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Sample records for 15n nmr relaxation

  1. Backbone dynamics of free barnase and its complex with barstar determined by 15N NMR relaxation study.

    Sahu, S C; Bhuyan, A K; Udgaonkar, J B; Hosur, R V

    2000-10-01

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly 15N-labeled free barnase and its complex with unlabelled barstar have been studied at 40 degrees C, pH 6.6, using 15N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D [1H]-15N NMR spectroscopy. 15N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R1), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R2), and steady-state heteronuclear [1H]-15N NOEs have been measured at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla for 91 residues of free barnase and for 90 residues out of a total of 106 in the complex (excluding three prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide 15N sites of barnase. The primary relaxation data for both the cases have been analyzed in the framework of the model-free formalism using both isotropic and axially symmetric models of the rotational diffusion tensor. As per the latter, the overall rotational correlation times (tau(m)) are 5.0 and 9.5 ns for the free and complexed barnase, respectively. The average order parameter is found to be 0.80 for free barnase and 0.86 for the complex. However, the changes are not uniform along the backbone and for about 5 residues near the binding interface there is actually a significant decrease in the order parameters on complex formation. These residues are not involved in the actual binding. For the residues where the order parameter increases, the magnitudes vary significantly. It is observed that the complex has much less internal mobility, compared to free barnase. From the changes in the order parameters, the entropic contribution of NH bond vector motion to the free energy of complex formation has been calculated. It is apparent that these motion's cause significant unfavorable contributions and therefore must be compensated by many other favorable contributions to effect tight complex formation. The observed variations in the motion and their different locations with regard to the binding interface may have important implications for remote effects and regulation of the enzyme action. PMID

  2. Backbone dynamics of free barnase and its complex with barstar determined by 15N NMR relaxation study

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly 15N-labeled free barnase and its complex with unlabelled barstar have been studied at 40 deg. C, pH 6.6, using 15N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D {1H}-15N NMR spectroscopy. 15N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R1), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R2), and steady-state heteronuclear {1H}-15N NOEs have been measured at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla for 91 residues of free barnase and for 90 residues out of a total of 106 in the complex (excluding three prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide 15N sites of barnase. The primary relaxation data for both the cases have been analyzed in the framework of the model-free formalism using both isotropic and axially symmetric models of the rotational diffusion tensor. As per the latter, the overall rotational correlation times (τm) are 5.0 and 9.5 ns for the free and complexed barnase, respectively. The average order parameter is found to be 0.80 for free barnase and 0.86 for the complex. However, the changes are not uniform along the backbone and for about 5 residues near the binding interface there is actually a significant decrease in the order parameters on complex formation. These residues are not involved in the actual binding. For the residues where the order parameter increases, the magnitudes vary significantly. It is observed that the complex has much less internal mobility, compared to free barnase. From the changes in the order parameters, the entropic contribution of NH bond vector motion to the free energy of complex formation has been calculated. It is apparent that these motions cause significant unfavorable contributions and therefore must be compensated by many other favorable contributions to effect tight complex formation. The observed variations in the motion and their different locations with regard to the binding interface may have important implications for remote effects and regulation of the enzyme action

  3. Backbone dynamics of free barnase and its complex with barstar determined by 15N NMR relaxation study

    Sahu, Sarata C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India); Bhuyan, Abani K.; Udgaonkar, Jayant B. [University of Agricultural Sciences (UAS), National Centre for Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (India); Hosur, R.V. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2000-10-15

    Backbone dynamics of uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled free barnase and its complex with unlabelled barstar have been studied at 40 deg. C, pH 6.6, using {sup 15}N relaxation data obtained from proton-detected 2D {l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace}-{sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy. {sup 15}N spin-lattice relaxation rate constants (R{sub 1}), spin-spin relaxation rate constants (R{sub 2}), and steady-state heteronuclear {l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace}-{sup 15}N NOEs have been measured at a magnetic field strength of 14.1 Tesla for 91 residues of free barnase and for 90 residues out of a total of 106 in the complex (excluding three prolines and the N-terminal residue) backbone amide {sup 15}N sites of barnase. The primary relaxation data for both the cases have been analyzed in the framework of the model-free formalism using both isotropic and axially symmetric models of the rotational diffusion tensor. As per the latter, the overall rotational correlation times ({tau}{sub m}) are 5.0 and 9.5 ns for the free and complexed barnase, respectively. The average order parameter is found to be 0.80 for free barnase and 0.86 for the complex. However, the changes are not uniform along the backbone and for about 5 residues near the binding interface there is actually a significant decrease in the order parameters on complex formation. These residues are not involved in the actual binding. For the residues where the order parameter increases, the magnitudes vary significantly. It is observed that the complex has much less internal mobility, compared to free barnase. From the changes in the order parameters, the entropic contribution of NH bond vector motion to the free energy of complex formation has been calculated. It is apparent that these motions cause significant unfavorable contributions and therefore must be compensated by many other favorable contributions to effect tight complex formation. The observed variations in the motion and their different locations with regard to the binding interface

  4. 15N NMR relaxation studies of calcium-loaded parvalbumin show tight dynamics compared to those of other EF-hand proteins

    Baldellon, C; Alattia, J R; Strub, M P;

    1998-01-01

    Dynamics of the rat alpha-parvalbumin calcium-loaded form have been determined by measurement of 15N nuclear relaxation using proton-detected heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. The relaxation data were analyzed using spectral density functions and the Lipari-Szabo formalism. The major dynamic features...

  5. Effects of ion binding on the backbone dynamics of calbindin D9k determined by 15N NMR relaxation.

    Akke, M; Skelton, N J; Kördel, J; Palmer, A G; Chazin, W J

    1993-09-21

    The backbone dynamics of apo- and (Cd2+)1-calbindin D9k have been characterized by 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation rate constants and steady-state [1H]-15N nuclear Overhauser effects were measured at a magnetic field strength of 11.74 T by two-dimensional, proton-detected heteronuclear NMR experiments using 15N-enriched samples. The relaxation parameters were analyzed using a model-free formalism that characterizes the dynamics of the N-H bond vectors in terms of generalized order parameters and effective correlation times. The data for the apo and (Cd2+)1 states were compared to those for the (Ca2+)2 state [Kördel, J., Skelton, N. J., Akke, M., Palmer, A. G., & Chazin, W. J. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 4856-4866] to ascertain the effects on ion ligation on the backbone dynamics of calbindin D9k. The two binding loops respond differently to ligation by metal ions: high-frequency (10(9)-10(12) s-1) fluctuations of the N-terminal ion-binding loop are not affected by ion binding, whereas residues G57, D58, G59, and E60 in the C-terminal ion-binding loop have significantly lower order parameters in the apo state than in the metal-bound states. The dynamical responses of the four helices to binding of ions are much smaller than that for the C-terminal binding loop, with the strongest effect on helix III, which is located between the linker loop and binding site II. Significant fluctuations on slower time scales also were detected in the unoccupied N-terminal ion-binding loop of the apo and (Cd2+)1 states; the apparent rates were greater for the (Cd2+)1 state. These results on the dynamical response to ion binding in calbindin D9k provide insights into the molecular details of the binding process and qualitative evidence for entropic contributions to the cooperative phenomenon of calcium binding for the pathway in which the ion binds first in the C-terminal site. PMID:8373781

  6. Backbone dynamics of a biologically active human FGF-1 monomer, complexed to a hexasaccharide heparin-analogue, by {sup 15}N NMR relaxation methods

    Canales-Mayordomo, Angeles; Fayos, Rosa [Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC, Departamento de Estructura y Funcion de Proteinas (Spain); Angulo, Jesus; Ojeda, Rafael [Instituto de Investigaciones Quimicas, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain); Martin-Pastor, Manuel [Unidad de RM y Unidad de RMN de Biomoleculas Asociada al CSIC, Laboratorio de Estructura e Estructura de Biomoleculas Jose Carracido (Spain); Nieto, Pedro M.; Martin-Lomas, Manuel [Instituto de Investigaciones Quimicas, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain); Lozano, Rosa; Gimenez-Gallego, Guillermo; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC, Departamento de Estructura y Funcion de Proteinas (Spain)], E-mail: jjbarbero@cib.csic.es

    2006-08-15

    The binding site and backbone dynamics of a bioactive complex formed by the acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) and a specifically designed heparin hexasaccharide has been investigated by HSQC and relaxation NMR methods. The comparison of the relaxation data for the free and bound states has allowed showing that the complex is monomeric, and still induces mutagenesis, and that the protein backbone presents reduced motion in different timescale in its bound state, except in certain points that are involved in the interaction with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)

  7. Structure determination of uniformly 13C, 15N labeled protein using qualitative distance restraints from MAS solid-state 13C-NMR observed paramagnetic relaxation enhancement

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful method for structure determination of insoluble biomolecules. However, structure determination by MAS solid-state NMR remains challenging because it is difficult to obtain a sufficient amount of distance restraints owing to spectral complexity. Collection of distance restraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is a promising approach to alleviate this barrier. However, the precision of distance restraints provided by PRE is limited in solid-state NMR because of incomplete averaged interactions and intermolecular PREs. In this report, the backbone structure of the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1) has been successfully determined by combining the CS-Rosetta protocol and qualitative PRE restraints. The derived structure has a Cα RMSD of 1.49 Å relative to the X-ray structure. It is noteworthy that our protocol can determine the correct structure from only three cysteine-EDTA-Mn2+ mutants because this number of PRE sites is insufficient when using a conventional structure calculation method based on restrained molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. This study shows that qualitative PRE restraints can be employed effectively for protein structure determination from a limited conformational sampling space using a protein fragment library

  8. Measurement of {sup 15}N relaxation in deuterated amide groups in proteins using direct nitrogen detection

    Vasos, Paul R.; Hall, Jennifer B. [University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center for Biomolecular Structure and Organization (United States); Kuemmerle, Rainer [Bruker Biospin AG, NMR Division (Switzerland); Fushman, David [University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center for Biomolecular Structure and Organization (United States)], E-mail: fushman@umd.edu

    2006-09-15

    {sup 15}N chemical shielding tensors contain useful structural information, and their knowledge is essential for accurate analysis of protein backbone dynamics. The anisotropic component (CSA) of {sup 15}N chemical shielding can be obtained from {sup 15}N relaxation measurements in solution. However, the predominant contribution to nitrogen relaxation from {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H dipolar coupling in amide groups limits the sensitivity of these measurements to the actual CSA values. Here we present nitrogen-detected NMR experiments for measuring {sup 15}N relaxation in deuterated amide groups in proteins, where the dipolar contribution to {sup 15}N relaxation is significantly reduced by the deuteration. Under these conditions nitrogen spin relaxation becomes a sensitive probe for variations in {sup 15}N chemical shielding tensors. Using the nitrogen direct-detection experiments we measured the rates of longitudinal and transverse {sup 15}N relaxation for backbone amides in protein G in D{sub 2}O at 11.7 T. The measured relaxation rates are validated by comparing the overall rotational diffusion tensor obtained from these data with that from the conventional {sup 15}N relaxation measurements in H{sub 2}O. This analysis revealed a 17-24{sup o} angle between the NH-bond and the unique axis of the {sup 15}N chemical shielding tensor.

  9. Measurement of 15N relaxation in deuterated amide groups in proteins using direct nitrogen detection

    15N chemical shielding tensors contain useful structural information, and their knowledge is essential for accurate analysis of protein backbone dynamics. The anisotropic component (CSA) of 15N chemical shielding can be obtained from 15N relaxation measurements in solution. However, the predominant contribution to nitrogen relaxation from 15N-1H dipolar coupling in amide groups limits the sensitivity of these measurements to the actual CSA values. Here we present nitrogen-detected NMR experiments for measuring 15N relaxation in deuterated amide groups in proteins, where the dipolar contribution to 15N relaxation is significantly reduced by the deuteration. Under these conditions nitrogen spin relaxation becomes a sensitive probe for variations in 15N chemical shielding tensors. Using the nitrogen direct-detection experiments we measured the rates of longitudinal and transverse 15N relaxation for backbone amides in protein G in D2O at 11.7 T. The measured relaxation rates are validated by comparing the overall rotational diffusion tensor obtained from these data with that from the conventional 15N relaxation measurements in H2O. This analysis revealed a 17-24o angle between the NH-bond and the unique axis of the 15N chemical shielding tensor

  10. Dynamics of a truncated prion protein, PrP(113–231), from 15N NMR relaxation: Order parameters calculated and slow conformational fluctuations localized to a distinct region

    O'Sullivan, Denis B D; Jones, Christopher E; Abdelraheim, Salama R; Brazier, Marcus W; Toms, Harold; Brown, David R; Viles, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Prion diseases are associated with the misfolding of the prion protein (PrPC) from a largely α-helical isoform to a β-sheet rich oligomer (PrPSc). Flexibility of the polypeptide could contribute to the ability of PrPC to undergo the conformational rearrangement during PrPC–PrPSc interactions, which then leads to the misfolded isoform. We have therefore examined the molecular motions of mouse PrPC, residues 113–231, in solution, using 15N NMR relaxation measurements. A truncated fragment has b...

  11. Internal protein dynamics on ps to μs timescales as studied by multi-frequency 15N solid-state NMR relaxation

    A comprehensive analysis of the dynamics of the SH3 domain of chicken alpha-spectrin is presented, based upon 15N T1 and on- and off-resonance T1ρ relaxation times obtained on deuterated samples with a partial back-exchange of labile protons under a variety of the experimental conditions, taking explicitly into account the dipolar order parameters calculated from 15N–1H dipole–dipole couplings. It is demonstrated that such a multi-frequency approach enables access to motional correlation times spanning about 6 orders of magnitude. We asses the validity of different motional models based upon orientation autocorrelation functions with a different number of motional components. We find that for many residues a “two components” model is not sufficient for a good description of the data and more complicated fitting models must be considered. We show that slow motions with correlation times on the order of 1–10 μs can be determined reliably in spite of rather low apparent amplitudes (below 1 %), and demonstrate that the distribution of the protein backbone mobility along the time scale axis is pronouncedly non-uniform and non-monotonic: two domains of fast (τ −10 s) and intermediate (10−9 s −7 s) motions are separated by a gap of one order of magnitude in time with almost no motions. For slower motions (τ > 10−6 s) we observe a sharp ∼1 order of magnitude decrease of the apparent motional amplitudes. Such a distribution obviously reflects different nature of backbone motions on different time scales, where the slow end may be attributed to weakly populated “excited states.” Surprisingly, our data reveal no clearly evident correlations between secondary structure of the protein and motional parameters. We also could not notice any unambiguous correlations between motions in different time scales along the protein backbone emphasizing the importance of the inter-residue interactions and the cooperative nature of protein dynamics

  12. Internal protein dynamics on ps to μs timescales as studied by multi-frequency {sup 15}N solid-state NMR relaxation

    Zinkevich, Tatiana [Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, NMRGroup, Faculty of Natural Sciences II, Institut für Physik (Germany); Chevelkov, Veniamin [Max-Planck-Institut für Biophysikalische Chemie (Germany); Reif, Bernd [Technische Universität München, Department Chemie (Germany); Saalwächter, Kay; Krushelnitsky, Alexey, E-mail: krushelnitsky@physik.uni-halle.de [Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, NMRGroup, Faculty of Natural Sciences II, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2013-09-19

    A comprehensive analysis of the dynamics of the SH3 domain of chicken alpha-spectrin is presented, based upon {sup 15}N T{sub 1} and on- and off-resonance T{sub 1ρ} relaxation times obtained on deuterated samples with a partial back-exchange of labile protons under a variety of the experimental conditions, taking explicitly into account the dipolar order parameters calculated from {sup 15}N–{sup 1}H dipole–dipole couplings. It is demonstrated that such a multi-frequency approach enables access to motional correlation times spanning about 6 orders of magnitude. We asses the validity of different motional models based upon orientation autocorrelation functions with a different number of motional components. We find that for many residues a “two components” model is not sufficient for a good description of the data and more complicated fitting models must be considered. We show that slow motions with correlation times on the order of 1–10 μs can be determined reliably in spite of rather low apparent amplitudes (below 1 %), and demonstrate that the distribution of the protein backbone mobility along the time scale axis is pronouncedly non-uniform and non-monotonic: two domains of fast (τ < 10{sup −10} s) and intermediate (10{sup −9} s < τ < 10{sup −7} s) motions are separated by a gap of one order of magnitude in time with almost no motions. For slower motions (τ > 10{sup −6} s) we observe a sharp ∼1 order of magnitude decrease of the apparent motional amplitudes. Such a distribution obviously reflects different nature of backbone motions on different time scales, where the slow end may be attributed to weakly populated “excited states.” Surprisingly, our data reveal no clearly evident correlations between secondary structure of the protein and motional parameters. We also could not notice any unambiguous correlations between motions in different time scales along the protein backbone emphasizing the importance of the inter

  13. Synthesis and NMR characterization of (15N)taurine [2-(15N)aminoethanesulfonic acid

    The title compound was prepared in three steps with 55% overall yield starting from potassium (15N)phthalimide. The synthetic route involved reaction with 1,2-dibromoethane, hydrolysis of the resulting N-(2-bromoethyl) (15N)phthalimide with HBr and treatment of the 2-bromoethyl(15N)amine thus formed with sodium sulphite. The product was characterized by 13C, 1H and 15N NMR spectroscopy. The absolute coupling constants of 15N with the 13C nuclei and the non-exchanging protons were determined and an unambiguous assignment of the proton signals obtained. (author)

  14. Multinuclear NMR of 15 N labelled organic molecules

    The paper presents the application of multinuclear NMR techniques to the study of 15 N labeled organic molecules. There are some important points of great interest in such type of research, namely, structure determination, i.e. location of the 15 N in molecule and determination of 15 N concentration in order to obtain quantitative results about the intramolecular short and long range interaction. Different NMR techniques were used in the study of 13 C, 1 H and 15 N. Obtaining the 15 N NMR signal imposes some special preparation of the spectrometer. First, we had to manage a very large spectral window (-400 to +1200 ppm) which makes difficult finding the signal. Secondly, in the condition of proton decoupling, in a very large band, a decrease of the signal can occur due to the NOE negative effect. To avoid this effect, other decoupling method, called 'inverse gated 1 H decoupling' was used. As a reference, for 15 N, we used CH3NO2, fixed at 0 ppm. In order to find the suitable spectral window we used the formamide (15 N). The results of obtaining the 15 N-labeled procaine are presented. (author)

  15. Measurement of 15N relaxation rates in perdeuterated proteins by TROSY-based methods

    While extracting dynamics parameters from backbone 15N relaxation measurements in proteins has become routine over the past two decades, it is increasingly recognized that accurate quantitative analysis can remain limited by the potential presence of systematic errors associated with the measurement of 15N R1 and R2 or R1ρ relaxation rates as well as heteronuclear 15N-{1H} NOE values. We show that systematic errors in such measurements can be far larger than the statistical error derived from either the observed signal-to-noise ratio, or from the reproducibility of the measurement. Unless special precautions are taken, the problem of systematic errors is shown to be particularly acute in perdeuterated systems, and even more so when TROSY instead of HSQC elements are used to read out the 15N magnetization through the NMR-sensitive 1H nucleus. A discussion of the most common sources of systematic errors is presented, as well as TROSY-based pulse schemes that appear free of systematic errors to the level of 2′/R1′ ratios fit an axially symmetric diffusion tensor with a Pearson’s correlation coefficient of 0.97, comparable to fits obtained for backbone amide RDCs to the Saupe matrix.

  16. Structure determination of uniformly {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeled protein using qualitative distance restraints from MAS solid-state {sup 13}C-NMR observed paramagnetic relaxation enhancement

    Tamaki, Hajime [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Life Science (Japan); Egawa, Ayako [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Kido, Kouki [Hokkaido University, Graduate School of Life Science (Japan); Kameda, Tomoshi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Biotechnology Research Institute for Drug Discovery (Japan); Kamiya, Masakatsu; Kikukawa, Takashi; Aizawa, Tomoyasu [Hokkaido University, Faculty of Advanced Life Science (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshimichi [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Demura, Makoto, E-mail: demura@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Hokkaido University, Faculty of Advanced Life Science (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful method for structure determination of insoluble biomolecules. However, structure determination by MAS solid-state NMR remains challenging because it is difficult to obtain a sufficient amount of distance restraints owing to spectral complexity. Collection of distance restraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is a promising approach to alleviate this barrier. However, the precision of distance restraints provided by PRE is limited in solid-state NMR because of incomplete averaged interactions and intermolecular PREs. In this report, the backbone structure of the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1) has been successfully determined by combining the CS-Rosetta protocol and qualitative PRE restraints. The derived structure has a Cα RMSD of 1.49 Å relative to the X-ray structure. It is noteworthy that our protocol can determine the correct structure from only three cysteine-EDTA-Mn{sup 2+} mutants because this number of PRE sites is insufficient when using a conventional structure calculation method based on restrained molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. This study shows that qualitative PRE restraints can be employed effectively for protein structure determination from a limited conformational sampling space using a protein fragment library.

  17. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  18. COVALENT BINDING OF REDUCED METABOLITES OF [15N3] TNT TO SOIL ORGANIC MATTER DURING A BIOREMEDIATION PROCESS ANALYZED BY 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY. (R826646)

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding ofbiologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-15N3-trinitrotoluene(TNT) to different soil fractions (humic acids, fulvicacids, and humin) using liquid 15N NMR spectroscopy. Asilylation p...

  19. NMR spectroscopic studies of 15N labelled geminally disubstituted cyclotriphosphazenes

    It is demonstrated by means of some selected 15N labelled geminally disubstituted cyclotriphosphazenes, 15N3P3X4Y2 (X = Cl; Y = F, NH2, or SEt), as an example, that the coupling constants 1Jsub(PN) may be of different signs. The absolute value of 1Jsub(PN) is significantly influenced only by those substituents, which are bonded to the phosphorus nucleus directly concerned in the coupling. Also the 15N chemical shifts are only changed by substituents on directly bonded phosphorus atoms. (author)

  20. Direct measurement of the 15N CSA/dipolar relaxation interference from coupled HSQC spectra

    Here we propose a method for the measurement of the 15N CSA/dipolar relaxation interference based on direct comparison of the 15N doublet components observed in a 1H-coupled 1H-15N HSQC-type spectrum. This allows the determination of the cross-correlation rates with no need for correction factors associated with other methods. The signal overlap problem of coupled HSQC spectra is addressed here by using the IPAP scheme (Ottiger et al., 1998). The approach is applied to the B3 domain of protein G to show that the method provides accurate measurements of the 15N CSA/dipolar cross-correlation rates

  1. Temperature {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N NMR and CP/MAS {sup 15}N NMR spectra of benzotriazole derivatives - prototropic tautomerism; Widma temperaturowe {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N NMR oraz CP/MAS {sup 15}N NMR pochodnych benzotriazolu - tautomeria prototropowa

    Wiench, J.W.; Stefaniak, L. [Inst. Chemii Organicznej, Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The prototropic tautomerism in benzotriazole derivatives solutions has been investigated in different temperatures by means of {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N NMR and {sup 15}N CP/MAS NMR spectra. The ratio of different tautomeric forms and kinetics of proton exchange have been measured for the systems studied on the base of observed spectroscopic factors. 5 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs.

  2. 15N NMR spectroscopy of Pseudomonas cytochrome c-551

    15N-1H correlation spectroscopy with detection at the 1H frequency has been used at natural abundance to detect nitrogen nuclei bonded to protons in the ferrocytochrome c-551 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 19429). Side-chain aromatic nitrogen, main-chain amides, and side-chain amides have been assigned to specific residues by comparison to previous proton assignments. Assignment ambiguities arising from overlap in the proton dimension have been resolved by examining spectra as a function of temperature and pH. Nitrogen chemical shifts are reported at pH 4.6 and 9.4 and three temperatures, 32, 50, and 60 degree C. Significant differences arise from the observed protein shifts and expected shifts in the random coil polypeptide

  3. Proton-decoupled CPMG: A better experiment for measuring 15N R2 relaxation in disordered proteins

    Yuwen, Tairan; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R.

    2014-04-01

    15N R2 relaxation is one of the most informative experiments for characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Small changes in nitrogen R2 rates are often used to determine how IDPs respond to various biologically relevant perturbations such as point mutations, posttranslational modifications and weak ligand interactions. However collecting high-quality 15N relaxation data can be difficult. Of necessity, the samples of IDPs are often prepared with low protein concentration and the measurement time can be limited because of rapid sample degradation. Furthermore, due to hardware limitations standard experiments such as 15N spin-lock and CPMG can sample the relaxation decay only to ca. 150 ms. This is much shorter than 15N T2 times in disordered proteins at or near physiological temperature. As a result, the sampling of relaxation decay profiles in these experiments is suboptimal, which further lowers the precision of the measurements. Here we report a new implementation of the proton-decoupled (PD) CPMG experiment which allows one to sample 15N R2 relaxation decay up to ca. 0.5-1 s. The new experiment has been validated through comparison with the well-established spin-lock measurement. Using dilute samples of denatured ubiquitin, we have demonstrated that PD-CPMG produces up to 3-fold improvement in the precision of the data. It is expected that for intrinsically disordered proteins the gains may be even more substantial. We have also shown that this sequence has a number of favorable properties: (i) the spectra are recorded with narrow linewidth in nitrogen dimension; (ii) 15N offset correction is small and easy to calculate; (iii) the experiment is immune to various spurious effects arising from solvent exchange; (iv) the results are stable with respect to pulse miscalibration and rf field inhomogeneity; (v) with minimal change, the pulse sequence can also be used to measure R2 relaxation of 15Nε spins in arginine side chains. We anticipate that

  4. Direct measurement of the {sup 15}N CSA/dipolar relaxation interference from coupled HSQC spectra

    Hall, Jennifer B. [University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center of Biomolecular Structure and Organization (United States); Dayie, Kwaku T. [Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Department of Molecular Biology, Center for Structural Biology (United States); Fushman, David [University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center of Biomolecular Structure and Organization (United States)], E-mail: fushman@wam.umd.edu

    2003-06-15

    Here we propose a method for the measurement of the {sup 15}N CSA/dipolar relaxation interference based on direct comparison of the {sup 15}N doublet components observed in a {sup 1}H-coupled {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC-type spectrum. This allows the determination of the cross-correlation rates with no need for correction factors associated with other methods. The signal overlap problem of coupled HSQC spectra is addressed here by using the IPAP scheme (Ottiger et al., 1998). The approach is applied to the B3 domain of protein G to show that the method provides accurate measurements of the {sup 15}N CSA/dipolar cross-correlation rates.

  5. λ cro repressor complex with O/sub R/3 DNA: 15N NMR observations

    15N NMR studies of the coliphage λ cro repressor are presented. The protein has been uniformly labeled with 15N, and individual amino acids have been incorporated. Although the four C-terminal residues (63-66) were not located in the original crystallographic studies of the protein it has been proposed that the C-terminus is involved in DNA binding. These experiments give direct verification of that proposal. [15N] Amide resonances are assigned for residues 56, 62, 63, and 66 in the C-terminus by enzymatic digestion and by 13C-15N double-labeling experiments. 15N{1H} nuclear Overhauser effects show that the C-terminus is mobile on a nanosecond time scale. Exchange experiments using distortionless enhancement via polarization transfer, which is sensitive to proton exchange on the 1/J/sub NH/(10 ms) time scale, indicate that the amide protons in the C-terminus are freely accessible to solvent. It is thus a flexible arm in solution. The binding of both specific operator and nonspecific DNA is shown to reduce both the mobility and the degree of solvent exposure of this arm. Two-dimensional 15N-1H correlation experiments using 15N-labeled cro reveal inconsistencies with previously reported 1H NMR assignments for the lysine amides. This result suggests that those assignments require reexamination, illustrating the utility of 15N labeling for obtaining 1H resonance assignments of biomolecules. Furthermore, isomerization of the peptide bond of Pro-59, which has been previously suggested and which would significantly affect the properties of the C-terminal arm, is shown to not occur

  6. Recent advances in the application of 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy to soil organic matter studies

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been applied to many studies in soil science, geochemistry, and environmental science. In recent years, the study of soil organic matter (SOM) using NMR techniques has progressed rapidly. NMR spectroscopy has been used to study chemical changes of SOM during decomposition, and also of soil extract fractions such as humic acid and fulvic acid. NMR spectroscopy of soils has improved rapidly in recent years with the introduction of pre-treatment and particle-size fractionation. In addition to routine liquid- and solid-state 13C NMR applications, 15N NMR spectra of natural abundant samples have been reported, but 15N-enriched material is more convenient to use due to the low natural abundance of 15N. Some newly developed NMR techniques have also been utilised, such as 2-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and improved 1H NMR techniques. These are reviewed and commented on in this paper. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Publishing

  7. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    Jones, R.A. [Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  8. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of phenazopyridine derivatives.

    Burgueño-Tapia, Eleuterio; Mora-Pérez, Yolanda; Morales-Ríos, Martha S; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2005-03-01

    Phenazopyridine hydrochloride (1), a drug in clinical use for many decades, and some derivatives were studied by one- and two-dimensional (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR methodology. The assignments, combined with DFT calculations, reveal that the preferred protonation site of the drug is the pyridine ring nitrogen atom. The chemoselective acetylation of phenazopyridine (2) and its influence on the polarization of the azo nitrogen atoms were evidenced by the (15)N NMR spectra. Molecular calculations of the phenazopyridines 2-4 show that the pyridine and phenyl groups are oriented in an antiperiplanar conformation with intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the N-b atom and the C-2 amino group preserving the E-azo stereochemistry. PMID:15625718

  9. 15N Solid-State NMR as a Probe of Flavin H-bonding

    Cui, Dongtao; Koder, Ronald L.; Dutton, P. Leslie; Miller, Anne-Frances

    2011-01-01

    Flavins mediate a wide variety of different chemical reactions in biology. To learn how one cofactor can be made to execute different reactions in different enzymes, we are developing solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to probe the flavin electronic structure, via the 15N chemical shift tensor principal values (δii). We find that SSNMR has superior responsiveness to H-bonds, compared to solution NMR. H-bonding to a model of the flavodoxin active site produced an increase of 10 ppm in the δ11 of N5 altho...

  10. Non-uniform sampling of NMR relaxation data

    Schwarz-Linnet, Troels; Teilum, Kaare

    2016-01-01

    The use of non-uniform sampling of NMR spectra may give significant reductions in the data acquisition time. For quantitative experiments such as the measurement of spin relaxation rates, non-uniform sampling is however not widely used as inaccuracies in peak intensities may lead to errors...... in the extracted dynamic parameters. By systematic reducing the coverage of the Nyquist grid of (15)N Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion datasets for four different proteins and performing a full data analysis of the resulting non-uniform sampled datasets, we have compared the performance...... reconstructs the non-uniform sampled spectra with high accuracy. For two of the four analyzed datasets, a coverage of only 20 % results in essentially the same results as the fully sampled data. As exemplified by other data, such a low coverage is in general not enough to produce reliable results. We find...

  11. Changes in Rhodospirillum rubrum cytochrome c2 and subsequent renaturation: An 15N NMR study

    The 15N-enriched ferrocytochrome c2from Rhodospirillum rubrum was studied by 15N NMR at different solvent pH values. The mobility and chemical shift to the N-terminal glutamic acid (335.4 ppm at pH 5.1) were found to depend on pH. It was least mobile between pH 8 and 9.0, which is explained in terms of pH-dependent conformational changes and formation of salt linkages and/or hydrogen bonds. The resonances of the lysine side chains are centered around 341.7 ppm at low pH and move upfield with pH by about 8.4 ppm with pH/sub a/ values of 10.8. The exchange rates of the εNH protons are lowest near the pK/sub a/ values. The protein is very stable in the pH range between 4.9 and 10.0 but unfolds abruptly at pH 10.5-11. Denaturation was verified by the measurement of several parameters by NMR. The renaturation of the protein demonstrates that the folding begins with reformation of home coordination and establishment of a hydrophobic core, followed by positioning of side chains and peptide backbones linking the nucleation centers. The repositioning processes had time scales of minutes to hours in contrast to the reported values of seconds in some studies

  12. In Vivo Measurements of NMR Relaxation Times

    Kroeker, Randall M.; Mcveigh, Elliot R.; Hardy, Peter; Bronskill, Michael J.; Henkelman, R. Mark

    1985-01-01

    A series of solenoidal NMR probes were built to measure T1 and T2 relaxation times in vivo in the mouse, over the frequency range of 5 to 60 MHz, using inversion-recovery and spin-echo pulse sequences. KHT tumors growing in the legs of C3H mice were studied and compared with normal mouse legs. The tumor relaxation times were studied at 10 MHz during the course of tumor growth and as a function of frequency when the tumor had a mass of approximately 0.9 g. Mouse legs with tumors have higher T1...

  13. An optimized method for {sup 15}N R{sub 1} relaxation rate measurements in non-deuterated proteins

    Gairí, Margarida, E-mail: mgairi@rmn.ub.edu [University of Barcelona (CCiTUB), NMR Facility, Scientific and Technological Centers (Spain); Dyachenko, Andrey [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB) (Spain); González, M. Teresa; Feliz, Miguel [University of Barcelona (CCiTUB), NMR Facility, Scientific and Technological Centers (Spain); Pons, Miquel [University of Barcelona, Biomolecular NMR Laboratory and Organic Chemistry Department (Spain); Giralt, Ernest, E-mail: ernest.giralt@irbbarcelona.org [Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB) (Spain)

    2015-06-15

    {sup 15}N longitudinal relaxation rates are extensively used for the characterization of protein dynamics; however, their accurate measurement is hindered by systematic errors. {sup 15}N CSA/{sup 1}H–{sup 15}N dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CC) and amide proton exchange saturation transfer from water protons are the two main sources of systematic errors in the determination of {sup 15}N R{sub 1} rates through {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N HSQC-based experiments. CC is usually suppressed through a train of 180° proton pulses applied during the variable {sup 15}N relaxation period (T), which can perturb water magnetization. Thus CC cancellation is required in such a way as to minimize water saturation effects. Here we examined the level of water saturation during the T period caused by various types of inversion proton pulses to suppress CC: (I) amide-selective IBURP-2; (II) cosine-modulated IBURP-2; (III) Watergate-like blocks; and (IV) non-selective hard. We additionally demonstrate the effect of uncontrolled saturation of aliphatic protons on {sup 15}N R{sub 1} rates. In this paper we present an optimized pulse sequence that takes into account the crucial effect of controlling also the saturation of the aliphatic protons during {sup 15}N R{sub 1} measurements in non-deuterated proteins. We show that using cosine-modulated IBURP-2 pulses spaced 40 ms to cancel CC in this optimized pulse program is the method of choice to minimize systematic errors coming from water and aliphatic protons saturation effects.

  14. 15N and 1H NMR evidence for multiple conformations of the complex of dihydrofolate reductase with its substrate, folate

    The binding of folate to Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase in the presence and absence of NADP+ has been studied by 15N NMR, using [5-15N]folate. In the presence of NADP+, three separate signals were observed for the single 15N atom, in agreement with our earlier evidence from 1H and 13C NMR for multiple conformations of this complex. The 15N spectra of the binary enzyme-folate complex provide evidence for the first time that this complex also exists in at least two conformational states. This is confirmed by the observation of two separate resonances for the 7-proton of bound folate, located by two-dimensional exchange spectroscopy. 15 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 table

  15. NMR experiments for resonance assignments of 13C, 15N doubly-labeled flexible polypeptides: Application to the human prion protein hPrP(23-230)

    A combination of three heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR experiments tailored for sequential resonance assignments in uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled flexible polypeptide chains is described. The 3D (H)N(CO-TOCSY)NH, 3D (H)CA(CO-TOCSY)NH and 3D (H)CBCA(CO-TOCSY)NH schemes make use of the favorable 15N chemical shift dispersion in unfolded polypeptides, exploit the slow transverse 15N relaxation rates of unfolded polypeptides in high resolution constant-time [1H, 15N]-correlation experiments, and use carbonyl carbon homonuclear isotropic mixing to transfer magnetization sequentially along the amino acid sequence. Practical applications are demonstrated with the 100-residue flexible tail of the recombinant human prion protein, making use of spectral resolution up to 0.6 Hz in the 15N dimension, simultaneous correlation with the two adjacent amino acid residues to overcome problems associated with spectral overlap, and the potential of the presently described experiments to establish nearest-neighbor correlations across proline residues in the amino acid sequence

  16. Rapid mass spectrometric analysis of 15N-Leu incorporation fidelity during preparation of specifically labeled NMR samples

    Truhlar, Stephanie M E; Cervantes, Carla F; Torpey, Justin W;

    2008-01-01

    analyzing the isotopic abundance of the peptides in the mass spectra using the program DEX. This analysis determined that expression with a 10-fold excess of unlabeled amino acids relative to the (15)N-amino acid prevents the scrambling of the (15)N label that is observed when equimolar amounts are used......Advances in NMR spectroscopy have enabled the study of larger proteins that typically have significant overlap in their spectra. Specific (15)N-amino acid incorporation is a powerful tool for reducing spectral overlap and attaining reliable sequential assignments. However, scrambling of the label...... during protein expression is a common problem. We describe a rapid method to evaluate the fidelity of specific (15)N-amino acid incorporation. The selectively labeled protein is proteolyzed, and the resulting peptides are analyzed using MALDI mass spectrometry. The (15)N incorporation is determined by...

  17. Combined solid state and solution NMR studies of {alpha},{epsilon}-{sup 15}N labeled bovine rhodopsin

    Werner, Karla; Lehner, Ines [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany); Dhiman, Harpreet Kaur [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology (United States); Richter, Christian; Glaubitz, Clemens; Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany); Khorana, H. Gobind [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Departments of Biology and Chemistry (United States)], E-mail: khorana@mit.edu

    2007-04-15

    Rhodopsin is the visual pigment of the vertebrate rod photoreceptor cell and is the only member of the G protein coupled receptor family for which a crystal structure is available. Towards the study of dynamics in rhodopsin, we report NMR-spectroscopic investigations of {alpha},{epsilon}-{sup 15}N-tryptophan labeled rhodopsin in detergent micelles and reconstituted in phospholipids. Using a combination of solid state {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-REDOR and HETCOR experiments of all possible {sup 13}C'{sub i-1} carbonyl/{sup 15}N{sub i}-tryptophan isotope labeled amide pairs, and H/D exchange {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N-HSQC experiments conducted in solution, we assigned chemical shifts to all five rhodopsin tryptophan backbone {sup 15}N nuclei and partially to their bound protons. {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N chemical shift assignment was achieved for indole side chains of Trp35{sup 1.30} and Trp175{sup 4.65}. {sup 15}N chemical shifts were found to be similar when comparing those obtained in the native like reconstituted lipid environment and those obtained in detergent micelles for all tryptophans except Trp175{sup 4.65} at the membrane interface. The results suggest that the integrated solution and solid state NMR approach presented provides highly complementary information in the study of structure and dynamics of large membrane proteins like rhodopsin.

  18. Rapid mass spectrometric analysis of 15N-Leu incorporation fidelity during preparation of specifically labeled NMR samples

    Truhlar, Stephanie M.E.; Cervantes, Carla F.; Torpey, Justin W.; Kjaergaard, Magnus; Komives, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in NMR spectroscopy have enabled the study of larger proteins that typically have significant overlap in their spectra. Specific 15N-amino acid incorporation is a powerful tool for reducing spectral overlap and attaining reliable sequential assignments. However, scrambling of the label during protein expression is a common problem. We describe a rapid method to evaluate the fidelity of specific 15N-amino acid incorporation. The selectively labeled protein is proteolyzed, and the resulting peptides are analyzed using MALDI mass spectrometry. The 15N incorporation is determined by analyzing the isotopic abundance of the peptides in the mass spectra using the program DEX. This analysis determined that expression with a 10-fold excess of unlabeled amino acids relative to the 15N-amino acid prevents the scrambling of the 15N label that is observed when equimolar amounts are used. MALDI TOF-TOF MS/MS data provide additional information that shows where the “extra” 15N labels are incorporated, which can be useful in confirming ambiguous assignments. The described procedure provides a rapid technique to monitor the fidelity of selective labeling that does not require a lot of protein. These advantages make it an ideal way of determining optimal expression conditions for selectively labeled NMR samples. PMID:18567787

  19. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica.

    Verma, Deepshikha; Bhattacharya, Alok; Chary, Kandala V R

    2016-04-01

    We report almost complete sequence specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a 150-residue long calmodulin-like calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP6), as a prelude to its structural and functional characterization. PMID:26377206

  20. Non-uniform sampling of NMR relaxation data

    The use of non-uniform sampling of NMR spectra may give significant reductions in the data acquisition time. For quantitative experiments such as the measurement of spin relaxation rates, non-uniform sampling is however not widely used as inaccuracies in peak intensities may lead to errors in the extracted dynamic parameters. By systematic reducing the coverage of the Nyquist grid of 15N Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion datasets for four different proteins and performing a full data analysis of the resulting non-uniform sampled datasets, we have compared the performance of the multi-dimensional decomposition and iterative re-weighted least-squares algorithms in reconstructing spectra with accurate peak intensities. As long as a single fully sampled spectrum is included in a series of otherwise non-uniform sampled two-dimensional spectra, multi-dimensional decomposition reconstructs the non-uniform sampled spectra with high accuracy. For two of the four analyzed datasets, a coverage of only 20 % results in essentially the same results as the fully sampled data. As exemplified by other data, such a low coverage is in general not enough to produce reliable results. We find that a coverage level not compromising the final results can be estimated by recording a single full two-dimensional spectrum and reducing the spectrum quality in silico

  1. Non-uniform sampling of NMR relaxation data

    Linnet, Troels E.; Teilum, Kaare, E-mail: kaare.teilum@bio.ku.dk [University of Copenhagen, SBiNLab and the Linderstrøm-Lang Centre for Protein Science, Department of Biology (Denmark)

    2016-02-15

    The use of non-uniform sampling of NMR spectra may give significant reductions in the data acquisition time. For quantitative experiments such as the measurement of spin relaxation rates, non-uniform sampling is however not widely used as inaccuracies in peak intensities may lead to errors in the extracted dynamic parameters. By systematic reducing the coverage of the Nyquist grid of {sup 15}N Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion datasets for four different proteins and performing a full data analysis of the resulting non-uniform sampled datasets, we have compared the performance of the multi-dimensional decomposition and iterative re-weighted least-squares algorithms in reconstructing spectra with accurate peak intensities. As long as a single fully sampled spectrum is included in a series of otherwise non-uniform sampled two-dimensional spectra, multi-dimensional decomposition reconstructs the non-uniform sampled spectra with high accuracy. For two of the four analyzed datasets, a coverage of only 20 % results in essentially the same results as the fully sampled data. As exemplified by other data, such a low coverage is in general not enough to produce reliable results. We find that a coverage level not compromising the final results can be estimated by recording a single full two-dimensional spectrum and reducing the spectrum quality in silico.

  2. Characterization of pH-dependent conformational heterogeneity in Rhodospirillum rubrum cytochrome c2 using 15N and 1H NMR

    The 15N-enriched ferricytochrome c2 from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been studied by 15N and 1H NMR spectroscopy as a function of pH. The 15N resonance of the heme and ligand τ nitrogen are broadened beyond detection because of paramagnetic relaxation. The 15N resonance of the ligand histidine π nitrogen was unambiguously identified at 184 ppm (pH 5.6). The 15N resonances of the single nonligand histidine are observed only at low pH, as in the ferrocytochrome because of the severe broadening caused by tautomerization. The dependence of the 15N and 1H spectra of the ferricytochrome on pH indicated that the ligand histidine π NH does not dissociate in the neutral pH range and is involved in a hydrogen bond, similar to that in the reduced state. Transitions having pKa's of 6.2, 8.6, and 9.2 are observed in the ferricytochrome. Structural heterogeneity leads to multiple resonances of the heme ring methyl at position 8. The exchange rate between the conformations is temperature dependent. The transition with a pKa of 6.2 is assigned to the His-42 imidazole group. The displacement of the ligand methionine causes gross conformational change near the heme center. There are multiple conformations at high pH, as judged by saturation-transfer experiments. The N-terminus of the ferricytochrome has a pKa of 8.6. In contrast to its partially restricted mobility in the reduced state, it is found to be very mobile, reflecting a looser structure of the ferricytochrome

  3. Application of unsymmetrical indirect covariance NMR methods to the computation of the (13)C (15)N HSQC-IMPEACH and (13)C (15)N HMBC-IMPEACH correlation spectra.

    Martin, Gary E; Hilton, Bruce D; Irish, Patrick A; Blinov, Kirill A; Williams, Antony J

    2007-10-01

    Utilization of long-range (1)H--(15)N heteronuclear chemical shift correlation has continually grown in importance since the first applications were reported in 1995. More recently, indirect covariance NMR methods have been introduced followed by the development of unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing methods. The latter technique has been shown to allow the calculation of hyphenated 2D NMR data matrices from more readily acquired nonhyphenated 2D NMR spectra. We recently reported the use of unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing to combine (1)H--(13)C GHSQC and (1)H--(15)N GHMBC long-range spectra to yield a (13)C--(15)N HSQC-HMBC chemical shift correlation spectrum that could not be acquired in a reasonable period of time without resorting to (15)N-labeled molecules. We now report the unsymmetrical indirect covariance processing of (1)H--(13)C GHMBC and (1)H--(15)N IMPEACH spectra to afford a (13)C--(15)N HMBC-IMPEACH spectrum that has the potential to span as many as six to eight bonds. Correlations for carbon resonances long-range coupled to a protonated carbon in the (1)H--(13)C HMBC spectrum are transferred via the long-range (1)H--(15)N coupling pathway in the (1)H--(15)N IMPEACH spectrum to afford a much broader range of correlation possibilities in the (13)C--(15)N HMBC-IMPEACH correlation spectrum. The indole alkaloid vincamine is used as a model compound to illustrate the application of the method. PMID:17729230

  4. Simple, efficient protocol for enzymatic synthesis of uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled DNA for heteronuclear NMR studies.

    Masse, J.E.; Bortmann, P; Dieckmann, T.; Feigon, J

    1998-01-01

    The use of uniformly 13C,15N-labeled RNA has greatly facilitated structural studies of RNA oligonucleotides by NMR. Application of similar methodologies for the study of DNA has been limited, primarily due to the lack of adequate methods for sample preparation. Methods for both chemical and enzymatic synthesis of DNA oligonucleotides uniformly labeled with 13C and/or 15N have been published, but have not yet been widely used. We have developed a modified procedure for preparing uniformly 13C,...

  5. Detection of organic sulfur by [sup 15]N and [sup 19]F NMR via formation of iminosulfuranes

    Franz, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Lamb, C.N.

    1992-08-01

    We have synthesized new iminosulfuranes from a variety of diaryl-and dialkyl sulfides and dibenzothiophene. The pattern of [sup 15]N chemical shifts indicates that functional groups attached to sulfur are not simply resolved into aryl and alkyl groups. Thus, resolution of sulfur functional groups using [sup 15]N NMR via iminosulfurane does not appear practicable. However, iminosulfurane formation, together with the N-haloamide reaction and the Pummerer rearrangement, provides pathways for chemical discrimination of different sulfur substituents using unique [sup 15]N- or, [sup 19]F-labelled fragments for different categories of sulfur functional groups. In efforts currently underway, we are applying these reactions to methylated extracts and conversion products of the high-organic-sulfur containing Yugoslavian Rasa and Spanish Mequinenza lignites. 1 tab, 14 refs.

  6. Detection of organic sulfur by {sup 15}N and {sup 19}F NMR via formation of iminosulfuranes

    Franz, J.A.; Linehan, J.C.; Lamb, C.N.

    1992-08-01

    We have synthesized new iminosulfuranes from a variety of diaryl-and dialkyl sulfides and dibenzothiophene. The pattern of {sup 15}N chemical shifts indicates that functional groups attached to sulfur are not simply resolved into aryl and alkyl groups. Thus, resolution of sulfur functional groups using {sup 15}N NMR via iminosulfurane does not appear practicable. However, iminosulfurane formation, together with the N-haloamide reaction and the Pummerer rearrangement, provides pathways for chemical discrimination of different sulfur substituents using unique {sup 15}N- or, {sup 19}F-labelled fragments for different categories of sulfur functional groups. In efforts currently underway, we are applying these reactions to methylated extracts and conversion products of the high-organic-sulfur containing Yugoslavian Rasa and Spanish Mequinenza lignites. 1 tab, 14 refs.

  7. NMR relaxation in the magnetic balls system

    The mathematical model of nucleon spin relaxation time in the presence of dipole-dipole magnetic interaction is presented. The relaxation times as a temperature function are calculated using an expansion into spherical harmonics series. Results of calculations are presented

  8. NMR spin-lattice relaxation in molecular rotor systems

    Wzietek, P

    2015-01-01

    A general expression is derived for the dipolar NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate $1/T_1$ of a system exhibiting Brownian dynamics in a discrete and finite configuration space. It is shown that this approach can be particularly useful to model the proton relaxation rate in molecular rotors.

  9. Monitoring the refinement of crystal structures with 15N solid-state NMR shift tensor data

    The 15N chemical shift tensor is shown to be extremely sensitive to lattice structure and a powerful metric for monitoring density functional theory refinements of crystal structures. These refinements include lattice effects and are applied here to five crystal structures. All structures improve based on a better agreement between experimental and calculated 15N tensors, with an average improvement of 47.0 ppm. Structural improvement is further indicated by a decrease in forces on the atoms by 2–3 orders of magnitude and a greater similarity in atom positions to neutron diffraction structures. These refinements change bond lengths by more than the diffraction errors including adjustments to X–Y and X–H bonds (X, Y = C, N, and O) of 0.028 ± 0.002 Å and 0.144 ± 0.036 Å, respectively. The acquisition of 15N tensors at natural abundance is challenging and this limitation is overcome by improved 1H decoupling in the FIREMAT method. This decoupling dramatically narrows linewidths, improves signal-to-noise by up to 317%, and significantly improves the accuracy of measured tensors. A total of 39 tensors are measured with shifts distributed over a range of more than 400 ppm. Overall, experimental 15N tensors are at least 5 times more sensitive to crystal structure than 13C tensors due to nitrogen’s greater polarizability and larger range of chemical shifts

  10. 15 N NMR studies on tautomerism and regioisomerism of nitrogen heterocycles

    Kolehmainen, E.; Gawinecki, R.; Osmialowski, B.; Kauppinen, R.; Marek, R.; Hocková, Dana; Kovacs, L.

    Leipzig: University of Leipzig, 2000. s. -. [European Experimental NMR Conference /15./. 12.06.2000-17.06.2000, Leipzig] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  11. Mechanism of Solid-State Thermolysis of Ammonia Boraine: 15N NMR Study Using Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    Kobayashi, Takeshi [Ames Laboratory; Gupta, Shalabh [Ames Laboratory; Caporini, Marc A [Bruker BioSpin Corporation; Pecharsky, Vitalij K [Ames Laboratory; Pruski, Marek [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-28

    The solid-state thermolysis of ammonia borane (NH3BH3, AB) was explored using state-of-the-art 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy, including 2D indirectly detected 1H{15N} heteronuclear correlation and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced 15N{1H} cross-polarization experiments as well as 11B NMR. The complementary use of 15N and 11B NMR experiments, supported by density functional theory calculations of the chemical shift tensors, provided insights into the dehydrogenation mechanism of AB—insights that have not been available by 11B NMR alone. Specifically, highly branched polyaminoborane derivatives were shown to form from AB via oligomerization in the “head-to-tail” manner, which then transform directly into hexagonal boron nitride analog through the dehydrocyclization reaction, bypassing the formation of polyiminoborane.

  12. 15 N NMR studies of nitrogen heterocycles: examples on tautomerism and regioisomerism

    Kolehmainen, E.; Gawinecki, R.; Osmialowski, B.; Kauppinen, R.; Marek, R.; Hocková, Dana; Kovacs, L.

