rockwell hardness number (except in 70% deformed sample because of its thickness); an increase of even several hundreds per cent in microhardness knoop number in nitrided surface. The later surely modifies waste resistance which would be worth to quantify in further studies. Microhardness measured in an internal transversal face to nitrided surface had a gradual diminish in its value with depth. Auger microanalysis showed a higher relative concentration rate CN/CFe near the surface giving evidence of nitrogen presence till 250 microns deep. The color metallography etchant used, produced faster corrosion in nitrited regions. Therefore, corrosion studies have to be done before using ion nitrited 316-L under these chemicals. (Author)

  2. Electron beam welding of austenitic stainless steel

    Austenitic stainless steel is used for liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactors with operating temperature of about 550 deg C, because its elevated temperature properties are excellent and the results of use are abundant. The welded joints in LMFBRs require high degree of safety, and the application of electron beam welding is studied to make welding joints of high quality. When the inelastic deformation in a certain limit is allowed as prescribed in the ASME Code, Case 1592, the elevated temperature properties of the welded joints of structures are particularly important. The materials tested were 10 mm thick plates of SUS 304, SUS 316 and SUS 321 steels, and 150 kV - 40 mA electron beam welder was employed. The method of welding was one side, one pass Uranami welding, and first, the appropriate welding conditions were decided. Elevated temperature tensile test was carried out on the parent materials and welded joints by electron beam welding and coated arc welding. Creep rupture test and elevated temperature fatigue test were also carried out. In EB-welded austenitic stainless steel, delta ferrite is scattered finely in austenite, and its quantity is very small and less than 1.5%. The tensile strength and 0.2% proof stress of EB-welded joints are almost same as those of parent materials. The creep rupture and fatigue properties of the joints are also close to those of parent materials. (Kako, I.)

  3. Nanostructured nickel-free austenitic stainless steel/hydroxyapatite composites.

    Tulinski, Maciej; Jurczyk, Mieczyslaw

    2012-11-01

    In this work Ni-free austenitic stainless steels with nanostructure and their nanocomposites with hydroxyapatite are presented and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and optical profiling. The samples were synthesized by mechanical alloying, heat treatment and nitriding of elemental microcrystalline powders with addition of hydroxyapatite (HA). In our work we wanted to introduce into stainless steel hydroxyapatite ceramics that have been intensively studied for bone repair and replacement applications. Such applications were chosen because of their high biocompatibility and ability to bond to bone. Since nickel-free austenitic stainless steels seem to have better mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility compared to 316L stainless steels, it is possible that composite made of this steel and HA could improve properties, as well. Mechanical alloying and nitriding are very effective technologies to improve the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. Similar process in case of nanocomposites of stainless steel with hydroxyapatite helps achieve even better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Hence nanocrystalline nickel-free stainless steels and nickel-free stainless steel/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites could be promising bionanomaterials for use as a hard tissue replacement implants, e.g., orthopedic implants. In such application, the surface roughness and more specifically the surface topography influences the proliferation of cells (e.g., osteoblasts). PMID:23421285

  4. Fatigue properties of duplex stainless steel

    Turrel, Benjamin; Luna Garcia, Jordi; Andraschko, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    PFC presentat a Oslo University College The aim of the project is to study fatigue properties of duplex stainless steel used for a bridge. The samples had to be tested and the results have to be compared with the theory, studied before. Six specimens have been broken by tensile fatigue testing machine in order to get more knowledge about the lifetime and the behavior under dynamic stress and not only for welded parts. Out of this new knowledge a new fatigue curve for this ma...

  5. 75 FR 81309 - Stainless Steel Plate from Belgium, Italy, Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan

    2010-12-27

    ... COMMISSION [Investigation Nos. 701-TA-376 and 379 and 731-TA-788, 790-793 (Second Review)] Stainless Steel... stainless steel plate from Belgium and South Africa and the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel plate... steel plate from Belgium and South Africa and/or the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel...

  6. Characterization of silane layers on modified stainless steel surfaces and related stainless steel-plastic hybrids

    The aim of this work was to characterize silane layers on the modified stainless steel surfaces and relate it to the adhesion in the injection-molded thermoplastic urethane-stainless steel hybrids. The silane layers were characterized with scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, allowing the direct quantization of silane layer thickness and its variation. The surface topographies were characterized with atomic force microscope and chemical analyses were performed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The mechanical strength of the respective stainless steel-thermoplastic urethane hybrids was determined by peel test. Polishing and oxidation treatment of the steel surface improved the silane layer uniformity compared to the industrially pickled surface and increased the adhesion strength of the hybrids, resulting mainly cohesive failure in TPU. XPS analysis indicated that the improved silane bonding to the modified steel surface was due to clean Fe2O3-type surface oxide and stronger interaction with TPU was due to more amino species on the silane layer surface compared to the cleaned, industrially pickled surface. Silane layer thickness affected failure type of the hybrids, with a thick silane layer the hybrids failed mainly in the silane layer and with a thinner layer cohesively in plastic.

  7. Flow lines and microscopic elemental inhomogeneities in austenitic stainless steels

    Mosley, Jr, W C

    1982-01-01

    Flow lines in mechanically formed austenitic stainless steels are known to influence fracture behavior. Enhancement of flow lines by chemical etching is evidence of elemental inhomogeneity. This paper presents the results of electron microprobe analyses to determine the nature of flow lines in three austenitic stainless steels: 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn, 304L, and 19Ni-18Cr.

  8. Operational experience with stainless steel condenser tubes

    Longitudinal seam welded tubes of stainless austenitic 18/8 CrNi and 18/8/2 CrNiMo steels have proved their worth when used in steam condensers with fresh water recooling. However, in water containing a high level of salt, in particular brackish water and seawater, experience to date has not been satisfactory in the case of these materials. High-alloy austenitic, ferritic and austenitic-ferritic steels developed during the last 10 years, on the other hand, have high pitting potentials and, both in the laboratory and in practice, have proved their suitability as heat-exchanger materials for steam condensers. These materials are easily worked to form welded tubes with a longitudinal seam and are therefore a relatively inexpensive design which ensures both plant safety and availability

  9. Advanced surface analysis on stainless steel

    The aim of this investigation is to minimise the build-up of radionuclides (especially of Co-60) in the oxide layers of austenitic steels by variation of pH and dosing of metal ions. Stainless steel samples were exposed to water in 11 autoclaves in flow through mode (11/h) for 5 days at 288 oC with metal ions and radioactive tracers having been added to the water. In addition to the activity measurements the semiconducting properties of the oxides and oxide layer thickness were determined by photo-electrochemistry and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Correlation of activity uptake with layer thickness, type of semiconductor and band gap energy is shown. The presence of different metal ions in the oxidation process implies changes of the semiconducting properties of the oxide and different susceptibility of activity uptake into the oxide layers. (author)

  10. Deformation induced martensitic transformation in stainless steels

    Deformation induced martensitic transformation was investigated in metastable austenitic stainless steel. This steel can present a microstructure of austenite (γ), α' martensite and non magnetic ε martensite. Uni-axial tensile test was used for loading at different temperatures below room temperature (from -120 to 20 deg. C). During the deformation the transformation takes place at certain places in an anisotropic way and texture also develops. Quantitative phase analysis was done by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetic methods while the texture was described by X-ray diffraction using a special inverse pole figure. The quantitative phase analysis has shown that the formation of α' and ε martensite from austenite is the function of deformation rate, and deformation temperature. The transformation of the textured austenite takes place in an anisotropic way and a well defined crystallographic relationship between the parent and α' martensite phase has been measured

  11. Development of a lean duplex stainless steel

    Liljas, M.; Johansson, P.; Liu Hui-Ping; Olsson, C.O.A. [Avesta Research Centre, Avesta (Sweden). Outokumpu Stainless

    2008-06-15

    The classic series of duplex stainless steels shows very high corrosion resistance and can be used for very demanding applications. A new lean duplex steel, LDX 2101 {sup registered} (EN 1.4162, UNS S32101), has been developed with corrosion resistance on a par with standard austenitic grades. Application areas include: structural components, chemical industry, tanks and containers. The steel was designed to have equal amounts of ferrite and austenite in annealed condition and with an austenite that is stable against strain-induced martensite. Thanks to its high nitrogen content, the steel has a fast austenite reformation when subjected to thermal cycling, e.g. welding. Unlike conventional duplex grades, the formation of intermetallic phase is very sluggish, although precipitation of nitrides and carbides has a certain impact on material properties after exposure in the temperature range 600 to 800 C. The precipitation behaviour after different isothermal treatments is described and its influence on different product properties is shown. A good agreement was found between impact toughness and corrosion resistance for a wide range of thermal treatments. (orig.)

  12. Carburization of stainless steel furnace tubes

    Stainless steel containing molybdenum are usually recommended to resist naphtenic acid corrosion in vacuum heaters. In 1993 the original 5Cr-1/2Mo roof tubes of the furnace in a vacuum unit were replaced by stainless steel 316 Ti to minimize tube replacement and increase heater reliability. Unexpectedly, some of the new tubes failed after only three years of service and just one year after undergoing the last inspection. The damage occurred in the form of deep holes and perforations, starting from the outside tube surface on the fireside. Coke build-up occurred due to severe operating conditions, overheating the tubes on the fireside, above 675 Centigrade. Metallographic and Scanning Electron Microscopy (Sem) examination revealed internal and external carburization of the material due to the presence of coke and combustion ashes, respectively. The increase in the skin metal temperature facilitated the diffusion of carbon from these carbon-rich deposits into the low carbon content material (0.023%). Depletion of chromium at the grain boundaries due to the massive formation of chromium carbides, resulted in a severe intergranular corrosion attack by molten salts rich in vanadium and sulfur produced by asphalt burning. Normal operating practice demands the use of steam for the heater tubes to control coke build-up. This practice had been first reduced and then eliminated, during the past two years prior to the failure, because of economic incentives. This paper describes the root cause analysis conducted to account for these premature tube failures. (Author)

  13. Fracture toughness of irradiated stainless steel alloys

    The postirradiation fracture toughness responses of Types 316 and 304 stainless steel (SS) wrought products, cast CF8 SS and Type 308 SS weld deposit were characterized at 4270C using J/sub R/-curve techniques. Fast-neutron irradiation of these alloys caused an order of magnitude reduction in J/sub c/ and two orders of magnitude reduction in tearing modulus at neutron exposures above 10 dpa, where radiation-induced losses in toughness appeared to saturate. Saturation J/sub c/ values for the wrought materials ranged from 28 to 31 kJ/m2; the weld exhibited a saturation level of 11 kJ/m2. Maximum allowable flaw sizes for highly irradiated stainless steel components stressed to 90% of the unirradiated yield strength are on the order of 3 cm for the wrought material and 1 cm for the weld. Electron fractographic examination revealed that irradiation displacement damage brought about a transition from ductile microvoid coalescence to channel fracture, associated with local separation along planar deformation bands. The lower saturation toughness value for the weld relative to that for the wrought products was attributed to local failure of ferrite particles ahead of the advancing crack which prematurely initiated channel fracture

  14. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  15. Antibacterial polyelectrolyte micelles for coating stainless steel.

    Falentin-Daudré, Céline; Faure, Emilie; Svaldo-Lanero, Tiziana; Farina, Fabrice; Jérôme, Christine; Van De Weerdt, Cécile; Martial, Joseph; Duwez, Anne-Sophie; Detrembleur, Christophe

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we report on the original synthesis and characterization of novel antimicrobial coatings for stainless steel by alternating the deposition of aqueous solutions of positively charged polyelectrolyte micelles doped with silver-based nanoparticles with a polyanion. The micelles are formed by electrostatic interaction between two oppositely charged polymers: a polycation bearing 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine units (DOPA, a major component of natural adhesives) and a polyanion (poly(styrene sulfonate), PSS) without using any block copolymer. DOPA units are exploited for their well-known ability to anchor to stainless steel and to form and stabilize biocidal silver nanoparticles (Ag(0)). The chlorine counteranion of the polycation forms and stabilizes biocidal silver chloride nanoparticles (AgCl). We demonstrate that two layers of micelles (alternated by PSS) doped with silver particles are enough to impart to the surface strong antibacterial activity against gram-negative E. coli. Moreover, micelles that are reservoirs of biocidal Ag(+) can be easily reactivated after depletion. This novel water-based approach is convenient, simple, and attractive for industrial applications. PMID:22506542

  16. Assessment of thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steels

    A procedure and correlations are presented for assessing thermal embrittlement and predicting Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness J-R curve of cast stainless steel components under Light Water Reactor operating conditions from known material information. The ''saturation'' impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Fracture properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. A common ''predicted lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented

  17. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH OF THE DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL WELDS IN SHIPBUILDING

    Juraga, Ivan; Stojanović, Ivan; Ljubenkov, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel is used in shipbuilding increasingly because of its good mechanical properties and marked corrosion resistance. This steel has a two phase structure (austenite-ferrite) which is sensitive on heat input during welding because of the possible ferritisation appearance, that is, increase in ferrite content in the area of heat effected zone (HAZ) which can lead to loss of mechanical and corrosion properties. Work with duplex stainless steel requires special attention in ever...

  18. The continuous strength method for structural stainless steel design

    Afshan, S; Gardner, L.

    2013-01-01

    Current stainless steel design standards are based on elastic, perfectly plastic material behaviour providing consistency with carbon steel design expressions, but often leading to overly conservative results, particularly in the case of stocky elements. More economic design rules in accordance with the actual material response of stainless steel, which shows a rounded stress–strain curve with significant strain hardening, are required. Hence, the continuous strength method (CSM) was develope...

  19. 75 FR 81308 - Stainless Steel Sheet And Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, And Taiwan

    2010-12-27

    ... COMMISSION Stainless Steel Sheet And Strip From Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, And Taiwan AGENCY... countervailing duty order on stainless steel sheet and strip from Korea and antidumping duty orders on stainless... on stainless steel sheet and strip from Korea and/or the antidumping duty orders on stainless...

  20. On phase equilibria in duplex stainless steels

    Wessman, S. [Swerea KIMAB AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Pettersson, R. [Outokumpu Stainless AB, Avesta Research Centre, Avesta (Sweden); Hertzman, S. [Outokumpu Stainless Research Foundation, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-05-15

    The equilibrium conditions of four duplex stainless steels; Fe-23Cr-4.5Ni-0.1N, Fe-22Cr-5.5Ni-3Mo-0.17N, Fe-25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-0.27N and Fe-25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-1W-1.5Cu-0.27N were studied in the temperature region from 700 to 1000 C. Phase compositions were determined with SEM EDS and the phase fractions using image analysis on backscattered SEM images. The results showed that below 1000 C the steels develop an inverse duplex structure with austenite and sigma phase, of which the former is the matrix phase. With decreasing temperature, the microstructure will be more and more complex and finely dispersed. The ferrite is, for the higher alloyed steels, only stable above 1000 C and at lower temperatures disappears in favour of intermetallic phases. The major intermetallic phase is sigma phase with small amounts of chi phase, the latter primarily in high Mo and W grades. Nitrides, not a focus in this investigation, were present as rounded particles and acicular precipitates at lower temperatures. The results were compared to theoretical predictions using the TCFE5 and TCFE6 databases. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Hydrogen Effects on Austenitic Stainless Steels and High-Strength Carbon Steels

    Todoshchenko, Olga

    2015-01-01

    The resistance to hydrogen embrittlement is an important factor in the development of new steel grades for a variety of applications. The thesis describes investigations on hydrogen effects on two classes of steels - austenitic stainless steels and advanced high-strength carbon steels. Hydrogen solubility and diffusion in metastable austenitic stainless steels are studied with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). This method, together with the mathematical modeling of the processes of hy...

  2. Development of commercial nitrogen-rich stainless steels

    This paper reviews the development of nitrogen alloyed stainless steels. Nitrogen alloying of austenitic stainless steels started at an early stage and was to a large extent caused by nickel shortage. However, direct technical advantages such as increased strength of the nitrogen alloyed steels made them attractive alternatives to the current steels. It was not until the advent of the AOD (argon oxygen decarburisation) process in the late 1960s that nitrogen alloying could be controlled to such accuracy that it became successful commercially on a broader scale. The paper describes production aspects and how nitrogen addition influences microstructure and the resulting properties of austenitic and duplex stainless steels. For austenitic steels there are several reasons for nitrogen alloying. Apart from increasing strength nitrogen also improves structural stability, work hardening and corrosion resistance. For duplex steels nitrogen also has a decisive effect in controlling the microstructure during thermal cycles such as welding. (orig.)