    Turku: Abo Akademi, 2000 - (Mattinen, J.). s. 27-28 ISBN 952-12-0663-2. [Finnish NMR Symposium /22./. 24.05.2000-26.05.2000, Turku] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  13. Differentiation of Histidine Tautomeric States using 15N Selectively Filtered 13C Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.; Fu, Riqiang

    2014-01-01

    The histidine imidazole ring in proteins usually contains a mixture of three possible tautomeric states (two neutral - τ and π states and a charged state) at physiological pHs. Differentiating the tautomeric states is critical for understanding how the histidine residue participates in many structurally and functionally important proteins. In this work, one dimensional 15N selectively filtered 13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy is proposed to differentiate histidine tautomeric states and to identify all 13C resonances of the individual imidazole rings in a mixture of tautomeric states. When 15N selective 180° pulses are applied to the protonated or non-protonated nitrogen region, the 13C sites that are bonded to the non-protonated or protonated nitrogen sites can be identified, respectively. A sample of 13C,15N labeled histidine powder lyophilized from a solution at pH 6.3 has been used to illustrate the usefulness of this scheme by uniquely assigning resonances of the neutral τ and charged states from the mixture. PMID:25026459

  14. Solution NMR Experiment for Measurement of (15)N-(1)H Residual Dipolar Couplings in Large Proteins and Supramolecular Complexes.

    Eletsky, Alexander; Pulavarti, Surya V S R K; Beaumont, Victor; Gollnick, Paul; Szyperski, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) are exquisite probes of protein structure and dynamics. A new solution NMR experiment named 2D SE2 J-TROSY is presented to measure N-H RDCs for proteins and supramolecular complexes in excess of 200 kDa. This enables validation and refinement of their X-ray crystal and solution NMR structures and the characterization of structural and dynamic changes occurring upon complex formation. Accurate N-H RDCs were measured at 750 MHz (1)H resonance frequency for 11-mer 93 kDa (2)H,(15)N-labeled Trp RNA-binding attenuator protein tumbling with a correlation time τc of 120 ns. This is about twice as long as that for the most slowly tumbling system, for which N-H RDCs could be measured, so far, and corresponds to molecular weights of ∼200 kDa at 25 °C. Furthermore, due to the robustness of SE2 J-TROSY with respect to residual (1)H density from exchangeable protons, increased sensitivity at (1)H resonance frequencies around 1 GHz promises to enable N-H RDC measurement for even larger systems. PMID:26293598

  15. Qualitative Study of Substituent Effects on NMR 15N and 17O Chemical Shifts

    Contreras, Rubén H.; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Bustamante, Manuel G.; Pasqualini, Enrique E.; Melo, Juan I.; Tormena, Cláudio F.

    2009-08-01

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-β substituent effects on both 15N and 17O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and σ-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds.

  16. Qualitative study of substituent effects on NMR (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts.

    Contreras, Rubén H; Llorente, Tomás; Pagola, Gabriel I; Bustamante, Manuel G; Pasqualini, Enrique E; Melo, Juan I; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2009-09-10

    A qualitative approach to analyze the electronic origin of substituent effects on the paramagnetic part of chemical shifts is described and applied to few model systems, where its potentiality can be appreciated. The formulation of this approach is based on the following grounds. The influence of different inter- or intramolecular interactions on a second-order property can be qualitatively predicted if it can be known how they affect the main virtual excitations entering into that second-order property. A set of consistent approximations are introduced in order to analyze the behavior of occupied and virtual orbitals that define some experimental trends of magnetic shielding constants. This approach is applied first to study the electronic origin of methyl-beta substituent effects on both (15)N and (17)O chemical shifts, and afterward it is applied to a couple of examples of long-range substituent effects originated in charge transfer interactions such as the conjugative effect in aromatic compounds and sigma-hyperconjugative interactions in saturated multicyclic compounds. PMID:19685922

  17. Alkaline Hydrolysis/Polymerization of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: Characterization of Products by 13C and 15N NMR

    Thorn, K.A.; Thorne, P.G.; Cox, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis has been investigated as a nonbiological procedure for the destruction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in explosives contaminated soils and munitions scrap. Nucleophilic substitutions of the nitro and methyl groups of TNT by hydroxide ion are the initial steps in the alkaline degradation of TNT. Potential applications of the technique include both in situ surface liming and ex situ alkaline treatment of contaminated soils. A number of laboratory studies have reported the formation of an uncharacterized polymeric material upon prolonged treatment of TNT in base. As part of an overall assessment of alkaline hydrolysis as a remediation technique, and to gain a better understanding of the chemical reactions underlying the hydrolysis/polymerization process, the soluble and precipitate fractions of polymeric material produced from the calcium hydroxide hydrolysis of unlabeled and 15N-labeled TNT were analyzed by elemental analysis and 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectra indicated that reactions leading to polymerization included nucleophilic displacement of nitro groups by hydroxide ion, formation of ketone, carboxyl, alcohol, ether, and other aliphatic carbons, conversion of methyl groups to diphenyl methylene carbons, and recondensation of aromatic amines and reduced forms of nitrite, including ammonia and possibly hydroxylamine, into the polymer. Compared to the distribution of carbons in TNT as 14% sp 3- and 86% sp2-hybridized, the precipitate fraction from hydrolysis of unlabeled TNT contained 33% sp3- and 67% sp 2-hybridized carbons. The concentration of nitrogen in the precipitate was 64% of that in TNT. The 15N NMR spectra showed that, in addition to residual nitro groups, forms of nitrogen present in the filtrate and precipitate fractions include aminohydroquinone, primary amide, indole, imine, and azoxy, among others. Unreacted nitrite was recovered in the filtrate fraction. The toxicities and susceptibilities to

  18. Cooling overall spin temperature: Protein NMR experiments optimized for longitudinal relaxation effects

    Deschamps, Michaël; Campbell, Iain D.

    2006-02-01

    In experiments performed on protonated proteins at high fields, 80% of the NMR spectrometer time is spent waiting for the 1H atoms to recover their polarization after recording the free induction decay. Selective excitation of a fraction of the protons in a large molecule has previously been shown to lead to faster longitudinal relaxation for the selected protons [K. Pervushin, B. Vögeli, A. Eletsky, Longitudinal 1H relaxation optimization in TROSY NMR spectroscopy, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124 (2002) 12898-12902; P. Schanda, B. Brutscher, Very fast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy for real-time investigation of dynamic events in proteins on the time scale of seconds, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127 (2005) 8014-8015; H.S. Attreya, T. Szyperski, G-matrix Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy for complete protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101 (2004) 9642-9647]. The pool of non-selected protons acts as a "thermal bath" and spin-diffusion processes ("flip-flop" transitions) channel the excess energy from the excited pool to the non-selected protons in regions of the molecule where other relaxation processes can dissipate the excess energy. We present here a sensitivity enhanced HSQC sequence (COST-HSQC), based on one selective E-BURP pulse, which can be used on protonated 15N enriched proteins (with or without 13C isotopic enrichment). This experiment is compared to a gradient sensitivity enhanced HSQC with a water flip-back pulse (the water flip-back pulse quenches the spin diffusion between 1H N and 1H α spins). This experiment is shown to have significant advantages in some circumstances. Some observed limitations, namely sample overheating with short recovery delays and complex longitudinal relaxation behaviour are discussed and analysed.

  19. 1H, 13C and 13N chemical shifts and 1H-15N and 13C-15N heteronuclear spin-spin coupling constants n the NMR spectra of 5-substituted furfural oximes

    The 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR spectra of 15N-enriched 5-substituted furfural oximes were investigated. It was shown that the chemical shifts of the ring atoms and the oxime group correlate satisfactorily with the F and R substituent constants, whereas their sensitivity to the effect of the substituents is lower than in monosubstituted furan derivatives. The constants of spin-spin coupling between the ring protons and the oxime group were determined. An analysis of the 1H-1H spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) on the basis of their stereospecificity indicates that the E isomers have primarily an s-trans conformation in polar dimethyl sulfoxide, whereas the Z isomers, on the other hand, have an s-cis conformation. The signs of the direct and geminal 13C-15N SSCC were determined for 5-trimethylsilylfurfural oxime

  20. Extracting protein dynamics information from overlapped NMR signals using relaxation dispersion difference NMR spectroscopy

    Protein dynamics plays important roles in many biological events, such as ligand binding and enzyme reactions. NMR is mostly used for investigating such protein dynamics in a site-specific manner. Recently, NMR has been actively applied to large proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins, which are attractive research targets. However, signal overlap, which is often observed for such proteins, hampers accurate analysis of NMR data. In this study, we have developed a new methodology called relaxation dispersion difference that can extract conformational exchange parameters from overlapped NMR signals measured using relaxation dispersion spectroscopy. In relaxation dispersion measurements, the signal intensities of fluctuating residues vary according to the Carr-Purcell-Meiboon-Gill pulsing interval, whereas those of non-fluctuating residues are constant. Therefore, subtraction of each relaxation dispersion spectrum from that with the highest signal intensities, measured at the shortest pulsing interval, leaves only the signals of the fluctuating residues. This is the principle of the relaxation dispersion difference method. This new method enabled us to extract exchange parameters from overlapped signals of heme oxygenase-1, which is a relatively large protein. The results indicate that the structural flexibility of a kink in the heme-binding site is important for efficient heme binding. Relaxation dispersion difference requires neither selectively labeled samples nor modification of pulse programs; thus it will have wide applications in protein dynamics analysis

  1. Extracting protein dynamics information from overlapped NMR signals using relaxation dispersion difference NMR spectroscopy

    Konuma, Tsuyoshi [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Department of Structural and Chemical Biology (United States); Harada, Erisa [Suntory Foundation for Life Sciences, Bioorganic Research Institute (Japan); Sugase, Kenji, E-mail: sugase@sunbor.or.jp, E-mail: sugase@moleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, Department of Molecular Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Protein dynamics plays important roles in many biological events, such as ligand binding and enzyme reactions. NMR is mostly used for investigating such protein dynamics in a site-specific manner. Recently, NMR has been actively applied to large proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins, which are attractive research targets. However, signal overlap, which is often observed for such proteins, hampers accurate analysis of NMR data. In this study, we have developed a new methodology called relaxation dispersion difference that can extract conformational exchange parameters from overlapped NMR signals measured using relaxation dispersion spectroscopy. In relaxation dispersion measurements, the signal intensities of fluctuating residues vary according to the Carr-Purcell-Meiboon-Gill pulsing interval, whereas those of non-fluctuating residues are constant. Therefore, subtraction of each relaxation dispersion spectrum from that with the highest signal intensities, measured at the shortest pulsing interval, leaves only the signals of the fluctuating residues. This is the principle of the relaxation dispersion difference method. This new method enabled us to extract exchange parameters from overlapped signals of heme oxygenase-1, which is a relatively large protein. The results indicate that the structural flexibility of a kink in the heme-binding site is important for efficient heme binding. Relaxation dispersion difference requires neither selectively labeled samples nor modification of pulse programs; thus it will have wide applications in protein dynamics analysis.

  2. NMR spin relaxation rates in the Heisenberg bilayer

    Mendes, Tiago; Curro, Nicholas; Scalettar, Richard; Paiva, Thereza; Dos Santos, Raimundo R.

    One of the striking features of heavy fermions is the fact that in the vicinity of a quantum phase transition these systems exhibit the breakdown of Fermi-liquid behavior and superconductivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) expirements play an important role in the study of these phenomena. Measurements of NMR spin relaxation rates and Knight shift, for instance, can be used to probe the electronic spin susceptibility of these systems. Here we studied the NMR response of the Heisenberg bilayer model. In this model, it is well known that the increase of the interplane coupling between the planes, Jperp, supresses the antiferromagnetic order at a quantum critical point (QCP). We use stochastic series expansion (SSE) and the maximum-entropy analytic continuation method to calculate the NMR spin lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 and the spin echo decay 1 /T2 G as function of Jperp. The spin echo decay, T2 G increases for small Jperp, due to the increase of the order parameter, and then vanishes abruptly in the QCP. The effects of Jperp dilution disorder in the QCP and the relaxation rates are also discussed. This research was supported by the NNSA Grant Number DE-NA 0002908, and Ciência sem fronteiras program/CNPQ.

  3. pH dependence of 15N NMR shifts and coupling constants in aqueous imidazole and 1-methylimidazole. Comments on estimation of tautomeric equilibrium constants for aqueous histidine

    15N, 1H and 13C NMR spectra for [15N2]imidazole and [15N2]-1-methylimidazole in aqueous solution as functions of pH provide shift and coupling-constant information useful in characterizing the protonated and unprotonated forms of these compounds and as background for determining N binding to other species, such as metal ions. When combined with similar data for the imidazole-ring atoms in histidine, these data give more reliable estimates of tautomeric equilibrium constants for the amphionic and anionic forms of histidine than possible from the histidine data alone

  4. Microscale simulations of NMR relaxation in porous media

    Mohnke, Oliver; Klitzsch, Norbert

    2010-05-01

    In petrophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the measured relaxation signals originate from the fluid filled pore space. Hence, in rocks or sediments the water content directly corresponds to the initial amplitude of the recorded NMR relaxation signals. The relaxation rate (longitudinal/transversal decay time T1, T2) is sensitive to pore sizes and physiochemical properties of rock-fluid interfaces (surface relaxivity), as well as the concentration of paramagnetic ions in the fluid phases (bulk relaxivity). In the subproject A2 of the TR32 we aim at improving the basic understanding of these processes at the pore scale and thereby advancing the interpretation of NMR data by reducing the application of restrictive approximated interpretation schemes, e.g. for deriving pore size distributions, connectivity or permeability. In this respect we numerically simulate NMR relaxation data at the micro sale to study the impact of physical and hydrological parameters such as internal field gradients or pore connectivities on NMR signals. Joint numerical simulations of the NMR relaxation behavior (Bloch equations) in the presence of internal gradients (Ampere's law) and fluid flow (Navier-Stokes) on a pore scale dimension have been implemented in a finite element (FE) model using Comsol Multiphysics. Processes governing the time and spatial behavior of the nuclear magnetization density in a porous medium are diffusion and surface interactions at the rock-fluid interface. Based on Fick's law of diffusive motion Brownstein and Tarr (1979) introduced differential equations that describe the relaxation behavior of the Spin magnetization in single isolated pores and derived analytical solutions for simple geometries, i.e. spherical, cylindrical and planar. However, by numerically solving these equations in a general way using a FE algorithm this approach can be applied to study and simulate coupled complex pore systems, e.g. derived from computer tomography (CT

  5. Combining automated peak tracking in SAR by NMR with structure-based backbone assignment from 15N-NOESY

    Jang, Richard

    2012-03-21

    Background: Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMR-based drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically, which is not efficient for high-throughput drug screening.Results: We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C-labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-to-one mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better.Conclusions: Our mathematical programming approach for modeling chemical shift mapping as a graph problem, while modeling the errors directly, is potentially a time- and cost-effective first step for high-throughput drug screening based on limited NMR data and homologous 3D structures. 2012 Jang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  6. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectral and X-ray structural studies of 2-arylsulfonylamino-5-chlorobenzophenones

    Six 2-(4-R-phenylsulfonylamino)-5-chlorobenzophenones were prepared and their 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectra recorded and assigned. The dependence between the chemical shift of the amide proton and Hammett σ substituent constants is of the V type. Substituent effect on the chemical shift of the amide nitrogen atom was found insignificant. X-ray analysis shows that the terminal benzene rings in 2-(4-nitro-phenylsulfonylamino)-5-chlorobenzophenones are located close to each other. They are not, however, parallel, dihedral angle between them being equal to 10.86 deg (MP2/6-31G**//HF/6-31G** ab initio calculations show this to be 20.44 deg). This shows that the mutual orientation of two benzene rings in the molecule of this compound is caused by the π-π stacking. It is additionally reinforced by the intramolecular NH...O=C hydrogen bond. Except the dihedral angle between the benzene rings, X-ray determined structure of 2-(4-nitro-phenylsulfonylamino)-5-chlorobenzophenones is very similar to this optimized by the ab initio calculations. (author)

  7. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of 15N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S2) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S2) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S2 values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S2 parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S2 calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S2) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models

  8. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Yu, Lu [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Zhang, Longhua [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Xiong, Ying, E-mail: yxiong73@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Tian, Changlin, E-mail: cltian@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of {sup 15}N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S{sup 2}) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S{sup 2}) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S{sup 2} values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S{sup 2} parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S{sup 2} calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S{sup 2}) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models.

  9. Determination of the major tautomeric form of the covalently modified adenine in the (+)-CC-1065-DNA adduct by 1H and 15N NMR studies

    (+)-CC-1065 is an extremely potent antitumor antibiotic produced by Streptomyces zelensis. The potent cytotoxic effects of the drug are thought to be due to the formation of a covalent adduct with DNA through N3 of adenine. Although the covalent linkage sites between (+)-CC-1065 and DNA have been determined, the tautomeric form of the covalently modified adenine in the (+)-CC-1065-DNA duplex adduct was not defined. The [6-15N]deoxyadenosine-labeled 12-mer duplex adduct was then studied by 1H and 15N NMR. One-dimensional NOE difference and two-dimensional NOESY 1H NMR experiments on the nonisotopically labeled 12-mer duplex adduct demonstrate that the 6-amino protons of the covalently modified adenine exhibit two signals at 9.19 and 9.08 ppm. Proton NMR experiments on the [6-15N]deoxyadenosine-labeled 12-mer duplex adduct show that the two resonance signals for adenine H6 observed on the nonisotopically labeled duplex adduct were split into doublets by the 15N nucleus with coupling constants of 91.3 Hz for non-hydrogen-bonded and 86.8 Hz for hydrogen-bonded amino protons. The authors conclude that the covalently modified adenine N6 of the (+)-CC-1065-12-mer duplex adduct is predominantly in the doubly protonated form, in which calculations predict that the C6-N6 bond is shortened and the positive charge is delocalized over the entire adenine molecule

  10. Global Fold of Human Cannabinoid Type 2 Receptor Probed by Solid-State 13C-, 15N-MAS NMR and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Kimura, Tomohiro; Vukoti, Krishna; Lynch, Diane L.; Hurst, Dow P.; Grossfield, Alan; Pitman, Michael C.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Yeliseev, Alexei A.; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The global fold of human cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor in the agonist-bound active state in lipid bilayers was investigated by solid-state 13C- and 15N magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR, in combination with chemical-shift prediction from a structural model of the receptor obtained by microsecond-long molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Uniformly 13C-, and 15N-labeled CB2 receptor was expressed in milligram quantities by bacterial fermentation, purified, and functionally reconstituted into l...

  11. Histidine side-chain dynamics and protonation monitored by 13C CPMG NMR relaxation dispersion

    The use of 13C NMR relaxation dispersion experiments to monitor micro-millisecond fluctuations in the protonation states of histidine residues in proteins is investigated. To illustrate the approach, measurements on three specifically 13C labeled histidine residues in plastocyanin (PCu) from Anabaena variabilis (A.v.) are presented. Significant Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is observed for 13Cε1 nuclei in the histidine imidazole rings of A.v. PCu. The chemical shift changes obtained from the CPMG dispersion data are in good agreement with those obtained from the chemical shift titration experiments, and the CPMG derived exchange rates agree with those obtained previously from 15N backbone relaxation measurements. Compared to measurements of backbone nuclei, 13Cε1 dispersion provides a more direct method to monitor interchanging protonation states or other kinds of conformational changes of histidine side chains or their environment. Advantages and shortcomings of using the 13Cε1 dispersion experiments in combination with chemical shift titration experiments to obtain information on exchange dynamics of the histidine side chains are discussed

  12. Histidine side-chain dynamics and protonation monitored by {sup 13}C CPMG NMR relaxation dispersion

    Hass, Mathias A. S. [Leiden University, Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands); Yilmaz, Ali [University of Copenhagen, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Denmark); Christensen, Hans E. M. [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Chemistry (Denmark); Led, Jens J. [University of Copenhagen, Department of Chemistry (Denmark)], E-mail: led@kiku.dk

    2009-08-15

    The use of {sup 13}C NMR relaxation dispersion experiments to monitor micro-millisecond fluctuations in the protonation states of histidine residues in proteins is investigated. To illustrate the approach, measurements on three specifically {sup 13}C labeled histidine residues in plastocyanin (PCu) from Anabaena variabilis (A.v.) are presented. Significant Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is observed for {sup 13}C{sup {epsilon}}{sup 1} nuclei in the histidine imidazole rings of A.v. PCu. The chemical shift changes obtained from the CPMG dispersion data are in good agreement with those obtained from the chemical shift titration experiments, and the CPMG derived exchange rates agree with those obtained previously from {sup 15}N backbone relaxation measurements. Compared to measurements of backbone nuclei, {sup 13}C{sup {epsilon}}{sup 1} dispersion provides a more direct method to monitor interchanging protonation states or other kinds of conformational changes of histidine side chains or their environment. Advantages and shortcomings of using the {sup 13}C{sup {epsilon}}{sup 1} dispersion experiments in combination with chemical shift titration experiments to obtain information on exchange dynamics of the histidine side chains are discussed.

  13. Deriving NMR surface relaxivities, pore size distributions and water retention curves by NMR relaxation experiments on partially de-saturated rocks

    Mohnke, O.; Nordlund, C. L.; Klitzsch, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a method used over a wide field of geophysical applications to non-destructively determine transport and storage properties of rocks and soils. In NMR relaxometry signal amplitudes correspond directly to the rock's fluid (water, oil) content. On the other hand the NMR relaxation behavior, i.e. the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) NMR relaxation times, can be used to derive pore sizes and permeability as it is linearly linked to the pore's surface-to-volume-ratio and physiochemical properties of the rock-fluid interface by the surface relaxivity ρ_s This parameter, however, is dependent on the type and mineral constituents of the investigated rock sample and thus has to be determined and calibrated prior to estimating pore sizes from NMR relaxometry measurements. Frequently used methods to derive surface relaxivity to calibrate NMR pore sizes comprise mercury injection, pulsed field gradients (PFG-NMR) or grain size analysis. This study introduces an alternative approach to jointly estimate NMR surface relaxivity and pore radii distributions using NMR relaxation data obtained from partially de-saturated rocks. In this, inverse modeling is carried on a linked Young Laplace equation for capillary bundles and the Brownstein and Tarr equations. Subsequently, this approach is used to predict water retention curves of the investigated rocks. The method was tested and validated on simulated and laboratory transverse NMR data. Calculated inverse models are generally in a good agreement with results obtained from mercury injection and drainage measurements. Left: Measured and predicted water retention (pF) curves. Center: NMR relaxometry data, fit and error. Right: Mercury injection data (HgPor, dashed line) and jointly derived pore radii distributions and surface relaxivity by joint inverse modelling

  14. NMR Relaxation in Systems with Magnetic Nanoparticles: A Temperature Study

    Issa, Bashar; Obaidat, Ihab M.; Hejasee, Rola H.; Qadri, Shahnaz; Haik, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To measure and model NMR relaxation enhancement due to the presence of Gd substituted Zn-Mn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles at different temperatures. Materials and Methods Relaxation rates were measured at 1.5 T using FSE sequences in samples of agarose gel doped with uncoated and polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated Mn0.5Zn0.5Gd0.02Fe1.98O4 nanoparticles over the temperature range 8 to 58°C. Physical characterization of the magnetic nanoparticles synthesized using chemical co-precipitation included scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and magnetometry. Results Relaxivity (in s−1 mM−1 Fe) for the uncoated and coated particles, respectively, increased as follows: from 2.5 to 3.2 and 0.4 to 0.7 for T1, while for T2 it increased from 162.3 to 253.7 and 59.7 to 82.2 over the temperature range 8 to 58°C. T2 data was fitted to the echo limited motional regime using one fitting parameter that reflects the degree of agglomeration of particles into a cluster. This parameter was found to increase linearly with temperature and was larger for the PEG coated particles than the uncoated ones. Conclusion The increase of 1/T2 with temperature is modeled successfully using echo limited motional regime where both diffusion of the protons and nanoparticle cluster size increase with temperature. Both transverse and longitudinal relaxation efficiencies are reduced by PEG coating at all temperatures. If prediction of relaxation rates under different particle concentrations and operating temperatures is possible then the use of MNP in temperature monitoring and hyperthermia applications may be achieved. PMID:23720101

  15. Biomass production of site selective {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N nucleotides using wild type and a transketolase E. coli mutant for labeling RNA for high resolution NMR

    Thakur, Chandar S.; Luo Yiling; Chen Bin; Eldho, Nadukkudy V.; Dayie, T. Kwaku, E-mail: dayie@umd.edu [Center for Biomolecular Structure and Organization, University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Characterization of the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids by NMR benefits significantly from position specifically labeled nucleotides. Here an E. coli strain deficient in the transketolase gene (tktA) and grown on glucose that is labeled at different carbon sites is shown to facilitate cost-effective and large scale production of useful nucleotides. These nucleotides are site specifically labeled in C1 Prime and C5 Prime with minimal scrambling within the ribose ring. To demonstrate the utility of this labeling approach, the new site-specific labeled and the uniformly labeled nucleotides were used to synthesize a 36-nt RNA containing the catalytically essential domain 5 (D5) of the brown algae group II intron self-splicing ribozyme. The D5 RNA was used in binding and relaxation studies probed by NMR spectroscopy. Key nucleotides in the D5 RNA that are implicated in binding Mg{sup 2+} ions are well resolved. As a result, spectra obtained using selectively labeled nucleotides have higher signal-to-noise ratio compared to those obtained using uniformly labeled nucleotides. Thus, compared to the uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled nucleotides, these specifically labeled nucleotides eliminate the extensive {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C coupling within the nitrogenous base and ribose ring, give rise to less crowded and more resolved NMR spectra, and accurate relaxation rates without the need for constant-time or band-selective decoupled NMR experiments. These position selective labeled nucleotides should, therefore, find wide use in NMR analysis of biologically interesting RNA molecules.

  16. Increasing the sensitivity of NMR diffusion measurements by paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement, with application to ribosome–nascent chain complexes

    Chan, Sammy H. S.; Waudby, Christopher A.; Cassaignau, Anaïs M. E.; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John, E-mail: j.christodoulou@ucl.ac.uk [University College London and Birkbeck College, Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    The translational diffusion of macromolecules can be examined non-invasively by stimulated echo (STE) NMR experiments to accurately determine their molecular sizes. These measurements can be important probes of intermolecular interactions and protein folding and unfolding, and are crucial in monitoring the integrity of large macromolecular assemblies such as ribosome–nascent chain complexes (RNCs). However, NMR studies of these complexes can be severely constrained by their slow tumbling, low solubility (with maximum concentrations of up to 10 μM), and short lifetimes resulting in weak signal, and therefore continuing improvements in experimental sensitivity are essential. Here we explore the use of the paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement (PLRE) agent NiDO2A on the sensitivity of {sup 15}N XSTE and SORDID heteronuclear STE experiments, which can be used to monitor the integrity of these unstable complexes. We exploit the dependence of the PLRE effect on the gyromagnetic ratio and electronic relaxation time to accelerate recovery of {sup 1}H magnetization without adversely affecting storage on N{sub z} during diffusion delays or introducing significant transverse relaxation line broadening. By applying the longitudinal relaxation-optimized SORDID pulse sequence together with NiDO2A to 70S Escherichia coli ribosomes and RNCs, NMR diffusion sensitivity enhancements of up to 4.5-fold relative to XSTE are achieved, alongside ∼1.9-fold improvements in two-dimensional NMR sensitivity, without compromising the sample integrity. We anticipate these results will significantly advance the use of NMR to probe dynamic regions of ribosomes and other large, unstable macromolecular assemblies.Graphical Abstract.

  17. Increasing the sensitivity of NMR diffusion measurements by paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement, with application to ribosome–nascent chain complexes

    The translational diffusion of macromolecules can be examined non-invasively by stimulated echo (STE) NMR experiments to accurately determine their molecular sizes. These measurements can be important probes of intermolecular interactions and protein folding and unfolding, and are crucial in monitoring the integrity of large macromolecular assemblies such as ribosome–nascent chain complexes (RNCs). However, NMR studies of these complexes can be severely constrained by their slow tumbling, low solubility (with maximum concentrations of up to 10 μM), and short lifetimes resulting in weak signal, and therefore continuing improvements in experimental sensitivity are essential. Here we explore the use of the paramagnetic longitudinal relaxation enhancement (PLRE) agent NiDO2A on the sensitivity of 15N XSTE and SORDID heteronuclear STE experiments, which can be used to monitor the integrity of these unstable complexes. We exploit the dependence of the PLRE effect on the gyromagnetic ratio and electronic relaxation time to accelerate recovery of 1H magnetization without adversely affecting storage on Nz during diffusion delays or introducing significant transverse relaxation line broadening. By applying the longitudinal relaxation-optimized SORDID pulse sequence together with NiDO2A to 70S Escherichia coli ribosomes and RNCs, NMR diffusion sensitivity enhancements of up to 4.5-fold relative to XSTE are achieved, alongside ∼1.9-fold improvements in two-dimensional NMR sensitivity, without compromising the sample integrity. We anticipate these results will significantly advance the use of NMR to probe dynamic regions of ribosomes and other large, unstable macromolecular assemblies.Graphical Abstract

  18. Nature of organic carbon and nitrogen in physically protected organic matter of some Australian soils as revealed by solid-state 13 C and 15 N NMR spectroscopy

    The 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was applied for characterising the chemical nature of the remaining organic fraction. The 13C NMR spectroscopic comparison of the residues after UV photo-oxidation and the untreated bulk soils revealed a considerable increase in condensed aromatic structures in the residues for 4 of the 5 soils. This behaviour was recently shown to be typical for char-containing soils. In the sample where no char was detectable by NMR spectroscopy, the physically protected carbon consisted of functional groups similar to those observed for the organic matter of the bulk sample, although their relative proportions were altered. The solid-state 15N NMR spectrum from this sample revealed that some peptide structures were able to resist UV photo-oxidation, probably physically protected within the core of micro aggregates. Heterocyclic aromatic nitrogen was not detected in this spectrum, but pyrrolic nitrogen was found to comprise a major fraction of the residues after photo-oxidation of the <53 μm containing soils. Acid hydrolysis of these samples confirmed that some peptide-like material was still present. The identification of a considerable amount of aromatic carbon and nitrogen, assignable to charred material in 4 of the 5 investigated soils, supports previous observations that char largely comprises the inert or passive organic matter pool of many Australian soils. The influence of such material on the carbon and nitrogen dynamics in such soils, however, requires further research. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Australia

  19. Detecting pyramidal state of the glycosidic nitrogen in 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine; theoretical study of 15N NMR parameters

    Šebera, Jakub; Dračínský, Martin; Nencka, Radim; Trantírek, L.; Tanaka, Y.; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    Brno : Masaryk University, 2014 - (Novotný, J.; Foroutan -Nejad, C.; Marek, R.). C7 ISBN 978-80-86441-45-0. [NMR Valtice. Central European NMR Meeting /29./. 27.4.-30.4.2014, Valtice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-27676S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hOGG1 enzyme * OxoG * NMR Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  20. Quadrupole interactions and NMR relaxation in KSbF6

    The authors focus on the study of the physical properties of the low-temperature cubic phase f of KSbF6. We give a change in the temperature dependences of the quadrupole coupling constants at the 121Sb nuclei, the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 for the 19F nuclei, and the dielectric constant epsilon(T) in polycrystalline samples of KSbF6. The NMR spectra of the 121Sb nuclei were recorded using a CW spectrometer at a frequency of 20 MHz. The T1 measurements at the 19F nuclei were made using the IS-3 pulse spectrometer at a frequency of 27.2 MHz

  1. Nitrogen-15 labeled 5S RNA. Identification of uridine base pairs in Escherichia coli 5S RNA by 1H-15N multiple quantum NMR

    Escherichia coli 5S RNA labeled with 15N at N3 of the uridines was isolated from the Sφ-187 uracil auxotroph grown on a minimal medium supplemented with [3-15N]uracil. 1H-15N multiple quantum filtered and 2D chemical shift correlated spectra gave resonances for the uridine imino 1H-15N units whose protons were exchanging slowly with solvent. Peaks with 1H/15N shifts at 11.6/154.8, 11.7/155.0, 11.8/155.5, 12.1/155.0, and 12.2/155.0 ppm were assigned to GU interactions. Two labile high-field AU resonances at 12.6/156.8 and 12.8/157.3 ppm typical of Au pairs in a shielded environment at the end of a helix were seen. Intense AU signals were also found at 13.4/158.5 and 13.6/159.2 ppm where 1H-15N units in normal Watson-Crick pairs resonate. 1H resonances at 10.6 and 13.8 ppm were too weak, presumably because of exchange with water, to give peaks in chemical shift correlated spectra. 1H chemical shifts suggest that the resonance at 13.8 ppm represents a labile AU pair, while the resonance at 10.6 ppm is typical of a tertiary interaction between U and a tightly bound water or a phosphate residue. The NMR data are consistent with proposed secondary structures for 5S RNA

  2. NMR Relaxation and Diffusion Study of Ultrasound Recycling of Polyurethanes

    von Meerwall, E.; Ghose, S.; Isayev, A. I.

    2004-04-01

    We have examined the effect of intense ultrasound on unfilled polyurethane foam and rubber using proton NMR transverse relaxation and pulsed-gradient diffusion studies, sol extraction, GPC characterization, and glass transition measurements. Results correlate well with ultrasound amplitude. The proton T2 relaxation at 70.5 deg. C exhibits three discrete components, due to heavily entangled sol and crosslinked network; unentangled polymeric sol plus dangling network chain ends; and oligomer remnants. Devulcanizing produces heavy sol, increases segmental mobility of all species, and generates more dangling chain ends. In foams, but not in rubber, additional light sol is generated at the expense of network. All mobilities are significantly lower than in the other rubbers we have studied, an effect unrelated to the glass transition, nearly constant at -60 deg. C. Diffusion measurements, possible only in foams, show a bimodal spectrum whose fast component slows markedly with ultrasound amplitude, attesting to the production of fragments heavier than the original oligomers, as confirmed by GPC analysis. This work is the first to study ultrasound devulcanization in industrial rubbery foams.

  3. Oligomeric complexes of some heteroaromatic ligands and aromatic diamines with rhodium and molybdenum tetracarboxylates: 13C and 15N CPMAS NMR and density functional theory studies.

    Leniak, Arkadiusz; Kamieński, Bohdan; Jaźwiński, Jarosław

    2015-05-01

    Seven new oligomeric complexes of 4,4'-bipyridine; 3,3'-bipyridine; benzene-1,4-diamine; benzene-1,3-diamine; benzene-1,2-diamine; and benzidine with rhodium tetraacetate, as well as 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetraacetate, have been obtained and investigated by elemental analysis and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, (13)C and (15)N CPMAS NMR. The known complexes of pyrazine with rhodium tetrabenzoate, benzoquinone with rhodium tetrapivalate, 4,4'-bipyridine with molybdenum tetrakistrifluoroacetate and the 1 : 1 complex of 2,2'-bipyridine with rhodium tetraacetate exhibiting axial-equatorial ligation mode have been obtained as well for comparison purposes. Elemental analysis revealed 1 : 1 complex stoichiometry of all complexes. The (15)N CPMAS NMR spectra of all new complexes consist of one narrow signal, indicating regular uniform structures. Benzidine forms a heterogeneous material, probably containing linear oligomers and products of further reactions. The complexes were characterized by the parameter complexation shift Δδ (Δδ = δcomplex  - δligand). This parameter ranged from around -40 to -90 ppm in the case of heteroaromatic ligands, from around -12 to -22 ppm for diamines and from -16 to -31 ppm for the complexes of molybdenum tetracarboxylates with 4,4'-bipyridine. The experimental results have been supported by a density functional theory computation of (15)N NMR chemical shifts and complexation shifts at the non-relativistic Becke, three-parameter, Perdew-Wang 91/[6-311++G(2d,p), Stuttgart] and GGA-PBE/QZ4P levels of theory and at the relativistic scalar and spin-orbit zeroth order regular approximation/GGA-PBE/QZ4P level of theory. Nucleus-independent chemical shifts have been calculated for the selected compounds. PMID:25614975

  4. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements in NMR peptide-membrane interaction studies

    Small membrane-bound proteins or peptides are involved in numerous essential biological processes, like cellular recognition, signaling, channel formation, and cytolysis. The secondary structure, orientation, mode of interaction and dynamics of these peptides can be as varied as their functions. Their localization in the membrane, the immersion depth, and their binding mode are factors critical to the function of these peptides. The atomic 3D solution structure of peptides bound to micelles can be determined by NMR spectroscopy. However, by employing paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) information on the complete topology of peptide bound to a micelle can be obtained. The antimicrobial peptide maximin H6, fst, a bacterial toxin, and the human peptide hormone ghrelin served as membrane-bound model peptides of similar sizes but strongly differing amino acid sequences. Their structures and binding behavior were determined and compared.The measured PREs provided suitable data for determining and distinguishing the different topologies of the investigated peptides bound to micelles. Maximin H6 and fst fold into α-helices upon insertion into a membrane, whereas the unstructured ghrelin is freely mobile in solution and interacts only via a covalently bound octanoyl group with the lipids. Maximin H6 is oriented parallel to the membrane surface, enabling the peptide to aggregate at the membrane water interface. Fst binds in transmembrane orientation with a protruding intrinsically disordered region near the C-terminus. Aside from determining the orientation of the bound peptides from the PREs, the moieties critical for membrane binding could be mapped in ghrelin. If suitable relaxation-edited spectra are acquired, the complete orientation and immersion depth of a peptide bound to a micelle can readily be obtained. (author)

  5. The theoretical investigation of solvent effects on the relative stability and 15N NMR shielding of antidepressant heterocyclic drug

    Tahan, Arezoo; Khojandi, Mahya; Salari, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) and Tomasi's polarized continuum model (PCM) were used for the investigation of solvent polarity and its dielectric constant effects on the relative stability and NMR shielding tensors of antidepressant mirtazapine (MIR). The obtained results indicated that the relative stability in the polar solvents is higher than that in non-polar solvents and the most stable structure was observed in the water at the B3LYP/6-311++G ( d, p) level of theory. Also, natural bond orbital (NBO) interpretation demonstrated that by increase of solvent dielectric constant, negative charge on nitrogen atoms of heterocycles and resonance energy for LP(N10) → σ* and π* delocalization of the structure's azepine ring increase and the highest values of them were observed in water. On the other hand, NMR calculations showed that with an increase in negative charge of nitrogen atoms, isotropic chemical shielding (σiso) around them increase and nitrogen of piperazine ring (N19) has the highest values of negative charge and σiso among nitrogen atoms. NMR calculations also represented that direct solvent effect on nitrogen of pyridine ring (N15) is more than other nitrogens, while its effect on N19 is less than other ones. Based on NMR data and NBO interpretation, it can be deduced that with a decrease in the negative charge on nitrogen atoms, the intramolecular effects on them decrease, while direct solvent effect increases.

  6. H/D exchange of a 15N labelled Tau fragment as measured by a simple Relax-EXSY experiment

    Lopez, Juan; Ahuja, Puneet; Landrieu, Isabelle; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Huvent, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy

    2014-12-01

    We present an equilibrium H/D exchange experiment to measure the exchange rates of labile amide protons in intrinsically unfolded proteins. By measuring the contribution of the H/D exchange to the apparent T1 relaxation rates in solvents of different D2O content, we can easily derive the rates of exchange for rapidly exchanging amide protons. The method does not require double isotope labelling, is sensitive, and requires limited fitting of the data. We demonstrate it on a functional fragment of Tau, and provide evidence for the hydrogen bond formation of the phosphate moiety of Ser214 with its own amide proton in the same fragment phosphorylated by the PKA kinase.

  7. Quantifying Lipari-Szabo modelfree parameters from 13CO NMR relaxation experiments

    It is proposed to obtain effective Lipari-Szabo order parameters and local correlation times for relaxation vectors of protein 13CO nuclei by carrying out a 13CO-R1 auto relaxation experiment, a transverse 13CO CSA/13CO-13C CSA/dipolar cross correlation and a transverse 13CO CSA/13CO-15N CSA/dipolar cross correlation experiment. Given the global rotational correlation time from 15N relaxation experiments, a new program COMFORD (CO-Modelfree Fitting Of Relaxation Data) is presented to fit the 13CO data to an effective order parameter SCO2, an effective local correlation time and the orientation of the CSA tensor with respect to the molecular frame. It is shown that the effective SCO2 is least sensitive to rotational fluctuations about an imaginary Cα-Cα axis and most sensitive to rotational fluctuations about an imaginary axis parallel to the NH bond direction. As such, the SCO2 information is fully complementary to the 15N relaxation order parameter, which is least sensitive to fluctuations about the NH axis and most sensitive to fluctuations about the Cα-Cα axis. The new paradigm is applied on data of Ca2+ saturated Calmodulin, and on available literature data for Ubiquitin. Our data indicate that the SCO2 order parameters rapport on slower, and sometimes different, motions than the 15N relaxation order parameters. The CO local correlation times correlate well with the calmodulin's secondary structure

  8. Preparation of Uniformly 13C,15N-Labeled Recombinant Human Amylin for Solid-State NMR Investigation

    Kosicka, Iga; Kristensen, Torsten; Bjerring, Morten;

    2014-01-01

    A number of diseases are caused by the formation of amyloid fibrils. Detailed understanding of structural features of amyloid fibers is of great importance for our understanding of disease progression and design of agents for diagnostics or potential prevention of protein aggregation. In lack of ...... and electron microscopy, show toxicity towards human cells, and demonstrate that produced material may form the basis for structure determination using solid-state NMR....... crystal ordering, solid-state NMR forms the most suited method to determine the structures of the fibrils with atomic resolution. To exploit this potential, large amounts of isotopic-labeled protein need to be obtained through recombinant protein expression. However, expression and purification of...

  9. Towards fully automated structure-based NMR resonance assignment of 15N-labeled proteins from automatically picked peaks

    Jang, Richard

    2011-03-01

    In NMR resonance assignment, an indispensable step in NMR protein studies, manually processed peaks from both N-labeled and C-labeled spectra are typically used as inputs. However, the use of homologous structures can allow one to use only N-labeled NMR data and avoid the added expense of using C-labeled data. We propose a novel integer programming framework for structure-based backbone resonance assignment using N-labeled data. The core consists of a pair of integer programming models: one for spin system forming and amino acid typing, and the other for backbone resonance assignment. The goal is to perform the assignment directly from spectra without any manual intervention via automatically picked peaks, which are much noisier than manually picked peaks, so methods must be error-tolerant. In the case of semi-automated/manually processed peak data, we compare our system with the Xiong-Pandurangan-Bailey- Kellogg\\'s contact replacement (CR) method, which is the most error-tolerant method for structure-based resonance assignment. Our system, on average, reduces the error rate of the CR method by five folds on their data set. In addition, by using an iterative algorithm, our system has the added capability of using the NOESY data to correct assignment errors due to errors in predicting the amino acid and secondary structure type of each spin system. On a publicly available data set for human ubiquitin, where the typing accuracy is 83%, we achieve 91% accuracy, compared to the 59% accuracy obtained without correcting for such errors. In the case of automatically picked peaks, using assignment information from yeast ubiquitin, we achieve a fully automatic assignment with 97% accuracy. To our knowledge, this is the first system that can achieve fully automatic structure-based assignment directly from spectra. This has implications in NMR protein mutant studies, where the assignment step is repeated for each mutant. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  10. A correlation for miscible flood displacement efficiency in the San Andres with NMR relaxation

    This paper reports that a set of San Andres crystalline dolomite cores was examined for the relationship between pore attributes discernible from NMR relaxation and miscible flooding displacement efficiency. A strong correlation was observed between the inferred abundance of long relaxation time components and laboratory measured residual oil to a multicontact miscible displacement process. NMR relaxation time distribution proved to be a simple, noninvasive, nondestructive indicator of flow performance in the 12 San Andres dolomite samples examined. Spin-lattice relaxation measurements were conducted on clean, brine saturated core end pieces from plugs taken adjacent to those used for flow displacement studies. Sample data were deconvoluted into a distribution of relaxation times, which is ultimately related to surface-to-volume ratio distribution. The median relaxation time was determined to be the most sensitive statistics to convey flow performance. Residual oil saturation was adequately represented by a power law function of the median relaxation time

  11. Sensitivity enhancement using paramagnetic relaxation in MAS solid-state NMR of perdeuterated proteins

    Linser, Rasmus; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Diehl, Anne; Reif, Bernd

    2007-12-01

    Previously, Ishii et al., could show that chelated paramagnetic ions can be employed to significantly decrease the recycle delay of a MAS solid-state NMR experiment [N.P. Wickramasinghe, M. Kotecha, A. Samoson, J. Past, Y. Ishii, Sensitivity enhancement in C-13 solid-state NMR of protein microcrystals by use of paramagnetic metal ions for optimizing H-1 T-1 relaxation, J. Magn. Reson. 184 (2007) 350-356]. Application of the method is limited to very robust samples, for which sample stability is not compromised by RF induced heating. In addition, probe integrity might be perturbed in standard MAS PRE experiments due to the use of very short duty cycles. We show that these deleterious effects can be avoided if perdeuterated proteins are employed that have been re-crystallized from D 2O:H 2O = 9:1 containing buffer solutions. The experiments are demonstrated using the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin as a model system. The labeling scheme allows to record proton detected 1H, 15N correlation spectra with very high resolution in the absence of heteronuclear dipolar decoupling. Cu-edta as a doping reagent yields a reduction of the recycle delay by up to a factor of 15. In particular, we find that the 1H T1 for the bulk H N magnetization is reduced from 4.4 s to 0.3 s if the Cu-edta concentration is increased from 0 mM to 250 mM. Possible perturbations like chemical shift changes or line broadening due to the paramagnetic chelate complex are minimal. No degradation of our samples was observed in the course of the experiments.

  12. Quantification of cross polarization with relaxation compensated reciprocity relation in NMR

    Shu, Jie; Chen, Qun; Zhang, Shanmin

    2008-09-01

    The reciprocity relation in solid state NMR has been extended to include the effects of spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame. This method was successfully applied to the experiments of Hartmann-Hahn cross polarization, making the originally non-quantified NMR spectra quantitative. In addition, it provides detailed dynamics of cross polarization that is often obscured by spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame and by some other effects.

  13. NMR studies on 15N-labeled creatine (CR), creatinine (CRN), phosphocreatine (PCR), and phosphocreatinine (PCRN), and on barriers to rotation in creatine kinase-bound creatine in the enzymatic reaction

    Recently, the authors have synthesized 15N-2-Cr, 15N-3-Crn, 15N-2-Crn, 15N-3-PCrn, 15N-3-PCr, and 15N-2-PCr. 1H, 15N, 31P NMR data show that Crn protonates exclusively at the non-methylated ring nitrogen, confirm that PCrn is phosphorylated at the exocyclic nitrogen, and demonstrate that the 31P-15N one-bond coupling constant in 15N-3-PCr is 18 Hz, not 3 Hz as previously reported by Brindle, K.M., Porteous, R. and Radda, G.K.. The authors have found that creatine kinase is capable of catalyzing the 14N/15N positional isotope exchange of 3-15N-PCr in the presence of MgADP, but not in its absence. Further, the exchange does not take place when labeled PCr is resynthesized exclusively from the ternary complex E X Cr X MgATP as opposed to either E X Cr or free Cr. This suggests that the enzyme both imparts an additional rotational barrier to creatine in the complex and catalyzes the transfer of phosphoryl group with essentially complete regiospecificity

  14. Binding of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin to neurophysin studied by /sup 15/N NMR using magnetization transfer and indirect detection via protons

    Live, D.H.; Cowburn, D.

    1987-10-06

    NMR was used to monitor the binding to neurophysin of oxytocin and 8-arginine-vasopressin, /sup 15/N labeling being used to identify specific backbone /sup 15/N and /sup 1/H signals. The most significant effects of binding were large downfield shifts in the amino nitrogen resonance of Phe-3 of vasopressin and in its associated proton, providing evidence that the peptide bond between residues 2 and 3 of the hormones is hydrogen-bonded to the protein within hormone-neurophysin complexes. Suggestive evidence for hydrogen bonding of the amino nitrogen of Tyr-2 was also obtained in the form of decreased proton exchange rates on binding; however, the chemical shift changes of this nitrogen and its associated proton indicated that such hydrogen bonding, if present, is probably weak. Shifts in the amino nitrogen of Asn-5 and in the -NH protons of both Asn-5 and Cys-6 demonstrated that these residues are significantly perturbed by binding, suggesting conformational changes of the ring on binding and/or the presence of binding sites on the hormone outside the 1-3 region. No support was obtained for the thesis that there is a significant second binding site for vasopressin on each neutrophysin chain. The behavior of both oxytocin and vasopressin on binding was consistent with formation of 1:1 complexes in slow exchange with the free state under most pH conditions. At low pH there was evidence of an increased exchange rate. Additionally, broadening of /sup 15/N resonances in the bound state at low pH occurred without a corresponding change in the resonances of equilibrating free hormone. The results suggest significant conformational alteration in neurophysin-hormone complexes at low pH possibly associated with protonation of the carboxyl group of the hormone-protein salt bridge.

  15. Mechanism of the bisphosphatase reaction of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase probed by (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy.

    Okar, D A; Live, D H; Devany, M H; Lange, A J

    2000-08-15

    The histidines in the bisphosphatase domain of rat liver 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase were labeled with (15)N, both specifically at N1' and globally, for use in heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) NMR spectroscopic analyses. The histidine-associated (15)N resonances were assigned by correlation to the C2' protons which had been assigned previously [Okar et al., Biochemistry 38, 1999, 4471-79]. Acquisition of the (1)H-(15)N HSQC from a phosphate-free sample demonstrated that the existence of His-258 in the rare N1' tautomeric state is dependent upon occupation of the phosphate binding site filled by the O2 phosphate of the substrate, fructose-2,6-bisphosphate, and subsequently, the phosphohistidine intermediate. The phosphohistidine intermediate is characterized by two hydrogen bonds involving the catalytic histidines, His-258 and His-392, which are directly observed at the N1' positions of the imidazole rings. The N1' of phospho-His-258 is protonated ((1)H chemical shift, 14.0 ppm) and hydrogen bonded to the backbone carbonyl of Gly-259. The N1' of cationic His-392 is hydrogen bonded ((1)H chemical shift, 13.5 ppm) to the phosphoryl moiety of the phosphohistidine. The existence of a protonated phospho-His-258 intermediate and the observation of a fairly strong hydrogen bond to the same phosphohistidine implies that hydrolysis of the covalent intermediate proceeds without any requirement for an "activated" water. Using the labeled histidines as probes of the catalytic site mutation of Glu-327 to alanine revealed that, in addition to its function as the proton donor to fructose-6-phosphate during formation of the transient phosphohistidine intermediate at the N3' of His-258, this residue has a significant role in maintaining the structural integrity of the catalytic site. The (1)H-(15)N HSQC data also provide clear evidence that despite being a surface residue, His-446 has a very acidic pK(a), much less than 6.0. On the basis of

  16. Performance of a neural-network-based determination of amino acid class and secondary structure from 1H-15N NMR data

    A neural network which can determine both amino acid class and secondary structure using NMR data from 15N-labeled proteins is described. We have included nitrogen chemical shifts,3JHNHα coupling constants, α-proton chemical shifts, and side-chain proton chemical shifts as input to a three-layer feed-forward network. The network was trained with 456 spin systems from several proteins containing various types of secondary structure, and tested on human ubiquitin, which has no sequence homology with any of the proteins in the training set. A very limited set of data,representative of those from a TOCSY-HSQC and HNHA experiment, was used.Nevertheless, in 60% of the spin systems the correct amino acid class was among the top two choices given by the network, while in 96% of the spin systems the secondary structure was correctly identified. The performance of this network clearly shows the potential of the neural network algorithm in the automation of NMR spectral analysis

  17. Backbone and Ile-δ1, Leu, Val Methyl 1H, 13C and 15N NMR chemical shift assignments for human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein

    Yin, Cuifeng; Aramini, James M.; Ma, LiChung; Cort, John R.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Krug, R. M.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2011-10-01

    Human interferon-stimulated gene 15 protein (ISG15), also called ubiquitin cross-reactive protein (UCRP), is the first identified ubiquitin-like protein containing two ubiquitin-like domains fused in tandem. The active form of ISG15 is conjugated to target proteins via the C-terminal glycine residue through an isopeptide bond in a manner similar to ubiquitin. The biological role of ISG15 is strongly associated with the modulation of cell immune function, and there is mounting evidence suggesting that many viral pathogens evade the host innate immune response by interfering with ISG15 conjugation to both host and viral proteins in a variety of ways. Here we report nearly complete backbone 1HN, 15N, 13CO, and 13Ca, as well as side chain 13Cb, methyl (Ile-d1, Leu, Val), amide (Asn, Gln), and indole NH (Trp) NMR resonance assignments for the 157-residue human ISG15 protein. These resonance assignments provide the basis for future structural and functional solution NMR studies of the biologically important human ISG15 protein.