  3. Nickel-free Stainless Steel for Medical Applications

    Yibin REN; Ke YANG; Bingchun ZHANG; Yaqing WANG; Yong LIANG

    2004-01-01

    BIOSS4 steel is essentially a nickel-free austenitic stainless steel developed by the Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, in response to nickel allergy problems associated with nickel-containing stainless steels that are widely used in medical applications. The high nitrogen content of this steel effectively maintains the austenitic stability and also contributes to the high levels of corrosion resistance and strength. BIOSS4 steel possesses a good combination of high strength and toughness, better corrosion resistance, and better blood compatibility, in comparison with the medical 316L stainless steel. Potential applications of BIOSS4 steel can include medical implantation material and orthodontic or orthopedic devices, as well as jewelries and other decorations.

  4. Microbial-Influenced Corrosion of Corten Steel Compared with Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel in Oily Wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Mansouri, Hamidreza; Alavi, Seyed Abolhasan; Fotovat, Meysam

    2015-07-01

    The microbial corrosion behavior of three important steels (carbon steel, stainless steel, and Corten steel) was investigated in semi petroleum medium. This work was done in modified nutrient broth (2 g nutrient broth in 1 L oily wastewater) in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and mixed culture (as a biotic media) and an abiotic medium for 2 weeks. The behavior of corrosion was analyzed by spectrophotometric and electrochemical methods and at the end was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the degree of corrosion of Corten steel in mixed culture, unlike carbon steel and stainless steel, is less than P. aeruginosa inoculated medium because some bacteria affect Corten steel less than other steels. According to the experiments, carbon steel had less resistance than Corten steel and stainless steel. Furthermore, biofilm inhibits separated particles of those steels to spread to the medium; in other words, particles get trapped between biofilm and steel.

  5. In vivo behavior of a high performance duplex stainless steel.

    Cigada, A; De Santis, G; Gatti, A M; Roos, A; Zaffe, D

    1993-01-01

    An in vivo investigation of a new high molybdenum and nitrogen duplex stainless steel (25Cr--7Ni--4Mo--0.3N) has been performed. Cylindrical pins and specially developed devices, to test in static conditions the in vivo localized corrosion resistance, made of this new duplex steel and of a common austenitic stainless steel were implanted in rabbit's femurs for 6 and 12 months. After sacrifice, SEM observations and EDS microanalyses to detect metallic ion release were carried out on the femur sections surrounding the pins. Morphologic observations with stereoscope and SEM were performed on the metallic surfaces of the special devices in order to detect the presence of localized corrosion. Both ion release and localized corrosion were observed for the specimens made of austenitic stainless steel, but not for those made of 25Cr--7Ni--4Mo--0.3N duplex stainless steel. PMID:10148344

  6. Estimation of revealing methods of microstructure in duplex stainless steels

    Revealing of microstructure in duplex stainless steels by conventional chemical or electrochemical etching methods is relatively difficult as opposed to carbon steels. There are a many etching methods for duplex stainless steels, however electrolytic etching is really the best way to go. Electrochemical etching assures very good distinction of ferrite, austenite and secondary phases also etching of grain boundaries and twins, simultaneously warranting repeatability of process' circumstances. However, literature data do not deliver enough explicit parameters and conditions of electrolytic etching process, what in consequence can lead to indirect phenomenon during the process, such as pitting or etching twins. In frames of this work we have tested different methods of electrolytic etching of duplex stainless steel 1.4462-X2CrNiMoN 22.5.3 according to EURONORM (UNS S3108). This article has in view discussing of controversial matter of argument relating to revealing microstructure in duplex stainless steels on the ground of conducted investigations. (author)

  7. Stainless Steel Round Robin Test: Centrifugally cast stainless steel screening phase

    This report presents the results of the Centrifugally Cast Stainless Steel Round Robin Test (CCSSRRT). The CCSSRRT is the first phase of an effort to investigate and improve the capability and reliability of NDE inspections of light water reactor piping systems. This phase was a screening test to identify the most promising procedures presently available for CCSS. The next phase will be an in-depth program to evaluate the capability and reliability of inservice inspections (ISI) for piping. In the CCSSRRT, 15 centrifugally cast stainless steel pipe sections containing welds and laboratory-grown thermal fatigue cracks in both columnar and equiaxed base material were used. These pipe specimens were inspected by a total of 18 teams from Europe and the United States using a variety of NDE techniques, mostly ultrasonic (UT). The inspections were carried out at the team's facilities and included inspections from both sides of the weld and inspections restricted to one side of the weld. The results of the CCSSRRT make it apparent that a more detailed study on the capability and reliability of procedures to inspect stainless steel materials is needed to better understand the specific material and flaw properties and how they affect the outcome of an inspection

  8. Compressibility of 304 Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Materials Reinforced with 304 Short Stainless Steel Fibers

    Bibo Yao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Powder metallurgy (P/M technique is usually used for manufacturing porous metal materials. However, some P/M materials are limitedly used in engineering for their performance deficiency. A novel 304 stainless steel P/M material was produced by a solid-state sintering of 304 stainless steel powders and 304 short stainless steel fibers, which were alternately laid in layers according to mass ratio. In this paper, the compressive properties of the P/M materials were characterized by a series of uniaxial compression tests. The effects of fiber content, compaction pressure and high temperature nitriding on compressive properties were investigated. The results indicated that, without nitriding, the samples changed from cuboid to cydariform without damage in the process of compression. The compressive stress was enhanced with increasing fiber content ranging from 0 to 8 wt.%. For compaction pressure from 55 to 75 MPa, greater compaction pressure improved compressive stress. Moreover, high temperature nitriding was able to significantly improve the yield stress, but collapse failure eventually occurred.

  9. Magnetic characterisation of duplex stainless steel

    Mészáros, I.

    2006-02-01

    Heat treatment-induced microstructural processes were studied by different non-destructive magnetic and mechanical material testing methods in the present work. A commercial SAF 2507 type superduplex stainless steel was investigated. This alloy contains about 40% metastable ferrite which can decompose to a sigma phase and secondary austenite due to heat treatment. All the mechanical, corrosion resistance and magnetic properties are strongly influenced by this microstructural changes. This study had two aims: to understand better the kinetics of the ferrite decomposition process and to study the application possibilities of the applied magnetic measurements. This paper presents an application possibility of the nonlinear harmonics analysis measurement and demonstrates the possibility to find a quantitative correlation between measured harmonics and mechanical properties obtained from destructive tests.

  10. Electrochemical decontamination of Pu contaminated stainless steel

    Electrochemical decontamination has been demonstrated to be very effective in removing plutonium nitrate contamination (0.5 μg cm-2) on stainless steels. The amount of metal dissolved to achieve a DF of 102 to 103 was 2 to 7 μm depending on the electrolyte used. In unstirred electrolytes 1M HNO3, 1M HNO3/0.1M NaF, 5M HNO3 perform best. Under stirred electrolyte conditions, there is a general marginal fall in effectiveness except for 5M HNO3 where there is a slight improvement. The optimum performance is a compromise between maximizing the electrolyte throwing power and minimizing substrate surface roughening during decontamination. (author)

  11. Hydrogen permeability of nitrided stainless steel

    The surface of a 316 stainless steel (316SS) specimen was nitrided by an electrochemical treatment in molten fluoride salt. Its hydrogen permeability was evaluated and compared with that of bare 316SS at temperature from 450degC to 650degC. When it was exposed to hydrogen pressure of 1.0 kPa from 450degC to 650degC, its permeability was 7.2×10-11 to 6.4×10-12 mol/sec.m.Pa1/2. The permeation flux was increased with temperature and the permeability is deviated from Sieverts' law around 450degC. It followed Sieverts' law and was similar to that of bare 316SS at elevated temperatures. This result suggested the surface nitriding increases solubility at low temperatures around 450degC. (author)

  12. Simulation of a stainless steel multipass weldment

    Several problems in nuclear power plants are due to shrinkage and distortion of welded structures and the associated residual stresses. In this context, a stainless steel multipass weldment realized in a H type constrained specimen has been calculated by means of finite element method. The temperatures obtained from a 3 D modified Rosenthal equation are compared with the experimental ones, and are then used for the 2 D simulation in which a linear Kinematic hardening is assumed in relation to a Von Mises plasticity criteria. Materials data are well known up to very high temperatures (12000 C) and are introduced in the model. Experimental and calculated displacements after the first pass are compared and a discussion points out what improvements should be made for a better agreement. (author). 3 refs., 8 figs, 1 tab