  18. In vivo NMR field-cycling relaxation spectroscopy reveals 14N1H relaxation sinks in the backbones of proteins

    In this preliminary note, the authors report an in vivo study of Hirudo medicinalis, using field-cycling relaxation spectroscopy, showing clear 14N1H quadrupole dips, proving that the amide 14N1H groups of proteins can act as relaxation sinks in a frequency range relevant for NMR tomography. Also, as a byproduct of this work it is noted that during these experiments, leeches were exposed to field variation rates of about 50 Ts-1 in several thousand field-cycles up and down, without any obvious damage. (U.K.)

  19. MRI and proton-NMR relaxation times in diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of squamous cell carcinoma

    The potential application of MRI and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times to predict tumor growth and tumor response to therapy is investigated in 91 patients with various head and neck tumors. Of the 91 patients 38 underwent surgery and 53 underwent combined modality treatment (radiochemotherapy; RCT). The MRI morphology parameters and proton-NMR relaxation times before, during, and after therapy were evaluated. The spin-lattice T1 relaxation time of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) primary tumors is 815 ± 128 ms. Following the first RCT course 21 patients showed a complete tumor remission; 32 patients showed a significant reduction in T1 relaxation time in the primary SCC tumor region (712 ± 117 ms); 19 showed residual tumors and 13 showed reactive inflammation in biopsy. The histological verification shows a spin-lattice T1 relaxation time of 549 ± 181 ms for hyperplastic lymph nodes, 924 ± 116 ms for malignant SCC lymph nodes, and 854 ± 23 ms for inflammation. The sensitivity of the spin-lattice relaxation time is 82%, and the specificity is 93%. The negative predictive value is 85% and the positive predictive value is 93%. The T1 relaxation time of hypothetical malignant lymph nodes changes during combined modality treatment. We conclude that the spin-lattice relaxation time improves lymph node classification, and the T1 relaxation time is useful as a predictive assay indicating favorable therapeutic changes. (orig.)

  20. NMR Measurement of the Relaxations and Conductivity of Gel Electrolytes

    Kořínek, Radim; Bartušek, Karel; Ostanina, K.; Musil, M.

    Cambridge : Electromagnetics Academy, 2012, s. 1060-1063. ISBN 978-1-934142-20-2. ISSN 1559-9450. [PIERS 2012. Progres in Electromagnetics Research Symposium. Kuala Lumpur (MY), 27.03.2012-30.03.2012] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : polymer electrolytes * NMR Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  1. Elucidating the guest-host interactions and complex formation of praziquantel and cyclodextrin derivatives by (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Arrúa, Eva C; Ferreira, M João G; Salomon, Claudio J; Nunes, Teresa G

    2015-12-30

    Praziquantel is the drug of choice to treat several parasitic infections including the neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis. Due to its low aqueous solubility, cyclodextrins have been tested as potential host candidates to prepare praziquantel inclusion complexes with improved solubility. For the first time, the interactions of praziquantel with β-cyclodextrin and β-cyclodextrin derivatives (methyl-β-cyclodextrin and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin) were investigated using high resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The results of this work confirmed that solid-state NMR experiments provided structural characterization, demonstrating the formation of inclusion complexes most probably with PZQ adopting an anti conformation, also the most likely in amorphous raw PZQ. Further information on the interaction of praziquantel with methyl-β-cyclodextrin was obtained from proton rotating-frame relaxation time measurements, sensitive to kilohertz-regime motions but modulated by spin-diffusion. Evidences were presented in all cases for praziquantel complexation through the aromatic ring. In addition, 1:2 drug:carrier molar ratio appears to be the most probable and therefore suitable stoichiometry to improve pharmaceutical formulations of this antischistosomal drug. PMID:26602291

  2. Amino-acid selective experiments on uniformly 13C and 15N labeled proteins by MAS NMR: Filtering of lysines and arginines

    Jehle, Stefan; Rehbein, Kristina; Diehl, Anne; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2006-12-01

    Amino-acid selective magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments can aid the assignment of ambiguous cross-peaks in crowded spectra of solid proteins. In particular for larger proteins, data analysis can be hindered by severe resonance overlap. In such cases, filtering techniques may provide a good alternative to site-specific spin-labeling to obtain unambiguous assignments that can serve as starting points in the assignment procedure. In this paper we present a simple pulse sequence that allows selective excitation of arginine and lysine residues. To achieve this, we make use of a combination of specific cross-polarization for selective excitation [M. Baldus, A.T. Petkova, J. Herzfeld, R.G. Griffin, Cross polarization in the tilted frame: assignment and spectral simplification in heteronuclear spin systems, Mol. Phys. 95 (1998) 1197-1207.] and spin diffusion for transfer along the amino-acid side-chain. The selectivity of the filter is demonstrated with the excitation of lysine and arginine side-chain resonances in a uniformly 13C and 15N labeled protein preparation of the α-spectrin SH3 domain. It is shown that the filter can be applied as a building block in a 13C- 13C lysine-only correlation experiment.

  3. On the relaxation between non-Arrhenius diffusional behaviour and NMR relaxation in metals

    The author illustrates that a possible way of separating the 'two-defect model' and the alternative model where the activation of a second sefl-diffusion mechanism is not required is possible by NMR techniques. (L.F-Z.)

  4. Local Isotropic Diffusion Approximation for Coupled Internal and Overall Molecular Motions in NMR Spin Relaxation

    Gill, Michelle L.; Palmer, Arthur G.

    2014-01-01

    The present work demonstrates that NMR spin relaxation rate constants for molecules interconverting between states with different diffusion tensors can be modeled theoretically by combining orientational correlation functions for exchanging spherical molecules with locally isotropic approximations for the diffusion anisotropic tensors. The resulting expressions are validated by comparison with correlation functions obtained by Monte Carlo simulations and are accurate for moderate degrees of d...

  5. 13C NMR investigation of local motions involved in secondary relaxation of polymers

    Monnerie, Lucien

    The 13C NMR methods which can be used to study the local dynamics of solid samples through the cross-polarization and magic angle spinning technique are briefly reviewed. We present results obtained on solid polycycloalkyl methacrylates, polybutylene terephtalate, polystyrene and substituted polystyrenes and compare them with mechanical relaxation measurements.

  6. Optimization of CPMG sequences to measure NMR transverse relaxation time T2 in borehole applications

    M. Ronczka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR can provide key information such as porosity and permeability for hydrological characterization of geological material. In particular the NMR transverse relaxation time T2 is used to estimate permeability since it reflects a pore-size dependent relaxation process. The measurement sequence (CPMG usually consists of several thousands of electromagnetic pulses to densely record the relaxation process and to avoid relaxation processes that are due to diffusion. These pulses are equidistantly spaced by a time constant tE. In NMR borehole applications the use of CPMG sequences for measuring the transverse relaxation time T2 is limited due to requirements on energy consumption. For measuring T2, it is state-of-the-art to conduct at least two sequences with different echo spacings (tE for recording fast and slow relaxing processes that correspond to different pore-sizes. We focus on conducting only a single CPMG sequence and reducing the amount of energy while obtaining both slow and fast decaying components and minimizing the influence of relaxation due to diffusion. Therefore, we tested the usage of CPMG sequences with an increasing tE and a decreasing number of pulses. A synthetic study as well as laboratory measurements on samples of glass beads and granulate material of different grain size spectra were conducted to evaluate the effects of an increasing tE. We show that T2 distributions are broadened if the number of pulses is decreasing and the mean grain size is increasing, which is mostly an effect of a significantly shortened acquisition time. The shift of T2 distributions to small decay times as a function of tE and the mean grain size distribution is observed. We found that it is possible to conduct CPMG sequences with an increased tE. According to the acquisition time and increasing influence of relaxation due to diffusion, the sequence parameters need to be chosen carefully to avoid misinterpretations.

  7. Nanoscale coordination polymers exhibiting luminescence properties and NMR relaxivity

    Chelebaeva, Elena; Larionova, Joulia; Guari, Yannick; Ferreira, Rute A. S.; Carlos, Luis D.; Trifonov, Alexander A.; Kalaivani, Thangavel; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Guérin, Christian; Molvinger, Karine; Datas, Lucien; Maynadier, Marie; Gary-Bobo, Magali; Garcia, Marcel

    2011-03-01

    This article presents the first example of ultra-small (3-4 nm) magneto-luminescent cyano-bridged coordination polymer nanoparticles Ln0.333+Gdx3+/[Mo(CN)8]3- (Ln = Eu (x = 0.34), Tb (x = 0.35)) enwrapped by a natural biocompatible polymer chitosan. The aqueous colloidal solutions of these nanoparticles present a luminescence characteristic of the corresponding lanthanides (5D0 --> 7F0-4 (Eu3+) or the 5D4 --> 7F6-2 (Tb3+)) under UV excitation and a green luminescence of the chitosan shell under excitation in the visible region. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) efficiency, i.e. the nuclear relaxivity, measurements performed for Ln0.333+Gdx3+/[Mo(CN)8]3- nanoparticles show r1p and r2p relaxivities slightly higher than or comparable to the ones of the commercial paramagnetic compounds Gd-DTPA® or Omniscan® indicating that our samples may potentially be considered as a positive contrast agent for MRI. The in vitro studies performed on these nanoparticles show that they maybe internalized into human cancer and normal cells and well detected by fluorescence at the single cell level. They present high stability even at low pH and lack of cytotoxicity both in human cancer and normal cells.This article presents the first example of ultra-small (3-4 nm) magneto-luminescent cyano-bridged coordination polymer nanoparticles Ln0.333+Gdx3+/[Mo(CN)8]3- (Ln = Eu (x = 0.34), Tb (x = 0.35)) enwrapped by a natural biocompatible polymer chitosan. The aqueous colloidal solutions of these nanoparticles present a luminescence characteristic of the corresponding lanthanides (5D0 --> 7F0-4 (Eu3+) or the 5D4 --> 7F6-2 (Tb3+)) under UV excitation and a green luminescence of the chitosan shell under excitation in the visible region. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) efficiency, i.e. the nuclear relaxivity, measurements performed for Ln0.333+Gdx3+/[Mo(CN)8]3- nanoparticles show r1p and r2p relaxivities slightly higher than or comparable to the ones of the commercial paramagnetic compounds Gd

  8. NMR permeability estimators in "chalk" carbonate rocks obtained under different relaxation times and MICP size scalings

    Rios, Edmilson Helton; Figueiredo, Irineu; Moss, Adam Keith; Pritchard, Timothy Neil; Glassborow, Brent Anthony; Domingues, Ana Beatriz Guedes; Azeredo, Rodrigo Bagueira de Vasconcellos

    2016-04-01

    The effect of the selection of different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times for permeability estimation is investigated for a set of fully brine-saturated rocks acquired from Cretaceous carbonate reservoirs in the North Sea and Middle East. Estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the Pythagorean means are compared with estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the concept of a cumulative saturation cutoff. Select portions of the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation-time distributions are systematically evaluated by applying various cutoffs, analogous to the Winland-Pittman approach for mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves. Finally, different approaches to matching the NMR and MICP distributions using different mean-based scaling factors are validated based on the performance of the related size-scaled estimators. The good results that were obtained demonstrate possible alternatives to the commonly adopted logarithmic mean estimator and reinforce the importance of NMR-MICP integration to improving carbonate permeability estimates.

  9. Solid-state NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement immersion depth studies in phospholipid bilayers

    Chu, Shidong

    2010-11-01

    A new approach for determining the membrane immersion depth of a spin-labeled probe has been developed using paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) in solid-state NMR spectroscopy. A DOXYL spin label was placed at different sites of 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PSPC) phospholipid bilayers as paramagnetic moieties and the resulting enhancements of the longitudinal relaxation (T1) times of 31P nuclei on the surface of the bilayers were measured by a standard inversion recovery pulse sequence. The 31P NMR spin-lattice relaxation times decrease steadily as the DOXYL spin label moves closer to the surface as well as the concentration of the spin-labeled lipids increase. The enhanced relaxation vs. the position and concentration of spin-labels indicate that PRE induced by the DOXYL spin label are significant to determine longer distances over the whole range of the membrane depths. When these data were combined with estimated correlation times τc, the r-6-weighted, time-averaged distances between the spin-labels and the 31P nuclei on the membrane surface were estimated. The application of using this solid-state NMR PRE approach coupled with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) may be a powerful method for measuring membrane protein immersion depth. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 1H NMR Relaxation Investigation of Inhibitors Interacting with Torpedo californica Acetylcholinesterase

    Delfini, Maurizio; Gianferri, Raffaella; Dubbini, Veronica; Manetti, Cesare; Gaggelli, Elena; Valensin, Gianni

    2000-05-01

    Two naphthyridines interacting with Torpedo californica acetylcholinesterase (AChE) were investigated. 1H NMR spectra were recorded and nonselective, selective, and double-selective spin-lattice relaxation rates were measured. The enhancement of selective relaxation rates could be titrated by different ligand concentrations at constant AChE (yielding 0.22 and 1.53 mM for the dissociation constants) and was providing evidence of a diverse mode of interaction. The double-selective relaxation rates were used to evaluate the motional correlation times of bound ligands at 34.9 and 36.5 ns at 300 K. Selective relaxation rates of bound inhibitors could be interpreted also in terms of dipole-dipole interactions with protons in the enzyme active site.

  11. NMR relaxation times of trabecular bone—reproducibility, relationships to tissue structure and effects of sample freezing

    Prantner, Viktória; Isaksson, Hanna; Närväinen, Johanna; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nissi, Mikko J.; Avela, Janne; Gröhn, Olli H. J.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a potential tool for non-invasive evaluation of the trabecular bone structure. The objective of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the NMR relaxation parameters (T2, Carr-Purcel-T2, T1ρ) for fat and water and relate those to the structural parameters obtained by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Especially, we aimed to evaluate the effect of freezing on the relaxation parameters. For storing bone samples, freezing is the standard procedure during which the biochemical and cellular organization of the bone marrow may be affected. Bovine trabecular bone samples were stored at -20 °C for 7 days and measured by NMR spectroscopy before and after freezing. The reproducibility of NMR relaxation parameters, as expressed by the coefficient of variation, ranged from 3.1% to 27.9%. In fresh samples, some correlations between NMR and structural parameters (Tb.N, Tb.Sp) were significant (e.g. the relaxation rate for T2 of fat versus Tb.Sp: r = -0.716, p NMR relaxation times but the correlations between relaxation parameters and the μCT structural parameters were not statistically significant after freezing, suggesting some nonsystematic alterations of the marrow structure. Therefore, the use of frozen bone samples for NMR relaxation studies may provide inferior information about the trabecular bone structure.

  12. $^{11}B$ NMR and Relaxation in $MgB_2$ Superconductor

    Jung, J. K.; Baek, Seung Ho; F. Borsa; Bud'ko, S. L.; Lapertot, G.; Canfield, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    $^{11}B$ NMR and nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) are reported at 7.2 Tesla and 1.4 Tesla in powder samples of the intermetallic compound $MgB_2$ with superconducting transition temperature in zero field $T_c$ = 39.2 K. From the first order quadrupole perturbed NMR specrum a quadrupole coupling frequency of 835 $\\pm$ 5 kHz is obtained. The Knight shift is very small and it decreases to zero in the superconducting phase. The NSLR follows a linear law with $T_1T$ = 165 $\\pm$ 10 (sec ...

  13. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for 13C NMR relaxation studies

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of 15N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to 13C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and 13C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly 13C -labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions.

  14. Resonances in field-cycling NMR on molecular crystals. (reversible) Spin dynamics or (irreversible) relaxation?; Resonanzen in Field-Cycling-NMR an Molekuelkristallen. (reversible) Spindynamik oder (irreversible) Relaxation?

    Tacke, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Multi spin systems with spin 1/2 nuclei and dipolar coupled quadrupolar nuclei can show so called ''quadrupolar dips''. There are two main reasons for this behavior: polarization transfer and relaxation. They look quite alike and without additional research cannot be differentiated easily in most cases. These two phenomena have quite different physical and theoretical backgrounds. For no or very slow dynamics, polarization transfer will take place, which is energy conserving inside the spin system. This effect can entirely be described using quantum mechanics on the spin system. Detailed knowledge about the crystallography is needed, because this affects the relevant hamiltonians directly. For systems with fast enough dynamics, relaxation takes over, and the energy flows from the spin system to the lattice; thus a more complex theoretical description is needed. This description has to include a dynamic model, usually in the form of a spectral density function. Both models should include detailed modelling of the complete spin system. A software library was developed to be able to model complex spin systems. It allows to simulate polarization transfer or relaxation effects. NMR measurements were performed on the protonic conductor K{sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}. A single crystal shows sharp quadrupolar dips at room temperature. Dynamics could be excluded using relaxation measurements and literature values. Thus, a polarization transfer analysis was used to describe those dips with good agreement. As a second system, imidazolium based molecular crystals were analyzed. The quadrupolar dips were expected to be caused by polarization transfer; this was carefully analyzed and found not to be true. A relaxation based analysis shows good agreement with the measured data in the high temperature area. It leverages a two step spectral density function, which indicates two distinct dynamic processes happening in this system.

  15. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR studies of heterogeneous catalytic reaction over HY zeolite using natural abundance reactant.

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Shenhui; Su, Yongchao; Li, Bojie; Deng, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement solid-state NMR (PRE ssNMR) technique was used to investigate catalytic reaction over zeolite HY. After introducing paramagnetic Cu(II) ions into the zeolite, the enhancement of longitudinal relaxation rates of nearby nuclei, i.e.(29)Si of the framework and (13)C of the absorbents, was measured. It was demonstrated that the PRE ssNMR technique facilitated the fast acquisition of NMR signals to monitor the heterogeneous catalytic reaction (such as acetone to hydrocarbon) using natural abundance reactants. PMID:25616847

  16. NMR-relaxation in NdCl3 and YbCl3 solutions in H2O-DMSO

    On the basis of proton NMR relaxation measurements the composition of the first coordination sphere of Yb3+ and Nd3+ cations is characterized quantitatively in the binary H2O-DMSO solvent. 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Effect of fluctuations on the NMR relaxation beyond the Abrikosov vortex state

    Glatz, A.; Galda, A.; Varlamov, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    The effect of fluctuations on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation rate W =T1-1 is studied in a complete phase diagram of a two-dimensional superconductor above the upper critical field line Hc 2(T ) . In the region of relatively high temperatures and low magnetic fields, the relaxation rate W is determined by two competing effects. The first one is its decrease in the result of suppression of the quasiparticle density of states (DOS) due to formation of fluctuation Cooper pairs (FCPs). The second one is a specific, purely quantum relaxation process of the Maki-Thompson (MT) type, which for low field leads to an increase of the relaxation rate. The latter describes particular fluctuation processes involving self-pairing of a single electron on self-intersecting trajectories of a size up to phase-breaking length ℓϕ which becomes possible due to an electron spin-flip scattering event at a nucleus. As a result, different scenarios with either growth or decrease of the NMR relaxation rate are possible upon approaching the normal-metal-type-II superconductor transition. The character of fluctuations changes along the line Hc 2(T ) from the thermal long-wavelength type in weak magnetic fields to the clusters of rotating FCPs in fields comparable to Hc 2(0 ) . We find that below the well-defined temperature T0*≈0.6 Tc 0 , the MT process becomes ineffective even in the absence of intrinsic pair breaking. The small scale of the FCP rotations ξxy in such high fields impedes formation of long (≲ℓϕ) self-intersecting trajectories, causing the corresponding relaxation mechanism to lose its efficiency. This reduces the effect of superconducting fluctuations in the domain of high fields and low temperatures to just the suppression of quasiparticle DOS, analogous to the Abrikosov vortex phase below the Hc 2(T ) line.

  18. Comparison of aqueous molecular dynamics with NMR relaxation and residual dipolar couplings favors internal motion in a mannose oligosaccharide

    Almond, A; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Franch, T; Gotfredsen, Charlotte Held; Duus, J O

    2001-01-01

    An investigation has been performed to assess how aqueous dynamical simulations of flexible molecules can be compared against NMR data. The methodology compares state-of-the-art NMR data (residual dipolar coupling, NOESY, and (13)C relaxation) to molecular dynamics simulations in water over sever...

  19. NMR relaxation study of water dynamics in superparamagnetic iron-oxide-loaded vesicles

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Hsieh, Chu-Jung; Lin, Chao-Min; Hwang, Dennis W.

    2013-02-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have been introduced as contrast agents for clinical applications in magnetic resonance imaging. Recently, SPIO has been also used for tracking cells. However, NMR relaxation of water molecules behaves differently in a SPIO solution and SPIO-loaded cells. In this study, we used water-in-oil-in-water double emulsions to mimic cellular environments. The MR relaxation induced by the SPIO-loaded vesicles and SPIO solution indicates that T2* is sensitive to the iron concentration alone, and the behavior was very similar in both SPIO-loaded vesicles and SPIO solution. However, T2 relaxation of water in SPIO-loaded vesicles was faster than that in a SPIO solution. In addition, the contribution of water inside and outside the vesicles was clarified by replacing H2O with D2O, and water inside the vesicles was found to cause a nonlinear iron concentration dependency. The studied dilution revealed that vesicle aggregation undergoes a structural transition upon dilution by a certain amount of water. R2* relaxation is sensitive to this structural change and shows an obvious nonlinear iron concentration dependency when the SPIO loading is sufficiently high. Random walk simulations demonstrated that in the assumed model, the vesicles aggregate structures causing the differences between R2* and R2 relaxation of water in vesicles in the presence of SPIO particles.

  20. Effect of phosphorylation on hydrogen-bonding interactions of the active site histidine of the phosphocarrier protein HPr of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system determined by 15N NMR spectroscopy

    The phosphocarrier protein HPr of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar transport system of Escherichia coli can exist in a phosphorylated and a nonphosphorylated form. During phosphorylation, the phosphoryl group is carried on a histidine residue, His15. The hydrogen-bonding state of this histidine was examined with 15N NMR. For this purpose we selectively enriched the histidine imidazole nitrogens with 15N by supplying an E. coli histidine auxotroph with the amino acid labeled either at the Nδ1 and Nε2 positions or at only the Nδ1 position. 15N NMR spectra of two synthesized model compound, phosphoimidazole and phosphomethylimidazole, were also recorded. The authors show that, prior to phosphorylation, the protonated His15 Nε2 is strongly hydrogen bonded, most probably to a carboxylate moiety. The H-bond should strengthen the nucleophilic character of the deprotonated Nδ1, resulting in a good acceptor for the phosphoryl group. The hydrogen bond to the His15 Nδ1 breaks upon phosphorylation of the residue. Implications of the H-bond structure for the mechanism of phosphorylation of HPr are discussed

  1. NMR water-proton spin-lattice relaxation time of human red blood cells and red blood cell suspensions

    NMR water-proton spin-lattice relaxation times were studied as probes of water structure in human red blood cells and red blood cell suspensions. Normal saline had a relaxation time of about 3000 ms while packed red blood cells had a relaxation time of about 500 ms. The relaxation time of a red blood cell suspension at 50% hematocrit was about 750 ms showing that surface charges and polar groups of the red cell membrane effectively structure extracellular water. Incubation of red cells in hypotonic saline increases relaxation time whereas hypertonic saline decreases relaxation time. Relaxation times varied independently of mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration in a sample population. Studies with lysates and resealed membrane ghosts show that hemoglobin is very effective in lowering water-proton relaxation time whereas resealed membrane ghosts in the absence of hemoglobin are less effective than intact red cells. 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 table

  2. Anisotropic collective motion contributes to nuclear spin relaxation in crystalline proteins.

    Lewandowski, Józef R; Sein, Julien; Blackledge, Martin; Emsley, Lyndon

    2010-02-01

    A model for calculating the influence of anisotropic collective motions on NMR relaxation rates in crystalline proteins is presented. We show that small-amplitude (<10 degrees ) fluctuations may lead to substantial contributions to the (15)N spin-lattice relaxation rates and propose that the effect of domain motions should be included in solid-state NMR analyses of protein dynamics. PMID:19916496

  3. 59Co NMR and nuclear magnetic relaxation study of the magnetic superconductor Y9Co7

    The magnetic superconductor Y9Co7 presented in its structure magnetic and non-magnetic Co atoms. A search was made of the 59Co NMR lines attributed in the literature to magnetic Co atoms, With negative results. For the strong 59Co NMR line arising from nuclei of non-magnetic Co atoms the relaxation times T1 and T2 versus temperature were measured directly at 6.5 MHz and 9.0 MHz. A linear dependence on temperature was observed for 1/T1 which can be attributed to interactions with conduction electrons. 1/T2 is not linear with temperature, an effect that is related to the temperature dependence of the magnetization. (Authors)

  4. NMR relaxation and phase transitions in solid methane and deuterated derivatives

    This thesis describes an investigation of properties of solid methane at high pressure (till 10 kbar) with temperatures ranging from 2 until 100 K. The high inverse moment of inertia of the molecule combined with low ordering potentials gives rise to properties for which quantum effects play an important role: e.g. the transition temperature to a partially ordered phase shows an isotope effect of 35% when CH4 protons are substituted by deuterons. Interpretation of NMR properties of solid methane also show quantum effects. First, a helium cryostat is developed and described and NMR results for CH4, CH2D2 and CD4 are given. The influence of discrete tunnel states on the spin-lattice relaxation is studied theoretically. Application of group theory has simplified the calculations considerably. (G.J.P.)

  5. High resolution NMR study of T1 magnetic relaxation dispersion. IV. Proton relaxation in amino acids and Met-enkephalin pentapeptide

    Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion (NMRD) of protons was studied in the pentapeptide Met-enkephalin and the amino acids, which constitute it. Experiments were run by using high-resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in combination with fast field-cycling, thus enabling measuring NMRD curves for all individual protons. As in earlier works, Papers I–III, pronounced effects of intramolecular scalar spin-spin interactions, J-couplings, on spin relaxation were found. Notably, at low fields J-couplings tend to equalize the apparent relaxation rates within networks of coupled protons. In Met-enkephalin, in contrast to the free amino acids, there is a sharp increase in the proton T1-relaxation times at high fields due to the changes in the regime of molecular motion. The experimental data are in good agreement with theory. From modelling the relaxation experiments we were able to determine motional correlation times of different residues in Met-enkephalin with atomic resolution. This allows us to draw conclusions about preferential conformation of the pentapeptide in solution, which is also in agreement with data from two-dimensional NMR experiments (rotating frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy). Altogether, our study demonstrates that high-resolution NMR studies of magnetic field-dependent relaxation allow one to probe molecular mobility in biomolecules with atomic resolution

  6. Histidine side-chain dynamics and protonation monitored by C-13 CPMG NMR relaxation dispersion

    Hass, M. A. S.; Yilmaz, A.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager;

    2009-01-01

    The use of C-13 NMR relaxation dispersion experiments to monitor micro-millisecond fluctuations in the protonation states of histidine residues in proteins is investigated. To illustrate the approach, measurements on three specifically C-13 labeled histidine residues in plastocyanin (PCu) from...... Anabaena variabilis (A.v.) are presented. Significant Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion is observed for C-13(epsilon 1) nuclei in the histidine imidazole rings of A.v. PCu. The chemical shift changes obtained from the CPMG dispersion data are in good agreement with those obtained from...... states or other kinds of conformational changes of histidine side chains or their environment. Advantages and shortcomings of using the C-13(epsilon 1) dispersion experiments in combination with chemical shift titration experiments to obtain information on exchange dynamics of the histidine side chains...

  7. Local isotropic diffusion approximation for coupled internal and overall molecular motions in NMR spin relaxation.

    Gill, Michelle L; Palmer, Arthur G

    2014-09-25

    The present work demonstrates that NMR spin relaxation rate constants for molecules interconverting between states with different diffusion tensors can be modeled theoretically by combining orientational correlation functions for exchanging spherical molecules with locally isotropic approximations for the diffusion anisotropic tensors. The resulting expressions are validated by comparison with correlation functions obtained by Monte Carlo simulations and are accurate for moderate degrees of diffusion anisotropy typically encountered in investigations of globular proteins. The results are complementary to an elegant, but more complex, formalism that is accurate for all degrees of diffusion anisotropy [Ryabov, Y.; Clore, G. M.; Schwieters, C. D. J. Chem. Phys. 2012, 136, 034108]. PMID:25167331

  8. Phosphorus-31, 15N, and 13C NMR of glyphosate: Comparison of pH titrations to the herbicidal dead-end complex with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase

    The herbicidal dead-end ternary complex (ES3PGlyph) of glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) has been characterized by 31P, 15N, and 13C NMR. The NMR spectra of EPSPS-bound glyphosate show unique chemical shifts (δ) for each of the three nuclei. By 31P NMR, glyphosate in the dead-end complex is a distinct species 3.5 ppm downfield from free glyphosate. The 13C signal of glyphosate in the dead-end complex is shifted 4 ppm downfield from that of free glyphosate. The 15N signal for glyphosate (99%) in the dead-end complex is 5 ppm further downfield than that of any free zwitterionic species and 10 ppm downfield from that of the average free species at pH 10.1. The structures of each ionic state of glyphosate are modeled with force field calculations by using MacroModel. A correlation is made for the 31P δ and the C-P-O bond angle, and the 13C and 15N δ values are postulated to be related to C-C-O and C-N-C bond angles, respectively. The downfield 31P chemical shift perturbation for S3P in the EPSPS binary complex is consistent with ionization of the 3-phosphate of S3P upon binding. Comparison with the S3P 31P δ vs pH titration curve specifies predominantly the dianion of the 3-phosphate in the ES3P binary complex, while the ES3PGlyph complex indicates net protonation at the 3-phosphate. Chemical shift perturbations of this latter type may be explained by changes in the O-P-O bond angle

  9. Water interactions with varying molecular states of bovine casein: 2H NMR relaxation studies

    The caseins occur in milk as spherical colloidal complexes of protein and salts with an average diameter of 1200 A, the casein micelles. Removal of Ca2+ is thought to result in their dissociation into smaller protein complexes stabilized by hydrophobic interactions and called submicelles. Whether these submicelles actually occur within the micelles as discrete particles interconnected by calcium phosphate salt bridges has been the subject of much controversy. A variety of physical measurements have shown that casein micelles contain an inordinately high amount of trapped water (2 to 7 g H2O/g protein). With this in mind it was of interest to determine if NMR relaxation measurements could detect the presence of this trapped water within the micelles, and to evaluate whether it is a continuum with picosecond correlation times or is associated in part with discrete submicellar structures with nanosecond motions. For this purpose the variations in 2H NMR longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates of water with protein concentration were determined for bovine casein at various temperatures, under both submicellar and micellar conditions. D2O was used instead of H2O to eliminate cross-relaxation effects. From the protein concentration dependence of the relaxation rates, the second virial coefficient of the protein was obtained by nonlinear regression analysis. Using either an isotropic tumbling or an intermediate asymmetry model, degrees of hydration, v, and correlation times, tau c, were calculated for the caseins; from the latter parameter the Stokes radius, r, was obtained. Next, estimates of molecular weights were obtained from r and the partial specific volume. Values were in the range of those published from other methodologies for the submicelles

  10. NMR longitudinal relaxation enhancement in metal halides by heteronuclear polarization exchange during magic-angle spinning.

    Shmyreva, Anna A; Safdari, Majid; Furó, István; Dvinskikh, Sergey V

    2016-06-14

    Orders of magnitude decrease of (207)Pb and (199)Hg NMR longitudinal relaxation times T1 upon magic-angle-spinning (MAS) are observed and systematically investigated in solid lead and mercury halides MeX2 (Me = Pb, Hg and X = Cl, Br, I). In lead(ii) halides, the most dramatic decrease of T1 relative to that in a static sample is in PbI2, while it is smaller but still significant in PbBr2, and not detectable in PbCl2. The effect is magnetic-field dependent but independent of the spinning speed in the range 200-15 000 Hz. The observed relaxation enhancement is explained by laboratory-frame heteronuclear polarization exchange due to crossing between energy levels of spin-1/2 metal nuclei and adjacent quadrupolar-spin halogen nuclei. The enhancement effect is also present in lead-containing organometal halide perovskites. Our results demonstrate that in affected samples, it is the relaxation data recorded under non-spinning conditions that characterize the local properties at the metal sites. A practical advantage of fast relaxation at slow MAS is that spectral shapes with orientational chemical shift anisotropy information well retained can be acquired within a shorter experimental time. PMID:27306000

  11. NMR longitudinal relaxation enhancement in metal halides by heteronuclear polarization exchange during magic-angle spinning

    Shmyreva, Anna A.; Safdari, Majid; Furó, István; Dvinskikh, Sergey V.

    2016-06-01

    Orders of magnitude decrease of 207Pb and 199Hg NMR longitudinal relaxation times T1 upon magic-angle-spinning (MAS) are observed and systematically investigated in solid lead and mercury halides MeX2 (Me = Pb, Hg and X = Cl, Br, I). In lead(ii) halides, the most dramatic decrease of T1 relative to that in a static sample is in PbI2, while it is smaller but still significant in PbBr2, and not detectable in PbCl2. The effect is magnetic-field dependent but independent of the spinning speed in the range 200-15 000 Hz. The observed relaxation enhancement is explained by laboratory-frame heteronuclear polarization exchange due to crossing between energy levels of spin-1/2 metal nuclei and adjacent quadrupolar-spin halogen nuclei. The enhancement effect is also present in lead-containing organometal halide perovskites. Our results demonstrate that in affected samples, it is the relaxation data recorded under non-spinning conditions that characterize the local properties at the metal sites. A practical advantage of fast relaxation at slow MAS is that spectral shapes with orientational chemical shift anisotropy information well retained can be acquired within a shorter experimental time.

  12. Spin fluctuations in iron based superconductors probed by NMR relaxation rate

    Graefe, Uwe; Kuehne, Tim; Wurmehl, Sabine; Buechner, Bernd; Grafe, Hans-Joachim [IFW Dresden, Institute for Solid State Research, PF 270116, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Hammerath, Franziska [IFW Dresden, Institute for Solid State Research, PF 270116, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Department of Physics ' ' A. Volta' ' , University of Pavia-CNISM, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Lang, Guillaume [3LPEM-UPR5, CNRS, ESPCI Paris Tech, 10 Rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)

    2013-07-01

    We present {sup 75}As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results in F doped LaOFeAs iron pnictides. In the underdoped superconducting samples, pronounced spin fluctuations lead to a peak in the NMR spin lattice relaxation rate, (T{sub 1}T){sup -1}. The peak shows a typical field dependence that indicates a critical slowing of spin fluctuations: it is reduced in height and shifted to higher temperatures. In contrast, a similar peak in the underdoped magnetic samples at the ordering temperature of the spin density wave does not show such a field dependence. Furthermore, the peak is absent in optimally and overdoped samples, suggesting the absence of strong spin fluctuations. Our results indicate a glassy magnetic ordering in the underdoped samples that is in contrast to the often reported Curie Weiss like increase of spin fluctuations towards T{sub c}. Additional measurements of the linewidth and the spin spin relaxation rate are in agreement with such a glassy magnetic ordering that is most likely competing with superconductivity. Our results will be compared to Co doped BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, where a similar peak in (T{sub 1}T){sup -1} has been observed.

  13. Spin fluctuations in iron based superconductors probed by NMR relaxation rate

    We present 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results in F doped LaOFeAs iron pnictides. In the underdoped superconducting samples, pronounced spin fluctuations lead to a peak in the NMR spin lattice relaxation rate, (T1T)-1. The peak shows a typical field dependence that indicates a critical slowing of spin fluctuations: it is reduced in height and shifted to higher temperatures. In contrast, a similar peak in the underdoped magnetic samples at the ordering temperature of the spin density wave does not show such a field dependence. Furthermore, the peak is absent in optimally and overdoped samples, suggesting the absence of strong spin fluctuations. Our results indicate a glassy magnetic ordering in the underdoped samples that is in contrast to the often reported Curie Weiss like increase of spin fluctuations towards Tc. Additional measurements of the linewidth and the spin spin relaxation rate are in agreement with such a glassy magnetic ordering that is most likely competing with superconductivity. Our results will be compared to Co doped BaFe2As2, where a similar peak in (T1T)-1 has been observed.

  14. Relaxation NMR as a tool to study the dispersion and formulation behavior of nanostructured carbon materials.

    Fairhurst, David; Cosgrove, Terence; Prescott, Stuart W

    2016-06-01

    Solvent relaxation NMR has been used to estimate the surface areas and wettability of various types of nanostructured carbon materials in a range of solvents including water, ethanol, and tetrahydrofuran. We illustrate the application of the technique through several short case studies using samples including nanocarbon blacks, graphene oxide, nanographites, and porous graphenes. The technique is shown to give a good measure of surface area, correlating well with conventional surface area estimates obtained by nitrogen adsorption, transmission electron microscopy, or light scattering for the non-porous samples. NMR relaxation has advantages in terms of speed of analysis and being able to use concentrated, wet, and opaque samples. For samples that are porous, two distinct surface areas can be estimated assuming the two environments ('inner' and 'outer') have the same surface chemistry, and that there is a slow exchange of solvent molecules between them. Furthermore, we show that differences in wettability and dispersability between samples dispersed in water, ethanol, and cyclopentanone can be observed, along with changes to the surface chemistry of the interface. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25989999

  15. Resonances in field-cycling NMR on molecular crystals. (reversible) Spin dynamics or (irreversible) relaxation?

    Multi spin systems with spin 1/2 nuclei and dipolar coupled quadrupolar nuclei can show so called ''quadrupolar dips''. There are two main reasons for this behavior: polarization transfer and relaxation. They look quite alike and without additional research cannot be differentiated easily in most cases. These two phenomena have quite different physical and theoretical backgrounds. For no or very slow dynamics, polarization transfer will take place, which is energy conserving inside the spin system. This effect can entirely be described using quantum mechanics on the spin system. Detailed knowledge about the crystallography is needed, because this affects the relevant hamiltonians directly. For systems with fast enough dynamics, relaxation takes over, and the energy flows from the spin system to the lattice; thus a more complex theoretical description is needed. This description has to include a dynamic model, usually in the form of a spectral density function. Both models should include detailed modelling of the complete spin system. A software library was developed to be able to model complex spin systems. It allows to simulate polarization transfer or relaxation effects. NMR measurements were performed on the protonic conductor K3H(SO4)2. A single crystal shows sharp quadrupolar dips at room temperature. Dynamics could be excluded using relaxation measurements and literature values. Thus, a polarization transfer analysis was used to describe those dips with good agreement. As a second system, imidazolium based molecular crystals were analyzed. The quadrupolar dips were expected to be caused by polarization transfer; this was carefully analyzed and found not to be true. A relaxation based analysis shows good agreement with the measured data in the high temperature area. It leverages a two step spectral density function, which indicates two distinct dynamic processes happening in this system.

  16. Contribution of proton NMR relaxation to the investigation of molecular dynamics in columnar mesophases of discotic and polycatenar molecules

    A C Ribeiro; P J Sebastiao; C Cruz

    2003-08-01

    We present in this work a review concerning wide frequency range 1 proton NMR relaxation studies performed in compounds exhibiting columnar mesophases, namely the Colho mesophase in the case of a liquid crystal of discotic molecules and the h mesophase in the case of a liquid crystal of biforked molecules. These NMR relaxation studies were performed combining conventional and fast field cycling NMR techniques in a frequency range between 100 Hz and 300 MHz. The possibility of probing such a large frequency range has provided a way to effectively distinguish the influence, on the 1 relaxation profiles, of the different molecular movements observed in this type of mesophases. In addition, we present a comparison between the molecular dynamics in columnar (h) and lamellar (SmC) mesophases exhibited by the same biforked compound.

  17. Solution conformation and dynamics of a tetrasaccharide related to the LewisX antigen deduced by NMR relaxation measurements

    1H-NMR cross-relaxation rates and nonselective longitudinal relaxation times have been obtained at two magnetic fields (7.0 and 11.8 T) and at a variety of temperatures for the branched tetrasaccharide methyl 3-O-α-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl-β-galactopyranosyl-(1→4)[3-O-α-fucosyl] -glucopyranoside (1), an inhibitor of astrocyte growth. In addition, 13C-NMR relaxation data have also been recorded at both fields. The 1H-NMR relaxation data have been interpreted using different motional models to obtain proton-proton correlation times. The results indicate that the GalNAc and Fuc rings display more extensive local motion than the two inner Glc and Gal moieties, since those present significantly shorter local correlation times. The13C-NMR relaxation parameters have been interpreted in terms of the Lipari-Szabo model-free approach. Thus, order parameters and internal motion correlation times have been deduced. As obtained for the1H-NMR relaxation data, the two outer residues possess smaller order parameters than the two inner rings. Internal correlation times are in the order of 100 ps. The hydroxymethyl groups have also different behaviour,with the exocyclic carbon on the glucopyranoside unit showing the highestS2. Molecular dynamics simulations using a solvated system have also been performed and internal motion correlation functions have been deduced from these calculations. Order parameters and interproton distances have been compared to those inferred from the NMR measurements. The obtained results are in fair agreement with the experimental data

  18. Solution conformation and dynamics of a tetrasaccharide related to the Lewis{sup X} antigen deduced by NMR relaxation measurements

    Poveda, Ana [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Servicio Interdepartamental de Investigacion (Spain); Asensio, Juan Luis; Martin-Pastor, Manuel; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Instituto de Quimica Organica, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain)

    1997-07-15

    {sup 1}H-NMR cross-relaxation rates and nonselective longitudinal relaxation times have been obtained at two magnetic fields (7.0 and 11.8 T) and at a variety of temperatures for the branched tetrasaccharide methyl 3-O-{alpha}-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl-{beta}-galactopyranosyl-(1{sup {yields}}4)[3-O-{alpha}-fucosyl] -glucopyranoside (1), an inhibitor of astrocyte growth. In addition, {sup 13}C-NMR relaxation data have also been recorded at both fields. The {sup 1}H-NMR relaxation data have been interpreted using different motional models to obtain proton-proton correlation times. The results indicate that the GalNAc and Fuc rings display more extensive local motion than the two inner Glc and Gal moieties, since those present significantly shorter local correlation times. The{sup 13}C-NMR relaxation parameters have been interpreted in terms of the Lipari-Szabo model-free approach. Thus, order parameters and internal motion correlation times have been deduced. As obtained for the{sup 1}H-NMR relaxation data, the two outer residues possess smaller order parameters than the two inner rings. Internal correlation times are in the order of 100 ps. The hydroxymethyl groups have also different behaviour,with the exocyclic carbon on the glucopyranoside unit showing the highestS{sup 2}. Molecular dynamics simulations using a solvated system have also been performed and internal motion correlation functions have been deduced from these calculations. Order parameters and interproton distances have been compared to those inferred from the NMR measurements. The obtained results are in fair agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Estimating Pore Properties from NMR Relaxation Time Measurements in Heterogeneous Media

    Grunewald, E.; Knight, R.

    2008-12-01

    The link between pore geometry and the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time T2 is well- established for simple systems but is poorly understood for complex media with heterogeneous pores. Conventional interpretation of NMR relaxation data employs a model of isolated pores in which each hydrogen proton samples only one pore type, and the T2-distribution is directly scaled to estimate a pore-size distribution. During an actual NMR measurement, however, each proton diffuses through a finite volume of the pore network, and so may sample multiple pore types encountered within this diffusion cell. For cases in which heterogeneous pores are strongly coupled by diffusion, the meaning of the T2- distribution is not well understood and further research is required to determine how such measurements should be interpreted. In this study we directly investigate the implications of pore coupling in two groups of laboratory NMR experiments. We conduct two suites of experiments, in which samples are synthesized to exhibit a range of pore coupling strengths using two independent approaches: (a) varying the scale of the diffusion cell and (b) varying the scale over which heterogeneous pores are encountered. In the first set of experiments, we vary the scale of the diffusion cell in silica gels which have a bimodal pore-size distribution comprised of intragrannular micropores and much larger intergrannular pores. The untreated gel exhibits strong pore coupling with a single broad peak observed in the T2-distribution. By treating the gel with varied amounts of paramagnetic iron surface coatings, we decrease the surface relaxation time, T2S, and effectively decrease both the size of the diffusion cell and the degree of pore coupling. As more iron is coated to the grain surfaces, we observe a separation of the broad T2-distribution into two peaks that more accurately represent the true bimodal pore-size distribution. In the second set of experiments, we vary the scale over

  20. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements in structure determination of proteins by NMR spectroscopy

    Solution NMR spectroscopy is a versatile tool to study a variety of a biomolecular parameters such as its structural assembly, its dynamics and its interaction with other molecules. We used the methodological expansion of paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) to gain additional insights into spatial proximities and surface accessibility of a variety of proteins.The structure of Fst, a toxic, hydrophobic peptide was solved within a membrane mimicking environment. Using PREs, it was possible to show a transmembrane binding mode.Further, the structure of Cla h 8 was solved which is a eukaryotic homologue to prokaryotic cold shock proteins. We were using PREs to determine the high resolution structure and its mode of binding to DNA.Additionally, we solved the structure of Phl p 5a, a major grass pollen allergen. The determination of PREs displayed the dynamic behavior of different parts of the molecule. (author)

  1. Wettability of quartz surface as observed by NMR transverse relaxation time (T2)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Katika, Konstantina; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    wettability property of quartz surface by using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) method. The principle of this method is that protons in water relax faster when it comes close to solid surface. We observed that quart is highly water wet. A layer of water (bound water) forms on the quartz surface when they are......Injection of optimized water composition (smart water) is an advanced water flooding method for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). Low saline waterflooding has been proved successful in sandstone reservoir. However, there is still controversy on the mechanism of smart water flooding. We studied the...... mixed. The amount of bound water increases polynomially with increased surface area. Addition of some ions in water based solutions increases the amount of bound water for same amount of surface area. We studied the affect of Ca2+, Mg2+ and Na+ ions and observed that Mg2+ ion produces the maximum amount...

  2. Relationships between 1H NMR Relaxation Data and Some Technological Parameters of Meat: A Chemometric Approach

    Brown, Robert J. S.; Capozzi, Francesco; Cavani, Claudio; Cremonini, Mauro A.; Petracci, Massimiliano; Placucci, Giuseppe

    2000-11-01

    In this paper chemometrics (ANOVA and PCR) is used to measure unbiased correlations between NMR spin-echo decays of pork M. Longissimus dorsi obtained through Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiments at low frequency (20 MHz) and the values of 14 technological parameters commonly used to assess pork meat quality. On the basis of the ANOVA results, it is also found that the CPMG decays of meat cannot be best interpreted with a "discrete" model (i.e., by expanding the decays in a series of a discrete number of exponential components, each with a different transverse relaxation time), but rather with a "continuous" model, by which a continuous distribution of T2's is allowed. The latter model also agrees with literature histological results.

  3. IRMA iterative relaxation matrix approach for NMR structure determination application to DNA fragments

    The subject of this thesis is the structure determination of DNA molecules in solution with the use of NMR. For this purpose a new relaxation matrix approach is introduced. The emphasis is on the interpretation of nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) in terms of proton-proton distances and related three dimensional structures. The DNA molecules studied are obligonucleotides, unmodifief as well as modified molecules bu UV radiation. From comparison with unmodified molecules it turned out that UV irradiation scarcely influences the helical structure of the DNA string. At one place of the string a nucleotide is rotated towards the high-ANTI conformation which results in a slight unwinding of the DNA string but sufficient for blocking of the normal reading of genetic information. (H.W.). 456 refs.; 50 figs.; 30 tabs

  4. relaxGUI: a new software for fast and simple NMR relaxation data analysis and calculation of ps-ns and μs motion of proteins

    Investigation of protein dynamics on the ps-ns and μs-ms timeframes provides detailed insight into the mechanisms of enzymes and the binding properties of proteins. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an excellent tool for studying protein dynamics at atomic resolution. Analysis of relaxation data using model-free analysis can be a tedious and time consuming process, which requires good knowledge of scripting procedures. The software relaxGUI was developed for fast and simple model-free analysis and is fully integrated into the software package relax. It is written in Python and uses wxPython to build the graphical user interface (GUI) for maximum performance and multi-platform use. This software allows the analysis of NMR relaxation data with ease and the generation of publication quality graphs as well as color coded images of molecular structures. The interface is designed for simple data analysis and management. The software was tested and validated against the command line version of relax.

  5. 1H, 15N and 13C NMR resonance assignment, secondary structure and global fold of the FMN-binding domain of human cytochrome P450

    The FMN-binding domain of human NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase,corresponding to exons 3-;7, has been expressed at high level in an active form and labelled with 13C and 15N. Most of the backbone and aliphatic side-chain 1H, 15Nand 13C resonances have been assigned using heteronuclear double- and triple-resonance methods, together with a semiautomatic assignment strategy. The secondary structure as estimated from the chemical shift index and NOE connectivities consists of six α-helices and fiveβ-strands. The global fold was deduced from the long-range NOE sun ambiguously assigned in a 4D 13C-resolved HMQC-NOESY-HMQC spectrum. The fold is of the alternating α/β type, with the fiveβ-strands arranged into a parallel β-sheet. The secondary structure and global fold are very similar to those of the bacterial flavodoxins, but the FMN-binding domain has an extra short helix in place of a loop, and an extra helix at the N-terminus (leading to the membrane anchordomain in the intact P450 reductase). The experimental constraints were combined with homology modelling to obtain a structure of the FMN-bindingdomain satisfying the observed NOE constraints. Chemical shift comparisons showed that the effects of FMN binding and of FMN reduction are largely localised at the binding site

  6. Correlated dynamics between protein HN and HC bonds observed by NMR cross relaxation.

    Vögeli, Beat; Yao, Lishan

    2009-03-18

    Although collective dynamics of atom groups steer many biologically relevant processes in biomacromolecules, most atomic resolution motional studies focus on isolated bonds. In this study, a new method is introduced to assess correlated dynamics between bond vectors by cross relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Dipole-dipole cross correlated relaxation rates between intra- and inter-residual H(N)-N and H(alpha)-C(alpha) in the 56 residue protein GB3 are measured with high accuracy. It is demonstrated that the assumption of anisotropic molecular tumbling is necessary to evaluate rates accurately and predictions from the static structure using effective bond lengths of 1.041 and 1.117 A for H(N)-N and H(alpha)-C(alpha) are within 3% of both experimental intra- and inter-residual rates. Deviations are matched to models of different degrees of motional correlation. These models are based on previously determined orientations and motional amplitudes from residual dipolar couplings with high accuracy and precision. Clear evidence of correlated motion in the loops comprising residues 10-14, 20-22, and 47-50 and anticorrelated motion in the alpha helix comprising 23-38 is presented. Somewhat weaker correlation is observed in the beta strands 2-4, which have previously been shown to exhibit slow correlated motional modes. PMID:19235934

  7. Detection of closed influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion peptide structures in membranes by backbone {sup 13}CO-{sup 15}N rotational-echo double-resonance solid-state NMR

    Ghosh, Ujjayini; Xie Li; Weliky, David P., E-mail: weliky@chemistry.msu.edu [Michigan State University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-02-15

    The influenza virus fusion peptide is the N-terminal {approx}20 residues of the HA2 subunit of the hemagglutinin protein and this peptide plays a key role in the fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes during initial infection of a cell. The fusion peptide adopts N-helix/turn/C-helix structure in both detergent and membranes with reports of both open and closed interhelical topologies. In the present study, backbone {sup 13}CO-{sup 15}N REDOR solid-state NMR was applied to the membrane-associated fusion peptide to detect the distribution of interhelical distances. The data clearly showed a large fraction of closed and semi-closed topologies and were best-fitted to a mixture of two structures that do not exchange. One of the earlier open structural models may have incorrect G13 dihedral angles derived from TALOS analysis of experimentally correct {sup 13}C shifts.

  8. [Evaluation of NMR relaxation method as a diagnostic tool for donor blood analysis and patients with hematologic diseases and burns].

    Gangardt, M G; Popova, O V; Shmarov, D A; Kariakina, N F; Papish, E A; Kozinets, G I

    2002-08-01

    Diagnostic value of the NMR-relaxation method in the blood plasma was estimated in the patients with different pathologies. The time of hydrogen nuclei longitudinal relaxation (T1) in the health donors of the blood, in the patients with oncopathology (hemoblastoses) and in the cases with anemia and burning disease were investigated. The time of the longitudinal relaxation (T1) was measured by automated NMR-relaxometer "Palma" (Russia). The working frequency was equal to 35 MHz, the temperature was 45 +/- 0.1 degrees C. For the single measurement 0.2 ml of blood obtained from heparinized venous blood 1.5 hours after its taking was used. The time of the longitudinal relaxation (T1) was shown to be 1.78 +/- 0.02 in the health donors, 1.70 +/- 0.06 s in cases with anemia, 1.97 +/- 0.48 c in patients with leucosis, 2.40 +/- 0.12 s in patients with burns. The sensitivity and the specificity of diagnostics of leucosis based upon the results of the only single T1 measurement in blood plasma were concluded to be 75%. It proves the significant T1 change both in patients with anemia and burning disease of the II-III degree. However it is evidently insufficient for selective use of NMR-relaxation blood plasma (serum) in the diagnostics of anemia and leucosis. The data obtained prove also the possibility of use of NMR-relaxation blood plasma (serum) for control of the hemostasis state during treatment or remission. PMID:12362635

  9. A minor conformation of a lanthanide tag on adenylate kinase characterized by paramagnetic relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    Hass, Mathias A. S.; Liu, Wei-Min [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands); Agafonov, Roman V.; Otten, Renee; Phung, Lien A. [Brandeis University, Department of Biochemistry, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Schilder, Jesika T. [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands); Kern, Dorothee [Brandeis University, Department of Biochemistry, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Ubbink, Marcellus, E-mail: m.ubbink@chem.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden University, Leiden Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands)

    2015-02-15

    NMR relaxation dispersion techniques provide a powerful method to study protein dynamics by characterizing lowly populated conformations that are in dynamic exchange with the major state. Paramagnetic NMR is a versatile tool for investigating the structures and dynamics of proteins. These two techniques were combined here to measure accurate and precise pseudocontact shifts of a lowly populated conformation. This method delivers valuable long-range structural restraints for higher energy conformations of macromolecules in solution. Another advantage of combining pseudocontact shifts with relaxation dispersion is the increase in the amplitude of dispersion profiles. Lowly populated states are often involved in functional processes, such as enzyme catalysis, signaling, and protein/protein interactions. The presented results also unveil a critical problem with the lanthanide tag used to generate paramagnetic relaxation dispersion effects in proteins, namely that the motions of the tag can interfere severely with the observation of protein dynamics. The two-point attached CLaNP-5 lanthanide tag was linked to adenylate kinase. From the paramagnetic relaxation dispersion only motion of the tag is observed. The data can be described accurately by a two-state model in which the protein-attached tag undergoes a 23° tilting motion on a timescale of milliseconds. The work demonstrates the large potential of paramagnetic relaxation dispersion and the challenge to improve current tags to minimize relaxation dispersion from tag movements.

  10. A minor conformation of a lanthanide tag on adenylate kinase characterized by paramagnetic relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    NMR relaxation dispersion techniques provide a powerful method to study protein dynamics by characterizing lowly populated conformations that are in dynamic exchange with the major state. Paramagnetic NMR is a versatile tool for investigating the structures and dynamics of proteins. These two techniques were combined here to measure accurate and precise pseudocontact shifts of a lowly populated conformation. This method delivers valuable long-range structural restraints for higher energy conformations of macromolecules in solution. Another advantage of combining pseudocontact shifts with relaxation dispersion is the increase in the amplitude of dispersion profiles. Lowly populated states are often involved in functional processes, such as enzyme catalysis, signaling, and protein/protein interactions. The presented results also unveil a critical problem with the lanthanide tag used to generate paramagnetic relaxation dispersion effects in proteins, namely that the motions of the tag can interfere severely with the observation of protein dynamics. The two-point attached CLaNP-5 lanthanide tag was linked to adenylate kinase. From the paramagnetic relaxation dispersion only motion of the tag is observed. The data can be described accurately by a two-state model in which the protein-attached tag undergoes a 23° tilting motion on a timescale of milliseconds. The work demonstrates the large potential of paramagnetic relaxation dispersion and the challenge to improve current tags to minimize relaxation dispersion from tag movements

  11. (15)N NMR spectroscopy unambiguously establishes the coordination mode of the diimine linker 2-(2'-pyridyl)pyrimidine-4-carboxylic acid (cppH) in Ru(ii) complexes.

    Battistin, Federica; Balducci, Gabriele; Demitri, Nicola; Iengo, Elisabetta; Milani, Barbara; Alessio, Enzo

    2015-09-21

    We investigated the reactivity of three Ru(ii) precursors -trans,cis,cis-[RuCl2(CO)2(dmso-O)2], cis,fac-[RuCl2(dmso-O)(dmso-S)3], and trans-[RuCl2(dmso-S)4] - towards the diimine linker 2-(2'-pyridyl)pyrimidine-4-carboxylic acid (cppH) or its parent compound 4-methyl-2-(2'-pyridyl)pyrimidine ligand (mpp), in which a methyl group replaces the carboxylic group on the pyrimidine ring. In principle, both cppH and mpp can originate linkage isomers, depending on how the pyrimidine ring binds to ruthenium through the nitrogen atom ortho (N(o)) or para (N(p)) to the group in position 4. The principal aim of this work was to establish a spectroscopic fingerprint for distinguishing the coordination mode of cppH/mpp also in the absence of an X-ray structural characterization. By virtue of the new complexes described here, together with the others previously reported by us, we successfully recorded {(1)H,(15)N}-HMBC NMR spectra at natural abundance of the (15)N isotope on a consistent number of fully characterized Ru(ii)-cppH/mpp compounds, most of them being stereoisomers and/or linkage isomers. Thus, we found that (15)N NMR chemical shifts unambiguously establish the binding mode of cppH and mpp - either through N(o) or N(p)- and can be conveniently applied also in the absence of the X-ray structure. In fact, coordination of cppH to Ru(ii) induces a marked upfield shift for the resonance of the N atoms directly bound to the metal, with coordination induced shifts (CIS) ranging from ca.-45 to -75 ppm, depending on the complex, whereas the unbound N atom resonates at a frequency similar to that of the free ligand. Similar results were found for the complexes of mpp. This work confirmed our previous finding that cppH has no binding preference, whereas mpp binds exclusively through N(p). Interestingly, the two cppH linkage isomers trans,cis-[RuCl2(CO)2(cppH-κN(p))] (5) and trans,cis-[RuCl2(CO)2(cppH-κN(o))] (6) were easily obtained in pure form by exploiting their different

  12. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  13. Ultrasound Devulcanization of Natural Rubber, Studied by NMR Relaxation and Diffusion

    von Meerwall, E.

    2005-03-01

    In support of recycling of industrial rubbers, we have studied the effect of intense ultrasound on unfilled natural rubber networks using proton and carbon transverse NMR relaxation and diffusion, sol extraction, and bulk characterization. At 70.5^o C the proton echo decay exhibits three components, due to entangled sol and crosslinked network; unentangled polymeric sol plus dangling chain ends; and oligomer remnants. Contrary to the 13C results which indicate backbone mobilities decreasing with sonication (hence with increasing sol fraction), all 1H component T2 values, hence intermolecular mobilities, increase by similar modest factors; the network component amplitude decreases strongly. Diffusion of unentangled sol is sharply bimodal, arising from intermediate fractions and unreactive oligomers. Both diffusion rates decrease slightly with sonication in spite of plasticization by sol, because degradation adds sol primarily of intermediate molecular weights. We compare these results with our earlier work in SBR. Although ultrasound devulcanization does not recover many properties of the virgin melt, recyclability is not compromised.

  14. A spin-spin relaxation rate investigation of the gelatin ferrous sulphate NMR dosimeter

    Spin-spin NMR relaxation rate in the ferrous sulphate gelatin dosimeter has been studied in terms of pH, gelatin concentration, the addition of benzoic acid, and sample size. It is demonstrated that R2 is more sensitive to changes in Fe3+ ion concentration than R1 when measuring at frequencies of 64 and 100 MHz. pH has an important effect on dose response curves, and oxygen depletion occurs significantly more rapidly in FeSO4 gelatin than in the liquid FeSO4, resulting in a saturation dose of ∼ 80 Gy at depths greater than ∼ 3 mm in phantom. The concentration of gelatin can be increased to 12% by weight, and the dosimeter will continue to exhibit a linear dose response. Sensitivity is maintained at higher gel concentrations by pH compensation. Addition of low-concentration benzoic acid to the system does not alter the dose response of the gelatin FeSO4 system. Finally, spontaneous oxidation of Fe2+ ions does not significantly alter the shape of dose response curves but does result in increases in R2 by up to 4% per day. (author)

  15. Surface-NMR measurements of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 in a homogeneous sandy aquifer in Skive, Denmark

    Walbrecker, J.; Behroozmand, A.

    2011-12-01

    Efficient groundwater management requires reliable means of characterizing shallow groundwater aquifers. One key parameter in this respect is hydraulic conductivity. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a geophysical exploration technique that can potentially provide this type of information in a noninvasive, cost-effective way. The technique is based on measuring the precession of nuclear spins of protons in groundwater molecules. It involves large loop antennas deployed on Earth's surface to generate electromagnetic pulses tuned to specifically excite and detect groundwater proton spins. Naturally, the excited state of spins is transitory - once excited, spins relax back to their equilibrium state. This relaxation process is strongly influenced by the spin environment, which, in the case of groundwater, is defined by the aquifer. By employing empirical relations, changes in relaxation behavior can be used to identify changes in aquifer hydraulic conductivity, making the NMR relaxation signal a very important piece of information. Particularly, efforts are made to record the longitudinal relaxation parameter T1, because it is known from laboratory studies that it often reliably correlates with hydraulic conductivity, even in the presence of magnetic species. In surface NMR, T1 data are collected by recording the NMR signal amplitude following two sequential excitation pulses as a function of the delay time τ between the two pulses. In conventional acquisition, the two pulses have a mutual phase shift of π. Based on theoretical arguments it was recently shown that T1 times acquired according to this conventional surface-NMR scheme are systematically biased. It was proposed that the bias can be minimized by cycling the phase of the two pulses between π and zero in subsequent double-pulse experiments, and subtracting the resulting signal amplitudes (phase-cycled pseudosaturation recovery scheme, pcPSR). We present the first surface-NMR T1 data set recorded

  16. NMR relaxation rates and Knight shifts in MgB2 and AlB2: theory versus experiments

    We have performed 11B NMR measurements in 11B enriched MgB2 powder sample in the normal phase. The Knight shift was accurately determined by using the magic angle spinning technique. Results for 11B and 27Al Knight shifts (K) and relaxation rates (1/T1) are also reported for AlB2. The data show a dramatic decrease of both K and 1/T1 for 11B in AlB2 with respect to MgB2. We compare experimental results with ab initio calculated NMR relaxation rates and Knight shifts. The experimental values for 1/T1 and K are in most cases in good agreement with the theoretical results. We show that the decrease of K and 1/T1 for 11B is consistent with a drastic drop of the density of states at the boron site in AlB2 with respect to MgB2

  17. Surface-NMR measurements of the longitudinal relaxation time T1 in a homogeneous sand aquifer in Skive, Denmark

    Walbrecker, Jan O.; Behroozmand, Ahmad A.

    2012-12-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (surface NMR) is a geophysical technique used in the exploration of shallow aquifers. It is based on measuring the NMR response of water molecules to excitation by electromagnetic pulses. By increasing the moment of applied pulses, successively deeper regions of an aquifer can be probed. The longitudinal relaxation time T1, determined from the NMR experiment, depends on pore size and can be potentially used to estimate hydraulic conductivity. A novel scheme was recently proposed that was shown theoretically to be more reliable for acquiring surface-NMR T1 data than traditional acquisition. In this proof-of-concept study we provide the first empirical evidence for the superiority of the novel scheme. We chose a survey site close to Skive, Denmark, where proximate boreholes indicate a homogeneous sandy aquifer in the top 30 m. The homogeneous composition implies that the distribution of pore sizes does not vary significantly across the formation. Because pore size is reflected by the T1 relaxation time, we therefore assume that the homogeneous aquifer can be characterized by a single T1 independent of the applied pulse moment (i.e., sampled depth region)—this is the benchmark condition we tested with our surface-NMR measurements. We collected surface-NMR T1 data employing the traditional as well as the novel acquisition scheme at various pulse moments. For each pulse moment we infer a T1 relaxation time based on extensively sampled data (14 delay-time data points). The T1 relaxation times obtained using the novel scheme show a constant value of about 820 ms (± 38 ms) for all pulse moments. In contrast, the T1 relaxation times determined using the traditional scheme vary significantly between 530 and 750 ms with pulse moment, which in an inversion would result in a spatial variation of T1 across the aquifer. The results based on the novel scheme are consistent with a homogeneous aquifer, which we expect based on the borehole

  18. NMR Water Self–Diffusion and Relaxation Studies on Sodium Polyacrylate Solutions and Gels in Physiologic Ionic Solutions

    Bai, Ruiliang; Basser, Peter J.; Briber, Robert M.; Horkay, Ferenc

    2013-01-01

    Water self-diffusion coefficients and longitudinal relaxation rates in sodium polyacrylate solutions and gels were measured by NMR, as a function of polymer content and structure in a physiological concentration range of monovalent and divalent cations, Ca2+ and Na+. Several physical models describing the self-diffusion of the solvent were applied and compared. A free-volume model was found to be in good agreement with the experimental results over a wide range of polymer concentrations. The ...

  19. Optimized co-solute paramagnetic relaxation enhancement for the rapid NMR analysis of a highly fibrillogenic peptide

    Co-solute paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is an attractive way to speed up data acquisition in NMR spectroscopy by shortening the T1 relaxation time of the nucleus of interest and thus the necessary recycle delay. Here, we present the rationale to utilize high-spin iron(III) as the optimal transition metal for this purpose and characterize the properties of its neutral chelate form Fe(DO3A) as a suitable PRE agent. Fe(DO3A) effectively reduces the T1 values across the entire sequence of the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein with negligible impact on line width. The agent is better suited than currently used alternatives, shows no specific interaction with the polypeptide chain and, due to its high relaxivity, is effective at low concentrations and in ‘proton-less’ NMR experiments. By using Fe(DO3A) we were able to complete the backbone resonance assignment of a highly fibrillogenic peptide from α1-antitrypsin by acquiring the necessary suite of multidimensional NMR datasets in 3 h

  20. Characterization of the overall and internal dynamics of short oligonucleotides by depolarized dynamic light scattering and NMR relaxation measurements

    The dynamics of three synthetic oligonucleotides d(CG)4, d(CG)6, and d(CGCGTTGTTCGCG) of different length and shape were studied in solution by depolarized dynamic light scattering (DDLS) and time-resolved nuclear Overhauser effect cross-relaxation measurements. For cylindrically symmetric molecules the DDLS spectrum is dominated by the rotation of the main symmetry axis of the cylinder. The experimental correlation times describe the rotation of the oligonucleotides under hydrodynamic stick boundary conditions. It is shown that the hydrodynamic theory of Tirado and Garcia de la Torre gives good predictions of the rotational diffusion coefficients of cylindrically symmetric molecules of the small axial ratios studied here. These relations are used to calculate the solution dimensions of the DNA fragments from measured correlation times. The DDLS relaxations measurements provide a power method for distinguishing between different conformations of the oligonucleotides. Furthermore, the rotational correlation times are a very sensitive probe of the length of different fragments. The NMR results reflect the anisotropic motion of the molecules as well as the amount of local internal motion present. The experimental correlation time from NMR is determined by the rotation of both the short and long axes of the oligonucleotide. The authors results are compared with those from NMR relaxation measurements on other short oligonucleotides with lengths of up to 20 base pairs. Various dynamic models for the reorientation of the internuclear vector are applied to their interpretation

  1. Optimized co-solute paramagnetic relaxation enhancement for the rapid NMR analysis of a highly fibrillogenic peptide

    Oktaviani, Nur Alia [University of Groningen, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute (Netherlands); Risør, Michael W. [University of Aarhus, Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Department of Chemistry (Denmark); Lee, Young-Ho [Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research (Japan); Megens, Rik P. [University of Groningen, Stratingh Institute for Chemistry (Netherlands); Jong, Djurre H. de; Otten, Renee; Scheek, Ruud M. [University of Groningen, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute (Netherlands); Enghild, Jan J. [University of Aarhus, Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics (Denmark); Nielsen, Niels Chr. [University of Aarhus, Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Department of Chemistry (Denmark); Ikegami, Takahisa [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Medical Life Science (Japan); Mulder, Frans A. A., E-mail: fmulder@chem.au.dk [University of Groningen, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Co-solute paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is an attractive way to speed up data acquisition in NMR spectroscopy by shortening the T{sub 1} relaxation time of the nucleus of interest and thus the necessary recycle delay. Here, we present the rationale to utilize high-spin iron(III) as the optimal transition metal for this purpose and characterize the properties of its neutral chelate form Fe(DO3A) as a suitable PRE agent. Fe(DO3A) effectively reduces the T{sub 1} values across the entire sequence of the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein with negligible impact on line width. The agent is better suited than currently used alternatives, shows no specific interaction with the polypeptide chain and, due to its high relaxivity, is effective at low concentrations and in ‘proton-less’ NMR experiments. By using Fe(DO3A) we were able to complete the backbone resonance assignment of a highly fibrillogenic peptide from α{sub 1}-antitrypsin by acquiring the necessary suite of multidimensional NMR datasets in 3 h.

  2. Assignment of 1HN, 15N, 13Cα, 13CO and 13Cβ resonances in a 67 kDa p53 dimer using 4D-TROSY NMR spectroscopy

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a transcription factor that plays a crucial role in the activation of genes in response to DNA damage. As a first step towards detailed structural studies of the molecule aimed at understanding its regulation, we have used 4D-TROSY triple resonance NMR spectroscopy to obtain nearly complete 1HN, 15N, 13Cα, 13CO and 13Cβ resonance assignments of a dimeric form of the protein comprising DNA-binding and oligomerization domains (67 kDa). A simple comparison of 4D spectra recorded on p53 molecules consisting of DNA-binding and oligomerization domains with and without the regulatory domain establishes that both constructs have essentially identical chemical shifts. Although the affinity of p53 for target DNA is decreased in constructs containing the regulatory domain, the chemical shift results reported here suggest that this decrease is not due to specific domain interactions involving the regulatory portion of the molecule, or alternatively, that such interactions require the presence of DNA

  3. The effects of some parameters on the calculated 1H NMR relaxation times of cell water

    The effect of some parameters on the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times is calculated and a comparison between the calculated relaxation times with the results of different measurements is made. (M.S.)

  4. The inverted chevron plot measured by NMR relaxation reveals a native-like unfolding intermediate in acyl-CoA binding protein

    Teilum, Kaare; Poulsen, F. M.; Akke, M.

    2006-01-01

    those from stopped-flow kinetics and define an "inverted chevron" plot. The combination of NMR relaxation and stopped-flow kinetic measurements allowed determination of k f and k u in the range from 0.48 M GuHCl to 1.28 M GuHCl. Individually, the stopped-flow and NMR data fit two-state models...

  5. Rapid and simple determination of T1 relaxation times in time-domain NMR by Continuous Wave Free Precession sequence.

    Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Monaretto, Tatiana; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times have been widely used in time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) to determine several physicochemical properties of petroleum, polymers, and food products. The measurement of T2 through the CPMG pulse sequence has been used in most of these applications because it denotes a rapid, robust method. On the other hand, T1 has been occasionally used in TD-NMR due to the long measurement time required to collect multiple points along the T1 relaxation curve. Recently, several rapid methods to measure T1 have been proposed. Those methods based upon single shot, known as Continuous Wave Free Precession (CWFP) pulse sequences, have been employed in the simultaneous measurement of T1 and T2 in a rapid fashion. However, these sequences can be used exclusively in instrument featuring short dead time because the magnitude of the signal at thermal equilibrium is required. In this paper, we demonstrate that a special CWFP sequence with a low flip angle can be a simple and rapid method to measure T1 regardless of instruments dead time. Experimental results confirmed that the method called CWFP-T1 may be used to measure both single T1 value and T1 distribution in heterogeneous samples. Therefore, CWFP-T1 sequence can be a feasible alternative to CPMG in the determination of physicochemical properties, particularly in processes where fast protocols are requested such as industrial applications. PMID:27376553

  6. Rapid and simple determination of T1 relaxation times in time-domain NMR by Continuous Wave Free Precession sequence

    Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Monaretto, Tatiana; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times have been widely used in time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) to determine several physicochemical properties of petroleum, polymers, and food products. The measurement of T2 through the CPMG pulse sequence has been used in most of these applications because it denotes a rapid, robust method. On the other hand, T1 has been occasionally used in TD-NMR due to the long measurement time required to collect multiple points along the T1 relaxation curve. Recently, several rapid methods to measure T1 have been proposed. Those methods based upon single shot, known as Continuous Wave Free Precession (CWFP) pulse sequences, have been employed in the simultaneous measurement of T1 and T2 in a rapid fashion. However, these sequences can be used exclusively in instrument featuring short dead time because the magnitude of the signal at thermal equilibrium is required. In this paper, we demonstrate that a special CWFP sequence with a low flip angle can be a simple and rapid method to measure T1 regardless of instruments dead time. Experimental results confirmed that the method called CWFP-T1 may be used to measure both single T1 value and T1 distribution in heterogeneous samples. Therefore, CWFP-T1 sequence can be a feasible alternative to CPMG in the determination of physicochemical properties, particularly in processes where fast protocols are requested such as industrial applications.

  7. NMR relaxation of neritic carbonates: An integrated petrophysical and petrographical approach

    Vincent, Benoit; Fleury, Marc; Santerre, Yannick; Brigaud, Benjamin

    2011-05-01

    A set of carbonate outcrop samples, covering a wide range of the sedimentary textures and depositional environments existing on carbonate systems, was studied through an integrated petrographical and petrophysical approach. With the aim of improving the understanding of the NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) signal of carbonates, this work is: 1) providing an atlas for various carbonate reservoir rock-types, 2) providing a workflow for integrating geological and petrophysical data and, 3) documenting common shortfalls in NMR/MICP analyses in carbonates. The petrographical investigation includes thin section and SEM (Secondary Electron Microscope) observations, whereas petrophysical investigation includes porosity (Φ), permeability (K), NMR, MICP (Mercury Injection Capillary Pressure), and specific surface area (BET) measurements. On the basis of NMR and MICP data, 4 groups of samples were identified: (1) microporous samples, (2) micro-mesoporous samples, (3) wide multimodal samples, and (4) atypical samples. The microporous samples allow us to define a maximum NMR threshold for microporosity at a T 2 of 200 ms. NMR and MICP response of the investigated carbonates are often comparable in terms of modal distribution (microporous, micro-mesoporous and wide multimodal samples). In particular, micritization, a well known but underestimated early diagenetic process, tends to homogenize the NMR signal of primarily different sedimentary facies. A grainstone with heavily micritized grains can display well sorted unimodal NMR and MICP signatures very similar, even identical, to a mudstone-wackestone. Their signatures are comparable to that of a simple sphere packing model. On the contrary, several samples (labeled atypical samples) show a discrepancy between NMR and MICP response. This discrepancy is explained by the fact that MICP can be affected by the physical connectivity of the pore network, in case of disseminated and isolated molds in a micrite matrix for instance

  8. Application of chemometrics to low-field H-1 NMR relaxation data of intact fish flesh

    Jepsen, Signe Munk; Pedersen, H.T.; Engelsen, S.B.

    1999-01-01

    The possibilities for application of low-field H-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a rapid method for simultaneous assessment of basic quality parameters in fish were explored. In a first experiment, 200 salmon (Salmo salar) samples mapping the variation over an entire fish were measured by NMR...... and subsequently analysed for oil or water content by standard chemical methods. In a second experiment, 58 differently thawed cod (Gadus morhua) samples were measured by NMR and subsequently analysed for water-holding capacity. Correlations between chemical data and NMR data were evaluated using.......9% for oil and water content in fresh salmon flesh and water-holding capacity in thawed cod flesh respectively. Thus rapid, non-invasive low- field NMR can be used to simultaneously determine both oil and water content of fish flesh. Furthermore, it can predict water- holding capacity of cod flesh, with...

  9. Interactions of acetylcholinesterase with salvianolic acid B and rosmarinic acid from Salvia miltiorhiza water extract investigated by NMR relaxation rate

    Guo Wei Yin; Yi Ming Li; Wei Wei; Shan Hao Jiang; Da Yuan Zhu; Wei Hong Du

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand whether the ameliorating effect on old ages memory disorder by the root of Salvia miltiorhiza is related to the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, two main ingredients, salvianolic acid B (1) and rosmarinic acid (2), which were isolated from S. Miltiorhiza water extract, were investigated in vitro by NMR relaxation rate in this work. The results showed that the proton selective relaxation rates and the molecular rotational correlation time of proton pairs for compounds 1 and 2 increased significantly by adding of AChE in mixing solution. The study reveals that the two compounds might bind to the enzyme and have AChE inhibitory effect, which could contribute to the ameliorating effect at some extent on old ages memory disorder.

  10. NMR spin-lattice relaxation time T(1) of thin films obtained by magnetic resonance force microscopy.

    Saun, Seung-Bo; Won, Soonho; Kwon, Sungmin; Lee, Soonchil

    2015-05-01

    We obtained the NMR spectrum and the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) for thin film samples by magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). The samples were CaF2 thin films which were 50 nm and 150 nm thick. T1 was measured at 18 K using a cyclic adiabatic inversion method at a fixed frequency. A comparison of the bulk and two thin films showed that T1 becomes shorter as the film thickness decreases. To make the comparison as accurate as possible, all three samples were loaded onto different beams of a multi-cantilever array and measured in the same experimental environment. PMID:25828244

  11. NMR spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of thin films obtained by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    Saun, Seung-Bo; Won, Soonho; Kwon, Sungmin; Lee, Soonchil

    2015-05-01

    We obtained the NMR spectrum and the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) for thin film samples by magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). The samples were CaF2 thin films which were 50 nm and 150 nm thick. T1 was measured at 18 K using a cyclic adiabatic inversion method at a fixed frequency. A comparison of the bulk and two thin films showed that T1 becomes shorter as the film thickness decreases. To make the comparison as accurate as possible, all three samples were loaded onto different beams of a multi-cantilever array and measured in the same experimental environment.

  12. NMR relaxation in the magnetic balls system; Relaksacja MRJ w ukladzie kul magnetycznych

    Blicharski, J.S.; Kruk, D. [Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Inst. Fizyki, Cracow (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The mathematical model of nucleon spin relaxation time in the presence of dipole-dipole magnetic interaction is presented. The relaxation times as a temperature function are calculated using an expansion into spherical harmonics series. Results of calculations are presented. 9 refs, 4 figs.

  13. Three-way modelling of NMR relaxation profiles from thawed cod muscle

    Jensen, Kristina Nedenskov; Guldager, Helle Skov; Jørgensen, Bo Munk

    2002-01-01

    Low-field 1H nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation was used to measure water mobility and distribution in cod stored at -20°C or -30°C for up to 12 months and subsequently from 0 to 21 days in modified atmosphere at +2°C. The relaxation profiles were decomposed by parallel factor...

  14. NMR Water Self-Diffusion and Relaxation Studies on Sodium Polyacrylate Solutions and Gels in Physiologic Ionic Solutions.

    Bai, Ruiliang; Basser, Peter J; Briber, Robert M; Horkay, Ferenc

    2014-03-15

    Water self-diffusion coefficients and longitudinal relaxation rates in sodium polyacrylate solutions and gels were measured by NMR, as a function of polymer content and structure in a physiological concentration range of monovalent and divalent cations, Ca(2+) and Na(+). Several physical models describing the self-diffusion of the solvent were applied and compared. A free-volume model was found to be in good agreement with the experimental results over a wide range of polymer concentrations. The longitudinal relaxation rate exhibited linear dependence on polymer concentration below a critical concentration and showed non-linear behavior at higher concentrations. Both the water self-diffusion and relaxation were less influenced by the polymer in the gel state than in the uncrosslinked polymer solutions. The effect of Na(+) on the mobility of water molecules was practically undetectable. By contrast, addition of Ca(2+) strongly increased the longitudinal relaxation rate while its effect on the self-diffusion coefficient was much less pronounced. PMID:24409001

  15. NMR Water Relaxation and Self-Diffusion in Highly Concentrated Casein Systems

    Schorr, D.; Cambert, M.; Bouchoux, A.; Gésan-Guiziou, G.; Mariette, F.

    2010-01-01

    In a variety of dairy processing operations (drying, membrane filtration...), milk is concentrated, leading to dense and ultimately solid dispersions of caseins. In this work, we explore how water mobility is affected in such conditions and if there is any relation between the properties of water as seen by NMR and the macroscopic phase behavior of the dispersions. We also investigate the effect of structure by comparing the NMR results obtained with dispersions of casein micelles (NPC, nativ...

  16. Site-resolved (2)H relaxation experiments in solid materials by global line-shape analysis of MAS NMR spectra.

    Lindh, E L; Stilbs, P; Furó, I

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a way one can achieve good spectral resolution in (2)H MAS NMR experiments. The goal is to be able to distinguish between and study sites in various deuterated materials with small chemical shift dispersion. We show that the (2)H MAS NMR spectra recorded during a spin-relaxation experiment are amenable to spectral decomposition because of the different evolution of spectral components during the relaxation delay. We verify that the results are robust by global least-square fitting of the spectral series both under the assumption of specific line shapes and without such assumptions (COmponent-REsolved spectroscopy, CORE). In addition, we investigate the reliability of the developed protocol by analyzing spectra simulated with different combinations of spectral parameters. The performance is demonstrated in a model material of deuterated poly(methacrylic acid) that contains two (2)H spin populations with similar chemical shifts but different quadrupole splittings. In (2)H-exchanged cellulose containing two (2)H spin populations with very similar chemical shifts and quadrupole splittings, the method provides new site-selective information about the molecular dynamics. PMID:27152833

  17. Off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice NMR relaxation studies of phosphorus metabolite rotational diffusion in bovine lens homogenates

    The rotational diffusion behavior of phosphorus metabolites present in calf lens cortical and nuclear homogenates was investigated by the NMR technique of 31P off-resonance rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation as a means of assessing the occurrence and extent of phosphorus metabolite-lens protein interactions. 31P NMR spectra of calf lens homogenates were obtained at 10 and 18 degree C at 7.05 T. Effective rotational correlation times (τ0,eff) for the major phosphorus metabolites present in cortical and nuclear bovine calf lens homogenates were derived from nonlinear least-squares analysis of R vs ωe data with the assumption of isotropic reorientational motion. Intramolecular dipole-dipole (1H-31P, 31P-31P), chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), and solvent (water) translational intermolecular dipole-dipole (1H-31P) relaxation contributions were assumed in the analyses. A fast-exchange model between free and bound forms, was employed in the analysis of the metabolite R vs ωe curves to yield the fraction of free (unbound) metabolite (Θfree). The results of this study establish the occurrence of significant temperature-dependent (above and below the cold cataract phase transition temperature) binding of ATP (cortex) and PME (nucleus) and pi (nucleus) in calf lens

  18. Combined high-field 13C CP MAS NMR and low-field NMR relaxation measurements on post mortem porcine muscles.

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen; Andersen, Henrik Jørgen

    2004-05-19

    Changes in postmortem muscle characteristics are investigated in muscles from eight pigs exposed to different combinations of preslaughter stress (exercise on treadmill) and stunning method (CO(2) vs electrical stunning). Solid-state (13)C cross-polarization (CP) magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments are carried out on a total of 16 rapidly frozen M. longissimus muscle biopsies taken in vivo the day before slaughter and at 45 min postmortem. Simultaneously, low-field NMR T(2) relaxation time measurements are carried out on samples from M. longissimus. Glycogen and lactate are estimated from the (13)C CP MAS spectra, and correlations of r = 0.89 and r = 0.70, respectively, to subsequent biochemical determinations using partial least squares regression (PLSR) are established. Moreover, PLSR reveals that, besides the 72 ppm signal (carbons in glycogen), a signal around 38 ppm, which increases concomitantly with lactate, is also significantly correlated to changes in glycogen/lactate. With the assumption that the 38 ppm signal reflects CH(2) in phosphocreatine/creatine, altered mobility of creatine as a result of dephosphorylation is indicated. Finally, PLSR on the 45 min (13)C CP MAS spectra also reveals correlation (r = 0.54) to the slowest relaxing T(2) population (50 min postmortem), known to reflect extra-myofibrillar water. Subsequently, evaluation of the loading plot in the PLSR analysis reveals that the correlation exclusively is associated to the 52 ppm resonance intensity. With the assumption that this resonance reflects methyl groups in choline/phosphatidyl choline, the intensity changes in the 52 ppm resonance imply alterations in membrane properties. Accordingly, the data indicate a relationship between membrane properties and the amount of water being expelled from muscle cells postmortem, which supports the hypothesis that disruption of membranes is implicated in the postmortem mobilization of muscle water. PMID:15137869

  19. Re-evaluation of the model-free analysis of fast internal motion in proteins using NMR relaxation.

    Frederick, Kendra King; Sharp, Kim A; Warischalk, Nicholas; Wand, A Joshua

    2008-09-25

    NMR spin relaxation retains a central role in the characterization of the fast internal motion of proteins and their complexes. Knowledge of the distribution and amplitude of the motion of amino acid side chains is critical for the interpretation of the dynamical proxy for the residual conformational entropy of proteins, which can potentially significantly contribute to the entropy of protein function. A popular treatment of NMR relaxation phenomena in macromolecules dissolved in liquids is the so-called model-free approach of Lipari and Szabo. The robustness of the mode-free approach has recently been strongly criticized and the remarkable range and structural context of the internal motion of proteins, characterized by such NMR relaxation techniques, attributed to artifacts arising from the model-free treatment, particularly with respect to the symmetry of the underlying motion. We develop an objective quantification of both spatial and temporal asymmetry of motion and re-examine the foundation of the model-free treatment. Concerns regarding the robustness of the model-free approach to asymmetric motion appear to be generally unwarranted. The generalized order parameter is robustly recovered. The sensitivity of the model-free treatment to asymmetric motion is restricted to the effective correlation time, which is by definition a normalized quantity and not a true time constant and therefore of much less interest in this context. With renewed confidence in the model-free approach, we then examine the microscopic distribution of side chain motion in the complex between calcium-saturated calmodulin and the calmodulin-binding domain of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Deuterium relaxation is used to characterize the motion of methyl groups in the complex. A remarkable range of Lipari-Szabo model-free generalized order parameters are seen with little correlation with basic structural parameters such as the depth of burial. These results are contrasted with the

  20. Studies of 29Si spin-lattice relaxation times and paramagnetic impurities in clay minerals by magic-angle spinning 29Si-NMR and EPR

    High-resolution solid state 29Si-NMR spectra and EPR spectra have been examined on twelve natural philosilicates. It has been found that presence of paramagnetic impurities is markedly effective in shortening the 29Si spin-lattice relaxation times (10 to 1000 ms), and in broadening the linewidths and is favorable for the use of solid state high-resolution 29Si NMR as a tool for structural studies of inorganic materials. (author)

  1. Application of chemometrics to low-field H-1 NMR relaxation data of intact fish flesh

    Jepsen, Signe Munk; Pedersen, H.T.; Engelsen, S.B.

    1999-01-01

    .9% for oil and water content in fresh salmon flesh and water-holding capacity in thawed cod flesh respectively. Thus rapid, non-invasive low- field NMR can be used to simultaneously determine both oil and water content of fish flesh. Furthermore, it can predict water- holding capacity of cod flesh, with...

  2. Paraffin molecule mobility in channel clathrates of urea on spectroscopic NMR relaxation data

    Kriger, Y G; Chekhova, G N

    2001-01-01

    The temperature dependences of the protons spin-lattice relaxation time (T sub I) in the channel clathrates of urea with paraffins are measured. The data on the T sub I are interpreted within the frames of the model of the paraffins molecules and their fragments orientation in the clathrate channels. The dynamics peculiarities are connected with the disproportion effects of these compounds

  3. Hydration water dynamics in biopolymers from NMR relaxation in the rotating frame

    Blicharska, Barbara; Peemoeller, Hartwig; Witek, Magdalena

    2010-12-01

    Assuming dipole-dipole interaction as the dominant relaxation mechanism of protons of water molecules adsorbed onto macromolecule (biopolymer) surfaces we have been able to model the dependences of relaxation rates on temperature and frequency. For adsorbed water molecules the correlation times are of the order of 10 -5 s, for which the dispersion region of spin-lattice relaxation rates in the rotating frame R1ρ = 1/ T1ρ appears over a range of easily accessible B1 values. Measurements of T1ρ at constant temperature and different B1 values then give the "dispersion profiles" for biopolymers. Fitting a theoretical relaxation model to these profiles allows for the estimation of correlation times. This way of obtaining the correlation time is easier and faster than approaches involving measurements of the temperature dependence of R1 = 1/ T1. The T1ρ dispersion approach, as a tool for molecular dynamics study, has been demonstrated for several hydrated biopolymer systems including crystalline cellulose, starch of different origins (potato, corn, oat, wheat), paper (modern, old) and lyophilized proteins (albumin, lysozyme).

  4. Proton and tritium NMR relaxation studies of peptide inhibitor binding to bacterial collagenase: Conformation and dynamics

    The interaction of succinyl-Pro-Ala, a competitive inhibitor of Achromobacter iophagus collagenase, with the enzyme was studied by longitudinal proton and tritium relaxation. Specific deuterium and tritium labeling of the succinyl part at vicinal positions allowed the measurement of the cross-relaxation rates of individual proton or tritium spin pairs in the inhibitor-enzyme complex as well as in the free inhibitor. Overall correlation times, internuclear distances, and qualitative information on the internal mobility in Suc1 (as provided by the generalized order parameter S2) could be deduced by the comparison of proton and tritium cross-relaxation of spin pairs at complementary positions in the -CH2- CH2- moiety as analyzed in terms of the model-free approach by Lipari and Szabo. The conformational and motional parameters of the inhibitor in the free and enzyme-bound state were directly compared by this method. The measurement of proton cross-relaxation in the Ala residue provided additional information on the inhibitor binding. The determination of the order parameter in different parts of the inhibitor molecule in the bound state indicates that the succinyl and alanyl residues are primarily involved in the interaction with the enzyme activity site. The succinyl moiety, characterized in solution by the conformational equilibrium among the three staggered rotamers--i.e., trans: 50%; g+: 20%; g-: 30%--adopted in the bound state the unique trans conformation

  5. Temperature dependence of 1H NMR relaxation time, T2, for intact and neoplastic plant tissues

    Lewa, Czesław J.; Lewa, Maria

    Temperature dependences of the spin-spin proton relaxation time, T2, have been shown for normal and tumorous tissues collected from kalus culture Nicotiana tabacum and from the plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana. For neoplastic plant tissues, time T2 was increased compared to that for intact plants, a finding similar to that for animal and human tissues. The temperature dependences obtained were compared to analogous relations observed with animal tissues.

  6. Measurement of relaxation times by NMR-CT of electric superconductivity

    Shimizu, Koji; Yoshitoshi, Motosada (Shimadzu Corp., Kyoto (Japan)); Narise, Shoji; Hirakawa, Kogi

    1984-08-01

    Relaxation curves of T/sub 1/ in various tissues of the brain in patients with cerebral tumor and in healthy controls were obtained by saturation-recovery and inversion-recovery methods, whereby T/sub 1/ values were calculated. The results obtained were in good agreement with in vitro measurement results of excised brain tissues. Prolongation of T/sub 1/ values was evidently observed with increasing the strength of static magnetic field.

  7. Molecular interactions in the ionic liquid emim acetate and water binary mixtures probed via NMR spin relaxation and exchange spectroscopy.

    Allen, Jesse J; Bowser, Sage R; Damodaran, Krishnan

    2014-05-01

    Interactions of ionic liquids (ILs) with water are of great interest for many potential IL applications. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium (emim) acetate, in particular, has shown interesting interactions with water including hydrogen bonding and even chemical exchange. Previous studies have shown the unusual behavior of emim acetate when in the presence of 0.43 mole fraction of water, and a combination of NMR techniques is used herein to investigate the emim acetate-water system and the unusual behavior at 0.43 mole fraction of water. NMR relaxometry techniques are used to describe the effects of water on the molecular motion and interactions of emim acetate with water. A discontinuity is seen in nuclear relaxation behavior at the concentration of 0.43 mole fraction of water, and this is attributed to the formation of a hydrogen bonded network. EXSY measurements are used to determine the exchange rates between the H2 emim proton and water, which show a complex dependence on the concentration of the mixture. The findings support and expand our previous results, which suggested the presence of an extended hydrogen bonding network in the emim acetate-water system at concentrations close to 0.50 mole fraction of H2O. PMID:24654003

  8. TROSY NMR with partially deuterated proteins.

    Eletsky, A; Kienhöfer, A; Pervushin, K

    2001-06-01

    TROSY-type optimization of liquid-state NMR experiments is based on the preservation of unique coherence transfer pathways with distinct transverse relaxation properties. The broadband decoupling of the 1H spins interchanges the TROSY and anti-TROSY magnetization transfer pathways and thus is not used in TROSY-type triple resonance experiments or is replaced with narrowband selective decoupling. To achieve the full advantage of TROSY, the uniform deuteration of proteins is usually required. Here we propose a new and general method for 1H broadband decoupling in TROSY NMR, which does not compromise the relaxation optimization in the 15N-1H moieties, but uniformly and efficiently refocuses the 1JCH scalar coupling evolution in the 13C-1H moieties. Combined with the conventional 2H decoupling, this method enables obtaining high sensitivity TROSY-type triple resonance spectra with partially deuterated or fully protonated 13C,15N labeled proteins. PMID:11495249

  9. The Frequency-Dependence of the NMR Longitudinal Relaxation Rate, T(1)(-1), of Water in Cysts of the Brine Shrimp

    Egan, Thomas F.

    The NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate, T(,1)(' -1), of water is independent of the Larmor frequency, (omega)/2(pi), in the normal rf range. However, T(,1)('-1) of intracellular water in biological systems, which accounts for as much as 80% of the cell mass, is frequency-dependent. This indicates that the NMR properties of water in the cellular environment are influenced by long-correlation time processes due to the interaction of water with proteins and other macromolecular constituents of the cell. In this research, the relaxation rate T(,1)(' -1) of water in the Artemia (brine shrimp) cyst is examined as a function of: (1) the proton NMR Larmor frequency for .01 brine shrimp cysts are influenced by additional relexation mechanisms; translational diffusion of hydration water is one possibility.

  10. Observation of the vortex lattice melting by NMR spin-lattice relaxation in the mixed state

    For anisotropic layered superconductors the effect of moving vortices on the nuclear spin magnetization is calculated. Current is supposed to flow along layers, and applied magnetic field is tilted with respect to c-axis. In the solid phase the motion of the vortex lattice produces an alternating magnetic field perpendicular to the applied field which causes the decay of the spin-echo amplitude. This decay rate will display an array of peaks as a function of frequency. In the liquid phase this alternating field contribute to the longitudinal relaxation rate W1 which has a single peak

  11. Methods of 15N tracer research in biological systems

    The application of the stable isotope 15N is of increasing importance in different scientific disciplines, especially in medicine, agriculture, and the biosciences. The close correlation between the growing interest and improvements of analytical procedures resulted in remarkable advances in the 15N tracer technique. On the basis of the latest results of 15N tracer research in life sciences and agriculture methods of 15N tracer research in biological systems are compiled. The 15N methodology is considered under three headings: Chemical analysis with a description of methods of sample preparation (including different separation and isolation methods for N-containing substances of biological and agricultural origin) and special procedures converting ammonia to molecular nitrogen. Isotopic analysis with a review on the most important methods of isotopic analysis of nitrogen: mass spectrometry (including the GC-MS technique), emission spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy, and other analytical procedures. 15N-tracer techniques with a consideration of the role of the isotope dilution analysis as well as different labelling techniques and the mathematical interpretation of tracer data (modelling, N turnover experiments). In these chapters also sources of errors in chemical and isotopic analysis, the accuracy of the different methods and its importance on tracer experiments are discussed. Procedures for micro scale 15N analysis and aspects of 15N analysis on the level of natural abundance are considered. Furthermore some remarks on isotope effects in 15N tracer experiments are made. (author)

  12. The problem of internal motion of molecules in the liquid as seen from NMR relaxation studies

    Hertz, H. G.

    As a brief introduction the most important formulas are given and the crucial physical aspects will be worked out. It is essentially the Woessner theory which gives the framework of the facts to be treated. A number of experimental results are presented for the following molecules: Methanol, acetic acid, DMSO, ethanol, i-propanol, toluene and propylene carbonate. It will be shown that the proton-proton distances in the molecule which result from the proton relaxation data obtained in the dispersion range together with the "classical" theory do not agree with the generally accepted molecular geometry. Moreover, the general nature of the resulting motion in its qualitative and basic features does not correspond to the pattern generally accepted. A very general description of the molecule is given which is free of the difficulties which have appeared.

  13. On shape of NMR absorption spectra and cross-relaxation in hetero nuclear spin system

    Zobov, V E; Rodionova, O E

    2001-01-01

    The dynamic theory of the heteronuclear spin systems in solid bodies at high temperatures is developed. The system of the nonlinear integral equations is obtained for the time spin correlation functions in the approximation of the self-consistent fluctuating local field. The corrections, originating due to the fluctuating local fields correlations, existing in the real lattices, are accounted for thereby. The theory is applied to describing available experimental data for the LiF crystal (with two nuclei kinds). The free precession signals for the Li and F nuclei, as well as, the harmonic cross-relaxation spectra, the sup 6 Li isotope cross-polarization and the sup 8 Li isotope depolarization are calculated by the magnetic field orientations along the basic crystallographic axes. Good agreement between theory and experiment is achieved

  14. Model-free model elimination: A new step in the model-free dynamic analysis of NMR relaxation data

    Model-free analysis is a technique commonly used within the field of NMR spectroscopy to extract atomic resolution, interpretable dynamic information on multiple timescales from the R1, R2, and steady state NOE. Model-free approaches employ two disparate areas of data analysis, the discipline of mathematical optimisation, specifically the minimisation of a χ2 function, and the statistical field of model selection. By searching through a large number of model-free minimisations, which were setup using synthetic relaxation data whereby the true underlying dynamics is known, certain model-free models have been identified to, at times, fail. This has been characterised as either the internal correlation times, τe, τf, or τs, or the global correlation time parameter, local τm, heading towards infinity, the result being that the final parameter values are far from the true values. In a number of cases the minimised χ2 value of the failed model is significantly lower than that of all other models and, hence, will be the model which is chosen by model selection techniques. If these models are not removed prior to model selection the final model-free results could be far from the truth. By implementing a series of empirical rules involving inequalities these models can be specifically isolated and removed. Model-free analysis should therefore consist of three distinct steps: model-free minimisation, model-free model elimination, and finally model-free model selection. Failure has also been identified to affect the individual Monte Carlo simulations used within error analysis. Each simulation involves an independent randomised relaxation data set and model-free minimisation, thus simulations suffer from exactly the same types of failure as model-free models. Therefore, to prevent these outliers from causing a significant overestimation of the errors the failed Monte Carlo simulations need to be culled prior to calculating the parameter standard deviations

  15. Noninvasive measurement of temperature distributions with high spatial resolution using quantitative imaging of NMR relaxation times

    Doran, Simon J.; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Hall, Laurance D.

    1994-07-01

    The steady-state temperature distribution within a block of cis-polybutadiene has been mapped using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging. The experiment described makes use of the temperature dependence of the nuclear magnetic longitudinal relaxation time (T1) of the polymer protons. Hot and cold water flowed through two axially mounted pipes in a cylindrical sample, creating a dipolar temperature distribution. A fast inversion recovery imaging sequence was used to map T1 values in the sample with a spatial resolution of 0.3 mm and random error of ±5% for individual pixels in the 128×128 image. The T1 values thus obtained were converted into temperatures using an empirical calibration curve, leading to a temperature resolution of ±2 K for each pixel. Using a median filter (which reduces the image resolution by a variable factor of up to 3), the data are rendered smooth enough to obtain a clear contour plot. This is compared with a finite element solution of Laplace's equation over the same domain, demonstrating that the MRI technique is reliable. A number of experimental problems limiting both the exact comparison between theory and experiment and the long-term utility of the technique are discussed.

  16. Measuring 1HN temperature coefficients in invisible protein states by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    A method based on the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiment is presented for measuring the temperature coefficients of amide proton chemical shifts of low populated ‘invisible’ protein states that exchange with a ‘visible’ ground state on the millisecond time-scale. The utility of the approach is demonstrated with an application to an I58D mutant of the Pfl6 Cro protein that undergoes exchange between the native, folded state and a cold denatured, unfolded conformational ensemble that is populated at a level of 6% at 2.5°C. A wide distribution of amide temperature coefficients is measured for the unfolded state. The distribution is centered about –5.6 ppb/K, consistent with an absence of intra-molecular hydrogen bonds, on average. However, the large range of values (standard deviation of 2.1 ppb/K) strongly supports the notion that the unfolded state of the protein is not a true random coil polypeptide chain.

  17. Probing the hydration of composite cement pastes containing fly ash and silica fume by proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation

    2010-01-01

    Proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation (T1) was used as a prober for observing the hydration process of composite cement pastes blending fly ash and silica fume during the early age.The distribution at initial time,evolution curves and signals intensity of T1 were shown in this paper.Results demonstrate that the T1 distribution curves at initial time exhibit two peaks,which are regarded as two different water phases in the pastes.The evolution curves of T1 are in good agreement with the hydration process of composite pastes and could be roughly divided into four stages:initial period,dormant period,acceleration period and steady period.The hydration mechanism for each stage was discussed.The hydration of the composite cement pastes was retarded by the addition of fly ash and silica fume when compared to that of pure cement.However,the hydration degree of the cement in the blends was promoted.