  13. Fast response stainless steel sodium thermocouple

    Thermo electro motive force and transient response characteristics of well-type stainless steel sodium thermocouples have been studied. The experiments were performed with a specially constructed test rig allowing the placement of several couples at various depths of immersion in liquid sodium and at different spacings. The time response was studied by inducing temperature transients in a hot sodium injection and gas injection, and photographing the oscilloscope trace of the output. The possibility of using these thermocouples in transit time flowmeters in sodium circuit was ascertained by observing the response from two thermocouples in flowing sodium, and evaluating the cross-correlation between the response. The application of such thermocouples for fast reactors and sodium circuits is also discussed. (author)

  14. Forging evaluaion of 304L stainless steel

    The objective of this project was to evaluate and characterize the effects of various forging parameters on the metallographic structure and mechanical properties of 304L stainless steel forgings. Upset and die forgings were produced by hammer and Dynapak forging with forging temperatures ranging from 760 to 11450C, upset reductions ranging from 20 to 60%, and annealing times ranging from 0 to 25 minutes at 8430C. The carbide precipitation behavior observed was found to be a function of forging temperature and annealing time. Higher forging temperatures were beneficial in avoiding continuous carbide precipitation and annealing at 8430C promoted increased carbide precipitation. The yield strength of the unannealed forgings decreased with increasing forging temperature and, with the exception of the 11450C upset forgings, was significantly lowered by annealing

  15. Dissolution of stainless steel in artificial saliva.

    Lakatos-Varsányi, M; Wegrelius, L; Olefjord, I

    1997-01-01

    Dissolution of stainless steel type 304 in artificial saliva was studied by electrochemical methods, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and atom absorption spectroscopy. The samples were polarized in the -400 mV (saturated calomel electrode) to -50 mV (saturated calomel electrode) range. The total thickness of the passive film was found to be 25 +/- 3 A, independent of the potential. The passive film consists of a duplex structure: an inner layer of (Cr0.5Fe0.5)2O3 and an outer layer of a mixture of Cr(OH)3 and (CrxFey)PO4.2H2O. The analysis indicated that 11 micrograms/cm2 of the alloying elements were dissolved during exposure for 1 year. PMID:9197105

  16. MOCVD deposition of YSZ on stainless steels

    Chevalier, S.; Kilo, M.; Borchardt, G.; Larpin, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Yttria stabilized zirconia was deposited on stainless steel using the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, from β-diketonate precursors. The variation of the evaporation temperatures of yttrium and zirconium precursor allowed to control the level of Y within the film. Over the temperature range 125-150 °C, the Y content increased from 2.5 to 17.6 at.%. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses evidenced tetragonal phase of zirconia when the Y content was below 8 at.%, and cubic phase for higher concentration. Sputtered neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) profiles confirmed that the control and stability of Y precursor temperature were of major importance to guarantee the homogeneity of the deposited films.

  17. Nitrogen bearing austenitic stainless steels for surgical implants

    Tschiptschin, A.P.; Aidar, C.H.; Alonso-Falleiros, N. [Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Escola Politecnica; Neto, F.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1999-07-01

    Nitrogen addition promotes substantial improvements on general and localized corrosion performance of stainless steels. In recent times high nitrogen (up to 0.6 wt%) and Mn bearing super austenitic stainless steel has been studied for medical applications due to its low Ni content, the so called body friendly alloys. 18%Cr, 0.4%N and 15%Mn stainless steels were cast either from electrolytic or commercial master alloys in induction furnace, forged, solubilized at 1423K for 3 hours and water quenched. Delta ferrite and carbide precipitate free structures were observed. (orig.)

  18. EXAFS investigation of low temperature nitrided stainless steel

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny;

    2008-01-01

    Low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 flakes were investigated with EXAFS and X-ray diffraction analysis. The stainless steel flakes were transformed into a mixture of nitrogen expanded austenite and nitride phases. Two treatments were carried out yielding different overall nitrogen...... contents: (1) nitriding in pure NH3 and (2)nitriding in pure NH3 followed by reduction in H2. The majority of the Cr atoms in the stainless steel after treatment 1 and 2 was associated with a nitrogen–chromium bond distance comparable to that of the chemical compound CrN. The possibility of the occurrence...

  19. Kinetics of chemical interactions between zirconium alloys and stainless steels

    The chemical interaction kinetics of reactor core component zirconium alloys and stainless steels at high temperatures was examined. Interaction of as-received and preoxidized Zr1%Nb with X18H10T stainless steel used in WWER type nuclear reactors, and also that of Zircaloy-4 and AISI-316 stainless steel, for comparison, were investigated. The reaction rate measurements were supplemented with post-test metallographical examinations. Results are presented and evaluated, and compared with literature data. (author). 14 refs., 31 figs., 8 tabs

  20. Shear design recommendations for stainless steel plate girders

    Saliba, Najib; Real, E.; Gardner, Leroy

    2014-01-01

    The behaviour and design of stainless steel plate girders loaded in shear is investigated in this paper. A review of existing methods for the design of stainless steel plate girders, including codified provisions, is first presented. A database of thirty-four experiments carried out on austenitic, duplex and lean duplex stainless steel plate girders is then reported, and used to assess the current shear resistance design equations from Eurocode 3: Part 1.4 and Eurocode 3: Part 1.5 and the rec...

  1. Thermodynamic calculation of phase equilibria in stainless steels

    Klančnik G.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper two examples of thermodynamic investigation of stainless steels using both, experimental and modeling approach are described. The ferritic-austenitic duplex stainless steel and austenitic stainless steel were investigated using thermal analysis. The complex melting behavior was evident for both alloy systems. Experimentally obtained data were compared with the results of the thermodynamic calculations using the CALPHAD method. The equilibrium thermal events were also described by the calculated heat capacity. In spite of the complexity of both selected real alloy systems a relative good agreement was obtained between the thermodynamic calculations and experimental results.

  2. New Stainless Steel Alloys for Low Temperature Surface Hardening?

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present contribution showcases the possibility for developing new surface hardenable stainless steels containing strong nitride/carbide forming elements (SNCFE). Nitriding of the commercial alloys, austenitic A286, and ferritic AISI 409 illustrates the beneficial effect of having SNCFE present...... in the stainless steel alloys. The presented computational approach for alloy design enables “screening” of hundreds of thousands hypothetical alloy systems by use of Thermo-Calc. Promising compositions for new stainless steel alloys can be selected based on imposed criteria, i.e. facilitating easy...

  3. Thermal fatigue crack growth in stainless steel

    A judgment of residual service life of engineering parts exposed to thermal fatigue makes it possible to deal with economic and safety issues in power plants. The aim of this study is to analyze a fatigue crack initiation and propagation in A321 stainless steel bodies subjected to repeated thermal shocks. For this purpose, various methods of crack propagation monitoring were used. The first stage of experiments included mechanical cyclic loading of specimens with the central notch at fixed temperatures ranging from 20 °C to 410 °C. The crack growth rate was only minimally influenced by temperature in this case. Thermal loading of the same specimens with ΔT varying from 150 °C to 340 °C showed very rapid crack initiation in the notches and its asymmetric growth. Metallographic and fractographic analyses of failed specimens were carried out after 1000, 3000 and 6000 thermal cycles. The comparison of the fracture surface micromorphology confirmed the similarity in the mechanism of the thermal and mechanical fatigue crack growth. Stress analysis using the finite element method consisting of transient thermal and mechanical solutions was performed in order to simulate the experiments. Thermal fatigue crack growth assessment was carried out on the basis of the experiments and the computed thermally induced stress intensity factors. This model successfully confirms the discussed analogy of thermal and mechanical stress induced damage. Highlights: ► A fatigue crack initiation and propagation in A321 stainless steel was analyzed. ► Mechanical and thermal experiments were performed, simulated also by FEM. ► Similarity in the mechanism of thermal and mechanical fatigue crack growth found. ► Application of the Paris model for the thermal cycling confirmed.

  4. Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2014-01-21

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

  5. Behaviour and design of cold-formed lean duplex stainless steel members

    Huang, Yun'er; 黃韵兒

    2013-01-01

    Cold-formed stainless steel sections have been increasingly used in architectural and structural applications. Yet the high price of stainless steel limits the application to construction projects. The lean duplex stainless steel (EN 1.4162) offers an opportunity for stainless steels to be used more widely due to its competitive in price, good mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. The lean duplex stainless steel is a relatively new material, and research on this material is limited....