  18. NMR diffusion and relaxation measurements of organic molecules adsorbed in porous media

    The work in this thesis can be divided into two parts. The first part is focused on dynamic investigations of plastic crystals, both in bulk phases but also confined in porous materials (paper 1-3). This part was done together with professor Liudvikas Kimtys, Vilnius, Lithuania. The second part, with emphasis on diffusion, employed PFG NMR to measure the true intra-crystalline diffusivity, including development of a new pulse sequence with shorter effective diffusion time. This work was performed in collaboration with Dr. Geir H. Soerland, Trondheim, Norway and has resulted in three papers (paper 4-6). Paper 1-3: In these papers the dynamics of three organic compounds confined within mesoporous silica have been studied, and the results are discussed with reference to the bulk material. The three investigated compounds form disordered (plastic) phases of high symmetry on solidification (solid I). Thus, bulk cyclohexane exhibits a disordered phase between the solid-solid phase transition at 186 K and the melting point at 280 K. X-ray diffraction measurements have shown that solid I is face-centred cubic (Z=4, a=0.861 nm at 195 K), while the ordered solid II is monoclinic. Tert-butyl cyanide exhibits a plastic phase between the solid-solid transition point at 233 K and the melting point at 292 K. Neutron scattering techniques have established that solid I is tetragonal (Z=2, a=b=0.683 nm, c=0.674 nm, beta=90 deg at 234 K), while solid II is monoclinic. Finally, the disordered phase of pivalic acid melts at 310 K and undergoes a solid-solid phase transition at 280 K. The disordered phase is face-centred cubic, (Z=4, a=0.887 nm), while the low temperature phase (solid II) is triclinic. Paper 4-6; If one is aiming to measure true intra-crystallite diffusivities in porous media the distance travelled by the molecules during the pulse must be shorter than the size of the crystallite. The length of the diffusion time is therefore important. Working with heterogeneous media

  19. 鲜花生的低场核磁共振横向弛豫分析%Low Field NMR Transverse Relaxation Spectrum of Peanut

    李潮锐; 刘青; 杨培强

    2014-01-01

    As low field 1 H NMR relaxation can effectively measure moisture and fat in oil seed,the key problem is technology for identification of the contribution from these components respectively.The pea-nut mass change with hydrogenation is recorded for optimizing NMR measurement process.The CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill) technique was applied to obtain the NMR transverse relaxation of peanut and peanut oil samples,and the resonance relaxation spectrum was analyzed with the method of continu-ous spectrum iteration.According to the variation of relaxation spectrum peak area with peanut mass,the assignments of the relaxation peaks were determined with the results from peanut oil.The study found that the transverse relaxation spectrum peaks reflected the fat content in dry peanut.Compared with fat con-tent measured with traditional technology,the peak areas for dry fresh peanut had a positive linear corre-lation with its fat concentration.The results demonstrate that the NMR transverse relaxation spectrum can be used for determination of fat content in fresh peanut.%尽管低场1 H-核磁共振(NMR)弛豫谱技术可以有效地获取油料作物种子中水和油脂等组分含量信息,但实现准确分析的关键前提是解决弛豫谱的标识问题。首先,通过记录鲜花生脱水过程质量随时间变化确定核磁共振测量步骤;随之,采用CPMG (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill)方法获得花生核磁共振横向弛豫数据;最后,使用连续谱迭代方法得到花生核磁共振弛豫谱。由弛豫谱峰面积与花生质量变化关系,并借助纯花生油实验结果确认了样品脂肪的核磁共振横向弛豫谱。基于单位质量干燥花生和纯花生油两者的脂肪弛豫谱峰面积之比获得与索氏抽提法相吻合的含油率。

  20. Backbone (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N NMR assignment for the inactive form of the retroviral protease of the murine intracisternal A-type particle, inMIA-14 PR

    Motáčková, V.; Kubíčková, M.; Kožíšek, Milan; Grantz Šašková, Klára; Švec, Martin; Žídek, L.; Sklenář, V.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 2 (2009), s. 261-264. ISSN 1874-2718 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : retroviral protease * MIA-14 PR * DNA binding domain * homodimer * NMR Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.750, year: 2009

  1. Spin Liquid State in the 3D Frustrated Antiferromagnet PbCuTe2 O6 : NMR and Muon Spin Relaxation Studies

    Khuntia, P.; Bert, F.; Mendels, P.; Koteswararao, B.; Mahajan, A. V.; Baenitz, M.; Chou, F. C.; Baines, C.; Amato, A.; Furukawa, Y.

    2016-03-01

    PbCuTe2O6 is a rare example of a spin liquid candidate featuring a three-dimensional magnetic lattice. Strong geometric frustration arises from the dominant antiferromagnetic interaction that generates a hyperkagome network of Cu2 + ions although additional interactions enhance the magnetic lattice connectivity. Through a combination of magnetization measurements and local probe investigations by NMR and muon spin relaxation down to 20 mK, we provide robust evidence for the absence of magnetic freezing in the ground state. The local spin susceptibility probed by the NMR shift hardly deviates from the macroscopic one down to 1 K pointing to a homogeneous magnetic system with a low defect concentration. The saturation of the NMR shift and the sublinear power law temperature (T ) evolution of the 1 /T1 NMR relaxation rate at low T point to a nonsinglet ground state favoring a gapless fermionic description of the magnetic excitations. Below 1 K a pronounced slowing down of the spin dynamics is witnessed, which may signal a reconstruction of spinon Fermi surface. Nonetheless, the compound remains in a fluctuating spin liquid state down to the lowest temperature of the present investigation.

  2. (13)C solid-state NMR analysis of the most common pharmaceutical excipients used in solid drug formulations Part II: CP kinetics and relaxation analysis.

    Pisklak, Dariusz Maciej; Zielińska-Pisklak, Monika; Szeleszczuk, Łukasz; Wawer, Iwona

    2016-04-15

    Excipients used in the solid drug formulations differ in their NMR relaxation and (13)C cross-polarization (CP) kinetics parameters. Therefore, experimental parameters like contact time of cross-polarization and repetition time have a major impact on the registered solid state NMR spectra and in consequence on the results of the NMR analysis. In this work the CP kinetics and relaxation of the most common pharmaceutical excipients: anhydrous α-lactose, α-lactose monohydrate, mannitol, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium starch glycolate type A and B, starch of different origin, microcrystalline cellulose, hypromellose, ethylcellulose, methylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose, sodium alginate, magnesium stearate, sodium laurilsulfate and Kollidon(®) were analyzed. The studied excipients differ significantly in their optimum repetition time (from 5s to 1200s) and T1ρ(I) parameters (from 2ms to 73ms). The practical use of those differences in the excipients composition analysis was demonstrated on the example of commercially available tablets containing indapamide as an API. The information presented in this article will help to choose the correct acquisition parameters and also will save the time and effort needed for their optimization in the NMR analysis of the solid drug formulations. PMID:26836362

  3. Spin Liquid State in the 3D Frustrated Antiferromagnet PbCuTe_{2}O_{6}: NMR and Muon Spin Relaxation Studies.

    Khuntia, P; Bert, F; Mendels, P; Koteswararao, B; Mahajan, A V; Baenitz, M; Chou, F C; Baines, C; Amato, A; Furukawa, Y

    2016-03-11

    PbCuTe_{2}O_{6} is a rare example of a spin liquid candidate featuring a three-dimensional magnetic lattice. Strong geometric frustration arises from the dominant antiferromagnetic interaction that generates a hyperkagome network of Cu^{2+} ions although additional interactions enhance the magnetic lattice connectivity. Through a combination of magnetization measurements and local probe investigations by NMR and muon spin relaxation down to 20 mK, we provide robust evidence for the absence of magnetic freezing in the ground state. The local spin susceptibility probed by the NMR shift hardly deviates from the macroscopic one down to 1 K pointing to a homogeneous magnetic system with a low defect concentration. The saturation of the NMR shift and the sublinear power law temperature (T) evolution of the 1/T_{1} NMR relaxation rate at low T point to a nonsinglet ground state favoring a gapless fermionic description of the magnetic excitations. Below 1 K a pronounced slowing down of the spin dynamics is witnessed, which may signal a reconstruction of spinon Fermi surface. Nonetheless, the compound remains in a fluctuating spin liquid state down to the lowest temperature of the present investigation. PMID:27015508

  4. Complex molecular dynamics of (CH 3NH 3) 5Bi 2Br 11 (MAPBB) protons from NMR relaxation and second moment of NMR spectrum

    Latanowicz, L.; Medycki, W.; Jakubas, R.

    2011-08-01

    Molecular dynamics of a polycrystalline sample of (CH 3NH 3) 5Bi 2Br 11 (MAPBB) is studied on the basis of the proton T1 (55.2 MHz) relaxation time and the proton second moment of NMR line. The T1 (55.2 MHz) was measured for temperatures from 20 K to 330 K, while the second moment M2 for those from 40 K to 330 K. The proton spin pairs of the methyl and ammonium groups perform a complex stochastic motion being a resultant of four components characterised by the correlation times τ3T, τ3H, τ2, and τ iso, referring to the tunnelling and over the barrier jumps in a triple potential, jumps between two equilibrium sites and isotropic rotation. The theoretical expressions for the spectral densities in the cases of the complex motion considered were derived. For τ3H, τ2, and τ iso the Arrhenius temperature dependence was assumed, while for τ3T - the Schrödinger one. The correlation times τ3H for CH 3 and NH 3 groups differ, which indicates the uncorrelated motion of these groups. The stochastic tunnelling jumps are not present above the temperature T tun at which the thermal energy is higher than the activation energy of jumps over the barrier attributed to the hindered rotation of the CH 3 and NH 3 groups. The T tun temperature is 54.6 K for NH 3 group and 46.5 K for CH 3 group in MAPBB crystal. The tunnelling jumps of the methyl and ammonium protons are responsible for the flattening of T1 temperature dependence at low temperatures. The isotropic tumbling is detectable only from the M2 temperature dependence. The isotropic tumbling reduces the second moment to 4 G2 which is the value of the intermolecular part of the second moment. The motion characterised by the correlation time τ2 is well detectable from both T1 and M2 temperature dependences. This motion causes the appearance of T1 minimum at 130 K and reduction of the second moment to the 7.7 G2 value. The small tunnelling splitting ω T of the same value for the methyl and ammonium groups was estimated as

  5. NMR relaxation study of the phase transitions and relaxation mechanisms of the alums MCr(SO4)2.12H2O (M=Rb and Cs) single crystals

    The physical properties and phase transition mechanisms of MCr(SO4)2.12H2O (M=Rb and Cs) single crystals have been investigated. The phase transition temperatures, NMR spectra, and the spin-lattice relaxation times T1 of the 87Rb and 133Cs nuclei in the two crystals were determined using DSC and FT NMR spectroscopy. The resonance lines and relaxation times of the 87Rb and 133Cs nuclei undergo significant changes at the phase transition temperatures. The sudden changes in the splitting of the Rb and Cs resonance lines are attributed to changes in the local symmetry of their sites, and the changes in the temperature dependences of T1 are related to variations in the symmetry of the octahedra of water molecules surrounding Rb+ and Cs+. We also compared these 87Rb and 133Cs NMR results with those obtained for the trivalent cations Cr and Al in MCr(SO4)2.12H2O and MAl(SO4)2.12H2O crystals. - Graphical Abstract: The physical properties and phase transition mechanisms of MCr(SO4)2.12H2O (M=Rb, Cs, and NH4) single crystals have been investigated. Highlights: → The physical properties and phase transition mechanisms of MCr(SO4)2.12H2O (M=Rb and Cs) crystals → The NMR spectra and the spin-lattice relaxation times T1 of the 87Rb and 133Cs nuclei in the two crystals → The variations in the symmetry of the octahedra of water molecules surrounding Rb+ and Cs+.

  6. Conformation and dynamics of polyoxyethylene lauryl ether (Brij-35) chains in aqueous micellar solution studied by 2D NOESY and 1H NMR relaxation

    GAO; Hongchang(高红昌); FANG; Xiaowen(方晓雯); MAO; Shizhen(毛诗珍); YUAN; Hanzhen(袁汉珍); ZHAO; Sui(赵濉); CHENG; Gongzhen(程功臻); YU; Jiayong(俞稼镛); DU; Youru(杜有如)

    2002-01-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation time, spin-spin relaxation time and two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (2D NOESY) experiments of polyoxyethylene lauryl ether (Brij-35) micelles in aqueous solutions at a concentration of 100 times the critical micellar concentration (cmc) give direct evidence that the hydrophilic polyoxyethylene chains, staying in the exterior of the micellar core, are coiled, bent and aligned around the micellar core with a certain number of water molecules included. This hydrophilic layer is in contact with the solvent, water, keeping the micellar solution stable. 1H NMR relaxation time measurements show that the first oxyethylene group next to the alkyl chain participates in the formation of the surface area of the micellar core. The motion of the hydrophilic polyoxyethylene chains is less restricted as compared with the hydrophobic alkyl chains.

  7. Silver(I) and copper(I) bis(pyridine-2-carbaldehyde-imine) triflate complexes studied in solution by 1H, 1H-{109Ag}, INEPT 15N and INEPT 109Ag NMR

    Koten, G. van; Stein, G.C. van; Bok, B. de; Taylor, L C; Vrieze, K.; Brevard, C.

    1984-01-01

    The reactions of the neutral pyridine-imine, 6-R-py-2-CH=N-R' (NN'), donor ligands with [M(O{3}SCF{3})] [M = Ag(I) or Cu(I)] yield ionic complexes, consisting of a [M(NN'){2}]}+{ cation and a O{3}SCF{3}}-{ anion. }1{H NMR studies of the complexes which contain the prochiral substituent (R') i-Pr or the chiral (S)-CHMePh show that in the slow exchange limit the metal IB centres have tetrahedral geometries as a result of chelate bonding of the pyridine-imine ligands. The metal IB centres have e...

  8. Use of 15N Label in Organic Synthesis and Spectroscopy. Part I: Preparation of 15N-Labeled tert-Butylamine

    Talaty, Erach R.; Boese, Christopher A.; Adewale, Sanni M.; Ismail, Mohammed S.; Provenzano, Frank A.; Utz, Melissa J.

    2002-02-01

    The preparation of 15N-labeled tert-butylamine involves the conversion of the correspondingly labeled potassium cyanide into the 15N-labeled tert-butylformamide via the Ritter reaction in 85% yield, followed by hydrolysis with either aqueous sodium hydroxide or hydrochloric acid. The NMR spectra of the compounds provide a valuable opportunity for discussing several important topics in NMR spectroscopy, such as cis-trans isomerism due to restricted rotation and 15N coupling. Comparison of the IR spectra of the labeled and unlabeled compounds permits a forum for discussing the theory of vibrational frequencies.

  9. Paramagnetic NMR relaxation in polymeric matrixes: sensitivity enhancement and selective suppression of embedded species (1H and 13C PSR filter).

    Fernandez-Megia, Eduardo; Correa, Juan; Novoa-Carballal, Ramon; Riguera, Ricardo

    2007-12-12

    A study of the practical applications of the addition of paramagnetic spin relaxation (PSR) ions to a variety of polymers (PLL, PAA, PGA, PVP, and polysaccharides such as hyaluronic acid, chitosan, mannan, and dextran) in solution (D2O and DMSO-d6) is described. Use of Gd(III), Cu(II), and Mn(II) allows a reduction of up to 500% in the 1H longitudinal relaxation times (T1), and so in the time necessary for recording quantitative NMR spectra (sensitivity enhancement) neither an increase of the spectral line width nor chemical shift changes resulted from addition of any of the PSR agents tested. Selective suppression of the 1H and 13C NMR signals of certain components (low MW molecules and polymers) in the spectrum of a mixture was attained thanks to their different sensitivity [transverse relaxation times (T2)] to Gd(III) (PSR filter). Illustration of this strategy with block copolymers (PGA-g-PEG) and mixtures of polymers and low MW molecules (i.e., lactose-hyaluronic acid, dextran-PAA, PVP-glutamic acid) in 1D and 2D NMR experiments (COSY and HMQC) is presented. In those mixtures where PSR and CPMG filters alone failed in the suppression of certain components (i.e., PVP-mannan-hyaluronic acid) due to their similarity of 1H T2 values and sensitivities to Gd(III), use of the PSR filter in combination with CPMG sequences (PSR-CPMG filter) successfully resulted in the sequential suppression of the components (hyaluronic acid first and then mannan). PMID:18004845

  10. (1)H NMR z-spectra of acetate methyl in stretched hydrogels: quantum-mechanical description and Markov chain Monte Carlo relaxation-parameter estimation.

    Shishmarev, Dmitry; Chapman, Bogdan E; Naumann, Christoph; Mamone, Salvatore; Kuchel, Philip W

    2015-01-01

    The (1)H NMR signal of the methyl group of sodium acetate is shown to be a triplet in the anisotropic environment of stretched gelatin gel. The multiplet structure of the signal is due to the intra-methyl residual dipolar couplings. The relaxation properties of the spin system were probed by recording steady-state irradiation envelopes ('z-spectra'). A quantum-mechanical model based on irreducible spherical tensors formed by the three magnetically equivalent spins of the methyl group was used to simulate and fit experimental z-spectra. The multiple parameter values of the relaxation model were estimated by using a Bayesian-based Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. PMID:25486634

  11. Osmotic and aging effects in caviar oocytes throughout water and lipid changes assessed by 1H NMR T1 and T2 relaxation and MRI.

    Gussoni, Maristella; Greco, Fulvia; Vezzoli, Alessandra; Paleari, Maria Antonietta; Moretti, Vittorio Maria; Lanza, Barbara; Zetta, Lucia

    2007-01-01

    By combining NMR relaxation spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging techniques, unsalted (us) and salted (s) caviar (Acipenser transmontanus) oocytes were characterized over a storage period of up to 90 days. The aging and the salting effects on the two major cell constituents, water and lipids, were separately assessed. T1 and T2 decays were interpreted by assuming a two-site exchange model. At Day 0, two water compartments that were not in fast exchange were identified by the T1 relaxation measurements on the us oocytes. In the s samples, T1 decay was monoexponential. During the time of storage, an increment of the free water amount was found for the us oocytes, ascribed to an increased metabolism. T1 and T2 of the s oocytes shortened as a consequence of the osmotic stress produced by salting. Selective images showed the presence of water endowed with different regional mobility that severely changed during the storage. Lipid T1 relaxation decays collected on us and s samples were found to be biexponential, and the T1 values lengthened during storage. In us and s oocytes, the increased lipid mobility with the storage was ascribed to lipolysis. Selective images of us samples showed lipids that were confined to the cytoplasm for up to 60 days of storage. PMID:17222723

  12. Solid State NMR Study of Polystyrene Nanolatex Particles(I) 13C Spin-Lattice Relaxation Time

    2001-01-01

    13C spin-lattice relaxtion times for polystyrene nanolatex particles have been investigated. It was found that the dramatic increase at 80℃ annealing temperature is well below the Tg temperature of bulk polystyrene, the increase of relaxation time of aromatic carbons is larger than that of for aliphatic carbons at transition annealing temperature.

  13. Relaxation-compensated difference spin diffusion NMR for detecting 13C–13C long-range correlations in proteins and polysaccharides

    The measurement of long-range distances remains a challenge in solid-state NMR structure determination of biological macromolecules. In 2D and 3D correlation spectra of uniformly 13C-labeled biomolecules, inter-residue, inter-segmental, and intermolecular 13C–13C cross peaks that provide important long-range distance constraints for three-dimensional structures often overlap with short-range cross peaks that only reflect the covalent structure of the molecule. It is therefore desirable to develop new approaches to obtain spectra containing only long-range cross peaks. Here we show that a relaxation-compensated modification of the commonly used 2D 1H-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) experiment allows the clean detection of such long-range cross peaks. By adding a z-filter to keep the total z-period of the experiment constant, we compensate for 13C T1 relaxation. As a result, the difference spectrum between a long- and a scaled short-mixing time spectrum show only long-range correlation signals. We show that one- and two-bond cross peaks equalize within a few tens of milliseconds. Within ∼200 ms, the intensity equilibrates within an amino acid residue and a monosaccharide to a value that reflects the number of spins in the local network. With T1 relaxation compensation, at longer mixing times, inter-residue and inter-segmental cross peaks increase in intensity whereas intra-segmental cross-peak intensities remain unchanged relative to each other and can all be subtracted out. Without relaxation compensation, the difference 2D spectra exhibit both negative and positive intensities due to heterogeneous T1 relaxation in most biomolecules, which can cause peak cancellation. We demonstrate this relaxation-compensated difference PDSD approach on amino acids, monosaccharides, a crystalline model peptide, a membrane-bound peptide and a plant cell wall sample. The resulting difference spectra yield clean multi-bond, inter-residue and intermolecular correlation peaks, which

  14. Utilization of paramagnetic relaxation enhancements for high-resolution NMR structure determination of a soluble loop-rich protein with sparse NOE distance restraints

    NMR structure determination of soluble proteins depends in large part on distance restraints derived from NOE. In this study, we examined the impact of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE)-derived distance restraints on protein structure determination. A high-resolution structure of the loop-rich soluble protein Sin1 could not be determined by conventional NOE-based procedures due to an insufficient number of NOE restraints. By using the 867 PRE-derived distance restraints obtained from the NOE-based structure determination procedure, a high-resolution structure of Sin1 could be successfully determined. The convergence and accuracy of the determined structure were improved by increasing the number of PRE-derived distance restraints. This study demonstrates that PRE-derived distance restraints are useful in the determination of a high-resolution structure of a soluble protein when the number of NOE constraints is insufficient

  15. An inversion method of 2D NMR relaxation spectra in low fields based on LSQR and L-curve

    Su, Guanqun; Zhou, Xiaolong; Wang, Lijia; Wang, Yuanjun; Nie, Shengdong

    2016-04-01

    The low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) inversion method based on traditional least-squares QR decomposition (LSQR) always produces some oscillating spectra. Moreover, the solution obtained by traditional LSQR algorithm often cannot reflect the true distribution of all the components. Hence, a good solution requires some manual intervention, for especially low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data. An approach based on the LSQR algorithm and L-curve is presented to solve this problem. The L-curve method is applied to obtain an improved initial optimal solution by balancing the residual and the complexity of the solutions instead of manually adjusting the smoothing parameters. First, the traditional LSQR algorithm is used on 2D NMR T1-T2 data to obtain its resultant spectra and corresponding residuals, whose norms are utilized to plot the L-curve. Second, the corner of the L-curve as the initial optimal solution for the non-negative constraint is located. Finally, a 2D map is corrected and calculated iteratively based on the initial optimal solution. The proposed approach is tested on both simulated and measured data. The results show that this algorithm is robust, accurate and promising for the NMR analysis.

  16. Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency and 1H-NMR relaxation properties of iron oxide/paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles

    Ruggiero, Maria R.; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Sieni, Elisabetta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Forzan, Michele; Cavallari, Eleonora; Stefania, Rachele; Dughiero, Fabrizio; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) can be exploited in biomedicine as agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatments and as contrast enhancers in magnetic resonance imaging. New, oleate-covered, iron oxide particles have been prepared either by co-precipitation or thermal decomposition methods and incorporated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-Fe-NPs) to improve their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Moreover, the PLGA-Fe-NPs have been loaded with paclitaxel to pursue an MFH-triggered drug release. Remarkably, it has been found that the nanoparticle formulations are characterized by peculiar 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles that directly correlate with their heating potential when exposed to an alternating magnetic field. By prolonging the magnetic field exposure to 30 min, a significant drug release was observed for PLGA-Fe-NPs in the case of the larger-sized magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the immobilization of lipophilic Fe-NPs in PLGA-NPs also made it possible to maintain Néel relaxation as the dominant relaxation contribution in the presence of large iron oxide cores (diameters of 15–20 nm), with the advantage of preserving their efficiency when they are entrapped in the intracellular environment. The results reported herein show that NMRD profiles are a useful tool for anticipating the heating capabilities of Fe-NPs designed for MFH applications.

  17. Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency and (1)H-NMR relaxation properties of iron oxide/paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles.

    Ruggiero, Maria R; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti; Sieni, Elisabetta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Forzan, Michele; Cavallari, Eleonora; Stefania, Rachele; Dughiero, Fabrizio; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-15

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) can be exploited in biomedicine as agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatments and as contrast enhancers in magnetic resonance imaging. New, oleate-covered, iron oxide particles have been prepared either by co-precipitation or thermal decomposition methods and incorporated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-Fe-NPs) to improve their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Moreover, the PLGA-Fe-NPs have been loaded with paclitaxel to pursue an MFH-triggered drug release. Remarkably, it has been found that the nanoparticle formulations are characterized by peculiar (1)H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles that directly correlate with their heating potential when exposed to an alternating magnetic field. By prolonging the magnetic field exposure to 30 min, a significant drug release was observed for PLGA-Fe-NPs in the case of the larger-sized magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the immobilization of lipophilic Fe-NPs in PLGA-NPs also made it possible to maintain Néel relaxation as the dominant relaxation contribution in the presence of large iron oxide cores (diameters of 15-20 nm), with the advantage of preserving their efficiency when they are entrapped in the intracellular environment. The results reported herein show that NMRD profiles are a useful tool for anticipating the heating capabilities of Fe-NPs designed for MFH applications. PMID:27265726

  18. Probing Microsecond Time Scale Dynamics in Proteins by Methyl H-1 Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill Relaxation Dispersion NMR Measurements. Application to Activation of the Signaling Protein NtrC(r)

    Otten, Renee; Villali, Janice; Kern, Dorothee; Mulder, Frans A. A.

    2010-01-01

    To study microsecond processes by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy, low power deposition and short pulses are crucial and encourage the development of experiments that employ H-1 Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse trains. Herein, a method is described for the comprehensive study of microse

  19. Synthesis of 15 N double labelled urea

    Synthesis of double 15 N labelled urea by reacting 15 N - ammonia with elemental sulfur and carbon monoxide in a pressure vessel is presented. 15 NH3 was produced by H15 NO3 reduction with Dewarda alloy in alkaline solution, or by nitric monoxide reduction with hydrogen on metallic manganese. An average yield of 85% tacking into account 15 N - urea and 15 N ammonium sulfate, produced in the same time, and 99% urea purity (checked by I.R. spectroscopy and mass spectrometry) were obtained. (authors)

  20. Comparison of {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C-determined parameters of mobility in melittin

    Zhu Lingyang [University Indianapolis, Department of Physics, Indiana University Purdue (United States); Prendergast, Franklyn G. [Mayo Foundation, Department of Pharmacology (United States); Kemple, Marvin D. [University Indianapolis, Department of Physics, Indiana University Purdue (United States)

    1998-07-15

    Backbone and tryptophan side-chain mobilities in the 26-residue, cytolytic peptide melittin (MLT) were investigated by {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C NMR. Specifically, inverse-detected {sup 15}N T{sub 1} and steady-state NOE measurements were made at 30 and 51 MHz on MLT at 22 deg. C enriched with {sup 15}N at six amide positions and in the Trp{sup 19} side chain. Both the disordered MLT monomer (1.2 mM peptide at pH 3.6 in neat water) and {alpha}-helical MLT tetramer (4.0 mM peptide at pH 5.2 in 150 mM phosphate buffer) were examined. The relaxation data were analyzed in terms of the Lipari and Szabo model-free formalism with three parameters: {tau}{sub m}, the correlation time for the overall rotation; S{sup 2}, a site-specific order parameter which is a measure of the amplitude of the internal motion; and {tau}{sub e}, a local, effective correlation time of the internal motion. A comparison was made of motional parameters from the {sup 15}N measurements and from {sup 13}C measurements on MLT, the latter having been made here and previously [Kemple et al. (1997) Biochemistry, 36, 1678-1688]. {tau}{sub m} and {tau}{sub e} values were consistent from data on the two nuclei. In the MLT monomer, S{sup 2} values for the backbone N-H and C{alpha}-H vectors in the same residue were similar in value but in the tetramer the N-H order parameters were about 0.2 units larger than the C{alpha}-H order parameters. The Trp side-chain N-H and C-H order parameters, and {tau}{sub e} values were generally similar in both the monomer and tetramer. Implications of these results regarding the dynamics of MLT are examined.

  1. Characterization of Two Distinct Amorphous Forms of Valsartan by Solid-State NMR.

    Skotnicki, Marcin; Apperley, David C; Aguilar, Juan A; Milanowski, Bartłomiej; Pyda, Marek; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Valsartan (VAL) is an antihypertensive drug marketed in an amorphous form. Amorphous materials can have different physicochemical properties depending on preparation method, thermal history, etc., but the nature of such materials is difficult to study by diffraction techniques. This study characterizes two different amorphous forms of valsartan (AR and AM) using solid-state NMR (SSNMR) as a primary investigation tool, supported by solution-state NMR, FT-IR, TMDSC, and dissolution tests. The two forms are found to be clearly distinct, with a significantly higher level of structural arrangement in the AR form, as observed in (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H SSNMR. (13)C and (15)N NMR indicates that the fully amorphous material (AM) contains an approximately equal ratio of cis-trans conformers about the amide bond, whereas the AR form exists mainly as one conformer, with minor conformational "defects". (1)H ultrafast MAS NMR shows significant differences in the hydrogen bonding involving the tetrazole and acid hydrogens between the two materials, while (15)N NMR shows that both forms exist as a 1,2,3,4-tetrazole tautomer. NMR relaxation times show subtle differences in local and bulk molecular mobility, which can be connected with the glass transition, the stability of the glassy material, and its response to aging. Counterintuitively the fully amorphous material is found to have a significantly lower dissolution rate than the apparently more ordered AR material. PMID:26602457

  2. Syntheses of 15N-labeled pre-queuosine nucleobase derivatives

    Jasmin Levic

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Pre-queuosine or queuine (preQ1 is a guanine derivative that is involved in the biosynthetic pathway of the hypermodified tRNA nucleoside queuosine (Que. The core structure of preQ1 is represented by 7-(aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine (preQ1 base. Here, we report the synthesis of three preQ1 base derivatives with complementary 15N-labeling patterns, utilizing [15N]-KCN, [15N]-phthalimide, and [15N3]-guanidine as cost-affordable 15N sources. Such derivatives are required to explore the binding process of the preQ1 base to RNA targets using advanced NMR spectroscopic methods. PreQ1 base specifically binds to bacterial mRNA domains and thereby regulates genes that are required for queuosine biosynthesis.

  3. Resolution of the 15N balance enigma?

    The enigma of soil nitrogen balance sheets has been discussed for over 40 years. Many reasons have been considered for the incomplete recovery of 15N applied to soils, including sampling uncertainty, gaseous N losses from plants, and entrapment of soil gases. The entrapment of soil gases has been well documented for rice paddy and marshy soils but little or no work appears to have been done to determine entrapment in drained pasture soils. In this study 15N-labelled nitrate was applied to a soil core in a gas-tight glovebox. Water was applied, inducing drainage, which was immediately collected. Dinitrogen and N-2 were determined in the flux through the soil surface, and in the gases released into the glovebox as a result of irrigation or physical destruction of the core. Other components of the N balance were also measured, including soil inorganic-N and organic-N. Quantitative recovery of the applied 15N was achieved when the experiment was terminated 484 h after the 15N-labelled material was applied. Nearly 23% of the 15N was recovered in the glovebox atmosphere as N2 and N2O due to diffusion from the base of the soil core, convective flow after irrigation, and destructive soil sampling. This 15N would normally be unaccounted for using the sampling methodology typically employed in 15N recovery experiments. Copyright (2001) CSIRO Publishing

  4. Adiabatic fast passage application in solid state NMR study of cross relaxation and molecular dynamics in heteronuclear systems

    Baranowski, M.; Woźniak-Braszak, A.; Jurga, K.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the benefits of using fast adiabatic passage for the study of molecular dynamics in the solid state heteronuclear systems in the laboratory frame. A homemade pulse spectrometer operating at the frequency of 30.2 MHz and 28.411 MHz for protons and fluorines, respectively, has been enhanced with microcontroller direct digital synthesizer DDS controller [1-4]. This work briefly describes how to construct a low-cost and easy-to-assemble adiabatic extension set for homemade and commercial spectrometers based on recently very popular Arduino shields. The described set was designed for fast adiabatic generation. Timing and synchronization problems are discussed. The cross-relaxation experiments with different initial states of the two spin systems have been performed. Contrary to our previous work [5] where the steady-state NOE experiments were conducted now proton spins 1H are polarized in the magnetic field B0 while fluorine spins 19F are perturbed by selective saturation for a short time and then the system is allowed to evolve for a period in the absence of a saturating field. The adiabatic passage application leads to a reversal of magnetization of fluorine spins and increases the amplitude of the signal.

  5. Effects of glycosaminoglycan in the nucleus pulposus of cow on the /sup 1/H-NMR relaxation times and dynamic viscoelasticity

    Ohtomo, Satoshi

    1988-11-01

    Nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc (NP) has viscoelasticity owing to its high water content. The purpose of this study is to clarify the effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) on the mechanical property of NP by examining its interaction with water molecules. Nucleus pulposus of cow discs containing two different amounts of GAG were prepared: non-treated NP and GAG-depleted NP by treatment of hyaluronidase. The /sup 1/H-NMR relaxation times (T/sub 1/, T/sub 2/) indicating the mobility of water, and dynamic viscoelasticity (chemically bondE*chemically bond) of those materials were measured. The results suggested that the chemically bondE*chemically bond value in the normal NP depended on the mobility of water, which is regulated mainly by its interaction with GAG. On the other hand, the chemically bondE*chemically bond value in the GAG-depleted NP depended not only on the mobility of water but also on the elasticity of the collagen fiber in the NP. In conclusion, GAG plays an important role in the viscoelastic property of the NP by retaining water and by restricting its mobility.

  6. High-resolution NMR field-cycling device for full-range relaxation and structural studies of biopolymers on a shared commercial instrument

    Improvements are described in a shuttling field-cycling device (Redfield in Magn Reson Chem 41:753–768, 2003), designed to allow widespread access to this useful technique by configuring it as a removable module to a commercial 500 MHz NMR instrument. The main improvements described here, leading to greater versatility, high reliability and simple construction, include: shuttling provided by a linear motor driven by an integrated-control servomotor; provision of automated bucking magnets to allow fast two-stage cycling to nearly zero field; and overall control by a microprocessor. A brief review of history and publications that have used the system is followed by a discussion of topics related to such a device including discussion of some future applications. A description of new aspects of the shuttling device follows. The minimum round trip time to 1T and above is less than 0.25 s and to 0.002 T is 0.36 s. Commercial probes are used and sensitivity is that of the host spectrometer reduced only by relaxation during travel. A key element is development of a linkage that prevents vibration of the linear motor from reaching the probe.

  7. Monitoring primary response to chilling stress in etiolated Vigna radiata and V. mungo seedlings using thermal hysteresis of water proton NMR relaxation times

    Thermal hysteresis of longitudinal relaxation times (T1) of water protons in hypocotyls of etiolated Vigna radiata and V. mungo seedlings was investigated by pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Various lengths of chilling exposures during a cool-warm cycle between 20 and 0°C (below 10°C, about 4 h) for the T1 hysteresis measurement did not cause any visible injury symptoms in hypocotyls. However, the profiles of T1 hysteresis varied as a result of different chilling exposures. The sums of the T1 ratio (for detail see Introduction) reflecting T1 prolongation or shortening upon the warming process were a good quantitative index for the extent of T1 hysteresis, and the wide dispersion of this value ranging on the “minus” side (T1 prolongation upon warming) suggested the occurrence of a primary response of cells to chilling stress before obvious visible symptoms occur while the T1 ratio sums on the “plus” side (T1 shortening upon warming) corresponded to a response of serious visible injury. Therefore, the sums of the T1 ratio can be used as a non-destructive diagnostic tool for monitoring the primary event of chilling injury when lacking any visible injury symptoms. The data indicate that the critical temperature for the occurrence of primary response for chilling stress was around 7.5°C for V. radiata and 12.5°C for V. mungo

  8. Struktur- und Bindungsuntersuchungen nichtextrahierbarer 15 N- und 14 C-Simazinrückstände im Boden

    Berns, Anne Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the presented study was the characterization of the structure and binding modes of non-extractable residues (NER) of the triazine herbicide simazine. The chemical environments of unaltered as well as metabolized simazine compounds can be observed directly in soil or compost matrix by 15N-NMR spectroscopy. As the 15N-isotope has a very low sensitivity and natural abundance 15N-labeled simazine was used. To further enhance the signal to noise ratio and sensitivity of the NMR experime...

  9. Measurement and Calculation of Relaxation Time T2 and diffusion of Gel Electrolytes Based on the NaClO4 Inorganic Salt During Polymerization by NMR Method with Focusing on 23Na and 1H Nuclei

    Kořínek, Radim; Bartušek, Karel; Vondrák, I.; Musil, M.

    Bratislava : Slovak Academy of Sciences, 2011, s. 131-134. ISBN 978-80-969672-4-7. [International Conference on Measurement 2011 /8./. Smolenice (SK), 27.04.2011-30.04.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : T2 relaxation * diffusion * NMR * measurement Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  10. Internal motions in yeast phenylalanine transfer RNA from 13C NMR relaxation rates of modified base methyl groups: a model-free approach

    Internal motions at specific locations through yeast phenylalanine tRNA were measured by using nucleic acid biosynthetically enriched in 13C at modified base methyl groups. Carbon NMR spectra of isotopically enriched tRNA/sup Phe/ reveal 12 individual peaks for 13 of the 14 methyl groups known to be present. The two methyls of N2, N2-dimethylguanosine (m22G-26) have indistinguishable resonances, whereas the fourteenth methyl bound to ring carbon-11 of the hypermodified nucleoside 3' adjacent to the anticodon, wyosine (Y-37), does not come from the [methyl-13C] methionine substrate. Assignments to individual nucleosides within the tRNA were made on the basis of chemical shifts of the mononucleosides and correlation of 13C resonances with proton NMR chemical shifts via two-dimensional heteronuclear proton-carbon correlation spectroscopy. Values of 13C longitudinal relaxation (T1) and the nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOE) were determined at 22.5, 75.5, and 118 MHz for tRNA/sup Phe/ in a physiological buffer solution with 10 mM MgCl2, at 220C. These data were used to extract two physical parameters that define the system with regard to fast internal motion: the generalized order parameters (S2) and effective correlation times (tau/sub e/) for internal motion of the C-H internuclear vectors. For all methyl groups the generalized order parameter varied from 0.057 to 0.108, compared with the value of 0.111 predicted for a rapidly spinning methyl group rigidly mounted on a spherical macromolecule. Values of tau/sub e/ ranged from 4 to 16 ps, generally shorter times than measured in other work for amino acid methyl groups in several proteins. Somewhat surprising was the finding that the two methyl esters terminating the Y-37 side chain have order parameters similar to those of other methyls in tRNA and only 25% less than that for a methyl directly bonded to the base

  11. Preparation of 15N labelled protein sample by gene engineering technology

    Using the advanced multi-dimension heteronuclear pulses and isotope labelled protein technique, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has become an important tool in analysis of the solution conformation of protein. On the basis of the high level expression of a protein-trichosanthin in recombinant E.coli using DNA, 15N was used to label the protein, the 15N labelled trichosanthin was obtained by affinity chromatography on Ni-NTA agarose. Terminating pregnant effect in mice showed that this recombinant protein had the same activity as natural trichosanthin. A 1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC) spectrum was obtained from an AM-500 NMR spectrometer, demonstrating that this method is suitable in preparing labelled protein sample for NMR

  12. Nitrogen detected TROSY at high field yields high resolution and sensitivity for protein NMR

    Takeuchi, Koh [National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Molecular Profiling Research Center for Drug Discovery (Japan); Arthanari, Haribabu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Shimada, Ichio, E-mail: shimada@iw-nmr.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Molecular Profiling Research Center for Drug Discovery (Japan); Wagner, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard-wagner@hms.harvard.edu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Detection of {sup 15}N in multidimensional NMR experiments of proteins has sparsely been utilized because of the low gyromagnetic ratio (γ) of nitrogen and the presumed low sensitivity of such experiments. Here we show that selecting the TROSY components of proton-attached {sup 15}N nuclei (TROSY {sup 15}N{sub H}) yields high quality spectra in high field magnets (>600 MHz) by taking advantage of the slow {sup 15}N transverse relaxation and compensating for the inherently low {sup 15}N sensitivity. The {sup 15}N TROSY transverse relaxation rates increase modestly with molecular weight but the TROSY gain in peak heights depends strongly on the magnetic field strength. Theoretical simulations predict that the narrowest line width for the TROSY {sup 15}N{sub H} component can be obtained at 900 MHz, but sensitivity reaches its maximum around 1.2 GHz. Based on these considerations, a {sup 15}N-detected 2D {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N TROSY-HSQC ({sup 15}N-detected TROSY-HSQC) experiment was developed and high-quality 2D spectra were recorded at 800 MHz in 2 h for 1 mM maltose-binding protein at 278 K (τ{sub c} ∼ 40 ns). Unlike for {sup 1}H detected TROSY, deuteration is not mandatory to benefit {sup 15}N detected TROSY due to reduced dipolar broadening, which facilitates studies of proteins that cannot be deuterated, especially in cases where production requires eukaryotic expression systems. The option of recording {sup 15}N TROSY of proteins expressed in H{sub 2}O media also alleviates the problem of incomplete amide proton back exchange, which often hampers the detection of amide groups in the core of large molecular weight proteins that are expressed in D{sub 2}O culture media and cannot be refolded for amide back exchange. These results illustrate the potential of {sup 15}N{sub H}-detected TROSY experiments as a means to exploit the high resolution offered by high field magnets near and above 1 GHz.

  13. 15N in biological nitrogen fixation studies

    A bibliography with 298 references on the use of the stable nitrogen isotope 15N in the research on the biological fixation of dinitrogen is presented. The literature pertaining to this bibliography covers the period from 1975 to the middle of 1985. (author)

  14. Compact NMR

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  15. Compact NMR

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  16. 15N2 incorporation by rhizosphere soil

    Heterotrophic nitrogen fixation by rhizosphere soil samples from 20 rice cultivars grown under uniform field conditions was estimated employing 15N-tracer technique. Rhizosphere soil samples from different rice cultivars showed striking differences with regard to their ability to incorporate 15N2. Rhizosphere samples from rice straw-amended (3 and 6 tons/ha) soil exhibited more pronounced nitrogen-fixing activity than the samples form unamended soil; while the activity of the rhizosphere samples from soil receiving combined nitrogen (40 and 80 kg N/ha) was relatively low. However, the inhibitory effect of combined nitrogen was not expressed in the presence of rice straw at 6 tons/ha. Results suggest that plant variety, application of combined nitrogen and organic matter influence the rhizosphere nitrogen fixation. (orig.)

  17. Synthesis of 15N labeled glyphosate

    Amongst the actually commercialized herbicides the Glyphosate is the most used in Brazil. Its efficiency as well as the others herbicides against undesirable weeds is harmed by its final composts left at the environment. Although studies has being carried out to improve the knowledge about the herbicides behavior at the environment its complexity has led them towards innumerous to new significant research work where the use of radiolabeled composts (radiative tracers) are recommended to evaluate their bio-availability in the soil. However is the use, the manipulation and the storage of radiolabeled composts is requires an extra care under chemical safety point of view. The use of non radiolabeled composts is a world tendency especially for field researches. Under this context the presented work describes a method for the synthesis of 15N labeled glyphosate. The 15N-herbicide was undertaken by phosphometilation with the phosphit dialquil and 15N-glycine. The tests where carried out through a micro scale production plant and of equimolars amounts. At these conditions it's was possible to reach approximately a 20% of yield. At the conclusion of a best operational condition its expected to offer another important toll that shall be used in glyphosate behavior at the environment and undesirably weeds. (author)

  18. Towards quantification of butadiene content in styrene-butadiene block copolymers and their blends with general purpose polystyrene (GPPS) and the relation between mechanical properties and NMR relaxation times

    The properties of styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) block copolymers do not only depend on the butadiene content and the degree of polymerisation but also on their chain architecture. In this contribution we present the results of a low-field time domain (TD) NMR study in which the transverse relaxation behaviour of different SBS block copolymers was analysed and correlated with findings from mechanical testing on pure and blended materials and transmission electron microscopy data which provide information on the microphase separation. The results indicate that while a straightforward determination of the butadiene content as in blended materials like ABS is not possible for these materials, the TD-NMR results correlate quite well with the mechanical performance of blends from SBS block copolymers with general purpose polystyrene (GPPS), i.e. industrial grade homopolymer polystyrene. Temperature-dependent experiments on pure and blended materials revealed a slight reduction in the softening temperature of the GPPS fraction in the blends

  19. HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH experiment for {sup 1}H{sup N} and {sup 15}N sequential correlations in ({sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins

    Wiedemann, Christoph; Goradia, Nishit; Häfner, Sabine [Leibniz Institute for Age Research, Fritz Lipmann Institute, Research Group Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy (Germany); Herbst, Christian [Ubon Ratchathani University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Thailand); Görlach, Matthias; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Ramachandran, Ramadurai, E-mail: raman@fli-leibniz.de [Leibniz Institute for Age Research, Fritz Lipmann Institute, Research Group Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    A simple triple resonance NMR experiment that leads to the correlation of the backbone amide resonances of each amino acid residue ‘i’ with that of residues ‘i−1’ and ‘i+1’ in ({sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) labelled intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is presented. The experimental scheme, {HN-NCA heteronuclear TOCSY-NH}, exploits the favourable relaxation properties of IDPs and the presence of {sup 1}J{sub CαN} and {sup 2}J{sub CαN} couplings to transfer the {sup 15}N{sub x} magnetisation from amino acid residue ‘i’ to adjacent residues via the application of a band-selective {sup 15}N–{sup 13}C{sup α} heteronuclear cross-polarisation sequence of ∼100 ms duration. Employing non-uniform sampling in the indirect dimensions, the efficacy of the approach has been demonstrated by the acquisition of 3D HNN chemical shift correlation spectra of α-synuclein. The experimental performance of the RF pulse sequence has been compared with that of the conventional INEPT-based HN(CA)NH pulse scheme. As the availability of data from both the HCCNH and HNN experiments will make it possible to use the information extracted from one experiment to simplify the analysis of the data of the other and lead to a robust approach for unambiguous backbone and side-chain resonance assignments, a time-saving strategy for the simultaneous collection of HCCNH and HNN data is also described.

  20. 15N-labed glycine synthesis

    Claudinéia R. O. Tavares; José A. Bendassolli; Fernando Coelho; Carlos R. Sant Ana Filho; Clelber V. Prestes

    2006-01-01

    This work describes a method for 15N-isotope-labeled glycine synthesis, as well as details about a recovery line for nitrogen residues. To that effect, amination of alpha-haloacids was performed, using carboxylic chloroacetic acid and labeled aqueous ammonia (15NH3). Special care was taken to avoid possible 15NH3 losses, since its production cost is high. In that respect, although the purchase cost of the 13N-labeled compound (radioactive) is lower, the stable tracer produced constitutes an i...

  1. Synthesis of tetrazole-13C and 1,2,4-triazole-1,2-15N2

    We report here the syntheses of tetrazole-13C and 1,2,4-triazole-1,2-15N2 by simple, one-step procedures using common, commercially available, isotopically-labeled starting materials. Tetrazole-13C is conveniently prepared from K13CN and NaN3 in 70% yield, almost twice the best reported yield for (unlabeled) tetrazole by similar synthetic methods. 1,2,4-triazole-1,2-15N2 was synthesized in 35% yield from hydrazine-15N2 sulphate and 1,3,5-triazine. From 15N-NMR we determined that 15N was specifically incorporated into the 1 and 2 positions of the triazole ring. (author)

  2. 基于弛豫-扩散的二维核磁共振流体识别方法%Fluid identification method based on 2D diffusion-relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

    胡法龙; 周灿灿; 李潮流; 徐红军; 周凤鸣; 司兆伟

    2012-01-01

    Based on current acquisition modes of MRIL-Prime NMR logging tool, 2D NMR signals could be obtained by the combination of logging data from different modes, then the fluid properties in complicated reservoirs could be distinguished by 2D diflusion-relaxation NMR logging data distribution of pore fluids, generated by multi-echotrain joint inversion. In comparison with ID NMR logging, this method could increase fluid information in diffusion regime, separate oil, gas and water signals in 2D space and enhance the identification capacity of fluid properties from NMR logging. The 2D NMR logging in the multi-echowave interval was applied in the oil pays in Well A and the water layers in Well B in the Nanpu Sag by MRIL-Prime tool, and the interpretation matches the well testing result. It indicates that 2D NMR logging has advantages on the identification of light oil, and fluids in macropore reservoirs than ID NMR logging.%基于MRIL-Prime核磁共振测井仪器现有采集模式,将不同采集模式测井信息进行组合后获得二维核磁共振信号,利用多回波串联合反演技术获得孔隙流体弛豫-扩散的二维核磁共振信息分布,用以识别复杂储集层流体性质.相对一维核磁共振测井,该流体性质识别方法增加了扩散域流体信息,可以在二维空间内将油、气、水信号分离,提高核磁共振测井流体性质识别能力.利用MRIL-Prime仪器对南堡凹陷A井油层和B井水层进行多回波间隔的二维核磁共振测井试验,解释结果与试油结果相吻合,说明二维核磁共振测井在轻质油识别和大孔隙储集层流体识别方面相对一维核磁共振测井技术有明显优势.

  3. Effect of protein restriction on (15)N transfer from dietary [(15)N]alanine and [(15)N]Spirulina platensis into urea.

    Hamadeh, M J; Hoffer, L J

    2001-08-01

    Six normal men consumed a mixed test meal while adapted to high (1.5 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) and low (0.3 g. kg(-1) x day(-1)) protein intakes. They completed this protocol twice: when the test meals included 3 mg/kg of [(15)N]alanine ([(15)N]Ala) and when they included 30 mg/kg of intrinsically labeled [(15)N]Spirulina platensis ([(15)N]SPI). Six subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) receiving conventional insulin therapy consumed the test meal with added [(15)N]Ala while adapted to their customary high-protein diet. Protein restriction increased serum alanine, glycine, glutamine, and methionine concentrations and reduced those of leucine. Whether the previous diet was high or low in protein, there was a similar increase in serum alanine, methionine, and branched-chain amino acid concentrations after the test meal and a similar pattern of (15)N enrichment in serum amino acids for a given tracer. When [(15)N]Ala was included in the test meal, (15)N appeared rapidly in serum alanine and glutamine, to a minor degree in leucine and isoleucine, and not at all in other circulating amino acids. With [(15)N]SPI, there was a slow appearance of the label in all serum amino acids analyzed. Despite the different serum amino acid labeling, protein restriction reduced the postmeal transfer of dietary (15)N in [(15)N]Ala or [(15)N]SPI into [(15)N]urea by similar amounts (38 and 43%, respectively, not significant). The response of the subjects with IDDM was similar to that of the normal subjects. Information about adaptive reductions in dietary amino acid catabolism obtained by adding [(15)N]Ala to a test meal appears to be equivalent to that obtained using an intrinsically labeled protein tracer. PMID:11440912

  4. The effect of low-temperature dynamics of the dimethylammonium group in [(CH3)2NH2]3Sb2Cl9 on proton spin-lattice relaxation and narrowing of the proton NMR line.

    Latanowicz, L; Medycki, W; Jakubas, R

    2005-04-14

    This paper reports the temperature dependence of the relaxation time T1 (55.2 and 90 MHz) and the second moment of the NMR line for protons in a polycrystalline sample of [NH2(CH3)2]3Sb2Cl9 (DMACA). The fundamental aspects of molecular dynamics from quantum tunneling at low temperatures to thermally activated reorientation at elevated temperatures have been studied. The experimentally observed spin-lattice relaxation rate is a consequence of dipolar interactions between the spin pairs inside the methyl group (1/T(1AE) contribution) as well as the spins belonging to neighboring methyl groups and pairs, methyl spin-outer methyl spin (1/T(1EE) contribution). These contributions are considered separately. Two methyl groups in the dimethylammonium (DMA) cations are dynamically inequivalent. The values of the tunnel splitting of separate methyl groups are obtained from the T1 (55.2 MHz) experiment. The tunneling dynamics taking place below the characteristic temperatures 74 and 42 K for separate methyl groups are discussed in terms of the Schrödinger equation. These temperatures point to the one at which thermal energy C(p)T and potential barrier take the same value. It is established that the second moment of the proton NMR line below 74 K up to liquid helium temperature is much lower than the rigid lattice value, which is due to a tunneling stochastic process of the methyl groups. PMID:16833635

  5. NMR and dynamics of biopolymers

    Several basic experimental analytical NMR techniques that are frequently used for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of dynamic and exchange processes, focusing on proteins systems, are described: chemical exchange (slow exchange, fast exchange, intermediate exchange), heteronuclear relaxation measurements (relaxation parameters, strategy of relaxation data analysis, experimental results and examples, motional model interpretation of relaxation data, homonuclear relaxation); slow large-scale exchange and hydrogen-deuterium exchange are also studied: mechanisms of hydrogen exchange in a native protein, methods for measuring amide exchange rates by NMR, interpretation of amide exchange rates. 9 fig., 3 tab., 56 ref

  6. Translational diffusion in paramagnetic liquids by 1H NMR relaxometry: Nitroxide radicals in solution

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Kubica, A.; Meier, R.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-01-01

    For nitroxide radicals in solution one can identify three frequency regimes in which 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate of solvent molecules depend linearly on square root of the 1H resonance frequency. Combining a recently developed theory of nuclear (proton) spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of nitroxide radicals [D. Kruk et al., J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736854 with properties of the spectral density function associated with translational dynamics, relationships between the corresponding linear changes of the relaxation rate (for 14N spin probes) and relative translational diffusion coefficient of the solvent and solute molecules have been derived (in analogy to 15N spin probes [E. Belorizky et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 3674 (1998)], 10.1021/jp980397h). This method allows a simple and straightforward determination of diffusion coefficients in spin-labeled systems, by means of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The approach has thoroughly been tested by applying to a large set of experimental data—1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion results for solutions of different viscosity (decalin, glycerol, propylene glycol) of 14N and 15N spin probes. The experiments have been performed versus temperature (to cover a broad range of translational diffusion coefficients) using field cycling spectrometer which covers three decades in 1H resonance frequency, 10 kHz-20 MHz. The limitations of NMR relaxometry caused by the time scale of the translational dynamics as well as electron spin relaxation have been discussed. It has been shown that for spin-labeled systems NMR relaxometry gives access to considerably faster diffusion processes than for diamagnetic systems.

  7. An evaluation of detergents for NMR structural studies of membrane proteins

    Structural information on membrane proteins lags far behind that on soluble proteins, in large part due to difficulties producing homogeneous, stable, structurally relevant samples in a membrane-like environment. In this study 25 membrane mimetics were screened using 2D 1H-15N heteronuclear single quantum correlation NMR experiments to establish sample homogeneity and predict fitness for structure determination. A single detergent, 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-RAC-(1-glycerol)] (LPPG), yielded high quality NMR spectra with sample lifetimes greater than one month for the five proteins tested - R. sphaeroides LH1 α and β subunits, E. coli and B. pseudofirmus OF4 ATP synthase c subunits, and S. aureus small multidrug resistance transporter - with 1, 2, or 4 membrane spanning α-helices, respectively. Site-specific spin labeling established interhelical distances in the drug transporter and genetically fused dimers of c subunits in LPPG consistent with in vivo distances. Optical spectroscopy showed that LH1 β subunits form native-like complexes with bacteriochlorphyll a in LPPG. All the protein/micelle complexes were estimated to exceed 100 kDaltons by translational diffusion measurements. However, analysis of 15N transverse, longitudinal and 15N{1H} nuclear Overhauser effect relaxation measurements yielded overall rotational correlation times of 8 to 12 nsec, similar to a 15-20 kDalton protein tumbling isotropically in solution, and consistent with the high quality NMR data observed

  8. Change of 15N natural abundance (δ15N) in a forest soil receiving elevated N deposition

    Natural abundance of 15N15N) has been used to interpret N mineralization in forest ecosystems. Forest litter typically has depleted δ15N values ranging from -8 to 0 per mille and δ15N values of organic N in forest soil profiles become more enriched with depth. This study investigated (1) the change of δ15N and total N with depth, and (2) the relation between the change of δ15N within the 0 to 10, 10 to 20 and 20 to 30 cm intervals of the mineral layer and the N mineralization rates in these layers

  9. Dynamics of [C3H5N2]6[Bi4Br18] by means of 1H NMR relaxometry and quadrupole relaxation enhancement

    Masierak, W.; Florek-Wojciechowska, M.; Oglodek, I.; Jakubas, R.; Privalov, A. F.; Kresse, B.; Fujara, F.; Kruk, D.

    2015-05-01

    1H spin-lattice field cycling relaxation dispersion experiments in the intermediate phase II of the solid [C3H5N2]6[Bi4Br18] are presented. Two motional processes have been identified from the 1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion profiles and quantitatively described. It has been concluded that these processes are associated with anisotropic reorientations of the imidazolium ring, characterized by correlation times of the order of 10-8 s-10-9 s and of about 10-5 s. Moreover, quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) effects originating from slowly fluctuating 1H-14N dipolar interactions have been observed. From the positions of the relaxation maxima, the quadrupole coupling parameters for the 14N nuclei in [C3H5N2]6[Bi4Br18] have been determined. The 1H-14N relaxation contribution associated with the slow dynamics has been described in terms of a theory of QRE [Kruk et al., Solid State Nucl. Magn. Reson. 40, 114 (2011)] based on the stochastic Liouville equation. The shape of the QRE maxima (often referred to as "quadrupole peaks") has been consistently reproduced for the correlation time describing the slow dynamics and the determined quadrupole coupling parameters.

  10. Dynamics of [C3H5N2]6[Bi4Br18] by means of (1)H NMR relaxometry and quadrupole relaxation enhancement.

    Masierak, W; Florek-Wojciechowska, M; Oglodek, I; Jakubas, R; Privalov, A F; Kresse, B; Fujara, F; Kruk, D

    2015-05-28

    (1)H spin-lattice field cycling relaxation dispersion experiments in the intermediate phase II of the solid [C3H5N2]6[Bi4Br18] are presented. Two motional processes have been identified from the (1)H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion profiles and quantitatively described. It has been concluded that these processes are associated with anisotropic reorientations of the imidazolium ring, characterized by correlation times of the order of 10(-8) s-10(-9) s and of about 10(-5) s. Moreover, quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) effects originating from slowly fluctuating (1)H-(14)N dipolar interactions have been observed. From the positions of the relaxation maxima, the quadrupole coupling parameters for the (14)N nuclei in [C3H5N2]6[Bi4Br18] have been determined. The (1)H-(14)N relaxation contribution associated with the slow dynamics has been described in terms of a theory of QRE [Kruk et al., Solid State Nucl. Magn. Reson. 40, 114 (2011)] based on the stochastic Liouville equation. The shape of the QRE maxima (often referred to as "quadrupole peaks") has been consistently reproduced for the correlation time describing the slow dynamics and the determined quadrupole coupling parameters. PMID:26026454

  11. Dynamics of [C3H5N2]6[Bi4Br18] by means of 1H NMR relaxometry and quadrupole relaxation enhancement

    1H spin-lattice field cycling relaxation dispersion experiments in the intermediate phase II of the solid [C3H5N2]6[Bi4Br18] are presented. Two motional processes have been identified from the 1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion profiles and quantitatively described. It has been concluded that these processes are associated with anisotropic reorientations of the imidazolium ring, characterized by correlation times of the order of 10−8 s-10−9 s and of about 10−5 s. Moreover, quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) effects originating from slowly fluctuating 1H-14N dipolar interactions have been observed. From the positions of the relaxation maxima, the quadrupole coupling parameters for the 14N nuclei in [C3H5N2]6[Bi4Br18] have been determined. The 1H-14N relaxation contribution associated with the slow dynamics has been described in terms of a theory of QRE [Kruk et al., Solid State Nucl. Magn. Reson. 40, 114 (2011)] based on the stochastic Liouville equation. The shape of the QRE maxima (often referred to as “quadrupole peaks”) has been consistently reproduced for the correlation time describing the slow dynamics and the determined quadrupole coupling parameters

  12. Nitrogen detected TROSY at high field yields high resolution and sensitivity for protein NMR

    Detection of 15N in multidimensional NMR experiments of proteins has sparsely been utilized because of the low gyromagnetic ratio (γ) of nitrogen and the presumed low sensitivity of such experiments. Here we show that selecting the TROSY components of proton-attached 15N nuclei (TROSY 15NH) yields high quality spectra in high field magnets (>600 MHz) by taking advantage of the slow 15N transverse relaxation and compensating for the inherently low 15N sensitivity. The 15N TROSY transverse relaxation rates increase modestly with molecular weight but the TROSY gain in peak heights depends strongly on the magnetic field strength. Theoretical simulations predict that the narrowest line width for the TROSY 15NH component can be obtained at 900 MHz, but sensitivity reaches its maximum around 1.2 GHz. Based on these considerations, a 15N-detected 2D 1H–15N TROSY-HSQC (15N-detected TROSY-HSQC) experiment was developed and high-quality 2D spectra were recorded at 800 MHz in 2 h for 1 mM maltose-binding protein at 278 K (τc ∼ 40 ns). Unlike for 1H detected TROSY, deuteration is not mandatory to benefit 15N detected TROSY due to reduced dipolar broadening, which facilitates studies of proteins that cannot be deuterated, especially in cases where production requires eukaryotic expression systems. The option of recording 15N TROSY of proteins expressed in H2O media also alleviates the problem of incomplete amide proton back exchange, which often hampers the detection of amide groups in the core of large molecular weight proteins that are expressed in D2O culture media and cannot be refolded for amide back exchange. These results illustrate the potential of 15NH-detected TROSY experiments as a means to exploit the high resolution offered by high field magnets near and above 1 GHz

  13. Complex methyl groups dynamics in [(CH3)4P]3Sb2Br9 (PBA) from low to high temperatures by proton spin-lattice relaxation and narrowing of proton NMR spectrum.

    Latanowicz, L; Medycki, W; Jakubas, R

    2009-11-01

    Molecular dynamics of a polycrystalline sample of [(CH(3))(4)P](3)Sb(2)Br(9) (PBA) has been studied on the basis of the T(1) (24.7 MHz) relaxation time measurement, the proton second moment of NMR and the earlier published T(1) (90 MHz) relaxation times. The study was performed in a wide range of temperatures (30-337 K). The tunnel splitting omega(T) of the methyl groups was estimated as of low frequency (from kHz to few MHz). The proton spin pairs of the methyl group are known to perform a complex internal motion being a resultant of four components. Three of them involve mass transportation over and through the potential barrier and are characterized by the correlation times tau(3) and tau(T)of the jumps over the barrier and tunnel jumps in the threefold potential of the methyl group and tau(iso) the correlation time of isotropic rotation of the whole TMP cation. For tau(3) and tau(iso) the Arrhenius temperature dependence was assumed, while for tau(T)--the Schrödinger one. The fourth motion causes fluctuations of the tunnel splitting frequency, omega(T), and it is related to the lifetime of the methyl spin at the energy level. The correlation function for this fourth motion (tau(omega) correlation time) has been proposed by Müller-Warmuth et al. In this paper a formula for the correlation function and spectral density of the complex motion made of the above-mentioned four components was derived and used in interpretation of the T(1) relaxation time. The second moment of proton NMR line at temperatures below 50K is four times lower than its value for the rigid structure. The three components of the internal motion characterized by tau(T), tau(H), and tau(iso) were proved to reduce the second moment of the NMR line. The tunnel jumps of the methyl group reduce M(2) at almost 0K, the classical jumps over the barrier reduce M(2) in the vicinity of 50K, while the isotropic motion near 150K. Results of the study on the dynamics of CH(3) groups of TMP cation based on

  14. Synthesis of {sup 15}N labeled glyphosate; Sintese do glifosato enriquecido com {sup 15}N

    Oliveira, Claudineia R. de; Bendassolli, Jose Albertino; Tavares, Glauco Arnold; Rossete, Alexssandra L.R.M.; Tagliassachi, Romulo Barbieri; Prestes, Cleuber Vieira [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Isotopos Estaveis]. E-mail: crolivei@cena.usp.br

    2005-07-01

    Amongst the actually commercialized herbicides the Glyphosate is the most used in Brazil. Its efficiency as well as the others herbicides against undesirable weeds is harmed by its final composts left at the environment. Although studies has being carried out to improve the knowledge about the herbicides behavior at the environment its complexity has led them towards innumerous to new significant research work where the use of radiolabeled composts (radiative tracers) are recommended to evaluate their bio-availability in the soil. However is the use, the manipulation and the storage of radiolabeled composts is requires an extra care under chemical safety point of view. The use of non radiolabeled composts is a world tendency especially for field researches. Under this context the presented work describes a method for the synthesis of {sup 15}N labeled glyphosate. The {sup 15}N-herbicide was undertaken by phosphometilation with the phosphit dialquil and {sup 15}N-glycine. The tests where carried out through a micro scale production plant and of equimolars amounts. At these conditions it's was possible to reach approximately a 20% of yield. At the conclusion of a best operational condition its expected to offer another important toll that shall be used in glyphosate behavior at the environment and undesirably weeds. (author)

  15. Study of protein metabolism and cell proliferation using 15N

    Investigations of nitrogen and protein metabolism with the stable isotope 15N were carried out in 11 patients with arteriosclerosis and 7 healthy controls. After oral application of 3 g 15NH4Cl (95 At% 15N) per 70 kg body weight the incorporation of the isotope 15N in plasma proteins and blood cells and the 15N elimination in urine were followed up. Retardations of 15N elimination, an accelerated incorporation of 15N in fibrin and a retarded 15N incorporation in platelet protein were observed in patients with arteriosclerosis. The described method enables complex assertions about protein metabolism of the whole body and so represents a possibility to evaluate objectively the influence of an intervention on metabolism. (author)

  16. Determination of sugar conformation in large RNA oligonucleotides from analysis of dipole-dipole cross correlated relaxation by solution NMR spectroscopy

    A new experiment, the forward directed quantitative Γ-HCCH-TOCSY for the measurement of the conformation of the five-membered ribosyl unit in RNA oligonucleotides, is presented. The experiment relies on quantification of cross peak intensities caused by evolution of CH,CH-dipole-dipole cross correlated relaxation in non-evolution periods and the resolution enhancement obtainable in forward directed HCC-TOCSY transfer. Cross correlated relaxation rates are interpreted to reveal the sugar conformation of 22 out of 25 nucleotides in an isotopically labelled 25-mer RNA. The results obtained with this new method are in agreement with the conformational analysis derived from 3J(H,H) coupling constants

  17. A carbon-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation study of the molecular conformation of the nootropic drug 2-oxopyrrolidin-1-ylacetamide

    Baldo, M.; Grassi, A.; Guidoni, L.; Nicolini, M.; Pappalardo, G. C.; Viti, V.

    The spin-lattice relaxation times ( T1) of carbon-13 resonances of the drug 2-oxopyrrolidin- 1-ylacetamide ( 2OPYAC) were determined in CDCl 3 + DMSO and H 2O solutions to investigate the internal conformational flexibility. The measured T1s for the hydrogen-bearing carbon atoms of the 2-pyrrolidone ring fragment were diagnostic of a rigid conformation with respect to the acetamide linked moiety. The model of anisotropic reorientation of a rigid body was used to analyse the measured relaxation data in terms of a single conformation. Owing to the small number of T1 data available the fitting procedure for each of the possible conformations failed. The structure corresponding to the rigid conformation was therefore considered to be the one that is strongly stabilized by internal hydrogen bonding as predicted on the basis of theoretical MO ab initio quantum chemical calculations.

  18. 15N analysis in nutritional and metabolic research of infancy

    Investigation of protein metabolism in nutritional pediatric research by means of 15N tracer techniques has been relatively seldom used up to now. 15N-labelled compounds for these purposes are not injurious to health. The technique is based on oral or intravenous application of the tracer substances and on 15N analysis of the urine fractions. The subsequent calculation of protein synthesis and breakdown rate, turnover, and the reutilisation of amino acids from protein breakdown as well as the size of the metabolic pool offers detailed information of protein metabolism. Determination of these parameters were performed in infants on breast milk, formula feeding and on chemically defined diet. As an example of utilisation of D-amino acids for protein synthesis the 15N-D-phenylalanine retention of parenteral nutrition was found to be 33% of the applied dosis at an average. An oral 15N-glycine loading test proved to be of value for the prediction of the therapeutic effect of human growth hormone. 15N tracer technique was also tested in utilizing 15N-urea for bacterial protein synthesis of the intestinal flora and by incorporation of 15N from 15N-glycine and 15N-lysine into the jejunal mucosa for measuring the enterocyte regeneration. (author)

  19. Characterization of Maytenus ilicifolia samples by {sup 1}H NMR relaxation in the solid state; Caracterizacao dos constituintes polimericos da Maytenus ilicifolia por relaxacao nuclear de {sup 1}H por RMN no estado solido

    Preto, Monica S. de M.; Tavares, Maria I.B., E-mail: mibt@ima.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Professora Eloisa Mano. Lab de Ressonancia Magnetica Nuclear; Sebastiao, Pedro J.O. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-07-01

    The Maytenus ilicifolia (espinheira-santa) is a popular medicinal plant with different uses. It is native of South America and can be found in Brazil. In the Brazilian market it is possible found products labeled as M. ilicifolia. So far, the studies published in the literature involve the modification of the natural materials and do not concern the comparison between commercial the raw natural materials. Different non-destructive NMR techniques can be used to study natural materials. In this work it is presented a characterization study by Fast Field Cycling of the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation time (T{sub 1}) NMR, in the frequency range 100 khz-10 MHz. The results obtained in two commercial M. ilicifolia samples and one control sample collected in natura are compared. It was intended to study the possibility to elaborate a characterization method using FFCNMR suitable for the verification of authenticity and/or evaluation of tampering on products. The differences detected by FFCNMR relaxometry were confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis and infrared spectroscopy. (author)

  20. 19F NMR spectroscopic and relaxation studies of SbF5 and AsF5 intercalated in graphite, graphite fibers, and polyacetylene

    19F NMR spectra are presented for graphite powder reacted with SbF5, NOSbF6, NO2SbF6, graphite fibers reacted with AsF5, and polyacetylene reacted with NOSbF6 and with AsF5. For polyacetylene the linewidths imply rapid rotation and slow diffusion. For the other specimens linewidths imply that both rotation and diffusion are rapid. For SbF5 in graphite an activation enthalpy of 5+-1 kcal/mol is deduced from the observed T1 behavior. (orig.)

  1. Synthesis of [α-15N]-dl-tryptophan

    [α-15N]-dl-tryptophan was synthesized by the use of Al-Ni alloy catalytic hydrogenation from 15N-glycine via several steps. The overall yield of the final product was 46.9% and the abundance of 15N was about 93%. The physicochemical properties of the synthetic compound obtained were the same as those of the standard tryptophan. Its structure were confirmed by the elemental analyses, MS, UV and paper chromatography

  2. 15N tracer methodology for absorption studies in nutrition research

    Proceeding from 15N analyses, 15N tracer methods, and a model of protein metabolism it is shown that the nitrogen balance is a useful concept for expressing the relationship between the overall nitrogen intake of the body and the nitrogen excretion. After admistering low doses of 15N-labelled substances like protein and amino acids, the kinetics of digestion and absorption can be followed by measuring the 15N abundance in serum and urine of patients. A significant delay in the nitrogen absorption indicates gastrointestinal disorders

  3. Studies with 15N-lysine in colostomized hens. 1

    0.2% L-lysine with an atom-% 15N excess (15N') of 48% were given per day through a throat probe to three colostomized laying hybrids in addition to a pelleted ration of 120 g per animal and day. In the following 4 days unlabelled L-lysine was given. As the labelled lysine was given three times a day, the development of 15N' excretion could be pursued. 80 minutes after the 15N'-lysine dose a distinct atom-% 15N' could be detected in urine. 6 hours after the 15N' application 2.9%, 4.2% and 2.7%, resp. of the applied 15N' amount in urine were found. 8 days after the beginning of the experiment the excretion of 15N' in urine was 17.5% on the average of the consumed 15N' amount. 44% of the nitrogen in the ration, however, was excreted in urine. The results show that the lysine N is excreted to a considerably lower extent in urine than the nitrogen in the remaining ration. (author)

  4. 15N-ammonium test in clinical research

    By use of the 15N-ammonium test the liver function is investigated under influence of hormonal contraceptives in women and in liver diseases in children. With the described noninvasive nonradioactive isotope test the ammonia detoxification capability and the urea synthesis capacity of the liver is determined by measuring of the 15N excretion in ammonia and urea in urine after oral administering of 15N-ammonium chloride. The 15N-ammonium test shows a significant influence of the hormonal contraceptives on the liver function and gives diagnostic evidence for liver diseases in children. (author)

  5. Institute of Physics, A Mickiewicz University, Ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan, Poland: ? NMR relaxation in supercooled di-methyl phthalate

    Suchanski, W.; Szczesiak, E.; Jurga, S.

    1998-07-01

    Spin-lattice relaxation times 0953-8984/10/28/006/img2 and nuclear Overhauser enhancement factors (NOE) for the individual ring carbons in di-methyl phthalate (DMF) were measured over a wide range of temperatures. The results show that the reorientational correlation function corresponding to the global dynamics in supercooled liquid can be well described by a Davidson-Cole distribution. The viscosity dependence of the reorientational correlation time 0953-8984/10/28/006/img3 derived is analysed to investigate the adequacy of the modified Debye equation to description of the microscopic behaviour of supercooled systems.

  6. PEG Coating Reduces NMR Relaxivity of Mn0.5Zn0.5Gd0.02Fe1.98O4 Hyperthermia Nanoparticles

    Issa, Bashar; Qadri, Shahnaz; Obaidat, Ihab M.; Bowtell, Richard W.; Haik, Yousef

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate both T1 and T2 MR relaxation enhancement of Gd substituted Zn-Mn ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Both uncoated and polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated particles were used. Materials and Methods Chemical co-precipitation was used to synthesize particles in the form Mn0.5Zn0.5Gd0.02Fe1.98O4 suitable for hyperthermia applications. Physical characterization of the magnetic nanoparticles included SEM, TEM, ICP, and SQUID. T1 and T2 measurements were performed at 1.5 T. Results The saturation magnetization was 12.86 emu/g while the particle’s magnetic moment was 1.86 × 10−19 J/T. The particle size increased due to coating, while 1/T1 and 1/T2 relaxivities (26 °C) decreased from 2.5 to 0.7 and from 201.3 to 76.6 s−1 mM−1, respectively at a magnetic field 1.5 T. Conclusion The reduction in both 1/T1 and 1/T2 is attributed to increased distance of closest approach between the protons and the magnetic core caused by the shielding provided by the high molecular weight PEG. 1/T2 data is compared to existing theoretical models using a modified radius that takes into account both possible agglomeration of the particles and increased inter-particle separation induced by PEG coating. PMID:21928382

  7. Studies with 15N-lysine in colostomized hens. 6

    3 colostomized laying hybrides received 91.40 mg L-lysine-15N-excess (15N') each over a period of 4 days in a metabolism experiment with 15N-lysine. After another 4 days, during which the hens received the same rations supplemented by commercial L-lysine, the animals were butchered and divided into individual fractions. After hydrochloric hydrolysis of organs and tissues the heavy nitrogen of lysine, histidine and arginine were separated, quantitatively evaluated, processed and measured with an emission spectrometer. Atom-% 15N' on an average amounted to 0.20 in the liver, 0.16 in the kidneys, 0.06 in the flesh and 0.05 in the bones. Of the rediscovered 15N' applied, feces contained 8.1 %, urine 18.3 %, the eggs 24.3 %, the blood 4.9 %, the flesh 20.5 %, the bones 5.2 %, the gastrointestinal tract with its contents 4.5 %, the liver 3.5 %, the kidneys 0.9 %, the reproductive organs 3.7 %, and the rest 6.1 %. The quota of rediscovery of the 15N' applied was 95.7 %. 62 % of the total 15N' was rediscovered in eggs, body and feces as lysine 15N'. There was significantly more 15N' in all arginine fractions than in histidine. The quota of the lysine-15N' of the total 15N' differed considerably in the fractions: < 40 % bones and blood; 48-56 % gastrointestinal tract, feces, oviduct, kidneys; 62-63 % remaining ovary, rest; 69-71 % eggs, flesh, liver. It could be proved that the α-amino group of lysine is to a large extent incorporated into other amino acids. Further proof that the amino acid metabolism proceeds in two phases was submitted, i.e. higher amounts of amino acids previously deposited in the body are used for egg synthesis. (author)

  8. Formation of p-cresol:piperazine complex in solution monitored by spin-lattice relaxation times and pulsed field gradient NMR diffusion measurements

    de Carvalho, Erika Martins; Velloso, Marcia Helena Rodrigues; Tinoco, Luzineide Wanderley; Figueroa-Villar, José Daniel

    2003-10-01

    A study of the nature of the anthelmintic p-cresol:piperazine complex in chloroform solution has been conducted using different NMR techniques: self-diffusion coefficients using DOSY; NOE, NULL, and double-selective T1 measurements to determine inter-molecular distances; and selective and non-selective T1 measurements to determine correlation times. The experimental results in solution and CP-MAS were compared to literature X-ray diffraction data using molecular modeling. It was shown that the p-cresol:piperazine complex exists in solution in a very similar manner as it does in the solid state, with one p-cresol molecule hydrogen bonded through the hydroxyl hydrogen to each nitrogen atom of piperazine. The close correspondence between the X-ray diffraction data and the inter-proton distances obtained by NULL and double selective excitation techniques indicate that those methodologies can be used to determine inter-molecular distances in solution.

  9. 15N magnetic resonance of aqueous imidazole and zinc(II)-imidazole complexes. Evidence for hexacoordination

    15N NMR chemical shifts of doubly labeled [15N)imidazole permit evaluation of hydrogen bonding, proton association, and Zn(II) complex formation in homogeneous solution. The 15N resonant frequency in aqueous solutions of imidazole at pH 9-12 is independent of imidazole concentration, suggesting insignificant self-association via hydrogen bonding involving the N3 lone pair and the N1 proton of a neighboring molecule. Protonation at N3 (pH less than 5) produces a 31.2-ppM diamagnetic shift and deprotonation at N1 (pH greater than 13) an approximately20-ppM paramagnetic shift relative to neutral aqueous imidazole. Those shifts are very large compared to the approximately +-0.5-ppM uncertainty in the 15N shift measurements. In solutions of Zn2+ and imidazole the 15N resonance in ZnIm/sub i/2+ complexes (Im = imidazole) is diamagnetically shifted by 10 to 20 ppM relative to neutral aqueous imidazole. Over a range of ratios of total imidazole to total zinc such that the average number of complexed imidazole molecules per Zn2+ (anti ν) is approximately 3.5, or less, the shift data are well interpreted by a four-species model (i = 1-4) using stepwise formation constants from the literature. Significant deviations from that model at anti ν greater than 3.5 require that higher species (e.g., ZnIm52+ and ZnIm62+) be considered. A six-species model with reasonable formation constants for the fifth and sixth complexes provides satisfactory interpretation of all data. Implications of those observations with respect to biologically active zinc(II) proteins are considered. 2 tables, 4 figures

  10. NMR spin-lattice relaxation study of 7Li and 93Nb nuclei in Ti- or Fe-doped LiNbO3:Mg single crystals

    Tae Ho Yeom

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, to understand the effects of paramagnetic impurities, we investigated the temperature dependent of the spin-lattice relaxation times of pure LiNbO3, LiNbO3:Mg, LiNbO3:Mg/Ti, LiNbO3:Mg/Fe, and LiNbO3:Mg/Fe (thermally treated at 500°C single crystals. The results for the LiNbO3:Mg single crystals doped with Fe3+ or Ti3+ are discussed with respect to the site distribution and atomic mobility of Li and Nb. In addition, the effects of a thermal treatment on LiNbO3:Mg/Fe single crystals were examined based on the T1 analysis of 7Li and 93Nb. It was found that the presence of impurities in the crystals induced systematic changes of activation energies concerning atomic mobility.

  11. High-field 1H T1 and T2 NMR relaxation time measurements of H2O in homeopathic preparations of quartz, sulfur, and copper sulfate

    Baumgartner, Stephan; Wolf, Martin; Skrabal, Peter; Bangerter, Felix; Heusser, Peter; Thurneysen, André; Wolf, Ursula

    2009-09-01

    Quantitative meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials investigating the specific therapeutic efficacy of homeopathic remedies yielded statistically significant differences compared to placebo. Since the remedies used contained mostly only very low concentrations of pharmacologically active compounds, these effects cannot be accounted for within the framework of current pharmacology. Theories to explain clinical effects of homeopathic remedies are partially based upon changes in diluent structure. To investigate the latter, we measured for the first time high-field (600/500 MHz) 1H T1 and T2 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of H2O in homeopathic preparations with concurrent contamination control by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Homeopathic preparations of quartz (10 c-30 c, n = 21, corresponding to iterative dilutions of 100-10-100-30), sulfur (13 x-30 x, n = 18, 10-13-10-30), and copper sulfate (11 c-30 c, n = 20, 100-11-100-30) were compared to n = 10 independent controls each (analogously agitated dilution medium) in randomized and blinded experiments. In none of the samples, the concentration of any element analyzed by ICP-MS exceeded 10 ppb. In the first measurement series (600 MHz), there was a significant increase in T1 for all samples as a function of time, and there were no significant differences between homeopathic potencies and controls. In the second measurement series (500 MHz) 1 year after preparation, we observed statistically significant increased T1 relaxation times for homeopathic sulfur preparations compared to controls. Fifteen out of 18 correlations between sample triplicates were higher for controls than for homeopathic preparations. No conclusive explanation for these phenomena can be given at present. Possible hypotheses involve differential leaching from the measurement vessel walls or a change in water molecule dynamics, i.e., in rotational correlation time and/or diffusion. Homeopathic preparations

  12. Crystal structure, NMR study, dc-conductivity and dielectric relaxation studies of a new compound [C2H10N2]Cd(SCN)2Cl2

    Saidi, K.; Kamoun, S.; Ayedi, H. F.; Gargouri, M.

    2012-06-01

    The crystal structure, the solid NMR spectroscopy and the complex impedance study have been carried out on [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN)2. Characterization by single crystal X-ray crystallography shows that the cadmium atoms have à 2N2S2Cl hexa-coordination sphere, exhibiting pseudo-octahedral geometry. The cadmium atoms are bridged by two thiocyanate ions generating 1-D polymeric-chains. These chains are themselves interconnected by means of N-H…Cl(NCS) hydrogen bonds originating from the organic cation [(NH3)2(CH2)2]2+. 111Cd isotropic chemical shifts span a range of 268ppm. The cadmium atom exhibits multiplets that result from 111Cd-14N spin-spin coupling. Examination of 111Cd and 13C MAS line shapes shows direct measurement of the indirect spin-spin coupling constant 2J(111Cd, 14N) = 105Hz and the dipolar coupling constant of 1381Hz . Impedance spectroscopy measurements of [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN)2 have been studied from 209Hz to 5 MHz over the temperature range 300-370 K. The Cole-Cole (Z" versus Z') plots are fitted to two equivalent circuits models. The formalism of complex permittivity and impedance were employed to analyze the experimental data. The dc conductivity follows the Arrhenius relation with an activation energy Ea = 0.54 (3) eV.

  13. Crystal structure, NMR study, dc-conductivity and dielectric relaxation studies of a new compound [C2H10N2]Cd(SCN2Cl2

    Gargouri M.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure, the solid NMR spectroscopy and the complex impedance study have been carried out on [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN2. Characterization by single crystal X-ray crystallography shows that the cadmium atoms have à 2N2S2Cl hexa-coordination sphere, exhibiting pseudo-octahedral geometry. The cadmium atoms are bridged by two thiocyanate ions generating 1-D polymeric-chains. These chains are themselves interconnected by means of N-H…Cl(NCS hydrogen bonds originating from the organic cation [(NH32(CH22]2+. 111Cd isotropic chemical shifts span a range of 268ppm. The cadmium atom exhibits multiplets that result from 111Cd-14N spin-spin coupling. Examination of 111Cd and 13C MAS line shapes shows direct measurement of the indirect spin-spin coupling constant 2J(111Cd, 14N = 105Hz and the dipolar coupling constant of 1381Hz . Impedance spectroscopy measurements of [C2H10N2]CdCl2(SCN2 have been studied from 209Hz to 5 MHz over the temperature range 300-370 K. The Cole-Cole (Z” versus Z’ plots are fitted to two equivalent circuits models. The formalism of complex permittivity and impedance were employed to analyze the experimental data. The dc conductivity follows the Arrhenius relation with an activation energy Ea = 0.54 (3 eV.

  14. Application of 15N in biochemistry, agriculture and medicine

    The compendium on application of 15N in the biosciences comprises 7 chapters. The 1st chapter comprehends introductory remarks on isotopes in general and on nitrogen isotopes in particular. In the 2nd chapter fundamentals of 15N tracer techniques are discussed. The 3rd chapter deals with experiment programs and the evaluation of experiments. The methodology of sample preparation as well as of isotope analysis is treated in chapter 4. The chapters 5 to 7 deal with the application of 15N as tracer in biochemistry, agricultural research and medicine, resp. Relevant literature is added to each chapter

  15. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignment of the ubiquitin-like domain from Dsk2p

    Chen, Tony; Zhang, Daoning; Matiuhin, Yulia; Glickman, Michael; Fushman, David

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitin-like domain (UBL) of yeast protein Dsk2p is widely believed to recognize and bind to ubiquitin receptors on the proteasome and, as part of Dsk2p, to bridge polyubiquitinated substrates and proteasomal degradation machinery. Here we report NMR resonance assignment for 1H, 15N, and 13C nuclei in the backbone and side chains of the UBL domain of Dsk2p. This assignment will aid in NMR studies focused on understanding of Dsk2’s interactions with proteasomal receptors and its role as ...

  16. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with 2H, 13C and 15N in insect cells

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80 % can be achieved for 15N and 13C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For 2H,15N and 2H,13C,15N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73 %, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins

  17. Magnetic shielding tensors of 13C and 15N in organic solids

    Magnetic shielding tensors delta have become accessible by Fourier transform NMR in high magnetic fields. Measurements were performed on 13C and 15N in powders and single crystals at frequencies of 61 and 32 MHz, respectively. Some of the general features of the shielding tensors have been established regarding the size of the anisotropy as well as the orientation of the principal axes system of delta relative to the molecule. This holds in particular for carbons involved sp2 bonds, where the direction of the largest shielding is found to be perpendicular to the sp2 plane. This can be understood theoretically showing that the shielding is dominated by the paramagnetic contribution. For 13C and 15N shielding tensors can be studied for isoelectronic systems, e.g. benzoation and nitrobenzene. Comparison of the shielding anisotropies Δdelta for a number of isoelectronic pairs shows that Δdelta generally seems to be substantially larger for 15N. The powder spectra are affected in a characteristic way by molecular motions in the solid. By analysis of the lineshapes observed it is therefore possible to get reliable information about molecular reorientation in solids. As an example the motion of the P4 tetrahedra in solid white phosphorus is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Stereospecific assignments of glycine in proteins by stereospecific deuteration and {sup 15}N labeling

    Hansen, A.P.; Curley, R.W. Jr.; Panigot, M.J.; Fesik, S.W. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Stereospecific assignments are important for accurately determining the three-dimensional structures of proteins through the use of multidimensional NMR techniques. It is especially important to stereospecifically assign the glycine {alpha}-protons in proteins because of the potential for different backbone conformations of this residue. These stereospecific assignments are critical for interpreting the {sup 3}J{sub NH,{alpha}H} coupling constants and NOEs involving the glycine {alpha}-protons that determine the conformation of this part of the protein. However, it is often difficult to unambiguously obtain the stereospecific assignments for glycine residues by using only NOE data. In this poster, we present a method for unambiguous, stereospecific assignment of the {alpha}-protons of glycine residues. This method involves synthesis of stereo-specifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gly using a slightly modified procedure originally described by Woodard and coworkers for the stereoselective deuteration of glycine. The stereospecifically deuterated and {sup 15}N-labeled Gy has been incorporated into recombinant proteins expressed in both bacterial systems (FKBP) and mammalian cells (u-PA). Two- and three-dimensional isotope-filtered and isotope-edited NMR experiments were used to obtain the stereospecific assignments of the glycine {alpha}-protons for these proteins.

  19. The absorption, utilization and distribution of nitrate 15N and ammonium 15N in Populus Tomentosa seedlings

    Effects of different nitrogen sources (NO3-, NH4+) on the absorption, distribution and utilization of nitrogen on Populus tenement's seedlings (clone 50) was studied by using the 15N trace technique. Results showed that the Populus tenement's seedlings had the same nitrogen take up pattern: tissue nitrogen content grew up after fertilization, remarkbaly rising up after one week and reached peak after 28 days. Although the treatments are different, the tissue N content was about the same between 0.6g · plant-1. The maximum absorption of NO3-15N and NH4-15N was 0.26g · plant-1 and 0.12g · plant -1, which accounted for 39.15% and 19.95% of total nitrogen, respectively. The nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) of two nitrogen sources varied gignificantly. The maximum NUE of NO3-15N reached 25.83%, nearly twice of that of NH4-15N (12.03%). Hence we conclude that Populus tomentosa seedlings (clone 50) prefer to absorb NO3-. Nitrogen distribution rate changed obviously among different organs and the trend was leaf>root>stem. In the leaf, the distribution of NO3-15N was higher than that of NH4-15N. (authors)

  20. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    Rule, Gordon S

    2006-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy is a comprehensive textbook that guides the reader from a basic understanding of the phenomenological properties of magnetic resonance to the application and interpretation of modern multi-dimensional NMR experiments on 15N/13C-labeled proteins. Beginning with elementary quantum mechanics, a set of practical rules is presented and used to describe many commonly employed multi-dimensional, multi-nuclear NMR pulse sequences. A modular analysis of NMR pulse sequence building blocks also provides a basis for understanding and developing novel pulse programs. This text not only covers topics from chemical shift assignment to protein structure refinement, as well as the analysis of protein dynamics and chemical kinetics, but also provides a practical guide to many aspects of modern spectrometer hardware, sample preparation, experimental set-up, and data pr...

  1. Synthesis and biosynthesis of {sup 13}C-, {sup 15}N-labeled deoxynucleosides useful for biomolecular structural determinations

    Ashburn, D.A.; Garcia, K.; Hanners, J.L.; Silks, L.A. III; Unkefer, C.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Currently, there is a great emphasis on elucidating the structure, function, and dynamics of DNA. Much of the research involved in this study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Effective use of NMR spectroscopy for DNA molecules with mw > 10,000 requires stable isotope enrichment. We present strategies for site-specific isotopic labeling of the purine bases adenosine and guanosine and the biosynthesis of (U-{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) DNA from methylotropic bacteria. With commercially available 6-chloropurine, an effective two-step route leads to 2{prime}-deoxy-(amino-{sup 15}N)adenosine (dA). The resulting d(amino-{sup 15}N)A is used in a series of reactions to synthesize 2{prime}-deoxy-(2-{sup 13}C,1,amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2})guanosine or any combination thereof. An improved biosynthesis of labeled DNA has been accomplished using Methylobacterium extorquens AS1. Each liter of growth medium contains 4 g of methanol to yield 1 g of lyophilized cells. As much as 200 mg of RNA per liter of culture has been obtained. We are currently developing large-scale isolation protocols. General synthetic pathways to oligomeric DNA will be presented.

  2. Study on synthesis of 15N-hydrazine hydrate

    The 15N labeled hydrazine hydrate is a strong reducing agent in the synthesis procedure of stable isotope labeled compounds, and it has been widely used in the isotope-labeled pharmaceutical synthesis. The reaction conditions of 15N labeled hydrazine hydrate were mainly investigated by single-factor design, and the following optimized conditions were obtained: the concentration of available chlorine was 115-120 g/L, the chlorination re- action time was 30∼40 min, the reflux time was 7 min, and the mass ratio of material was m(catalyst) : m (urea) = 1.0 : 10.0, and the yield of 15N labeled hydrazine hydrate was 76.1%, the abundance of 15N was 99.20%. (authors)

  3. Studies with 15N-Lysine in colostomized hens. 4

    Each of 3 colostomized laying hens received per os 0.2% L-lysine with 48 atom-% 15N excess (15N') labelled in α-position in addition to a pelleted laying hen ration of 120 g over a period of 4 days. On the following 4 days they received equal amounts of unlabelled lysine. The eggs laid during the 8 days of the experiment were separated into the egg white, the yolk and the eggshell, and the total and heavy nitrogen in the individual fractions were determined. Above that, 17 amino acids and their atom-%15N' were determined in the 19 samples of the white and yolk of egg. Of the total 15N' from the lysine fed in the 4 days, 10.1% were found in the yolk, 10.5% in the egg white and 1.1% in the eggshells of the eggs laid during the 8 days of the experiment. 85% of the total amino acid 15N' of the yolk and 86% of the egg white detected to be lysine 15N'. The 15N' amount of the other 16 amino acids was mainly concentrated in the two acid and basic amino acids. Approximately 50% of the non-lysine 15N' in the egg are contained in aspartic acid, glutamic acid, histidine and arginine. A very low incorporation of the labelled lysine only could be detected in the aromatic and sulphur-containing amino acids from both the yolk and the egg white 43% of the 15N' was detected in the 10 essential and semi-essential (except lysine) and 57% in the 6 non-essential amino acids of the yolk and 52% and 48% resp. of the egg white. One can summarise that the incorporation of 15N' into the egg shows the same development as that of the labelled amino acids of the wheat protein and that 15% of the lysine 15N' could be detected in the 16 other amino acids. (author)

  4. High resolution NMR theory and chemical applications

    Becker, Edwin D

    1969-01-01

    High Resolution NMR: Theory and Chemical Applications focuses on the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as chemical shifts, lattices, and couplings. The book first offers information on the theory of NMR, including nuclear spin and magnetic moment, spin lattice relaxation, line widths, saturation, quantum mechanical description of NMR, and ringing. The text then ponders on instrumentation and techniques and chemical shifts. Discussions focus on the origin of chemical shifts, reference compounds, empirical correlations of chemical shifts, modulation and phase detection,

  5. Balance study of the fate of 15N fertilizer

    An interim report is presented on a series of experiments with wooden box-type lysimeters (60 cm x 60 cm x 70 cm) loaded with a sandy soil, a loess soil and straw-amended soil. The lysimeters support crops rotated over a five-year period to be studied - potato, barley, sugar-beet, barley (with winter rape) and finally (1979) potato. Each lysimeter received split applications of urea at total rates of 0, 50 or 100 kg.ha-1. The effects of soil residues of the herbicide monolinuron were also studied. The report deals with data collected during the first three years of the planned experiments (1975 - 1977 inclusive). 15N-labelled urea (47 atom 15N% excess) was initially used but in some experiments this was followed by applications of unlabelled urea in order to study the fate of the residual 15N in the subsequent years. The results to date indicated that in the first year highest recoveries in the plant of the applied 15N obtained on the sandy soil. The low recoveries of 15N in the subsequent years when unlabelled urea was supplied also indicated significant storage by soil or root organic matter of the applied 15N. Compared with the control (zero application of urea nitrogen), potato took up more total nitrogen in the presence of fertilizer including more of the unlabelled soil pool nitrogen. Analyses of the soil profiles in terms of total soil nitrogen and fertilizer-derived nitrogen (on the basis of 15N assays) indicated leaching of the labelled nitrogen down the soil profile in all cases during the three-year period. Analysis of NO3-N in leachates confirmed the presence of labelled urea-derived nitrogen. (author)

  6. Utilization of 15N-urea in laying hens. 3

    In 3 colostomized laying hens the incorporation of heavy nitrogen from urea into the amino acids of the 21 eggs laid during the 8-day experiment was determined. In these eggs the content of 15 amino acids was ascertained separately in white and yolk of the eggs and their atom-% 15N excess (15N') was determined. The heavy nitrogen could be detected in all amino acids investigated. The incorporation of 15N' into the essential amino acids of the white and yolk of eggs is very low. Of the 15N' amount of the urea applied 0.18% could be detected in the 9 essential amino acids of the white of egg and 0.12% in those of the yolk. For the 6 analyzed nonessential amino acids the rediscovery quota of 15N' in the white of egg was 0.50% and in the yolk 0.81% is that the NPN-source urea is insignificant for egg protein synthesis. (author)

  7. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    Pardi, A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  8. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    LeMaster, D.M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  9. 15N-labelled pyrazines of triterpenic acids

    Triterpenoid pyrazines from our research group were found selectively cytotoxic on several cancer cell lines with IC50 in low micromolar range. This sparked our interest in preparing their labeled analogs for metabolic studies. In this work, we prepared a set of non-labeled pyrazines from seven triterpenoid skeletal types along with their 15N labelled analogs. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of the target 15N labelled pyrazines. Currently, these compounds are being studied in complex metabolic studies. (author)

  10. The 15N ground state studied with elastic electron scattering

    The C0 elastic electron scattering form factor of 15N has been measured over a momentum transfer range q = 0.4-3.2 fm-1. From these form factor data the ground state charge density and its RMS radius (2.612±0.009 fm) were determined. This charge density as well as its difference with that of 16O were compared to recent large-basis shell-model calculations. Although these calculations describe the individual charge density reasonably, the difference between 16O and 15N cannot be reproduced satisfactorily. (orig.)

  11. Catalytic roles of βLys87 in tryptophan synthase: (15)N solid state NMR studies.

    Caulkins, Bethany G; Yang, Chen; Hilario, Eduardo; Fan, Li; Dunn, Michael F; Mueller, Leonard J

    2015-09-01

    The proposed mechanism for tryptophan synthase shows βLys87 playing multiple catalytic roles: it bonds to the PLP cofactor, activates C4' for nucleophilic attack via a protonated Schiff base nitrogen, and abstracts and returns protons to PLP-bound substrates (i.e. acid-base catalysis). ε-¹⁵N-lysine TS was prepared to access the protonation state of βLys87 using ¹⁵N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy for three quasi-stable intermediates along the reaction pathway. These experiments establish that the protonation state of the ε-amino group switches between protonated and neutral states as the β-site undergoes conversion from one intermediate to the next during catalysis, corresponding to mechanistic steps where this lysine residue has been anticipated to play alternating acid and base catalytic roles that help steer reaction specificity in tryptophan synthase catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications. Guest Editors: Andrea Mozzarelli and Loredano Pollegioni. PMID:25688830

  12. Auto-inducing media for uniform isotope labeling of proteins with 15N, 13C and 2H

    Auto-inducing media for protein expression offer many advantages like robust reproducibility, high yields of soluble protein and much reduced workload. Here, an auto-inducing medium for uniform isotope labelling of proteins with 15N, 13C and/or 2H in E. coli is presented. So far, auto-inducing media have not found widespread application in the NMR field, because of the prohibitively high cost of labeled lactose, which is an essential ingredient of such media. Here, we propose using lactose that is only selectively labeled on the glucose moiety. It can be synthesized from inexpensive and readily available substrates: labeled glucose and unlabeled activated galactose. With this approach, uniformly isotope labeled proteins were expressed in unattended auto-inducing cultures with incorporation of 13C, 15N of 96.6 % and 2H, 15N of 98.8 %. With the present protocol, the NMR community could profit from the many advantages that auto-inducing media offer

  13. NMR relaxation study of sickle cell disease

    Spin-echo methods have been developed for the fast determination in vitro of the complete polymerization time of Hbs momomers under standard deoxygenation conditions, and for the determination of amount of so-called irreversibly sickled cells (ISC). (author). 4 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  14. NMR signal analysis to attribute the components to the solid/liquid phases present in mixes and ice creams

    Mariette, F.; Lucas, T.

    2005-01-01

    The NMR relaxation signals from complex products like ice cream are hard to interpret because of the multi-exponential behaviour of the relaxation signal and the difficulty of attributing the NMR relaxation components to specific molecule fractions. An attribution of the NMR relaxation parameters is proposed, however, based on an approach that combines quantitative analysis of the spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times and the signal intensities with characterization of the ice cream com...

  15. Nitrogen input 15N-signatures are reflected in plant 15N natural abundances of N-rich tropical forest in China

    Abdisa Gurmesa, Geshere; Lu, Xiankai; Gundersen, Per; Yunting, Fang; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we tested the measurement of natural abundance of 15N15N) for its ability to assess changes in N cycling due to increased N deposition in two forest types; namely, an old-growth broadleaved forest and a pine forest, in southern China. We measured δ15N values of inorganic N in input and output fluxes under ambient N deposition, and N concentration and δ15N of major ecosystem compartments under ambient and increased N deposition. Our results showed that N deposition to the forests was 15N-depleted, and was dominated by NH4-N. Plants were 15N-depleted due to imprint from the 15N-depleted atmospheric N deposition. The old-growth forest had larger N concentration and was more 15N-enriched than the pine forest. Nitrogen addition did not significantly affect N concentration, but it significantly increased δ15N values of plants, and slightly more so in the pine forest, toward the 15N signature of the added N in both forests. The result indicates that the pine forest may rely more on the 15N-depleted deposition N. Soil δ15N values were slightly decreased by the N addition. Our result suggests that ecosystem δ15N is more sensitive to the changes in ecosystem N status and N cycling than N concentration in N-saturated sub-tropical forests.

  16. Isotopic enrichment of 15N by ionic exchange cromatography

    The ionic exchange chromatographic method in columns of resin which is employed in the study of isotopic enrichment of 15N is presented. Determinations are made of the isotopic separation constant for the exchange of isotopes 15N and 14N in the equilibrium involving ammonium hidroxide in the solution phase and ions NH4+ adsorbed in cationic resins: Dowex 50W-X8 and X12, 100-200 mesh. Experiments are also conducted for determination of height of theoretical plates for situations of equilibrium of the NH4+ band in two systems of resin's columns aimed at estimating the experimental conditions used. The isotopic analyses of nitrogen are carried out by mass spectrometry

  17. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 samples (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010). Third, relaxometric information forms the basis of understanding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. The general difficulty of imaging in soils are the inherent fast T2 relaxation times due to i) the small pore sizes, ii) presence of paramagnetic ions in the solid matrix, and iii) diffusion in internal gradients. The last point is important, since echo times can not set shorter than about 1ms for imaging purposes. The way out is either the usage of low fields for imaging in soils or special ultra-short pulse sequences, which do not create echoes. In this presentation we will give examples on conventional imaging of macropore fluxes in soil cores (Haber-Pohlmeier et al. 2010), and the combination with relaxometric imaging, as well as the advantages and drawbacks of low-field and ultra-fast pulse imaging. Also first results on the imaging of soil columns measured by SIP in Project A3 are given. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Waterflow Monitored by Tracer Transport in Natural Porous Media Using MRI." Vadose Zone J.: submitted. Haber-Pohlmeier, S., S. Stapf, et al. (2010). "Relaxation in a

  18. Simultaneous NMR assignment of backbone and side chain amides in large proteins with IS-TROSY

    A new strategy for the simultaneous NMR assignment of both backbone and side chain amides in large proteins with isotopomer-selective transverse-relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (IS-TROSY) is reported. The method considers aspects of both the NMR sample preparation and the experimental design. First, the protein is dissolved in a buffer with 50%H2O/50%D2O in order to promote the population of semideuterated NHD isotopomers in side chain amides of Asn/Gln residues. Second, a 13C'-coupled 2D 15N-1H IS-TROSY spectrum provides a stereospecific distinction between the geminal protons in the E and Z configurations of the carboxyamide group. Third, a suite of IS-TROSY-based triple-resonance NMR experiments, e.g. 3D IS-TROSY-HNCA and 3D IS-TROSY-HNCACB, are designed to correlate aliphatic carbon atoms with backbone amides and, for Asn/Gln residues, at the same time with side chain amides. The NMR assignment procedure is similar to that for small proteins using conventional 3D HNCA/3D HNCACB spectra, in which, however, signals from NH2 groups are often very weak or even missing due to the use of broad-band proton decoupling schemes and NOE data have to be used as a remedy. For large proteins, the use of conventional TROSY experiments makes resonances of side chain amides not observable at all. The application of IS-TROSY experiments to the 35-kDa yeast cytosine deaminase has established a complete resonance assignment for the backbone and stereospecific assignment for side chain amides, which otherwise could not be achieved with existing NMR experiments. Thus, the development of IS-TROSY-based method provides new opportunities for the NMR study of important structural and biological roles of carboxyamides and side chain moieties of arginine and lysine residues in large proteins as well as amino moieties in nucleic acids

  19. Marking Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) With Rubidium or 15N.

    Klick, J; Yang, W Q; Bruck, D J

    2015-06-01

    Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) has caused significant economic damage to berry and stone fruit production regions. Markers that are systemic in plants and easily transferred to target organisms are needed to track D. suzukii exploitation of host resources and trophic interactions. High and low concentrations of the trace element, rubidium (Rb), and the stable isotope, 15N, were tested to mark D. suzukii larvae feeding on fruits of enriched strawberry plants grown in containers under greenhouse conditions. Fly marker content and proportion of flies marked 1, 7, and 14 d after emergence from enriched fruits and fly dry mass were analyzed. Nearly 100% of the flies analyzed 14 d after emerging from 15N-enriched plants were marked, whereas only 30-75% and 0-3% were marked 14 d after emerging from high and low Rb concentration plants, respectively. Rapid Rb decay, strong 15N persistence, and the economics of using these markers in the field to elucidate D. suzukii pest ecology are discussed. PMID:26470275

  20. Geomorphic control on the δ15N of mountain forests

    R. G. Hilton

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mountain forests are subject to high rates of physical erosion which can export particulate nitrogen from ecosystems. However, the impact of geomorphic processes on nitrogen budgets remains poorly constrained. We have used the elemental and isotopic composition of soil and plant organic matter to investigate nitrogen cycling in the mountain forest of Taiwan, from 24 sites with distinct geomorphic (topographic slope and climatic (precipitation, temperature characteristics. The organic carbon to nitrogen ratio of soil organic matter decreased with soil 14C age, providing constraint on average rates of nitrogen loss using a mass balance model. Model predictions suggest that present day estimates of nitrogen deposition exceed contemporary and historic nitrogen losses. We found ∼6‰ variability in the stable isotopic composition (δ15N of soil and plants which was not related to soil 14C age or climatic conditions. Instead, δ15N was significantly, negatively correlated with topographic slope. Using the mass balance model, we demonstrate that the correlation can be explained by an increase in nitrogen loss by non-fractioning pathways on steeper slopes, where physical erosion most effectively removes particulate nitrogen. Published data from forests on steep slopes are consistent with the correlation. Based on our dataset and these observations, we hypothesise that variable physical erosion rates can significantly influence soil δ15N, and suggest particulate nitrogen export is a major, yet underappreciated, loss term in the nitrogen budget of mountain forests.