  6. Effects of Cr2N Precipitation on the Antibacterial Properties of AISI 430 Stainless Steel

    Je-Kang Du; Chih-Yeh Chao; Yu-Ting Jhong; Chung-Hao Wu; Ju-Hui Wu

    2016-01-01

    Based on their mechanical properties and good corrosion resistance, some commercial Ni-Cr stainless steels have been widely applied as biomaterials, including the austenitic 304 stainless steel, the austenitic 316 stainless steel, the duplex 2205 stainless steel, and the ferritic 430 stainless steel. In order to reduce the occurrence of infections resulting from biomaterial implants, instruments, and medical devices, Cu2+ and Ag2+ ions have been added onto biomaterials for increasing the anti...

  7. Electrochemical and passivation behavior investigation of ferritic stainless steel in simulated concrete pore media

    Hong Luo; Huaizhi Su; Chaofang Dong; Kui Xiao; Xiaogang Li

    2015-01-01

    The applications of stainless steel are one of the most reliable solutions in concrete structures to reduce chloride-induced corrosion problems and increase the structures service life, however, due to high prices of nickel, especially in many civil engineering projects, the austenitic stainless steel is replaced by the ferritic stainless steels. Compared with austenite stainless steel, the ferritic stainless steel is known to be extremely resistant of stress corrosion cracking and other prop...

  8. Evaluation of stainless steels for their resistance to intergranular corrosion

    Austenitic stainless steels are being considered as structural materials for first wall/blanket systems in the international thermonuclear reactor (ITER). The uniform corrosion of stainless steels in water is well known and is not a critical issue limiting its application for the ITER design. The sensitivity of austenitic steels to intergranular corrosion (IGC) can be estimated rather accurately by means of calculation methods, considering structure and chemical composition of steel. There is a maximum permissible carbon content level, at which sensitization of stainless steel is eliminated: K=Creff-αCeff, where α-thermodynamic coefficient, Creff-effective chromium content (regarding molybdenum influence) and Ceff-effective carbon content (taking into account nickel and stabilizing elements). Corrosion tests for 16Cr11Ni3MoTi, 316L and 316LN steel specimens, irradiated up to 2 x 1022 n/cm2 fluence have proved the effectiveness of this calculation technique for determination of austenitic steels tendency to IGC. This method is directly applicable in austenitic stainless steel production and enables one to exclude complicated experiments on determination of stainless steel susceptibility to IGC. (orig.)

  9. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N+, O+ and SiF3+, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF3+-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N+-implanted steel, O+-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions

  10. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    Zhao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Wang, S.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.

    2007-08-01

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N +, O + and SiF 3+, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF 3+-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N +-implanted steel, O +-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions.

  11. Welding technology trend of austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic services

    At present, the large use of stainless steel in cryogenic field is the storage and transport system for liquefied gas represented by LNG and the nuclear fusion reactors utilizing superconductivity. Most of the stainless steel used for the LNG system is austenitic stainless steel SUS 304. The main use of stainless steel for fusion reactors is the support structures for superconductive magnets, and the thick plates over 150 mm are used. In the experiment, SUS 304L and 316L were used, but the development of a new high strength stainless steel is actively advanced. The target specification of the cryogenic structural material for the fusion experimental reactor (FER) was proposed in 1982. The proof stress is not lower than 1200 MPa, and the fracture toughness value is not lower than 200 MPa √m at 4 K. Six kinds of nitrogen-strengthened austenitic stainless steels and high manganese austenitic steels are developed. As the problems of the welded parts, the toughness and strength at extremely low temperature, the susceptibility to high temperature cracking, the material quality design of the welded metals and so on are examined. The welding methods are GTAW and GMAW. (K.I.)

  12. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    Yoon-Jun Kim

    2004-12-19

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as {sigma} and {chi} can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ({sigma} + {chi}) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, {sigma} was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and {chi} by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in

  13. Phase transformations in cast duplex stainless steels

    Kim, Yoon-Jun

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as sigma (sigma) and chi (chi) can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (sigma + chi) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities, a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, a was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and chi by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in

  14. Evaluation of tensile properties of cast stainless steel using ball

    In this study the ball indentation tests were performed on the four unaged cast stainless steel and 316 stainless steel, which have different microstructure and strength, to examine the applicability of ball indentation test to the evaluation of thermal aging of cast stainless steel. Also, the reliability of test results were analyzed by evaluating the scattering of data tested from each material and by comparing tensile properties obtained from ball indentation test and tensile test. The results showed that the maximum standard deviation to mean value are less than 6%, and the average standard deviation to mean value are about 1.5∼2.5%, when 2 point data that show out of trend were discarded from the data set tested a single specimen. Also, the scattering increased slightly with decreasing δ-ferrite content. Additionally, the ball indentation test predicted the tensile properties of cast stainless steel within an error of ±10% for all materials

  15. Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

    2007-07-24

    A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.

  16. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened 2205 duplex stainless steel composite

    Oladayo OLANIRAN

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Composites of duplex stainless steel were produced by oxide dispersion strengthening with comparatively improved mechanical properties by hot press sintering of partially stabilized Zirconia (PSZ, 3% yttria, mole fraction dispersion in 2205 duplex stainless steels. Ceramic oxide was added as reinforcement, while chromium (Cr and Nickel (Ni were incorporated to maintain the austenitic/ferritic phase balance of the duplex stainless steel. The powders and sintered were characterized in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The microstructural evolution and phase formation during oxide dispersion strengthening of duplex stainless steel composites were investigated. The influence of composition variation of the reinforcements on the microstructural and corrosion behaviour in simulated mine water of the composites were investigated. In this manuscript, it was established that composition has great influence on the structure/properties relationship of the composites developed.

  17. Overlaying of type 316 austenitic stainless steel with type 430 ferritic stainless steel

    Overlaying of type 316 austenitic stainless steel vessel with type 430 ferritic stainless is proposed for liquid magnesium service. The interface in this type of bimetallic configuration has been shown to be a cause for concern as it contains a hard and brittle martensite micro constituent which becomes susceptible to cracking under certain conditions. This study was carried out to standardize the welding conditions and characterise the interface in order to obtain sound overlay. Some tests were also conducted to simulate the elevated temperature service. The investigation has shown that the interface hardness approaches 400 VPN when no preheating is employed. However, in the preheated samples, appreciable reduction in the peak hardness was observed. This has been attributed to a decrease in the cooling rate of the clad metal with an increase in the preheating temperature which results in softening of the martensite. The minimum recommended preheat is 473 K. The samples exposed to thermal cycle tests to a peak temperature of 1223 K to simulate the service condition did not show any cracking at the interface after 20 cycles of testing. Therefore, this study has demonstrated the stability of the interface between type 316 and 430 stainless steels at the intended temperature of service. (author)

  18. Stainless steels and special grades for specific applications

    The development of special steels grades with a composition between stainless steels and nickel alloys for localised corrosion resistance applications (steam condenser, combustion products de-pollution...) are shortly presented by family (austenitic and super-austenitic stainless steels of the URANUS family with or without nitrogen additions, austeno-ferritic steels), with electrochemistry corrosion tests evaluation : in standard medium (30 g/l NaCl + 6% FeCl3) or in real medium. (A.B.). 6 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Restorasi Gigi Insisivus Sulung Menggunakan Resin Veneer Mahkota Stainless Steel

    Hilda Shandika P.

    2008-01-01

    Untuk memperbaiki kerusakan gigi yang luas diperlukan restorasi yang tahan lama, retentif, dan estetik. Mahkota stainless steel digunakan untuk merestorasi insisivus sulung yang mengalami karies berat, kelainan bentuk atau akibat trauma. Mahkota ini merupakan restorasi yang kuat, tidak mudah fraktur, dan jarang rusak sampai beberapa tahun selama masih berada di tempatnya. Namun mahkota stainless steel memiliki kekurangan dari segi estetik karena warna peraknya yang mengganggu perhatian pada w...

  20. Properties of duplex stainless steels made by powder metallurgy

    M. Rosso; M. Actis Grande; Z. Brytan; L.A. Dobrzański

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper was to examine the mechanical properties of duplex stainless steels.Design/methodology/approach: In presented study duplex stainless steels were obtained through powder metallurgy starting from austenitic, martensitic base powders by controlled addition of alloying elements, such as Cr, Ni, Mo and Cu. In the studies behind the preparation of mixes, Schaeffler’s diagram was taken into consideration. Prepared mixes have been sintered in a vacuu...

  1. Probing the duplex stainless steel phases via magnetic force microscopy

    Gheno, S. M.; Santos, F. S.; Kuri, S. E.