  1. Absorption of ammonium sulphate 15N by coffee plants

    The objective of this study was to quantify the absorption of ammonium sulphate 15N by coffee plants. Treatments consisted of five sub-plots of 9 plants, of which the three central ones received 280 kg ha-1 of 15N, applied at four times: 1/4 on 01 Set 03; 1/4 on 03 Nov 03; 1/4 on 15 Dec 03 and 1/4 on 30 Jan 04. The isotopic enrichment was 2,072 ± 0,001 atom % 15N. The dry matter of the shoot was evaluated every 60 days, using one plant per replicate, collected outside the sub-plot. They were as similar as possible to the labeled plants, which were used only for isotopic and Total N analysis, after being dried at 65 deg C until constant weight. At harvest, plants had absorbed 42,88% of the fertilizer N. Leaves accumulated the largest amount of fertilizer N, and were also the compartments that received most N from other parts of the plant. The following partition of the fertilizer N was found at harvest: 23.01% in young leaves, 6.23% in old leaves, 4,46% in stem, 3.46% in fruits, 3.10% in young branches and 2.63% in old branches. (author)

  2. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    Wright, P.E. [Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  3. Cancer metastasis detected by NMR

    A narrow NMR line originating from the plasma membrane of a cancer cell is unexpected. The behaviour of these lines is explained in terms of fundamental physics and chemistry. There is biochemical evidence to support the presence of neutral lipid domains in the plasma membrane. T2 relaxation and clinical implications are briefly discussed

  4. Dynamic of N fertilizers: urea (15 N) and aqua ammonia (15 N) incorporated to the sugar cane soil. Final report

    The dynamic of N fertilizers, urea and aqua ammonia, in the soil of sugar cane crops are studied with an emphasis on the horizontal and vertical moving. The nitrogen routing from urea and aqua ammonia sources, by isotopic technique with 15 N in relation to the leaching, volatilization and extraction by the cultivation and residue of N immobilized manure in the soil with sugar cane plantation is also analysed. (C.G.C.)

  5. Studies on irradiation stability of polystyrene by NMR

    ZHAO Xin; SUN Wan-Fu; XIE Cheng-Xi

    2004-01-01

    The irradiation stability of polystyrene (PS) was studied by 13C and 1H NMR spectra, Nuclear Overhauser Relaxation (NOE) and 13C NMR spin-lattice relaxation time (T1). The results indicate that 13C and 1H NMR chemical shifts, NOE and T1 were almost invariant with the increase of irradiation dose. This shows that polystyrene is particularly stable within 2.5 kGy doses and the mechanism of its stability is discussed.

  6. NMR Studies of Quantum Rotors Confined in Zeolite

    Ji, Yu; Hamida, J. A.; Sullivan, N. S.

    2010-02-01

    We report the results of NMR studies of methane trapped in zeolite at low temperatures. Samples were prepared to contain 1.0±0.2 molecules per α-sodalite cage of zeolite-13X. The NMR spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation times were measured for 4NMR spin-spin relaxation is seen at this “melting” transition.

  7. Retention of atmospherically deposited nitrogen in soil: field and laboratory experiments using 15N isotope and 15N CPMAS NMR spectroscopy

    Morier Jaquet, Isabelle; Védy, Jean-Claude; Guenat, Claire

    2007-01-01

    Since a few decades, the balance of the nitrogen (N) cycle has been deeply disturbed by human activies. The global impact of these activities on the N cycle can be described as a doubling of the transfer from the vast and unreactive atmospheric pool to biologically available forms (N fixation). The main sources responsible for the increase of reactive N emissions are the use of artificial fertilisers (NH3) as well as the combustion processes (NOx). Reactive N is then transformed, transported ...

  8. Nuclear spin relaxation in liquids theory, experiments, and applications

    Kowalewski, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used across many fields because of the rich data it produces, and some of the most valuable data come from the study of nuclear spin relaxation in solution. While described to varying degrees in all major NMR books, spin relaxation is often perceived as a difficult, if not obscure, topic, and an accessible, cohesive treatment has been nearly impossible to find.Collecting relaxation theory, experimental techniques, and illustrative applications into a single volume, this book clarifies the nature of the phenomenon, shows how to study it, and explains why such studies are worthwhile. Coverage ranges from basic to rigorous theory and from simple to sophisticated experimental methods, and the level of detail is somewhat greater than most other NMR texts. Topics include cross-relaxation, multispin phenomena, relaxation studies of molecular dynamics and structure, and special topics such as relaxation in systems with quadrupolar nuclei and paramagnetic systems.Avoiding ove...

  9. Advanced NMR characterization of zeolite catalysts

    Welsh, L. B.

    1985-04-01

    The program discussed in this report is a two-year two-phase joint UOP-University of Illinois study of the application of improved high resolution solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to the characterization of zeolite catalysts. During the first phase of this program very pure, and in some cases isotopically enriched faujasites will be prepared and studied by magic angle sample spinning NMR (MASS NMR) and variable engine sample spinning NMR (VASS NMR) on 500 and 360 MHz (proton frequency) NMR spectrometers. The NMR techniques that will be emphasized are the measurement and analysis of the (17)O NMR properties, (27)Al NMR intensity quantitation, and (27)Al and (29)Si NMR relaxation rates. During the second phase of this program these NMR techniques will be used to study the effects of impurity concentration, dealumination treatments and cation exchange on the NMR properties of faujasites. The initial emphasis of this program during Phase I is on the preparation and measurement of the NMR properties of (17)O enriched Na-Y faujasties.

  10. Isotope 15N for agronomic research: an overview

    Fertilizer N recovery determined by isotope labelling technique using 15N enriched fertilizer was compared with apparent recovery of N obtained by the difference method and the extent of error associated with it was compared in six vegetable crops. In the difference method, fertilizer N recovery was overestimated and the error ranged from 3 per cent in tomato to 94 per cent in chilli, whereas uptake of soil N by the difference method was underestimated and the error ranged from 2 per cent in tomato to 64 per cent in chilli. One of the main reasons for the error was the degree of response to N due to increase in dry matter yield

  11. Interfaces in polymer nanocomposites - An NMR study

    Böhme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is applied for the investigation of polymer nanocomposites. Solid-state NMR is applied to study the modification steps to compatibilize layered double hydroxides with non-polar polymers. 1H relaxation NMR gives insight on the polymer dynamics over a wide range of correlation times. For the polymer chain dynamics the transverse relaxation time T2 is most suited. In this presentation we report on two applications of T2 measurements under external mechanical stress. In a low-field system relaxation NMR studies are performed in-situ under uniaxial stress. High-temperature experiments in a Couette cell permit the investigation of the polymer dynamics in the melt under shear flow.

  12. 31P and 1H NMR studies of the structure of enzyme-bound substrate complexes of lobster muscle arginine kinase: Relaxation measurements with Mn(II) and Co(II)

    The paramagnetic effects of Mn(II) and Co(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rates of 31P nuclei of ATP and ADP and of Mn(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rate of the δ protons of arginine bound to arginine kinase from lobster tail muscle have been measured. Temperature variation of 31P relaxation rates in E-MnADP and E-MnATP yields activation energies (ΔE) in the range 6-10 kcal/mol. Thus, the 31P relaxation rates in these complexes are exchange limited and cannot provide structural information. However, the relaxation rates in E-CoADP and E-CoATP exhibit frequency dependence and ΔE values in the range 1-2 kcal/mol; i.e., these rates depend upon 31P-Co(II) distances. These distances were calculated to be in the range 3.2-4.5 angstrom, appropriate for direct coordination between Co(II) and the phosphoryl groups. The paramagnetic effect of Mn(II) on the 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate of the δ protons of arginine in the E-MnADP-Arg complex was also measured at three frequencies. From the frequency dependence of the relaxation rate an effective τC of 0.6 ns has also been calculated, which is most likely to be the electron spin relaxation rate (τS1) for Mn(II) in this complex. The distance estimated on the basis of the reciprocal sixth root of the average relaxation rate of the δ protons was 10.9 ± 0.3 angstrom

  13. MERA: a webserver for evaluating backbone torsion angle distributions in dynamic and disordered proteins from NMR data

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Fundamental Medicine (Russian Federation); Shen, Yang; Lee, Jung Ho [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Hummer, Gerhard [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics (Germany); Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2015-09-15

    MERA (Maximum Entropy Ramachandran map Analysis from NMR data) is a new webserver that generates residue-by-residue Ramachandran map distributions for disordered proteins or disordered regions in proteins on the basis of experimental NMR parameters. As input data, the program currently utilizes up to 12 different parameters. These include three different types of short-range NOEs, three types of backbone chemical shifts ({sup 15}N, {sup 13}C{sup α}, and {sup 13}C′), six types of J couplings ({sup 3}J{sub HNHα}, {sup 3}J{sub C′C′}, {sup 3}J{sub C′Hα}, {sup 1}J{sub HαCα}, {sup 2}J{sub CαN} and {sup 1}J{sub CαN}), as well as the {sup 15}N-relaxation derived J(0) spectral density. The Ramachandran map distributions are reported in terms of populations of their 15° × 15° voxels, and an adjustable maximum entropy weight factor is available to ensure that the obtained distributions will not deviate more from a newly derived coil library distribution than required to account for the experimental data. MERA output includes the agreement between each input parameter and its distribution-derived value. As an application, we demonstrate performance of the program for several residues in the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein, as well as for several static and dynamic residues in the folded protein GB3.

  14. MERA: a webserver for evaluating backbone torsion angle distributions in dynamic and disordered proteins from NMR data

    MERA (Maximum Entropy Ramachandran map Analysis from NMR data) is a new webserver that generates residue-by-residue Ramachandran map distributions for disordered proteins or disordered regions in proteins on the basis of experimental NMR parameters. As input data, the program currently utilizes up to 12 different parameters. These include three different types of short-range NOEs, three types of backbone chemical shifts (15N, 13Cα, and 13C′), six types of J couplings (3JHNHα, 3JC′C′, 3JC′Hα, 1JHαCα, 2JCαN and 1JCαN), as well as the 15N-relaxation derived J(0) spectral density. The Ramachandran map distributions are reported in terms of populations of their 15° × 15° voxels, and an adjustable maximum entropy weight factor is available to ensure that the obtained distributions will not deviate more from a newly derived coil library distribution than required to account for the experimental data. MERA output includes the agreement between each input parameter and its distribution-derived value. As an application, we demonstrate performance of the program for several residues in the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein, as well as for several static and dynamic residues in the folded protein GB3

  15. An electron-scattering study of 15N

    An electron scattering experiment on 15N was performed in order to test the results of two different shell-model approaches, both performed in a full (0+2)ℎω space, one employing a phenomenologic interaction which is valid throughout the 1p shell, the other an interaction whose parameters were adjusted to fit the excitation energies of a number of states. The experiment was carried out at the high-energy electron-scattering facility of NIKHEF-k. A room temperature gas target was employed. Data were taken at forward angles in the range q=0.35 - 3.17 fm-1. Results are presented for negative-parity states up to an excitation energy of 13 MeV. The differences in groundstate charge density between 15N and the neighbouring nuclei 16O and 14N are compared with results of shell-model calculations. In ch. 5 the transition charge-densities to the excited negative-parity states are presented and compared with shell model calculations. 52 refs.; 18 figs.; 5 tabs

  16. Fuzzy logic control of 15 N separation plant

    The process of 15 N separation by chemical exchange in Nitrox system is automatically maintained in the optimal operation conditions using a computerized control. The automatic control leads to a maximum production of 15 N with a minimum of raw materials and energy consumption.. The control objective was achieved by considering two forms of knowledge: 1. objective knowledge, which uses the control engineering based on mathematical model of the separation process; 2. subjective knowledge, which represents linguistic information, very difficult to quantify using classical mathematics - e.g., the rule of HNO3 solution and SO2 flow rates adjustment in order to maintain a proper height and position of chemical reaction zone in the product refluxer. The above mentioned two types of knowledge were coordinated in a logical way using fuzzy logic control system which has the possibility to handle simultaneously numerical data and linguistic knowledge. In order to map input data vector into a scalar output, i.e., numbers to numbers a front-end 'fuzzifier' and a rear-end 'defuzzifier' was added to the usual fuzzy logic model. The inference engine of the control system maps the input fuzzy set into the output one. The inferential procedure maintains the isotope separation process in the optimal operation conditions. (author)

  17. Affordable uniform isotope labeling with {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N in insect cells

    Sitarska, Agnieszka; Skora, Lukasz; Klopp, Julia; Roest, Susan; Fernández, César; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D., E-mail: alvar.gossert@novartis.com [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    For a wide range of proteins of high interest, the major obstacle for NMR studies is the lack of an affordable eukaryotic expression system for isotope labeling. Here, a simple and affordable protocol is presented to produce uniform labeled proteins in the most prevalent eukaryotic expression system for structural biology, namely Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Incorporation levels of 80 % can be achieved for {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C with yields comparable to expression in full media. For {sup 2}H,{sup 15}N and {sup 2}H,{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N labeling, incorporation is only slightly lower with 75 and 73 %, respectively, and yields are typically twofold reduced. The media were optimized for isotope incorporation, reproducibility, simplicity and cost. High isotope incorporation levels for all labeling patterns are achieved by using labeled algal amino acid extracts and exploiting well-known biochemical pathways. The final formulation consists of just five commercially available components, at costs 12-fold lower than labeling media from vendors. The approach was applied to several cytosolic and secreted target proteins.

  18. Spin-Exchange Pumped NMR Gyros

    Walker, Thad G

    2016-01-01

    We present the basic theory governing spin-exchange pumped NMR gyros. We review the basic physics of spin-exchange collisions and relaxation as they pertain to precision NMR. We present a simple model of operation as an NMR oscillator and use it to analyze the dynamic response and noise properties of the oscillator. We discuss the primary systematic errors (differential alkali fields, quadrupole shifts, and offset drifts) that limit the bias stability, and discuss methods to minimize them. We give with a brief overview of a practical implementation and performance of an NMR gyro built by Northrop-Grumman Corporation, and conclude with some comments about future prospects.

  19. 15N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study of pyrolyzed metal-polyaniline cathode catalysts for oxygen reduction in fuel cells

    Kuroki, Shigeki; Hosaka, Yo; Yamauchi, Chiharu; Nagata, Shinsuke; Sonoda, Mayu

    2015-09-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of pyrolyzed metal-free and metal (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu)-containing polyaniline (PANI) in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) was studied. The metal-free PANI800 shows quite poor ORR catalytic activity, whilst the metal-containing PANIMe800 display a better ORR activity. The 15N CP/MAS NMR spectra of PANINi800 and PANICu800 show one weak peak at 118 ppm and there is no peak observed in PANIFe800, against that of PANI800, PANIMn800, PANICo800 and PANINi800 show two peaks at 273 and 118 ppm assigned to the pyridinic and pyridinium nitrogens. It is because of the paramagnetic effect of metal ions. The 15N spin-echo NMR spectra of PANIMe800 with fast recycle delay show the peaks at 140 and 270 ppm assigned to the graphitic and pyridinic nitrogens, against that of PANI800 shows no peak. The spectra of PANIMn800, PANICo800, PANINi800 and PANICu600 also contain a very broaden peak at 430 ppm assigned to the nitrogen with Fermi-contact effect from metal ions. The spectra of PANIFe800 show some spinning side bands and the average Fe3+-15N distance can be calculated. The some amount of iron ion are relieved and average Fe3+-15N distance increase after acid washing and the ORR activity decreases.

  20. Regioselectively (15NO2)-labeled N-methoxypicramide and DPPH prepared by using crown ether and solid sodium (15N) nitrite

    The present paper reports the regioselective [15NO2]-labeling of N-methoxy-2,4,6-trinitroaniline and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazine (reduced DPPH). Starting from N-methoxy-2,6-dinitroaniline, or N-methoxy-2,4-dinitroaniline, nitration in methylene chloride with solid sodium [15N]nitrite and 15-crown-5-ether afforded N-methoxy-2,6-dinitro-4-[15N]nitroaniline and N-methoxy-2,4-dinitro-6-[15N]nitroaniline, respectively. The same compounds could be prepared in higher purity by nitrodecarboxylation (ipso-substitution) under the same conditions starting from N-methoxy-4-carboxy-2,6-dinitroaniline (4-methoxyamino-3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid) and N-methoxy-2-carboxy-4,6-dinitroaniline (2-methoxyamino-3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid). Similarly, ipso-substitution of 2,2-diphenyl-1-(4-carboxy-2,6-dinitrophenyl)-hydrazine afforded, under the same reaction conditions, 2,2-diphenyl-1-(2,6-dinitro-4-[15N]nitrophenyl)-hydrazine. By 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR it was also observed that under these reaction conditions a 14NO2 group can be replaced by a 15NO2 group. (author)

  1. NMR screening for rapid protein characterization in structural proteomics.

    Hill, Justine M

    2008-01-01

    In the age of structural proteomics when protein structures are targeted on a genome-wide scale, the identification of proteins that are amenable to analysis using x-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy is the key to high throughput structure determination. NMR screening is a beneficial part of a structural proteomics pipeline because of its ability to provide detailed biophysical information about the protein targets under investigation at an early stage of the structure determination process. This chapter describes efficient methods for the production of uniformly (15)N-labeled proteins for NMR screening using both conventional IPTG induction and autoinduction approaches in E. coli. Details of sample preparation for NMR and the acquisition of 1D (1)H NMR and 2D (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra to assess the structural characteristics and suitability of proteins for further structural studies are also provided. PMID:18542882

  2. Effect of fed-batch on synthesis of 15N-L-tryptophan from precursor fermentation

    Using Candida utilis AS60 as 15N-L-tryptophan producing strain, the influence by different feeding modes of glucose, 15N-(NH4)2SO4 and 15N-anthranilic acid was studied. The results of these experiments show that the yield of 15N-L-tryptophan was 3.073 g/L by addition of 50 g/L of glucose, 2.1 g/L of 15N-(NH4)2SO4 and 1.5 g/L of 15N-anthranilic acid after 36 h of fermentation. (authors)

  3. Investigation of the metabolism of colostomized laying hens with 15N-labelled wheat. 6

    Three colostomized laving hens received 40 g 15N-labelled wheat with 20.13 atom-% 15N excess (15N'), 19.18 atom-% 15N'-lysine, 18.17 atom-% 15N'-histidine and 20.43 atom-% 15N'-arginine per day over a period of four days. After having received the same non-labelled feed ration on the following four days, the hens were slaughtered. The incorporation and distribution of 15N' in the total nitrogen and the nitrogen of the basic amino acids was determined in liver, kidneys, muscles, bones and the remaining carcass (excluding blood, digestive tract and genital organs). The quota of nitrogen of natural isotope frequency (14N) of the total 14N of the hens' carcasses was 47% in the muscles, 14% in the bones and 20% in the feathers; the relative 15N' values were 37%, 8% and 1%, resp. The atom-% 15N' in the kidneys was twice as much as in the liver four days after the last 15N' application. The average percentage of the nitrogen in the three basic amino acids of the total nitrogen in the tissues and organs (excluding feathers) is 25% concerning both 14N and 15N'. The 15N' balance revealed that in hen 1 100%, in hen 2 102% and in hen 3 101% of the consumed wheat 15N' were found. (author)

  4. Dynamics of [C{sub 3}H{sub 5}N{sub 2}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}] by means of {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry and quadrupole relaxation enhancement

    Masierak, W. [Department of Physics and Material Research, University of Economy, Garbary 2, 85-229 Bydgoszcz (Poland); Florek-Wojciechowska, M. [Faculty of Food Sciences, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Oczapowskiego 7, 10719 Olsztyn (Poland); Oglodek, I. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Jakubas, R. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, Joliot Curie 14, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Privalov, A. F.; Kresse, B.; Fujara, F. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, TU Darmstadt, Hochschulstr. 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Kruk, D., E-mail: danuta.kruk@matman.uwm.edu.pl [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Słoneczna 54, 10710 Olsztyn (Poland)

    2015-05-28

    {sup 1}H spin-lattice field cycling relaxation dispersion experiments in the intermediate phase II of the solid [C{sub 3}H{sub 5}N{sub 2}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}] are presented. Two motional processes have been identified from the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion profiles and quantitatively described. It has been concluded that these processes are associated with anisotropic reorientations of the imidazolium ring, characterized by correlation times of the order of 10{sup −8} s-10{sup −9} s and of about 10{sup −5} s. Moreover, quadrupole relaxation enhancement (QRE) effects originating from slowly fluctuating {sup 1}H-{sup 14}N dipolar interactions have been observed. From the positions of the relaxation maxima, the quadrupole coupling parameters for the {sup 14}N nuclei in [C{sub 3}H{sub 5}N{sub 2}]{sub 6}[Bi{sub 4}Br{sub 18}] have been determined. The {sup 1}H-{sup 14}N relaxation contribution associated with the slow dynamics has been described in terms of a theory of QRE [Kruk et al., Solid State Nucl. Magn. Reson. 40, 114 (2011)] based on the stochastic Liouville equation. The shape of the QRE maxima (often referred to as “quadrupole peaks”) has been consistently reproduced for the correlation time describing the slow dynamics and the determined quadrupole coupling parameters.

  5. (H)N(COCA)NH and HN(COCA)NH experiments for 1H-15N backbone assignments in 13C/15N-labeled proteins

    Bracken, Clay; Palmer, Arthur G. III [Columbia University, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics (United States); Cavanagh, John [New York State Department of Health, NMR Structural Biology Facility, Wadsworth Center (United States)

    1997-01-15

    Triple resonance HN(COCA)NH pulse sequences for correlating 1H(i), 15N(i),1H(i-1), and 15N(i-1) spins that utilize overlapping coherence transfer periods provide increased sensitivity relative to pulse sequences that utilize sequential coherence transfer periods. Although the overlapping sequence elements reduce the overall duration of the pulse sequences, the principal benefit derives from a reduction in the number of 180 deg. pulses. Two versions of the technique are presented: a 3D (H)N(COCA)NH experiment that correlates 15N(i),1H(i-1), and 15N(i-1) spins, and a 3D HN(COCA)NH experiment that correlates 1H(i), 15N(i),1H(i-1), and 15N(i-1) spins by simultaneously encoding the 1H(i) and 15N(i) chemical shifts during the t1 evolution period. The methods are demonstrated on a 13C/15N-enriched sample of the protein ubiquitin and are easily adapted for application to 2H/13C/15N-enriched proteins.

  6. Variation of natural 15N abundance (δ15N) in greenhouse tomato and available nitrogen in soil supplied with cow manure or chemical fertilizers

    Cow manure or chemical fertilizers applied to greenhouse-grown tomato changed N contents and natural 15N abundance (δ15N) in tomato plants and the δ15N values of available N in soil. Cow manure increased and chemical fertilizers decreased the δ15N values of tomato plants. In the early periods of tomato culture with cow manure, the δ15N values of nitrate nitrogen of soil were higher than those of whole cow manure N, and, thereafter, dropped to δ15N values between those of soil and cow manure. Application of chemical fertilizers to soil immediately raised the δ15N values of ammonium nitrogen in soil but they dropped quickly to δ15N values between those of soil and fertilizers. On the estimation of the soil-derived N, manure-derived N and fertilizer-derived N in tomato plants based on the δ15N values of sources, much caution should be paid concerning the isotopic variation caused by N sources and isotopic fractionation during N transformation in soil. (author)

  7. The “long tail” of the protein tumbling correlation function: observation by 1H NMR relaxometry in a wide frequency and concentration range

    Inter-protein interactions in solution affect the auto-correlation function of Brownian tumbling not only in terms of a simple increase of the correlation time, they also lead to the appearance of a weak slow component (“long tail”) of the correlation function due to a slowly changing local anisotropy of the microenvironment. The conventional protocol of correlation time estimation from the relaxation rate ratio R1/R2 assumes a single-component tumbling correlation function, and thus can provide incorrect results as soon as the “long tail” is of relevance. This effect, however, has been underestimated in many instances. In this work we present a detailed systematic study of the tumbling correlation function of two proteins, lysozyme and bovine serum albumin, at different concentrations and temperatures using proton field-cycling relaxometry combined with R1ρ and R2 measurements. Unlike high-field NMR relaxation methods, these techniques enable a detailed study of dynamics on a time scale longer than the normal protein tumbling correlation time and, thus, a reliable estimate of the parameters of the “long tail”. In this work we analyze the concentration dependence of the intensity and correlation time of the slow component and perform simulations of high-field 15N NMR relaxation data demonstrating the importance of taking the “long tail” in the analysis into account

  8. The “long tail” of the protein tumbling correlation function: observation by {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry in a wide frequency and concentration range

    Roos, Matthias [Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Institut für Physik (Germany); Hofmann, Marius [Universität Bayreuth, Lehrstuhl Experimentalphysik II, Universitätsstr. 30 (Germany); Link, Susanne; Ott, Maria; Balbach, Jochen [Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Institut für Physik (Germany); Rössler, Ernst [Universität Bayreuth, Lehrstuhl Experimentalphysik II, Universitätsstr. 30 (Germany); Saalwächter, Kay, E-mail: kay.saalwaechter@physik.uni-halle.de; Krushelnitsky, Alexey, E-mail: krushelnitsky@physik.uni-halle.de [Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Inter-protein interactions in solution affect the auto-correlation function of Brownian tumbling not only in terms of a simple increase of the correlation time, they also lead to the appearance of a weak slow component (“long tail”) of the correlation function due to a slowly changing local anisotropy of the microenvironment. The conventional protocol of correlation time estimation from the relaxation rate ratio R{sub 1}/R{sub 2} assumes a single-component tumbling correlation function, and thus can provide incorrect results as soon as the “long tail” is of relevance. This effect, however, has been underestimated in many instances. In this work we present a detailed systematic study of the tumbling correlation function of two proteins, lysozyme and bovine serum albumin, at different concentrations and temperatures using proton field-cycling relaxometry combined with R{sub 1ρ} and R{sub 2} measurements. Unlike high-field NMR relaxation methods, these techniques enable a detailed study of dynamics on a time scale longer than the normal protein tumbling correlation time and, thus, a reliable estimate of the parameters of the “long tail”. In this work we analyze the concentration dependence of the intensity and correlation time of the slow component and perform simulations of high-field {sup 15}N NMR relaxation data demonstrating the importance of taking the “long tail” in the analysis into account.

  9. In situ determination of surface relaxivities for unconsolidated sediments

    Duschl, Markus; Galvosas, Petrik; Brox, Timothy I.; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-08-01

    NMR relaxometry has developed into a method for rapid pore-size determination of natural porous media. Nevertheless, it is prone to uncertainties because of unknown surface relaxivities which depend mainly on the chemical composition of the pore walls as well as on the interfacial dynamics of the pore fluid. The classical approach for the determination of surface relaxivities is the scaling of NMR relaxation times by surface to volume ratios measured by gas adsorption or mercury intrusion. However, it is preferable that a method for the determination of average pore sizes uses the same substance, water, as probe molecule for both relaxometry and surface to volume measurements. One should also ensure that in both experiments the dynamics of the probe molecule takes place on similar length scales, which are in the order of some microns. Therefore, we employed NMR diffusion measurements with different observation times using bipolar pulsed field gradients and applied them to unconsolidated sediments (two purified sands, two natural sands, and one soil). The evaluation by Mitra's short-time model for diffusion in restricted environments yielded information about the surface to volume ratios which is independent of relaxation mechanisms. We point out that methods based on NMR diffusometry yield pore dimensions and surface relaxivities consistent with a pore space as sampled by native pore fluids via the diffusion process. This opens a way to calibrate NMR relaxation measurements with other NMR techniques, providing information about the pore-size distribution of natural porous media directly from relaxometry.

  10. Tracking the incorporation of 15N from labeled beech litter into mineral-organic associations

    Kleber, M.; Hatton, P.; Derrien, D.; Lajtha, K.; Zeller, B.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrogen containing organic compounds are thought to have a role in the complex web of processes that control the turnover time of soil organic matter. The sequential density fractionation technique is increasingly used for the purpose of investigating the association of organic materials with the mineral matrix. Organic materials in the denser fractions (>2.0 kg L-1) typically show 13C NMR signals indicative of carbohydrate and aliphatic structures, an absence of lignin and tannin structures and a narrow C:N ratio, suggesting a microbial origin of organic matter in these fractions. Here we take advantage of a labeling experiment conducted at two different sites in Germany and in France to investigate the incorporation of organic nitrogen into physical fractions of increasing density, representing a proximity gradient to mineral surfaces. 15N labeled beech litter was applied to two acidic forest topsoils 8 and 12 years ago. Although there are differences in the distribution patterns between the two soils, and the majority of the organic nitrogen was recovered in fractions representing organic matter of plant origin and not bound to the mineral matrix, our data clearly show that after a decade, significant amounts of the nitrogen had been incorporated in mineral-organic fractions of supposedly slow turnover. It remains to be shown to which extent the N in the densest fractions was incorporated by soil microbiota and associated with mineral surfaces in organic form or adsorbed to mineral surfaces in inorganic form (NH4+).

  11. Metabolic studies in colostomized laying hens using 15N-labelled wheat. 4

    3 colostomized laying hybrids received over 4 days a dosage of 672 mg 15N excess (15N'), 20.3 mg lysine 15N', 23.0 mg histidine 15N' and 66.7 mg arginine 15N' with a ration customary in production. After feeding the same unlabelled ration for another 4 days the hens were killed and the N content of the blood as well as of its fractions (cells, plasma, free amino acids of the plasma) was determined. The 15N' was determined in the total blood, the corpuscles, the plasma, the nonprotein-N (NPN) fraction as well as in the amino acids lysine, histidine and arginine. The average amount of the blood cell N in the total blood N was 58.5% and that of the plasma 40.3%; the corresponding 15N' values amounted to 66.1% and 33.9%, respectively. The sum of the 15N' of the basic amino acids of the blood cells, on an average, amounted to 39.7% of the total cell 15N'; the corresponding average value for the total 15N' in lysine, histidine and arginine of the blood plasma 15N' was 23.6.% and the quota of the three free amino acids of the total NP15N' of the plasma was 6.2%. (author)

  12. NMR investigation of Ag nanoparticles

    Son, Kwanghyo; Jang, Zeehoon

    2013-01-01

    109Ag nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and relaxation measurements have been performed on two powder samples of Ag nanoparticles with average sizes of 20 nm and 80 nm. The measurements have been done in an external field of 9.4 T and in the temperature range 10 K Knight shift ( K) and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/ T 1) are observed to be almost identical to the values reported for the bulk Ag metal, whereby the Korringa ratio R(= K 2 T 1 T/S) is found to be 2.0 for both samples in the investigated temperature range.

  13. TROSY experiment for refinement of backbone ψ and φ by simultaneous measurements of cross-correlated relaxation rates and 3,4JHαHN coupling constants

    The TROSY principle has been introduced into a HNCA experiment, which is designed for measurements of the intraresidual and sequential Hα-Cα/HN-N dipole/dipole and Hα-Cα/N dipole/CSA cross-correlated relaxation rates. In addition, the new experiment provides values of the 3,4JHαHN coupling constants measured in an E.COSY manner. The conformational restraints for the ψ and φ angles are obtained through the use of the cross-correlated relaxation rates together with the Karplus-type dependencies of the coupling constants. Improved signal-to-noise is achieved through preservation of all coherence transfer pathways and application of the TROSY principle. The application of the [15N,13C]-DQ/ZQ-[15N,1H]-TROSY-E.COSY experiment to the 16 kDa apo-form of the E. coli Heme Chaperon protein CcmE is described. Overall good agreement is achieved between ψ and φ angles measured with the new experiment and the average values determined from an ensemble of 20 NMR conformers

  14. Relaxed superconductors

    Andrade, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Momentum relaxation can be built into many holographic models without sacrificing homogeneity of the bulk solution. In this paper we study two such models: one in which translational invariance is broken in the dual theory by spatially-dependent sources for massless scalar fields and another that features an additional neutral scalar field. We turn on a charged scalar field in order to explore the condensation of a charged scalar operator in the dual theories. After demonstrating that the relaxed superconductors we construct are thermodynamically relevant, we find that the finite DC electrical conductivity of the normal phase is replaced by a superfluid pole in the broken phase. Moreover, when the normal phase possesses a Drude behaviour at low frequencies, the optical conductivity of the broken phase at low frequencies can be described by a two-fluid model that is a sum of a Drude peak and a superfluid pole, as was found recently for inhomogeneous holographic superconductors. We also study cases in which thi...

  15. Fate of 15N-urea and 15N-ammonium sulphate applied in different periods to cica-8 rice culture in greenhouse conditions

    The fate of nitrogen fertilizers in rice cultivars (Cica-8) is studied. Urea (1.973% at of 15N) and ammonium sulfate (1.826% at of 15N) are used. The fertilizers are applied in four levels (0,100,200 and 300 Kg N/ha) in shadow coditions and after 30 days of germination. (M.A.C.)

  16. 15N balance in wheat-moong-soybean cropping sequence

    Field experiments were conducted to study the effect of FYM and S on fertilizer 15N balance in wheat-moong-soybean cropping sequence, with the main emphasis on partial substitution of chemical fertilizer N through FYM. Response to partial substitution of N was observed in the first crop of the sequence. FYM substitution at higher level (50%) resulted in reduction of wheat yield, but 25% substitution of recommended N through FYM increased wheat yield. Total fertilizer N recovery by three crops wheat, moong and soybean grown in sequence ranged between 39 to 55 per cent of which 35 to 41 per cent was utilized by the first crop and 4 to 14 per cent by the second and third crops together while 21 to 36 per cent of the fertilizer N applied to wheat was present in soil after growing three crops. Fertilizer N recovery in soil plant system was 61 to 91 per cent. Higher fertilizer N recovery was associated with higher rate of substitution of FYM for chemical fertilizer. FYM boosted fertilizer N recovery and higher soil retentivity. Sulphur application had no significant effect on per cent residual fertilizer N retention in soil. (author)

  17. Extending the range of amide proton relaxation dispersion experiments in proteins using a constant-time relaxation-compensated CPMG approach

    Relaxation compensated constant-time Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiments for amide protons are presented that detect μs-ms time-scale dynamics of protein backbone amide sites. Because of their ten-fold larger magnetogyric ratio, much shorter 180 deg. pulses can be applied to 1H than to 15N spins; therefore, off-resonance effects are reduced and a wider range of effective rf fields can often be used in the case of 1H experiments. Applications to [1H-15N]-ubiquitin and [1H-15N]-perdeuterated HIV-1 protease are discussed. In the case of ubiquitin, we present a pulse sequence that reduces artifacts that arise from homonuclear 3J(HN-Hα) coupling. In the case of the protease, we show that relaxation dispersion of both 1H and 15N spins provides a more comprehensive picture of slow backbone dynamics than does the relaxation dispersion of either spin alone. We also compare the relative merits of 1H versus 15N transverse relaxation measurements and note the benefits of using a perdeuterated protein to measure the relaxation dispersion of both spin types

  18. Utilization of 15N-labelled urea in laying hens. 4

    In order to study the utilization of urea in poultry, 3 colostomized laying hybrids were orally supplied with a traditional ration supplemented with 1% 15N'-labelled urea with a 15N excess (15N') of 96.06 atom-% over a period of 6 days. After another 2 days on which the hens received the same ration with unlabelled urea, they were killed. The atom-% 15N' of the blood on an average of the 3 hens was 0.64, of the plasma 1.40 and of the corpuscles 0.47. The TCA-soluble fraction of the blood had an average 15N' of 1.14 atom-%; the 15N amount was 9.7% of the total amount of 15N in the blood. The amount of 15N' in the urea in the blood was 6.8 atom-%. This shows that the absorbed urea is decomposed very slowly. The quota of 15N' in the basic amino acids from the total 15N' of the blood plasma was only 0.3% and that of the corpuscles 2.2%. The average 15N' of the mature follicles was 2.39 atom-% whereas the smallest and the remaining ovary contain 1.12 atom-%. The labelling level of lysine in mature egg cells was, in contrast to this, only 0.08 atom-% 15N' and in infantile follicles 0.04 atom-% 15N'. 1% of the 15N' quota was in the follicles and the remaining ovary. Of the basic amino acids, histidine is most strongly labelled. The lower incorporation of the 15N' from urea into the basic amino acids shows that the nitrogen of this compound can be used for the synthesis of the essential amino acids to a low degree only. (author)

  19. The effect of organic matter and nitrification inhibitor on 15 N H4 and 15 N O3 absorption by the maize

    The effect of the forms 15 N H4 and 15 N O3 in presence or absence of organic matter and of the nitrification inhibitor AM (2-amino-4-chloro-6-methyl-pyrimidine) in dry matter weight and nitrogen content of the plant derived from soil and form fertilizer is studied. The experiment was carried out in greenhouse and the test plant was the hybrid Maize Centralmex . The fertilizers (15 N H4)2 S O4 and Na15 N O3, were added in two levels: 40 and 120 Kg N/ha, with 1,02% of N and 1,4% of 15 N in excess, respectively. Three soils of different physical and chemical characteristics were used; Regosol intergrade, Latosol Roxo and Podzolized de Lins e Marilia var. Marilia. (M.A.C.)

  20. Fermentation and Cost-Effective 13C/15N Labeling of the Nonribosomal Peptide Gramicidin S for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Analysis.

    Berditsch, Marina; Afonin, Sergii; Steineker, Anna; Orel, Nataliia; Jakovkin, Igor; Weber, Christian; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-06-01

    Gramicidin S (GS) is a nonribosomally synthesized decapeptide from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. Its pronounced antibiotic activity is attributed to amphiphilic structure and enables GS interaction with bacterial membranes. Despite its medical use for over 70 years, the peptide-lipid interactions of GS and its molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Therefore, a comprehensive structural analysis of isotope-labeled GS needs to be performed in its biologically relevant membrane-bound state, using advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, we describe an efficient method for producing the uniformly (13)C/(15)N-labeled peptide in a minimal medium supplemented by selected amino acids. As GS is an intracellular product of A. migulanus, we characterized the producer strain DSM 5759 (rough-convex phenotype) and examined its biosynthetic activity in terms of absolute and biomass-dependent peptide accumulation. We found that the addition of either arginine or ornithine increases the yield only at very high supplementing concentrations (1% and 0.4%, respectively) of these expensive (13)C/(15)N-labeled amino acids. The most cost-effective production of (13)C/(15)N-GS, giving up to 90 mg per gram of dry cell weight, was achieved in a minimal medium containing 1% (13)C-glycerol and 0.5% (15)N-ammonium sulfate, supplemented with only 0.025% of (13)C/(15)N-phenylalanine. The 100% efficiency of labeling is corroborated by mass spectrometry and preliminary solid-state NMR structure analysis of the labeled peptide in the membrane-bound state. PMID:25795666

  1. Application and Reliability of Solid-State NMR in Environmental Sciences

    Knicker, Heike

    2010-05-01

    technique increases the sensitivity of 13C by magnetization transfer from the 1H to the 13C spin system during a contact time tc. However, one has to bear in mind that some molecular properties may obscure quantification. Thus, for carbons with large C-H internuclear distances (bigger than four bonds, i.e in graphite structures) and for C in groups with high molecular mobility (i.e. gas) the proton-dipolar interactions are weakened and the polarization transfer may be incomplete. The observed intensity can also be affected by interactions of the protons with paramagnetic compounds. To circumvent this problem, the samples are often demineralized with hydrofluoric acid. Alternatively, the Bloch decay, a technique in which the 13C is directly excited is used. Here, on the other hand, one has to consider long relaxation times which may lead to saturation effects. Nevertheless, as it will be discussed within the presentation those quantification problems can be solved for most soil samples and then solid-state NMR spectroscopy represents a powerful tool for qualitative and quantitative analysis. Special techniques, such as dipolar dephasing or the proton spin relaxation editing can be used to extract additional information about chemical properties or mobility. A more detailed examination of the cross polarization behavior can be used to analyze the interaction of organic matter and paramagnetics but also for obtaining revealing properties on a molecular level. Applications involving isotopic labeling combined with both 13C and/or 15N NMR allows to follow the fate of a specific compound i.e. in a natural matrix and- if the enrichment is high enough - the use of 2D solid-state NMR techniques. In particular with respect to environmental chemistry, this combination of isotopic labeling with the use of corresponding NMR spectroscopy shows great potential for a better understanding of the kind of interaction between pollutants and natural organic matter.

  2. Bioagent detection using miniaturized NMR and nanoparticle amplification : final LDRD report.

    Clewett, C. F. M.; Adams, David Price; Fan, Hongyou; Williams, John D.; Sillerud, Laurel O.; Alam, Todd Michael; Aldophi, Natalie L. (New Mexico Resonance, Albuquerque, NM); McDowell, Andrew F. (New Mexico Resonance, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-11-01

    This LDRD program was directed towards the development of a portable micro-nuclear magnetic resonance ({micro}-NMR) spectrometer for the detection of bioagents via induced amplification of solvent relaxation based on superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The first component of this research was the fabrication and testing of two different micro-coil ({micro}-coil) platforms: namely a planar spiral NMR {micro}-coil and a cylindrical solenoid NMR {micro}-coil. These fabrication techniques are described along with the testing of the NMR performance for the individual coils. The NMR relaxivity for a series of water soluble FeMn oxide nanoparticles was also determined to explore the influence of the nanoparticle size on the observed NMR relaxation properties. In addition, The use of commercially produced superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for amplification via NMR based relaxation mechanisms was also demonstrated, with the lower detection limit in number of SPIONs per nanoliter (nL) being determined.

  3. The synthesis of barbituric acid and some of its derivatives isotopically labelled with 15N

    Full text: Barbituric acid is the parent compound of a large class of barbiturates that have central nervous system depressant properties, although barbituric acid itself is not pharmacologically active. In recent years, barbituric acid derivatives have been studied as antitumor, anticancer and anti-osteoporosis agents. The aim of this paper is to present the synthesis of barbituric acid-15N, 5,5-diethylbarbituric acid-15N (Veronal-15N) and 5-ethyl-5-phenylbarbituric acid- 15N (Phenobarbitone-15N) . As isotopically labelled material we used urea-15N2, 99 at.% 15N produced at National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. All compounds were fully characterized by Mass Spectrometry analyses, by FT-IR Spectroscopy and RX Diffraction, and the isotopic label was determined by MS on the molecular compounds. (author)

  4. Pion elastic and inelastic scattering from 15N

    Data were obtained on the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer for elastic and inelastic pion scattering from ground state 15N nuclei. States observed here included those of 0.0, 5.27, 6.32, 7.16, 7.30, 7.57, 8.31, 8.57, 9.15, 9.76, 9.9, 10.7, 11.3, 11.9, 12.5, 12.9, 13.1, 14.1, 14.4, 14.6, 15.0, 16.5, 16.9, 17.2, 17.6, 18.3, 18.7, and 18.9 MeV excitation energies. Angular distributions were obtained for scattering at angles from 25 degree to 90 degree in 5 degree increments with an incident pion energy of 164 MeV. Optical model analyses of the elastic (0 MeV) angular distributions with equal point proton and neutron densities in both momentum and coordinate space formulations accurately predict the data, although the two formulations require different energy shifts to do so. This difference is thought to be a result of the more accurate nonlocal representation of the nuclear potential in the momentum space code. Additional spectra were obtained for scattering at constant momentum transfers of .94 and 1.57 fm-1 in order to generate constant momentum transfer excitation functions. Use of these excitation functions, σ(π+)/σ(π-) ratios, and shell model DWIA calculations allowed identification of several excited states having shell-model-like, single particle-hole, pure spin-flip excitations. Shell model and collective model DWIA calculations, as well as the q = .94 and 1.57 fm-1 excitation functions and the σ(π+)/σ(π-) ratios indicate that the other states are generally well represented by a shell model description with collective enhancements

  5. Studies with 15N-labelled lysine in colostomized laying hens. 5

    3 colostomized laying hens received, together with a commercial ration of 120 g, 0.2 % 15N-labelled L-lysine with an atom-% 15N excess (15N') of 48 %; subsequently the same ration was fed over a period od 4 days with 0.2 % unlabelled L-lysine. After the end of the experiment the hens were slaughtered. The atom-% 15N' was determined in total, in the lysine, histidine and arginine N of blood cells, plasma, NPN fraction of the blood, stomach, small intestine, cecum and rectum. 15N' in the blood cells was 0.11 atom-% in the blood plasma 0.17 atom-%, in the NPN fraction of the blood 0.09 atom-%, in the tissues of the gastrointestinal tract 0.11 atom-% and in its contents 0.12 atom-%. On the average the blood contained per hen 77.9 % lysine-15N', 16.4 % arginine-15N' and 5.7 % histidine-15N' of the basic amino acid-15N'. For the gastrointestinal tract 78.7 % lysine-15N', 19.0 % arginine-15N' and 2.3 % histidine-15N' of the 15N' of the basic amino acids were ascertained. In comparison to histidine the α-amino-N of lysine is incorporated to a considerably higher degree into arginine. For lysine and arginine the atom-% 15N' in the contents of the gastrointestinal tract is 4 days after the end of the supplementation of labelled lysine 8 to 10 times higher than in the feces of the last day of the experiment. This indicates a considerable secretion of the 2 amino acids in the gastrointestinal tract and their reabsorption to a large extent. (author)

  6. Synthesis of 5-aryl-4-(2-acetylaminobenzoyl)-1,2,3-triazoles with the 15N isotope at the terminal positions of the triazole rings and the tautomeric composition

    A mixture of 4-(2-acetylaminobenzoyl)-5-phenyl(p-cumenyl)-1-15N,2,3- and 4-(2-acetylaminobenzoyl)-5-phenyl(p-cumenyl)-1,2,3-15N-triazoles was obtained from 1-acetyl-2-arylmethylene-3-indolinones and Na15N3 with the label at the terminal position. The tautomeric composition of the mixture, which corresponds to a state of equilibrium between the 2H and 3H forms of the triazole ring, was established by 1H (at low temperatures) and 15N NMR spectroscopy. The 4-(2-acetylaminobenzoyl)-5-aryl-1,2,3-triazoles are acylated at the sterically less hindered position 2 of the triazole ring

  7. 1H NMR relaxometry and quadrupole relaxation enhancement as a sensitive probe of dynamical properties of solids—[C(NH2)3]3Bi2I9 as an example

    Florek-Wojciechowska, M.; Wojciechowski, M.; Jakubas, R.; Brym, Sz.; Kruk, D.

    2016-02-01

    1H nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry has been applied to reveal information on dynamics and structure of Gu3Bi2I9 ([Gu = C(NH2)3] denotes guanidinium cation). The data have been analyzed in terms of a theory of quadrupole relaxation enhancement, which has been extended here by including effects associated with quadrupole (14N) spin relaxation caused by a fast fluctuating component of the electric field gradient tensor. Two motional processes have been identified: a slow one occurring on a timescale of about 8 × 10-6 s which has turned out to be (almost) temperature independent, and a fast process in the range of 10-9 s. From the 1H-14N relaxation contribution (that shows "quadrupole peaks") the quadrupole parameters, which are a fingerprint of the arrangement of the anionic network, have been determined. It has been demonstrated that the magnitude of the quadrupole coupling considerably changes with temperature and the changes are not caused by phase transitions. At the same time, it has been shown that there is no evidence of abrupt changes in the cationic dynamics and the anionic substructure upon the phase transitions.

  8. (1)H NMR relaxometry and quadrupole relaxation enhancement as a sensitive probe of dynamical properties of solids--[C(NH2)3]3Bi2I9 as an example.

    Florek-Wojciechowska, M; Wojciechowski, M; Jakubas, R; Brym, Sz; Kruk, D

    2016-02-01

    (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry has been applied to reveal information on dynamics and structure of Gu3Bi2I9 ([Gu = C(NH2)3] denotes guanidinium cation). The data have been analyzed in terms of a theory of quadrupole relaxation enhancement, which has been extended here by including effects associated with quadrupole ((14)N) spin relaxation caused by a fast fluctuating component of the electric field gradient tensor. Two motional processes have been identified: a slow one occurring on a timescale of about 8 × 10(-6) s which has turned out to be (almost) temperature independent, and a fast process in the range of 10(-9) s. From the (1)H-(14)N relaxation contribution (that shows "quadrupole peaks") the quadrupole parameters, which are a fingerprint of the arrangement of the anionic network, have been determined. It has been demonstrated that the magnitude of the quadrupole coupling considerably changes with temperature and the changes are not caused by phase transitions. At the same time, it has been shown that there is no evidence of abrupt changes in the cationic dynamics and the anionic substructure upon the phase transitions. PMID:26851925

  9. 1H NMR relaxometry and quadrupole relaxation enhancement as a sensitive probe of dynamical properties of solids—[C(NH2)3]3Bi2I9 as an example

    1H nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry has been applied to reveal information on dynamics and structure of Gu3Bi2I9 ([Gu = C(NH2)3] denotes guanidinium cation). The data have been analyzed in terms of a theory of quadrupole relaxation enhancement, which has been extended here by including effects associated with quadrupole (14N) spin relaxation caused by a fast fluctuating component of the electric field gradient tensor. Two motional processes have been identified: a slow one occurring on a timescale of about 8 × 10−6 s which has turned out to be (almost) temperature independent, and a fast process in the range of 10−9 s. From the 1H-14N relaxation contribution (that shows “quadrupole peaks”) the quadrupole parameters, which are a fingerprint of the arrangement of the anionic network, have been determined. It has been demonstrated that the magnitude of the quadrupole coupling considerably changes with temperature and the changes are not caused by phase transitions. At the same time, it has been shown that there is no evidence of abrupt changes in the cationic dynamics and the anionic substructure upon the phase transitions

  10. Evidence for extensive anisotropic local motions in a small enzyme using a new method to determine NMR cross-correlated relaxation rates in the absence of resolved scalar coupling

    Transverse 13CO-1HN (dipole-dipole)/13CO (CSA) cross-correlated relaxation rates were measured for the 13CO resonances of the protein ribonuclease Binase from Bacillus intermedius (12.3 kDa). This was carried out with a novel E.COSY-type triple-resonance experiment, which allows the measurement of cross-correlated transverse relaxation rate from multiplet effects in the absence of resolved scalar coupling. The 13CO-1HN (dipole-dipole)/13CO (CSA) cross-correlated relaxation rates were determined with an average precision of ±5% and cover a range of values between -1.5 and +0.6 Hz. The average (-0.44 Hz) is to be compared with the computed value of -0.83 Hz for this interaction. Mechanisms that potentially can cause the average to be smaller than the theoretical value and the unexpected large spread in observed values are discussed. It is suggested that large contributions to the variations are due to large amplitude local anisotropic motions

  11. {sup 1}H NMR relaxometry and quadrupole relaxation enhancement as a sensitive probe of dynamical properties of solids—[C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sub 3}Bi{sub 2}I{sub 9} as an example

    Florek-Wojciechowska, M. [Department of Physics and Biophysics, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Oczapowskiego 4, 10719 Olsztyn (Poland); Wojciechowski, M.; Brym, Sz.; Kruk, D., E-mail: danuta.kruk@matman.uwm.edu.pl [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Słoneczna 54, 10710 Olsztyn (Poland); Jakubas, R. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, Joliot Curie 14, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-02-07

    {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry has been applied to reveal information on dynamics and structure of Gu{sub 3}Bi{sub 2}I{sub 9} ([Gu = C(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}] denotes guanidinium cation). The data have been analyzed in terms of a theory of quadrupole relaxation enhancement, which has been extended here by including effects associated with quadrupole ({sup 14}N) spin relaxation caused by a fast fluctuating component of the electric field gradient tensor. Two motional processes have been identified: a slow one occurring on a timescale of about 8 × 10{sup −6} s which has turned out to be (almost) temperature independent, and a fast process in the range of 10{sup −9} s. From the {sup 1}H-{sup 14}N relaxation contribution (that shows “quadrupole peaks”) the quadrupole parameters, which are a fingerprint of the arrangement of the anionic network, have been determined. It has been demonstrated that the magnitude of the quadrupole coupling considerably changes with temperature and the changes are not caused by phase transitions. At the same time, it has been shown that there is no evidence of abrupt changes in the cationic dynamics and the anionic substructure upon the phase transitions.