    2008-03-01

    Duplex stainless steels are austenitic-ferritic alloys used in many applications, thanks to their excellent mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance. In this work, chemical analyses, x-ray diffraction, and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) were employed to characterize the solution annealed and aged duplex stainless steel. The samples exhibited no changes in lattice parameters and the MFM technique proved successful in clearly imaging the magnetic domain structure of the ferrite phase.

  2. Corrosion of Stainless Steels of Cryogenic Hydrocarbon Flare Tips Burners

    H. U. Nwosu; A. U. Iwuoha

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the corrosion resistance of AISI Type 304 Stainless Steel (SS) used in flare tips (burners) of natural gas (NG) extraction facilities is considered to determine the resistance of this grade of austenitic stainless steel to the aggressive corrosive actions of the environment. It was observed that the grade of SS yielded quite early to corrosion attacks which gave effects to scaling, flaking, pitting, material thinning and flare distortions in the burners contrary to expectations. T...

  3. Thermal fatigue of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    Virkkunen, Iikka

    2001-01-01

    Thermal fatigue behavior of AISI 304L, AISI 316, AISI 321, and AISI 347 austenitic stainless steels as well as 3RE60 and ACX-100 duplex stainless steels was studied. Test samples were subjected to cyclic thermal transients in the temperature range 20 - 600°C. The resulting thermal strains were analyzed with measurements and numerical calculations. The evolution of thermal fatigue damage was monitored with periodic residual stress measurements and replica-assisted microscopy. The elastic strai...

  4. Corrosion resistance properties of sintered duplex stainless steel

    L.A. Dobrzański; Z. Brytan; M. Actis Grande; M. Rosso

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper was to examine the corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels using electrochemical methods in 1M NaCl solution. The influence of powder mixes preparation and cooling cycle after sintering on corrosion properties was evaluated.Design/methodology/approach: In presented study duplex stainless steels were obtained through powder metallurgy starting from austenitic, martensitic base powders by controlled addition of alloying elements, such as Cr, Ni, Mo and Cu. In the ...

  5. CO-DOPED POLYPYRROLE COATINGS FOR STAINLESS STEEL PROTECTION

    W. PRISSANAROON; Brack, N.; Pigram, P. J.; J. LIESEGANG

    2006-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) films have been successfully electrodeposited on stainless steel substrates in aqueous solution. In this work, three systems of electrolytes were studied: oxalic acid, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DBSA) and a mixture of oxalic acid and DBSA. A combination of XPS and TOF–SIMS revealed the formation of an iron oxalate layer at the interface between the oxalic acid-doped PPy (PPy(Ox)) and stainless steel and a thin layer of DBSA was observed at the interface between DBSA-doped ...

  6. Fatigue curve and stress strain response for stainless steel

    Applicability of ASME, KTA and RCC-M fatigue design curves for stainless steels is an issue of current debate. Laboratory data have shown environmental effects in coolant waters, but applicability of the proposed new design criteria to current plant components has been questioned. In a Regulatory Guide for new designs, the US NRC endorsed also a new air curve for stainless steels. Aim of the current study is to test applicability of the existing and proposed design criteria

  7. Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility of Super Duplex Stainless Steels

    Alsarraf, Jalal

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the metallurgical and environmental factors that influence hydrogen embrittlement of super duplex stainless steels and presents a model to predict the rate at which embrittlement occurs. Super duplex stainless steel has an austenite and ferrite microstructure with an average fraction of each phase of approximately 50%. An investigation was carried out on the metallurgical and environmental factors that influence hydrogen embrittlement of super duplex st...

  8. Stainless steel reinforcement for durability in concrete structures

    Stainless steels and concrete are materials which the nuclear industry, more than any other, has given special attention to over the years. It is the intention of this paper to inform congress about developments outside the nuclear industry, in the use of stainless steel as reinforcement (rebar) in concrete structures. It is left to individual engineers within the industry to assess the implications of this information to applications with which they will be familiar. (author)

  9. Improved cast stainless steels for shield module applications

    Full text of publication follows: Casting of austenitic stainless steels offers the possibility of directly producing large and/or relatively complex structures, such as the first wall shield modules or the divertor cassette for the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER). Casting offers major cost savings when compared to fabrication via welding together quarter modules machined from large forgings. However, because of the large grain size, low dislocation density and extensive segregation of alloying elements, the strength properties of such cast components are frequently inferior to those of conventionally forged and annealed components. To improve and validate cast stainless steel as a substitute for wrought stainless steel for shield module applications, a series of test cast steels based on the commercially available CF3M specification have been designed and fabricated. These modifications utilize combinations of Mn and N,which are expected to synergistically result in significant increases in strength. In addition, two other alloys will enhance solid solution strengthening with Cu and W additions to increase strength. It will be necessary to demonstrate that these compositional modifications do not adversely affect performance in the ITER water corrosion and radiation environments Computational thermodynamics and solidification modeling predict that these improved cast steel compositions to be fully austenitic throughout the solidification process. Post-cast heat treatments are a second-route for improving strength and properties of cast materials. Homogenizing treatments to remove second particles have also been explored as means of improving strength in cast stainless steel. In this paper, the physical metallurgy, mechanical properties, and irradiation tolerance of the improved cast stainless steel compositions and heat treatments will be compared to standard cast stainless steel. Fracture toughness, weldability, and non-destructive analysis of

  10. Copper contamination in thin stainless steel sheet

    The standard welding technique used at Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for joining thin stainless sheet is the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. One of the reoccurring problems with the sheet welds is surface cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). Metallography shows that the cracks are only about 0.05 mm (0.002 in.) deep which is significant in a 0.25 mm (0.01 in.) thick sheet. Thus, welding requirements do not permit any surfacing cracking as detected by a fluorescent dye penetrant test conducted on every part after welding. Surface cracks have been found in both of the two most common weld designs in the thin sheet fabricated at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. These butt joints are welded between two 0.25 mm thick stainless steel sheets and a tube with eyelet welded to a 25 mm (0.98 in.) thick sheet. The weld between the two sheets is made on a semiautomatic seam welding unit, whereas the tube-to-eyelet-to-sheet welds are done manually. The quality of both welds is very dependent on the welding procedure and the way the parts are placed in the weld fixturing. Metallographic examination has indicated that some welded parts with surface cracking in the weld region had copper particles on the surface, and the question of copper contamination has been raised. With the aid of a scanning electron microscope and an electron microprobe, the existence of copper in an around the surface cracks has been verified. The copper is on the surface of the parts prior to welding in the form of small dust particles

  11. The electrochemistry of 13% chromium stainless steel in oilfield brines

    Sidorin, Dmitry; Pletcher, Derek [Department of Chemistry, The University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Hedges, Bill [BP Trinidad Ltd., P.O. Box 714, Port of Spain (Trinidad and Tobago)

    2005-07-25

    The electrochemistry of a 13% Cr stainless steel (API5CT L80-13Cr) in 3% NaCl containing acetate and either acetic acid or carbon dioxide at 333 K is explored using RDE voltammetry. The reduction of proton, carbonic acid and acetic acid occur simultaneously, immediately negative to the corrosion potential. Acetic acid gives a well formed reduction wave and the current densities increase with the equilibrium concentration of acetic acid in the medium; in the plateau region, the reduction is mass transport controlled. Despite this reduction process, the corrosion resistance and passivation current density are independent of the acetic acid concentration. It is confirmed that the 13% Cr stainless steel is much more resistant to corrosion that X65 carbon steel and, unlike the carbon steel, its rate of corrosion does not vary with acetic acid concentration. The properties of the passivating film appear to dominate the behaviour of the 13% Cr stainless steel. (author)

  12. The electrochemistry of 13% chromium stainless steel in oilfield brines

    The electrochemistry of a 13% Cr stainless steel (API5CT L80-13Cr) in 3% NaCl containing acetate and either acetic acid or carbon dioxide at 333 K is explored using RDE voltammetry. The reduction of proton, carbonic acid and acetic acid occur simultaneously, immediately negative to the corrosion potential. Acetic acid gives a well formed reduction wave and the current densities increase with the equilibrium concentration of acetic acid in the medium; in the plateau region, the reduction is mass transport controlled. Despite this reduction process, the corrosion resistance and passivation current density are independent of the acetic acid concentration. It is confirmed that the 13% Cr stainless steel is much more resistant to corrosion that X65 carbon steel and, unlike the carbon steel, its rate of corrosion does not vary with acetic acid concentration. The properties of the passivating film appear to dominate the behaviour of the 13% Cr stainless steel

  13. Vibration Characteristics Determined for Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels With a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Min, James B.; Raj, Sai V.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is to provide fan materials that are safer, weigh less, and cost less than the currently used titanium alloy or polymer matrix composite fans. The proposed material system is a sandwich fan construction made up of thin solid face sheets and a lightweight metal foam core. The stiffness of the sandwich structure is increased by separating the two face sheets by the foam layer. The resulting structure has a high stiffness and lighter weight in comparison to the solid facesheet material alone. The face sheets carry the applied in-plane and bending loads (ref. 1). The metal foam core must resist the transverse shear and transverse normal loads, as well as keep the facings supported and working as a single unit. Metal foams have ranges of mechanical properties, such as light weight, impact resistance, and vibration suppression (ref. 2), which makes them more suitable for use in lightweight fan structures. Metal foams have been available for decades (refs. 3 and 4), but the difficulties in the original processes and high costs have prevented their widespread use. However, advances in production techniques and cost reduction have created a new interest in this class of materials (ref. 5). The material chosen for the face sheet and the metal foam for this study was the aerospace-grade stainless steel 17-4PH. This steel was chosen because of its attractive mechanical properties and the ease with which it can be made through the powder metallurgy process (ref. 6). The advantages of a metal foam core, in comparison to a typical honeycomb core, are material isotropy and the ease of forming complex geometries, such as fan blades. A section of a 17-4PH sandwich structure is shown in the following photograph. Part of process of designing any blade is to determine the natural frequencies of the particular blade shape. A designer needs to predict the resonance frequencies of a new blade design to properly identify a useful

  14. EFFECT OF INTERMETALLIC PHASES ON CORROSION BEHAVIOR AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL AND SUPER-DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL

    Prabhu Paulraj; Rajnish Garg

    2015-01-01

    Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS) and Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS) have excellent integration of mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the formation of intermetallic phases is a major problem in their usage. The mechanical and corrosion properties are deteriorated due to the presence of intermetallic phases. These phases are induced during welding, prolonged exposure to high temperatures, and improper heat treatments. The main emphasis of this review article is on intermetallic pha...

  15. High temperature decontamination of stainless steel surfaces

    Dilute Chemical Decontamination process that is carried out at low temperatures (<90 °C) is effective in obtaining good decontamination factors (DFs) on carbon steel (CS) system surfaces of PHWRs as the formulation is efficient in dissolving magnetite present on CS surfaces. However, this low temperature dilute chemical decontamination process is not effective in achieving appreciable DFs on stainless steel (SS) surfaces of nuclear power reactors as it is not efficient in dissolving Cr and Ni substituted oxides present on these surfaces. Hence, a high temperature process was evaluated for the effective decontamination of SS surfaces. Among the various formulations evaluated, formulation consisting of 5 mM NTA and 10 mM N2H4 at 160 °C was found to be appropriate for high temperature decontamination application. Dissolution of various oxides like, magnetite (Fe3O4), mixed ferrites (NiFe2O4, ZnFe2O4, MgFe2O4 etc), Cr oxide (Cr2O3), bonaccordite (Ni2FeBO5) etc. was carried out in NTA at 160 °C. Significant increase in dissolution rate was observed for these oxides at 160 °C. On increasing the temperature from 80 to 180 °C, the dissolution rate of Fe3O4 increased about 6 fold. The optimised formulation (5 mM NTA with 10 mM N2H4) was employed for removing the oxide formed on SS-304, SS-316, SS-403 and SS-410 under simulated reactor water chemistry conditions. Oxide deposits from all the above surfaces could be completely removed by this high temperature process. This paper gives the summary of the results from the laboratory experiments and a simulated high temperature decontamination process. (author)

  16. He blisters on welded austenitic stainless steel

    Surface blisters of single-crystal and polycrystalline metals induced by He-ion irradiation have been investigated by many researchers and several blister-formation mechanisms have been proposed. But there is no report on what blister densities and blister sizes are to be expected on a welded 316 austenitic stainless steel in use as a fusion reactor material. An experiment was carried out, and details are given. The exfoliation of blisters was almost not observed until the total dose of 2 x 1022 ions m-2 was reached. A figure shows the blister densities for every increment in blister diameter of 0.5 μm on the base and weld metals. A second figure shows the corresponding blister densities on the base and weld metals annealed at 653 K for 4.5 ksec after He-ion irradiation. The total blister densities of the base metals decrease to 4.3 to 5.5 x 1010 blisters m-2 and the average blister sizes increase to 2.8 to 3.2 μm. This phenomenon indicates that the implanted He ions diffuse in the weld and base metals. The blister sizes on the weld metals are smaller than those on the base metals and the densities on the weld metals are greater than those on the base metals. (author)

  17. Fracture toughness of stainless steel welds

    The effects of temperature, composition and weld-process variations on the fracture toughness behavior for Types 308 and 16-8-2 stainless steel (SS) welds were examined using the multiple-specimen J/sub R/-curve procedure. Fracture characteristics were found to be dependent on temperature and weld process but not on filler material. Gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welds exhibited the highest fracture toughness, a shielded metal-arc (SMA) weld exhibited an intermediate toughness and submerged-arc (SA) welds yielded the lowest toughness. Minimum-expected fracture properties were defined from lower-bound J/sub c/ and tearing modulus values generated here and in previous studies. Fractographic examination revealed that microvoid coalescence was the operative fracture mechanism for all welds. Second phase particles of manganese silicide were found to be detrimental to the ductile fracture behavior because they separated from the matrix during the initial stages of plastic straining. In SA welds, the high density of inclusions resulting from silicon pickup from the flux promoted premature dimple rupture. The weld produced by the SMA process contained substantially less manganese silicide, while GTA welds contained no silicide inclusions. Delta ferrite particles present in all welds were substantially more resistant to local failure than the silicide phase. In welds containing little or no manganese silicide, delta ferrite particles initiated microvoid coalescence but only after extensive plastic straining

  18. Martensite transformation in antimony implanted stainless steel

    The authors have used Rutherford backscattering analysis (RBS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and diffraction to investigate austenitic stainless steel crystals implanted at room temperature with 80 keV Sb+ ions to a fluence of 5 x 1020 ions/m2, thus providing implantation with a heavy group V element. RBS channeling spectra from implanted crystals show a damage peak which approaches the height of the random level and therefore indicates a very high degree of disorder in the implanted layers. The distribution of the disorder extends to a depth 3-5 times the depth of the primary radiation damage. The Sb peaks under channeling as well as random conditions are indistinguishable, confirming that substitutionality during implantation is negligible. To establish the nature of the disorder which cannot be assessed from the RBS analysis alone, and in particular to assess whether an amorphous alloy is formed in the implanted layer as indicated from the RBS spectra, samples implanted under similar conditions were investigated in the TEM. Significant extra spots in the patterns can be ascribed to the presence of a radiation induced b.c.c. phase of martensitic origin. The result that a significant amount of martensite can be induced by antimony implantation seems to indicate that the main driving force for the transition is due to damage induced stress concentrations. (Auth.)

  19. 78 FR 34644 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    2013-06-10

    ... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Preliminary Results of... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel plate in coils (steel plate) from Belgium...: Scope of the Order The product covered by this order is certain stainless steel plate in...

  20. 78 FR 79662 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

    2013-12-31

    ... Value: Stainless Steel Plate in Coils from Belgium, 64 FR 15476 (March 31, 1999), as amended by... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium: Final Results of Antidumping... administrative review on stainless steel plate in coils (steel plate) from Belgium.\\1\\ This review covers...

  1. Corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel in sulphuric acid

    Duplex stainless steels are alloyed and processed to develop microstructure of roughly equal amounts of ferrite and austenite. Duplex stainless steel constitute a new class of materials because they have balanced amounts of ferrite and austenite. Since they have high content of chromium and molybdenum present, thus they have good corrosion resistance. Their corrosion resistance is double to that of annealed austenitic stainless steels with regard to pitting, crevice corrosion, sulphide stress corrosion, and chloride stress corrosion environments. The corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel in various concentrations of sulphuric acid was studied. The reactions were carried out by placing the steel specimen in a beaker containing a known concentration of sulphuric acid at room temperature for a definite period. Pits were initiated in duplex stainless steel specimen and the propagation of pits depends upon the concentration of the acid solution in which the sample is in contact. The weight loss for definite period of time were measured and corrosion rates were calculated in millimetres per year. The corrosion rates increases with an increase in acid concentration at room temperature. A comparison of the results obtained from various concentrations of sulphuric acid with the same concentrations of nitric acid is also discussed. (author)

  2. Radiation effects in stainless steels and tungsten using as ADS spallation neutron source system

    Radiation effects have been studied in the home-made modified 316L stainless steel and standard stainless steel and tungsten irradiated by 80 MeV 12C or 85 MeV 19F ions. The experimental results show that the radiation resistant property of stainless steels is much better than that of tungsten and the homemade modified 316L stainless steel has the best radiation resistant property among them. The stainless steels are a good choice for beam window material of the ADS spallation neutron source system, and the homemade modified 316L stainless steel is the best choice

  3. Stainless steel tube-based cell cryopreservation containers.

    Shih, Wei-Hung; Yu, Zong-Yan; Wu, Wei-Te

    2013-12-01

    This study focused on increasing the freezing rate in cell vitrification cryopreservation by using a cryopreservation container possessing rigid mechanical properties and high heat-transfer efficiency. Applying a fast freezing rate in vitrification cryopreservation causes a rapid temperature change in the cryopreservation container and has a substantial impact on mechanical properties; therefore, a highly rigid cryopreservation container that possesses a fast freezing rate must be developed. To produce a highly rigid cryopreservation container possessing superior heat transfer efficiency, this study applies an electrochemical machining (ECM) method to an ANSI 316L stainless steel tube to treat the surface material by polishing and roughening, thereby increasing the freezing rate and reducing the probability of ice crystal formation. The results indicated that the ECM method provided high-quality surface treatment of the stainless steel tube. This method can reduce internal surface roughness in the stainless steel tube, thereby reducing the probability of ice crystal formation, and increase external surface roughness, consequently raising convection heat-transfer efficiency. In addition, by thinning the stainless steel tube, this method reduces heat capacity and thermal resistance, thereby increasing the freezing rate. The freezing rate (3399 ± 197 °C/min) of a stainless steel tube after interior and exterior polishing and exterior etching by applying ECM compared with the freezing rate (1818 ± 54 °C/min) of an original stainless steel tube was increased by 87%, which also exceeds the freezing rate (2015 ± 49 °C/min) of an original quartz tube that has a 20% lower heat capacity. However, the results indicated that increasing heat-transferring surface areas and reducing heat capacities cannot effectively increase the freezing rate of a stainless steel tube if only one method is applied; instead, both techniques must be implemented concurrently to improve the

  4. Modern high strength QT, TM and duplex-stainless steels

    Pressure vessels are commonly manufactured with normalised steel grades with a yield strength up to 355 MPa or with austenitic stainless steels when corrosion as to be considered. From three decades, modern steels with higher mechanical properties - up to yield strength of 960 Mpa - are available and largely used for other applications where weight saving is of major importance as per off-shore, bridges, cranes, shipbuilding, line pipes.. The paper presents these modern steel's families - TMCP (Thermo Mechanically Controlled Process), QT (Quenched and Tempered) and Duplex (austeno-ferritic) stainless - in comparison with the normalised and austenitic steel grades. The following aspects are presented: the main mechanical properties (tensile and Charpy) as per the requirements of the standards for pressure equipment; some examples of use of these modern steels in the industry are given; the limitations of the forming conditions are considered; the weldability aspects and welds properties are developed; the interest of the PWHT (Post Weld Heat Treatment) is discussed. (orig.)

  5. Mechanical Properties of Thermally Aged Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds and Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Conventional test methods for tensile and J-R properties of such weld require large size specimens. Meanwhile, small punch (SP) test has advantages of using small size samples at specific location. In this study, the mechanical property changes caused by the thermal aging were evaluated for the stainless steel welds and CASSs using tensile, J-R, and SP test. Based on the results, correlations were developed to estimate the fracture toughness using the load-displacement curve of SP tests. Finally, the fracture surfaces of compact tension (CT) and SP test specimens are compared and discussed in view of the effect of thermal aging on microstructure. Stainless steel welds of ER316L and ER347 as well as CASS (CF8M) were thermally aged at 400 .deg. C for 5,000 h. So far, tensile properties and fracture toughness of un-aged materials were carried out at room temperature and 320 .deg. C as a reference data. In order to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on mechanical properties, aged specimens are being tested and the changes in these properties will be discussed. In addition, correlations will be developed to estimate the fracture toughness in between J-R curve and SP curve

  6. 77 FR 28568 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; North American Stainless, (Stainless Steel), Ghent, KY

    2012-05-15

    ... public comment has been given in the Federal Register (76 FR 66684-66685, 10-27-2011) and the application... Steel), Ghent, KY Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as... authority to establish a special-purpose subzone at the stainless steel mill of North American...

  7. Magnetic properties of stainless steels at room and cryogenic temperatures

    The magnetic properties of ten types of ferritic and martensitic stainless steels have been measured at room temperature and at 77 K. The steel samples studied were in the annealed state as received from the manufacturer. Our room temperature measurements indicate significantly harder magnetic properties than those quoted in the ASM International Handbook, which studied fully annealed stainless steel samples. Despite having harder magnetic properties than fully annealed steels some of the as-received steels still display soft magnetic properties adequate for magnetic applications. The carbon content of the steels was found to affect the permeability and coercive force, with lower-carbon steels displaying significantly higher permeability and lower coercive force. The decrease in coercive force with reduced carbon content is attributed to fewer carbide inclusions which inhibit domain wall motion. Cooling to 77 K resulted in harder magnetic properties. Averaged over the ten steels tested the maximum permeability decreased by 8%, the coercive force increased by 14%, and the residual and saturation flux densities increased by 4% and 3%, respectively. The change in coercive force when cooled is comparable to the theoretical prediction for iron, based on a model of domain wall motion inhibited by inclusions. The modest changes of the magnetic properties indicate that the stainless steels can still be used in magnetic applications at very low temperatures.

  8. Experimental study on the emissivity of stainless steel

    The emissivity of material is a very important parameter for thermal radiative heat transfer. The emissivities of stainless steel 316L and 304 were measured as a fuction of surface temperature and heating time of test section by indirect method using the infrared thermometer. The error range of experiment is within 3∼10% and most of errors were occurred in measuring the surface temperature by thermocouple. The range of temperature for the experiment was 50∼540.deg. C and the emissivities of stainless steel 316L and 304 were increased along with the increase of surface temperature, and the increase rates for two materials were approximately the same and the value was about 1.31x10-4(1/.deg. C). The emissivity of stainless steel 316L with surface roughness 4.1μm was between 0.44 and 0.51, and the emissivity of stainless steel 304 with surface roughness 2.0μm was between 0.32 and 0.38 in this temperature range. The emissivity of stainless steel 304 was gradually increased by a value of 0.03 at 395.deg. C for 266 hours

  9. Aging of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. The existing data are evaluated to determine the expected embrittlement of cast components during the operating lifetime of reactors and to define the objectives and scope of the investigation. This presentation describes the status of the program. Data for the metallurgical characterization of the various cast stainless steels used in the investigation are presented. Charpy impact tests on short-term aged material indicate that CF-3 stainless steels are less susceptible to embrittlement than CF-8 or CF-8M stainless steels. Microstructural characterization of cast stainless steels that were obtained from Georg Fischer Co. and aged for up to 70,000 h at 300, 350, and 4000C reveals the formation of four different types of precipitates that are not α'. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase is primarily due to pinning of the dislocations by two of these precipitates, designated as Type M and Type X. The ferrite phase is embrittled after approx. 8 y at 3000C and shows cleavage fracture. Examination of the fracture surfaces of the impact-test specimens indicates that the toughness of the long-term aged material is determined by the austenite phase. 8 figures, 3 tables

  10. Aging of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels operating conditions. The existing data are evaluated to determine the expected embrittlement of cast components during the operating lifetime of reactors and to define the objectives and scope of the investigation. This presentation describes the status of the program. Data for the metallurgical characterization of the various cast stainless steels used in the investigation are presented. Charpy impact tests on short-term aged material indicate that CF-3 stainless steels are less susceptible to embrittlement than CF-8 or CF-8M stainless steels. Microstructural characterization of cast stainless steels that were obtained from Georg Fischer Co. and aged for up to 70 000 h at 300, 350 and 4000C reveals the formation of four different types of precipitates that are not α'. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase is primarily due to pinning of the dislocations by two of these precipitates, designated as Type M and Type X. The ferrite phase is embrittled after proportional 8 y at 3000C and shows cleavage fracture. Examination of the fracture surfaces of the impact test specimens indicates that the toughness of the long-term aged material is determined by the austenitic phase. (orig./HP)