  12. 15N tracer kinetic studies on the validity of various 15N tracer substances for determining whole-body protein parameters in very small preterm infants

    Reliable 15N tracer substances for tracer kinetic determination of whole-body protein parameters in very small preterm infants are still a matter of intensive research, especially after some doubts have been raised about the validity of [15N]glycine, a commonly used 15N tracer. Protein turnover, synthesis, breakdown, and further protein metabolism data were determined by a paired comparison in four preterm infants. Their post-conceptual age was 32.2 +/- 0.8 weeks, and their body weight was 1670 +/- 181 g. Tracer substances applied in this study were a [15N]amino acid mixture (Ia) and [15N]glycine (Ib). In a second group of three infants with a post conceptual age of 15N-labeled 32.0 +/- 1.0 weeks and a body weight of 1,907 +/- 137 g, yeast protein hydrolysate (II) was used as a tracer substance. A three-pool model was employed for the analysis of the data. This model takes into account renal and fecal 15N losses after a single 15N pulse. Protein turnovers were as follows: 11.9 +/- 3.1 g kg-1 d-1 (Ia), 16.2 +/- 2.5 g kg-1 d-1 (Ib), and 10.8 +/- 3.0 g kg-1 d-1 (II). We were able to demonstrate an overestimation of the protein turnover when Ib was used. There was an expected correspondence in the results obtained from Ia and II. The 15N-labeled yeast protein hydrolysate is a relatively cheap tracer that allows reliable determination of whole-body protein parameters in very small preterm infants

  13. Auto-inducing media for uniform isotope labeling of proteins with {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H

    Guthertz, Nicolas [Institute of Cancer Research, Division of Structural Biology (United Kingdom); Klopp, Julia; Winterhalter, Aurélie; Fernández, César; Gossert, Alvar D., E-mail: alvar.gossert@novartis.com [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    Auto-inducing media for protein expression offer many advantages like robust reproducibility, high yields of soluble protein and much reduced workload. Here, an auto-inducing medium for uniform isotope labelling of proteins with {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C and/or {sup 2}H in E. coli is presented. So far, auto-inducing media have not found widespread application in the NMR field, because of the prohibitively high cost of labeled lactose, which is an essential ingredient of such media. Here, we propose using lactose that is only selectively labeled on the glucose moiety. It can be synthesized from inexpensive and readily available substrates: labeled glucose and unlabeled activated galactose. With this approach, uniformly isotope labeled proteins were expressed in unattended auto-inducing cultures with incorporation of {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N of 96.6 % and {sup 2}H, {sup 15}N of 98.8 %. With the present protocol, the NMR community could profit from the many advantages that auto-inducing media offer.

  14. Real-time pure shift {sup 15}N HSQC of proteins: a real improvement in resolution and sensitivity

    Kiraly, Peter; Adams, Ralph W.; Paudel, Liladhar; Foroozandeh, Mohammadali [University of Manchester, School of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Aguilar, Juan A. [Durham University, Department of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Timári, István [University of Debrecen, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (Hungary); Cliff, Matthew J. [University of Manchester, Manchester Institute of Biotechnology (United Kingdom); Nilsson, Mathias [University of Manchester, School of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Sándor, Péter [Agilent Technologies R& D and Marketing GmbH & Co. KG (Germany); Batta, Gyula [University of Debrecen, Department of Organic Chemistry (Hungary); Waltho, Jonathan P. [University of Manchester, Manchester Institute of Biotechnology (United Kingdom); Kövér, Katalin E. [University of Debrecen, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry (Hungary); Morris, Gareth A., E-mail: g.a.morris@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, School of Chemistry (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    Spectral resolution in proton NMR spectroscopy is reduced by the splitting of resonances into multiplets due to the effect of homonuclear scalar couplings. Although these effects are often hidden in protein NMR spectroscopy by low digital resolution and routine apodization, behind the scenes homonuclear scalar couplings increase spectral overcrowding. The possibilities for biomolecular NMR offered by new pure shift NMR methods are illustrated here. Both resolution and sensitivity are improved, without any increase in experiment time. In these experiments, free induction decays are collected in short bursts of data acquisition, with durations short on the timescale of J-evolution, interspersed with suitable refocusing elements. The net effect is real-time (t{sub 2}) broadband homodecoupling, suppressing the multiplet structure caused by proton–proton interactions. The key feature of the refocusing elements is that they discriminate between the resonances of active (observed) and passive (coupling partner) spins. This can be achieved either by using band-selective refocusing or by the BIRD element, in both cases accompanied by a nonselective 180° proton pulse. The latter method selects the active spins based on their one-bond heteronuclear J-coupling to {sup 15}N, while the former selects a region of the {sup 1}H spectrum. Several novel pure shift experiments are presented, and the improvements in resolution and sensitivity they provide are evaluated for representative samples: the N-terminal domain of PGK; ubiquitin; and two mutants of the small antifungal protein PAF. These new experiments, delivering improved sensitivity and resolution, have the potential to replace the current standard HSQC experiments.

  15. Fields of application and results of analytic procedures with 15N in pediatric alimentary research

    Investigation of protein metabolism in nutritional pediatric research by means of 15N tracer techniques has been relatively seldom used up to now. 15N labelled compounds for these purposes are not injurious to health. The technique is based on oral or intravenous application of the tracer substances and on 15N analysis of the urine fractions. The subsequent calculation of protein synthesis and breakdown rate, turnover and reutilisation of amino acids from protein breakdown as well as the size of the metabolic pool offers detailed information of protein metabolism. Determination of these parameters was performed in infants on mother's milk and formula feeding and on chemically defined diet. As an example of utilisation of D-amino acids for protein synthesis the 15N-D-phenylalanin retention on parenteral nutrition was found to be 33% of the applied dosis at an average. An oral 15N glycine loading test proved to be of value for the prediction of the therapeutic effect of human growth hormon in numerous types of dwarfism. Further application of 15N tracer technique dealt with utilisation of 15N urea for bacterial protein synthesis of the intestinal flora and with incorporation of 15N from 15N glycine and 15N lysine into the jejunal mucosa for measuring the enterocyte regeneration. (author)

  16. Studies with 15N-labelled lysine in colostomized hens. 3

    In a metabolism experiment with 15N-labelled lysine 3 colostomized laying hybrids received over 4 days 0.2% L-lysine with 48 at% 15N excess (15N') in addition to a ration conventionally produced and, subsequent to this, unlabelled lysine for four days. At the end of the experiment the hens were killed and the individual organs and tissues were prepared for 15N analysis. The incorporation of the lysine-15N' into the further amino acids of follicles, ovary and oviduct is described. The at% 15N' of the complete range of amino acids was analyzed in the individual follicles. Various levels of heavy nitrogen could be detected in all essential and non-essential amino acids. Of the total amount of 15N' detected in the follicles 64.0%, 65.0% and 61.2%, resp., could be detected in lysine and 25.2%, 25.4% and 28.7%, resp., in the other amino acids (hens 1 to 3). In the ovary on average 61.6% and in the oviduct 54.2% of the respective 15N' amount was detected in lysine. In the ovary 10.9% and in the oviduct 8.4% 15N' of the total 15N' of these samples were incorporated into the arginine molecules. (author)

  17. 13C, 15N Resonance Assignment of Parts of the HET-s Prion Protein in its Amyloid Form

    The partial 15N and 13C solid-state NMR resonance assignment of the HET-s prion protein fragment 218-289 in its amyloid form is presented. It is based on experiments measured at MAS frequencies in the range of 20-40 kHz using exclusively adiabatic polarization-transfer schemes. The resonance assignment within each residue is based on two-dimensional 13C--13C correlation spectra utilizing the DREAM mixing scheme. The sequential linking of the assigned residues used a set of two- and three-dimensional 15N--13C correlation experiments. Almost all cross peaks visible in the spectra are assigned, but only resonances from 43 of the 78 amino-acid residues could be detected. The missing residues are thought to be highly disordered and/or highly dynamic giving rise to broad resonance lines that escaped detection in the experiments applied. The line widths of the observed resonances are narrow and comparable to line widths observed in micro-crystalline samples. The 43 assigned residues are located in two fragments of about 20 residues

  18. Ner protein of phage Mu: Assignments using {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled protein

    Strzelecka, T.; Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The Ner protein is a small (74-amino acid) DNA-binding protein that regulates a switch between the lysogenic and lytic stages of phage Mu. It inhibits expression of the C repressor gene and down-regulates its own expression. Two-dimensional NMR experiments on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled protein provided most of the backbone and some of the sidechain proton assignments. The secondary structure determination using two-dimensional NOESY experiments showed that Ner consists of five {alpha}-helices. However, because most of the sidechain protons could not be assigned, the full structure was not determined. Using uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled Ner and a set of three-dimensional experiments, we were able to assign all of the backbone and 98% of the sidechain protons. In particular, the CBCANH and CBCA(CO)NH experiments were used to sequentially assign the C{alpha} and C{beta} resonances; the HCCH-CTOCSY and HCCH-COSY were used to assign sidechain carbon and proton resonances.

  19. Utilization of 15N-labelled urea in laying hens. 7

    3 colostomized laying hybrids received 1% 15N-labelled urea with 96.06 atom-% 15N excess (15N') with a commercial ration over a period of 6 days. After the application of the same ration with unlabelled urea on the following 2 days the animals were butchered. In the muscles of breast, legs and heart, the labelling of total nitrogen and the incorporation of urea 15N' into 15 amino acids of the 3 different kinds of muscles were ascertained. On average, significant differences could be ascertained between the atom-% 15N of the muscles was 0.25 and 0.34 atom-%, resp.; that of the cardial proteins 0.71 atom-% 15N'. The incorporation of urea 15N into the basic amino acids is low and varies both between the kinds of muscles and between the amino acids. On average the highest level of labelling was found among the essential amino acids valine, isoleucine and leucine; the average atom-% 15N' for the muscles of the breast is 0.13, of the leg 0.17, and of the heart 0.27; the 15N' quota of branched Chain amino acids in the total 15N' of the respective muscle is accordingly 6.0%, 5.0% and 4.5%. The non-essential amino acids, particularly glutamic acid, are more highly labelled in the muscles than the essential ones. A 15N' for glutamic acid of 0.24 atom-% in the breast muscles, of 0.27 atom-% in those of the legs and of 0.64 atom-% in the heart muscle could be detected. The average quota of the 15N' of these acid amino acids in the 15N' for breast, leg and heart muscles is 7.4, 6.2 and 6.7, resp. The quota of the 15N' in the 6 non-essential amino acids in the total 15N' in all 3 kinds of muscles is approximately two thirds and in the 9 essential ones one third of the total 15N'. Although the results show that there is a certain incorporation of 15N' from urea into the amino acids of the muscle proteins, their contribution to meeting the demands is irrelevant. (author)

  20. CO{sub H}(N)CACB experiments for assigning backbone resonances in {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled proteins

    Astrof, Nathan; Bracken, Clay; Cavanagh, John; Palmer, Arthur G

    1998-05-15

    A triple resonance NMR experiment, denoted CO{sub H}(N)CACB, correlates{sup 1}H{sup N} and {sup 13}CO spins with the{sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} spins of adjacent amino acids. The pulse sequence is an 'out-and-back' design that starts with{sup 1}H{sup N} magnetization and transfers coherence via the {sup 15}N spin simultaneously to the {sup 13}CO and{sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} spins, followed by transfer to the{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} spin. Two versions of the sequence are presented: one in which the {sup 13}CO spins are frequency labeled during an incremented t{sub 1} evolution period prior to transfer of magnetization from the {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} to the{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} resonances, and one in which the{sup 13}CO spins are frequency labeled in a constant-time manner during the coherence transfer to and from the{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} resonances. Because {sup 13}COand {sup 15}N chemical shifts are largely uncorrelated, the technique will be especially useful when degeneracy in the{sup 1}H{sup N}-{sup 15}N chemical shifts hinders resonance assignment. The CO{sub H}(N)CACB experiment is demonstrated using uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled ubiquitin.

  1. REDOR NMR of stable-isotope-labeled protein binding sites

    Schaefer, J. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Rotational-echo, double resonance (REDOR) NMR, a new analytical spectroscopic technique for solids spinning at the magic angle, has been developed over the last 5 years. REDOR provides a direct measure of heteronuclear dipolar coupling between isolated pairs of labeled nuclei. In a solid with a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N labeled pair, for example, the {sup 13}C rotational echoes that form each rotor period following a{sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization transfer can be prevented from reaching full intensity by insertion of a {sup 15}N {pi} pulse each half rotor period. The REDOR difference (the difference between a {sup 13}C NMR spectrum obtained under these conditions and one obtained with no {sup 15}N {pi} pulses) has a strong dependence on the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N dipolar coupling, and hence, the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N internuclear distance. REDOR is described as double-resonance even though three radio frequencies (typically {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N) are used because the protons are removed from the important evolution part of the experiment by resonant decoupling. The dephasing of magnetization in REDOR arises from a local dipolar {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N field gradient and involves no polarization transfer. REDOR has no dependence on {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N chemical-shift tensors and does not require resolution of a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N coupling in the chemical-shift dimension.

  2. Ionic-liquid-like local structure in $LiNO_3-Ca(NO_3)_2-H_2O$ as studied by ion and solvent nuclei NMR relaxation

    Matveev, Vladimir V; Lähderanta, Erkki

    2010-01-01

    Relaxation rates in the $13mLiNO_3-6,5mCa(NO_3)_2-H_2O$ ternary system have been measured for nuclei of water ($^1H$ and $^{17}O$), anion ($^{14}N$), and both cations ($^7Li$, $^{43}Ca$). The data analysis reveals the system structure as consisting of two main charged units: [Li(H$_2$O)$_4$]$^+$ and [Ca(NO$_3$)$_4$]$^{2-}$. Thus the system presents inorganic ionic liquid like structure.

  3. NMR in solid ionic and nanoionics

    Full text: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a spectroscopic technique which employs magnetic nuclei to study, among others, the dynamics of condensed matter at the atomic level. Thus, NMR has been and still is a successful instrument in the research field of solid electrolytes also known as solid ionics. This paper presents the typical NMR experiments performed in solid ionics together with some examples from nanoionics. The experiments to be discussed comprise: (i) measurements of the diffusion coefficient employing the pulsed-field gradient and the static fringe-field method; (ii) the experimentally related NMR imaging; (iii) double resonance experiments like spin-echo double resonance (SEDOR) and two-dimensional Fourier transform NMR (2D-FT NMR); (iv) various types of nuclear relaxation, in particular spin-lattice relaxation. The NMR techniques yield information on topics like the following: type and number of mobile atoms and defects, diffusion pathways (e.g. dimensionality restrictions), atomic jump frequencies, activation energy and activation volume of these movements, diffusion coefficient with activation energy and prefactor, correlation effects in atomic movements, space correlation factor, cooperative phenomena, symmetry of atomic sites, behavior at phase transitions. These applications will be illustrated by giving examples from crystals, glasses, and polymers. (author)

  4. Acetylene inhibition of N2O reduction in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays: evaluation by 15N tracer and 15N site preference of N2O

    Weymann, Daniel; Well, Reinhard; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Rohe, Lena

    2013-01-01

    Acetylene inhibition of N2O reduction in laboratory soil and groundwaterdenitrification assays: evaluation by 15N tracer and 15N site preference ofN2ODaniel Weymann (1), Reinhard Well (2), Dominika Lewicka-Szczebak (2,3), and Rohe Lena (2)(1) Forschungszentrum Juelich, Agrosphere Institute (IBG-3), Juelich, Germany (), (2)Thünen-Institute of Climate-Smart Agriculture, Braunschweig, Germany, (3) University of Wroclaw, PolandThe measurement of denitrification in soils and...

  5. Hyperpolarized 15N-pyridine Derivatives as pH-Sensitive MRI Agents

    Weina Jiang; Lloyd Lumata; Wei Chen; Shanrong Zhang; Zoltan Kovacs; A. Dean Sherry; Chalermchai Khemtong

    2015-01-01

    Highly sensitive MR imaging agents that can accurately and rapidly monitor changes in pH would have diagnostic and prognostic value for many diseases. Here, we report an investigation of hyperpolarized 15N-pyridine derivatives as ultrasensitive pH-sensitive imaging probes. These molecules are easily polarized to high levels using standard dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) techniques and their 15N chemical shifts were found to be highly sensitive to pH. These probes displayed sharp 15N resona...

  6. Investigation into endogenous N metabolism in 15N-labelled pigs. 1

    4 male castrated pigs (55-65 kg) either received a wheat-fish meal diet (1 and 2) or a wheat-horse bean diet (3 and 4) without straw meal supplement (1 and 3) or with a supplement of 20% dry matter (2 and 4). In order to investigate whether a 15N labelling of the pigs is also possible with a protein excess in the ration, the animals received 24.8 g (1 and 2) and 11.6 g crude protein/kg/sup 0.75/ live weight (3 and 4). During a 10-day 15N-labelling 385 mg 15N excess (15N') per kg/sup 0.75/ were applied with 15N labelling the following quotas of the applied 15N amount were incorporated: 1 = 10.2%, 2 = 7.2%, 3 = 18.7%, 4 = 14.4%. 15N excretion in both TCA fractions of feces showed a highly significant positive correlation to the increasing content of crude fibre in the 4 diets. The immediate 15N incorporation into the TCA-precipitable fraction of feces proves that 15N enters the large intestine endogenously and serves bacterial protein synthesis. 3 days after the last 15 application the pigs were killed. The values of atom-% 15N' were determined in the TCA-precipitable blood plasma and in the TCA-precipitable fraction of the liver. The other examined organs and tissues showed smaller differences between the test animals. The results show that the 15N labelling of tissues and organs of pigs is also possible at a high level of protein supply by means of an oral application of [15N] ammonia salts. (author)

  7. Investigation of the metabolism of colostomized laying hens with 15N-labelled wheat. 5

    In an experiment with 3 colostomized laying hybrids each animal received 80 g pelleted mixed feed and 40 g 15N-labelled wheat with 20.13 atom-% 15N excess (15N') over a period of four days. On the following four days the hens received rations composed in the same way with unlabelled wheat, however in the tissues and organs of the slaughtered hens 15N' was determined in the total N and the amino acids lysine, histidine and arginine in both the segments of the gastro intestinal tract and in its content. The amount of 15N' stomach, small intestine and colon was 43.7%, 27.2% and 29.1%, respectively. The tissue of the small intestine contained, on an average, the highest 15N' in lysine of all the basic amino acids. It was 0.82 atom-% 15N' for lysine, 0.55% for histidine and 0.63% for arginine. The percentage of the 15N' of the basic amino acids from the corresponding total 15N' amount of the charges was 20.5% in the contents of the gastrointestinal tract, 28.0% in the stomach tissue and in the tissues of the small intestine 24.4% of the cecum 21.5% and of the rectum 25.7%. (author)

  8. Utilization of 15N-labelled urea in laying hens. 6

    3 colostomized laying hybrids received a normal ration containing 1% 15N-labelled urea with 96.06% atom-% 15N excess (15N') over six days. Subsequently the same ration with unlabelled urea was given over 2 days, after which the animals were butchered. In the kidneys the 15N' amounted to 1.1 atom-% and 1.8 atom-% in the liver. The TCA soluble N fraction and the ammonia were more highly labelled than the total N. Lysine, histidine and arginine were lowly labelled in the kidneys. This also applies to the liver with the exception of histidine. In the branch-chained and aromatic amino acids of the liver the 15N' was between 0.2 and 0.3 atom-%. The highest labelling of non-essential amino acids was found in glutamic acid with 0.9 atom-% 15N' and aspartic acid with 1.1 atom-% 15 N'. The evaluation of the amino acid in the liver showed that the 6 non-essential amino acids account for two thirds of the total amino acid 15N' whereas the 9 essential ones account for one third of the amino acid 15N' only. (author)

  9. Effects of growth and change of food on the δ15N in marine fishes

    Information is limited concerning variation of the δ15N with growth in marine organisms and consequently the effect of growth of marine biota on the δ15N is not yet well understood. The δ15N in 26 species of marine fishes taken from Japanese coastal waters together with 4664 stomach contents of these fishes were examined to investigate the effects of food habits and growth on the δ15N. The mean δ15N for two species that fed mainly on large-size fishes and six species that fed mainly on small-size fishes were 14.5±1.0per mille and 12.8±0.7per mille, respectively. For five species that fed mainly on decapod crustaceans, two species that fed mainly on zooplankton, and three species that fed mainly on benthos (mainly Polychaeta), the δ15N were 13.0±0.7, 9.7±0.9, and 12.2±1.2per mille, respectively. The mean δ15N in the species whose prey were mainly fish or decapod crustaceans was about 3-5per mille higher than the species whose prey was mainly zooplankton. Within the four species that shift their food habits with growth to higher trophic level, the δ15N significantly increased with growth in one species (Pacific cod), while not significant increase in the δ15N with growth in the remaining species. (author)

  10. Nitrogen (15N) recovery from ammonium and nitrate applied to the soil by sugar cane

    An experiment was developed in a field aimed to compare the recovery of the ammonium-15 N and nitrate-15 N by the sugar cane plants harvested mechanically without burning. A rate of 70 kg ha-1 of N was applied as ammonium nitrate, in strip, onto cultural residues. Two lineal meters micropots were used. They received the fertilizer labeled with 15 N. Two treatments were established using labeled ammonium (NH4+-15 N) or nitrate (NO3-15 N). Two months after fertilization, four samples of the aerial part (two lineal meters) for treatment in the portions that did not receive the fertilizer-15 N, were taken in order to evaluated the fitomass production (Mg ha-1) and N-total accumulated (kg ha-1). This evaluation was repeated every two months up to complete five of them. Two leaves (leaves with 3 deg C visible auricle) were collected from plants that were in a middle of the micropots (15 N) and in corresponding positions in the adjacent rows, to evaluated the concentration of 15 N. There was a larger absorption of the nitrate-N (30.5%) than of the ammonium-N (21.2%). On the other hand, in the soil the results showed larger ammonium-15 N residual effect concentration, probably due to microorganism immobilization. (author)

  11. Simultaneous acquisition of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}-{sup 15}N and {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N-{sup 15}N sequential correlations in proteins: application of dual receivers in 3D HNN

    Chakraborty, Swagata; Paul, Subhradip; Hosur, Ramakrishna V., E-mail: hosur@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2012-01-15

    We describe here, adaptation of the HNN pulse sequence for multiple nuclei detection using two independent receivers by utilizing the detectable {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} transverse magnetization which was otherwise dephased out in the conventional HNN experiment. It enables acquisition of 2D {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}-{sup 15}N sequential correlations along with the standard 3D {sup 15}N-{sup 15}N-{sup 1}H correlations, which provides directionality to sequential walk in HNN, on one hand, and enhances the speed of backbone assignment, on the other. We foresee that the implementation of dual direct detection opens up new avenues for a wide variety of modifications that would further enhance the value and applications of the experiment, and enable derivation of hitherto impossible information.

  12. Review of relaxation times of tissues

    NMR proton imaging techniques are based on fundamental properties of the water molecules of the body tissues, in particular the varying ability of different populations of water protons to lose spin orientation energy to the immediate environment (spin-lattice relaxation with a time constant of T1) or to randomise their spin orientation (spin-spin relaxation which contributes largely to T2). In general it has been shown that changes in the T1 and T2 relaxation times of water protons in pathological tissue are non-specific. For this reason it is most unlikely that examination of the relaxation times of excised tissues samples will ever be a primary diagnostic tool in clinical medicine. NMR imaging, however, offers this information in a different way, since spatial information is added to the relaxation time, and the pathological tissue is shown within its host tissue so that differences in relaxation time appear as contrast in a visual display. The imaging technique is also of use when a relaxation time is seen which is sufficiently different to identify the tissue as abnormal, but when there are several different conditions which could cause such an abnormal relaxation time. In this case the spatial information, showing a precise position or, perhaps, a mottling throughout a large region of the organ, can provide the missing factor which, along with previous clinical knowledge, enables a certain diagnosis to be made. As one of the battery of hospital diagnostic tests it is believed that knowledge of the extent and location of changes in the state of the body water will prove to be of great assistance

  13. Factors Controlling the Stable Nitrogen Isotopic Composition (δ15N of Lipids in Marine Animals.

    Elisabeth Svensson

    Full Text Available Lipid extraction of biomass prior to stable isotope analysis is known to cause variable changes in the stable nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N of residual biomass. However, the underlying factors causing these changes are not yet clear. Here we address this issue by comparing the δ15N of bulk and residual biomass of several marine animal tissues (fish, crab, cockle, oyster, and polychaete, as well as the δ15N of the extracted lipids. As observed previously, lipid extraction led to a variable offset in δ15N of biomass (differences ranging from -2.3 to +1.8 ‰. Importantly, the total lipid extract (TLE was highly depleted in 15N compared to bulk biomass, and also highly variable (differences ranging from -14 to +0.7 ‰. The TLE consisted mainly of phosphatidylcholines, a group of lipids with one nitrogen atom in the headgroup. To elucidate the cause for the 15N-depletion in the TLE, the δ15N of amino acids was determined, including serine because it is one of the main sources of nitrogen to N-containing lipids. Serine δ15N values differed by -7 to +2 ‰ from bulk biomass δ15N, and correlated well with the 15N depletion in TLEs. On average, serine was less depleted (-3‰ than the TLE (-7 ‰, possibly due to fractionation during biosynthesis of N-containing headgroups, or that other nitrogen-containing compounds, such as urea and choline, or recycled nitrogen contribute to the nitrogen isotopic composition of the TLE. The depletion in 15N of the TLE relative to biomass increased with the trophic level of the organisms.

  14. Turnover of 15N labelled nitrate with special emphasis on denitrification in the field

    This study establishes a mass balance for 15N-labelled nitrate added to soil planted with a nitrogen-fixing crop (pea) and a non-fixing crop (barley). The results indicate that 15N unaccounted for in a mass balance is not necessarily lost by denitrification. Processes such as volatilization of ammonia should also be considered. 1 fig

  15. Synthesis and isotope-ratio analysis of methyl nitrite-15N

    Methyl nitrite-15N was synthesised on a 0.1 mole scale by the esterification of methanol by aqueous H15NO2. The method is simple and efficient, and provides analytically pure CH3O15NO. A method for determining the 15N enrichment of CH3O15NO is described. (author)

  16. Improvement of differential diagnostics in pseudohermaphroditismus masculinus by means of 15N-labelled amino acids

    In 7 children with male hermaphroditism the N retention test was performed using 15N-glycine (13.5 mg/kg body weight). On testosterone therapy the protein synthesis rate increased significantly while there was a significant decrease in the cumulative 15N excretion

  17. Increased Plant Uptake of Nitrogen from 15N Depleted Fertilizer Using Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria

    The techniques of 15N isotope have been very useful for determining the behavior and fate of N in soil, including the use efficiency of applied N fertilizers by plants. Our objective in this study was to use 15N isotope techniques to demonstrate that a model plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGP...

  18. Application of 15N amino acid absorption in chronic enteropathy and hepatic diseases in infants

    The aim of this study was to estimate malabsorption status in humans using a 15N stable isotope tracer technique. [15N]-glycine, 98.98 atom %, was synthesized in our institute and was administered orally as a single bolus dose to twelve patients. Six of the 12 subjects studied were healthy and 6 were suspected of having malabsorption. Blood, urine and faecal samples were obtained, proteins in the samples were precipitated with sulphosalicylic acid (5%), the eluate was purified with Dowex 50W-X8 (40mm x 2mm column), and derivatised to form the trifluoroacetyl-butyl esters using standard techniques. Gas chromatographic separation was performed on a glass column 2m X 3mm i.d. packed with EGA 1% on Chromosorb W AW 80-100 mesh. An isotope dilution GC/MS method and Kjeldahl digestion followed by MS analysis of nitrogen gas was performed. 15N isotopomer was used as internal standard. [15N]-Gly elimination in faeces was compared with total 15N elimination in faeces to distinguish artefacts caused by intestinal bacteria. Significant differences in the amount of [15N]-Gly eliminated in urine and faeces between malabsorption and control patients were obtained. It was concluded that more emphasis should be given to the faeces data than to urine because 15N elimination in urine is competitive with 15N incorporation into protein. 12 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs

  19. Utilization of 15N-labelled urea in laying hens. 8

    3 colostomized laying hybrids received orally with a conventional ration 1% urea with 96.06 atom-% 15N excess (15N') over a period of 6 days. In the period of the experiment every hen consumed 2.87 g 15N'. After another 2 days, on which they received conventional feed urea, the animals were butchered. 15N' was determined in the total N and in 15 amino acids of the oviduct. Of the 15 amino acids the labelling of glutamic acid, glycine and serine was highest and on average amounted to 0.80, 0.66 and 0.67 atom-% 15N', resp. In lysine and arginine only 0.10 and 0.11 atom-% 15N' could be detected. The amino acid N with natural isotopic frequency amounted to a quarter for the basic amino acids, a tenth for the branched chain ones and for the non-essential ones (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, serine, glycine, alanine, proline) a third of the total oviduct 14N. The average quota of 15N' is only 3.6%, that of the branched chain amino acids 4.5 and that of the non-essential ones 21.1%. Consequently, the 15N' of the urea is mainly used for the synthesis of the non-essential amino acids of the oviduct. (author)

  20. Utilization of 15N-labelled urea in laying hens. 2

    In an N metabolism experiment 3 colostomized laying hybrids received 2870 mg 15N excess (15N') per animal in 6 days in the form of urea with their conventional feed rations. During the 8-day experiment the 21 eggs laid were separated into egg-shell, white of egg and yolk. Weight, N content and 15N' of the individual fractions of the eggs were determined. On an average 4.6% of the heavy nitrogen was in the egg-shells, 50% in the white of egg and 45.5% in the yolk. 2.8%, 4.5% and 5.5% (hens 1 - 3) of the 15N' consumed were detected in the eggs. The maximum 15N' output in the white of egg was reached on the 6th day, whereas 15N' output in the yolk showed a nearly linear increase in the time of the experiment. The results show that labelled nitrogen from urea is incorporated into the egg to a lower degree than after the feeding of 15N-labelled proteins and that the development of its incorporation into the white of egg and the yolk differ from that after the feeding of 15N-labelled native proteins. (author)

  1. Disturbance and topography shape nitrogen availability and δ15N over long-term forest succession

    Forest disturbance and long-term succession can promote open N cycling that increases N loss and soil δ15N values. We examined soil and foliar patterns in N and δ15N, and soil N mineralization, across a topographically complex montane forest landscape influenced by human logging ...

  2. Sources and transformations of N in reclaimed coastal tidelands: evidence from soil δ15N data

    Kwak, Jin-Hyeob; Choi, Woo-Jung; Lim, Sang-Sun; Lee, Seung-Heon; Lee, Sang-Mo; Chang, Scott X.; Jung, Jae-Woon; Yoon, Kwang-Sik; Choi, Soo-Myung

    2008-01-01

    Electrical conductivity of saturated soil extracts (ECe) in three reclaimed tideland (RTL) soils on the west coast of Korea decreased with time since reclamation, indicating natural desalinization through leaching of salts by precipitation water. Soil N concentration increased with decreasing ECe. With the increase in soil N concentration, the δ15N decreased, likely caused by the input of 15N-depleted N sources. As N2-fixing plant species were found in the oldest RTL, atmospheric N2 fixation likely contributed to the increase in soil N concentration in the oldest RTL. Negative δ15N (-7.1 to -2.0‰) of total inorganic N (NH4 ++NO3 -) and published data on N deposition near the study area indicate that atmospheric N deposition might be another source of N in the RTLs. Meanwhile, the consistently negative δ15N of soil NO3 - excluded N input from chemical fertilizer through groundwater flow as a potential N source, since NO3 - in groundwater generally have a positive δ15N. The patterns of δ15N of NH4 + (+2.3 to +5.1‰) and NO3 - (-9.2 to -5.0‰) suggested that nitrification was an active process that caused 15N enrichment in NH4 + but denitrification was probably minimal which would otherwise have caused 15N enrichment in NO3 -. A quantitative approach on N budget would provide a better understanding of soil N dynamics in the studied RTLs.

  3. 1H NMR in a-Si

    Carlos, W. E.; Taylor, P. C.

    1982-10-01

    Results of pulsed NMR studies of hydrogen in a-Si: H prepared at several laboratories by glow discharge of silane are presented. The origins of the two 1H NMR lines seen in almost all samples of a-Si: H are discussed. Solid-echo measurements are presented which indicate that these two components are due to spatially isolated groups of protons. We attribute the narrow line to protons slightly clustered in the bulk of the material and the broad line to protons distributed on internal surfaces. The spin-lattice relaxation time shows a minimum at T~30 K which is interpreted as due to relaxation via spin diffusion to a small number of H2 molecules acting as relaxation centers. Annealing results suggest that all the hydrogen molecules are trapped in very similar sites.

  4. Utilization of fertilizer and stored nitrogen by asparagus and kiwifruit estimated using 15N

    The efficiency of recovery of 15N enriched nitrogen fertilizer was examined in field trials on two contrasting mature perennial crops: a vegetable (asparagus) and a woody deciduous vine (kiwifruit). In the asparagus experiment, 50 kg N/ha were applied either prior to fern growth (early summer) or pre-harvest (early spring). In the former treatment, 15N uptake was rapid during the period of fern growth (summer and autumn) and by early winter most 15N had been stored in crown and root material. In contrast, uptake of 15N applied pre-harvest was slow, indicating that most of the N for spear production was from remobilization of stored N. Removal of added 15N in produce over two harvest years was small. 8 refs, 3 tabs

  5. Using a macroalgal δ15N bioassay to detect cruise ship waste water effluent inputs

    Highlights: → Green macroalgae exposed to nutrient solutions exhibited changes in tissue 15N signatures. → Macroalgae exhibited no fractionation with NO3 and slight fractionation with NH4. → Algae exposed to cruise ship waste water had increased tissue δ15N indicating a heavy N source. → Field bioassays exhibited decreased δ15N indicating isotopically light riverine δ15N-NO3 was likely the dominant N source. → Algal bioassays could not detect a δ15N cruise ship waste water signal in this system. - Abstract: Green macroalgae bioassays were used to determine if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in a small harbor. Opportunistic green macroalgae (Ulva spp.) were collected, cultured under nutrient depleted conditions and characterized with regard to N content and δ15N. Samples of algae were used in controlled incubations to evaluate the direction of isotope shift from exposure to CSWWE. Algae samples exposed to CSWWE exhibited an increase of 1-2.5 per mille in δ15N values indicating that the CSWWE had an enriched isotope signature. In contrast, algae samples exposed to field conditions exhibited a significant decrease in the observed δ15N indicating that a light N source was used. Isotopically light, riverine nitrogen derived from N2-fixing trees in the watershed may be a N source utilized by algae. These experiments indicate that the δ15N CSWWE signature was not detectable under the CSWWE loading conditions of this experiment.

  6. Utilization of 15N-labelled urea in laying hens. 9

    For studying the incorporation of the 15N labelled urea into individual organs and tissues 3 colostomized laying hens were butchered after they had received 1% urea (96.06 atom-% 15N excess) with a high quality ration over a period of six days and after receiving conventional urea for another two days. Nitrogen and atom-% 15N excess (15N') were determined in the bones, the feathers and the remaining body (skin, lungs and windpipe, head with comb and wattle, lower leg without bones and with skin, pancreas and fatty tissue). In the remaining body the atom-% 15N' was determined in 15 amino acids. The labelling in the remaining body and the bones was approximately the same and averaged 0.37 atom-% 15N'. A significantly lower relative frequency could be detected in the feathers. The lysine of the remaining body contained only 0.04 atom-% 15N', tyrosine 0.06, histidine and arginine 0.07. The phenylalanine and proline molecules were labelled with 0.11 atom-% 15N'. Most 15N' was incorporated in serine and glutamic acid with over 0.30 atom-%. In the six non-essential amino acids out of the 15 amino acids studied, 48.6 of the non-isotopic nitrogen of the total N of the remaining body and 70.7% of the isotopic nitrogen of total 15N' could be detected. Consequently the urea N is mainly used for the synthesis of the non-essential amino acids, with its utilization being very low. (author)

  7. NMR Solution Structure and Biophysical Characterization of Vibrio harveyi Acyl Carrier Protein A75H

    Chan, David I.; Chu, Byron C. H.; Lau, Cheryl K. Y.; Hunter, Howard N.; Byers, David M.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial acyl carrier protein (ACP) is a highly anionic, 9 kDa protein that functions as a cofactor protein in fatty acid biosynthesis. Escherichia coli ACP is folded at neutral pH and in the absence of divalent cations, while Vibrio harveyi ACP, which is very similar at 86% sequence identity, is unfolded under the same conditions. V. harveyi ACP adopts a folded conformation upon the addition of divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Mg2+ and a mutant, A75H, was previously identified that restores the folded conformation at pH 7 in the absence of divalent cations. In this study we sought to understand the unique folding behavior of V. harveyi ACP using NMR spectroscopy and biophysical methods. The NMR solution structure of V. harveyi ACP A75H displays the canonical ACP structure with four helices surrounding a hydrophobic core, with a narrow pocket closed off from the solvent to house the acyl chain. His-75, which is charged at neutral pH, participates in a stacking interaction with Tyr-71 in the far C-terminal end of helix IV. pH titrations and the electrostatic profile of ACP suggest that V. harveyi ACP is destabilized by anionic charge repulsion around helix II that can be partially neutralized by His-75 and is further reduced by divalent cation binding. This is supported by differential scanning calorimetry data which indicate that calcium binding further increases the melting temperature of V. harveyi ACP A75H by ∼20 °C. Divalent cation binding does not alter ACP dynamics on the ps-ns timescale as determined by 15N NMR relaxation experiments, however, it clearly stabilizes the protein fold as observed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange studies. Finally, we demonstrate that the E. coli ACP H75A mutant is similarly unfolded as wild-type V. harveyi ACP, further stressing the importance of this particular residue for proper protein folding. PMID:20659901

  8. Proton dynamics at low and high temperatures in a novel ferroelectric diammonium hypodiphosphate (NH4)2H2P2O6 (ADhP) as studied by 1H spin-lattice relaxation time and second moment of NMR line

    Medycki, W.; Latanowicz, L.; Szklarz, P.; Jakubas, R.

    2013-06-01

    Proton spin-lattice relaxation times T1 at 24.7 MHz and 15 MHz and second moment of NMR line have been applied to study molecular dynamics of a novel ferroelectric (NH4)2H2P2O6 (Tc = 178 K) in the temperature range 10-290 K. Low-temperature T1 behaviour below Tc is interpreted in terms of Haupt's theory and Schrödinger correlation time of tunnelling jumps. A shallow T1 minimum observed around 39 K is attributed to the C3 classical motion of "intra" proton-proton vectors of NH3 (ammonium groups NH4+ may perform stochastic jumps about any of the four C3 symmetry axes). The tunnelling splitting of the ground state vibrational level, (νT)v0, of the same frequency for both ammonium groups was estimated as high as 900 MHz ((ℏωT)=3.7 μeV). This tunnelling splitting exists only in the ferroelectric phase. Magnetisation recovery is found to be non-exponential in the temperature regime 63-48 K. The temperature of 63 K is the discovered Ttun above which the probability of stochastic tunnelling jumps equals zero. The T1 relaxation time is temperature independent below 25 K, which is related to a constant value of the correlation time characterising tunnelling jumps according to Schrödinger. The T1 minima observed in the paraelectric phase (204 K at 15 MHz and 213 K at 24.7 MHz) as well as second moment reduction at about 130 K are attributed to isotropic motion of all protons.

  9. Microviscosity of human erythrocytes studied using hypophosphite two-spin order relaxation.

    Price, W S; Perng, B C; Tsai, C L; Hwang, L P

    1992-01-01

    A new 31P NMR method is used to probe the cytoplasmic viscosity of human erythrocytes. The method is based on observing two-spin order relaxation of the 31P atom of the hypophosphite ion. This method is superior to our previous method, using the longitudinal relaxation time of the ion, because random field effects such as intermolecular dipole-dipole relaxation can be separated from intramolecular relaxation. This allows a more accurate determination of the effective reorientational correlati...

  10. NMR Assignment of Polymerase β labeled with 2H, 13C, and 15N in complex with substrate DNA

    Mueller, Geoffrey A.; DeRose, Eugene F.; Kirby, Thomas W.; London, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    DNA Polymerase β is a multifunctional enzyme involved in base excision repair of nuclear DNA in vertebrate cells. It has been extensively studied as a model for mechanistic studies of the nucleotidyl transferase reaction, DNA synthesis fidelity, and protein-DNA interactions. Previous studies of 13C-methyl-methionine labeled Rat pol β revealed extensive dynamics in response to various DNA repair substrates (Bose-Basu et. al, 2004). We present here the first assignments of the full-length prote...

  11. 15N Photo-CIDNP MAS NMR To Reveal Functional Heterogeneity in Electron Donor of Different Plant Organisms

    Janssen, Geertje J.; Roy, Esha; Matysik, Jörg; Alia, A.

    2011-01-01

    In plants and cyanobacteria, two light-driven electron pumps, photosystems I and II (PSI, PSII), facilitate electron transfer from water to carbon dioxide with quantum efficiency close to unity. While similar in structure and function, the reaction centers of PSI and PSII operate at widely different potentials with PSI being the strongest reducing agent known in living nature. Photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) in magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic res...

  12. Ring-Substituted Benzohydroxamic Acids: 1H, 13C and 15N NMR Spectra and NHOH Proton Exchange

    Schraml, Jan; Tkadlecová, M.; Pataridis, S.; Soukupová, Ludmila; Blechta, Vratislav; Roithová, Jana; Exner, Otto

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 7 (2005), s. 535-542. ISSN 0749-1581 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1566; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072605; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072005; GA MŠk(CZ) LB98233 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : proton exchange * substituent effects * chemical shifts Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.553, year: 2005

  13. Variable δ15N Diet-Tissue Discrimination Factors among Sharks: Implications for Trophic Position, Diet and Food Web Models

    Olin, Jill A.; Hussey, Nigel E.; Alice Grgicak-Mannion; Mark W Fritts; Wintner, Sabine P.; Fisk, Aaron T.

    2013-01-01

    The application of stable isotopes to characterize the complexities of a species foraging behavior and trophic relationships is dependent on assumptions of δ(15)N diet-tissue discrimination factors (∆(15)N). As ∆(15)N values have been experimentally shown to vary amongst consumers, tissues and diet composition, resolving appropriate species-specific ∆(15)N values can be complex. Given the logistical and ethical challenges of controlled feeding experiments for determining ∆(15)N values for lar...

  14. Understanding NMR relaxometry of partially water-saturated rocks

    O. Mohnke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR relaxometry measurements are commonly used to characterize the storage and transport properties of water-saturated rocks. These assessments are based on the proportionality of NMR signal amplitude and relaxation time to porosity (water content and pore size, respectively. The relationship between pore size and NMR relaxation time depends on pore shape, which is usually assumed to be spherical or cylindrical. However, the NMR response at partial water saturation for natural sediments and rocks differs strongly from the response calculated for spherical or cylindrical pores, because these pore shapes cannot account for water menisci remaining in the corners of de-saturated angular pores. Therefore, we consider a bundle of pores with triangular cross-sections. We introduce analytical solutions of the NMR equations at partial saturation of these pores, which account for water menisci of de-saturated pores. After developing equations that describe the water distribution inside the pores, we calculate the NMR response at partial saturation for imbibition and drainage based on the deduced water distributions. For this pore model, NMR amplitude and NMR relaxation time at partial water saturation strongly depend on pore shape even so the NMR relaxation time at full saturation only depends on the surface to volume ratio of the pore. The pore-shape-dependence at partial saturation arises from the pore shape and capillary pressure dependent water distribution in pores with triangular cross-sections. Moreover, we show the qualitative agreement of the saturation dependent relaxation time distributions of our model with those observed for rocks and soils.

  15. NMR spectroscopy

    The book reviews the applications of NMR-spectroscopy in medicine and biology. The first chapter of about 40 pages summarizes the history of development and explains the chemical and physical fundamentals of this new and non-invasive method in an easily comprehensible manner. The other chapters summarize diagnostic results obtained with this method in organs and tissues, so that the reader will find a systematic overview of the available findings obtained in the various organ systems. It must be noted, however, that ongoing research work and new insight quite naturally will necessitate corrections to be done, as is the case here with some biochemical interpretations which would need adjustment to latest research results. NMR-spectroscopy is able to measure very fine energy differences on the molecular level, and thus offers insight into metabolic processes, with the advantage that there is no need of applying ionizing radiation in order to qualitatively or quantitatively analyse the metabolic processes in the various organ systems. (orig./DG) With 40 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Dynamics of solutions and fluid mixtures by NMR

    After a short introduction to NMR spectroscopy, with a special emphasis on dynamical aspects, an overview on two fundamental aspects of molecular dynamics, NMR relaxation and its relationship with molecular reorientation, and magnetization transfer phenomena induced by molecular rate processes (dynamic NMR) is presented, followed by specific mechanisms of relaxation encountered in paramagnetic systems or with quadrupolar nuclei. Application fields are then reviewed: solvent exchange on metal ions with a variable pressure NMR approach, applications of field gradients in NMR, aggregation phenomena and micro-heterogeneity in surfactant solutions, polymers and biopolymers in the liquid state, liquid-like molecules in rigid matrices and in soft matter (swollen polymers and gels, fluids in and on inorganic materials, food)

  17. The 15N-enrichment in dark clouds and Solar System objects

    Hily-Blant, Pierre; Faure, Alexandre; Quirico, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The line intensities of the fundamental rotational transitions of H13CN and HC15N were observed towards two prestellar cores, L183 and L1544, and lead to molecular isotopic ratios 140 6 14N/15N 6 250 and 140 6 14N/15N 6 360, respectively. The range of values reflect genuine spatial variations within the cores. A comprehensive analysis of the available measurements of the nitrogen isotopic ratio in prestellar cores show that molecules carrying the nitrile functional group appear to be systematically 15N-enriched com- pared to those carrying the amine functional group. A chemical origin for the differential 15N-enhance- ment between nitrile- and amine-bearing interstellar molecules is proposed. This sheds new light on several observations of Solar System objects: (i) the similar N isotopic fractionation in Jupiter's NH3 and solar wind N+; (ii) the 15N-enrichments in cometary HCN and CN (that might represent a direct inter- stellar inheritance); and (iii) 15N-enrichments observed in organics in primitive cosmoma...

  18. δ15N of seagrass leaves for monitoring anthropogenic nutrient increases in coral reef ecosystems

    In a coral reef environment, a slight increase in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN;≥1.0 μM) can alter the ecosystem via macroalgal blooms. We collected seagrass leaves from the tropical and subtropical Pacific Ocean in five countries and examined the interactions between nutrient concentrations (C, N, P), molar ratios of nutrients, and δ15N to find a possible indicator of the DIN conditions. Within most sites, the concentrations of nutrients and their molar ratios showed large variations owing to species-specific values. On the other hand, almost identical δ15N values were found in seagrass leaves of several species at each site. The correlations between δ15N and nutrient concentrations and between δ15N and molar ratios of nutrients suggested that nutrient availability did not affect the δ15N value of seagrass leaves by altering the physiological condition of the plants. Increases in δ15N of seagrass leaves mostly matched increases in DIN concentrations in the bottom water. We suggest that δ15N in seagrass leaves can be a good tool to monitor time-integrated decrease/increase of DIN concentrations at a site, both in the water column and the interstitial water

  19. 15N-labeled nitrogen from green manure and ammonium sulfate utilization by the sugarcane ratoon

    Legumes as green manure are alternative sources of nitrogen (N) for crops and can supplement or even replace mineral nitrogen fertilization due to their potential for biological nitrogen fixation (BNF). The utilization of nitrogen by sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) fertilized with sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.) and ammonium sulfate (AS) was evaluated using the 15N tracer technique. N was added at the rate of 196 and 70 kg ha-1 as 15N-labeled sunn hemp green manure (SH) and as ammonium sulfate (AS), respectively. Treatments were: (I) Control; (II) AS15N; (III) SH15N + AS; (IV) SH15N; and (V) AS15N + SH. Sugarcane was cultivated for five years and was harvested three times. 15N recovery was evaluated in the two first harvests. In the sum of the three harvests, the highest stalk yields were obtained with a combination of green manure and inorganic N fertilizer; however, in the second cutting the yields were higher where SH was used than in plots with AS. The recovery of N by the first two consecutive harvests accounted for 19 to 21% of the N applied as leguminous green manure and 46 to 49% of the N applied as AS. The amounts of inorganic N, derived from both N sources, present in the 0-0.4 m layer of soil in the first season after N application and were below 1 kg ha-1. (author)

  20. Determination of nitrogenase activity of induced cucumber nodules by 15N Trace method

    The author reports the determination results of nitrogenase activity of induced cucumber root nodules by 15N trace method. The root systems bearing induced nodules of cucumber were exposed to a gas mixture containing 15N2 for 48 h and partial root systems soaked in free-nitrogen culture solution simultaneously. After exposure the 15N content in the modulated root systems of cucumber is 0.431 Atom % 15N by mass spectrometric analysis, whereas in the contrast samples without exposure to 15N is 0.369 Atom % 15N. The statistical t test for the results of 15N trace experiments is: t = 3.15 > t0.01 = 2.819. It has been demonstrated that the nitrogenase activity in cucumber nodules is at a remarkable level of 99.9%. The nitrogenase activity in detached nodules of cucumber was also determined by conventional acetylene reduction method. In both methods clear evidences of nitrogenase activity were obtained for the induced nodules of cucumber

  1. Light-mediated 15N fractionation in Caribbean gorgonian octocorals: implications for pollution monitoring

    Baker, D. M.; Kim, K.; Andras, J. P.; Sparks, J. P.

    2011-09-01

    The stable nitrogen isotope ratio ( δ 15N) of coral tissue is a useful recorder of anthropogenic pollution in tropical marine ecosystems. However, little is known of the natural environmentally induced fractionations that affect our interpretation of coral δ 15N values. In symbiotic scleractinians, light affects metabolic fractionation of N during photosynthesis, which may confound the identification of N pollution between sites of varied depth or turbidity. Given the superiority of octocorals for δ 15N studies, our goal was to quantify the effect of light on gorgonian δ 15N in the context of monitoring N pollution sources. Using field collections, we show that δ 15N declined by 1.4‰ over 20 m depth in two species of gorgonians, the common sea fan, Gorgonia ventalina, and the slimy sea plume, Pseudopterogorgia americana. An 8-week laboratory experiment with P. americana showed that light, not temperature causes this variation, whereby the lowest fractionation of the N source was observed in the highest light treatment. Finally, we used a yearlong reciprocal depth transplant experiment to quantify the time frame over which δ 15N changes in G. ventalina as a function of light regime . Over the year, δ 15N was unchanged and increased slightly in the deep control colonies and shallow colonies transplanted to the deep site, respectively. Within 6 months, colonies transplanted from deep to shallow became enriched by 0.8‰, mirroring the enrichment observed in the shallow controls, which was likely due to the combined effect of an increase in the source δ 15N and reduced fractionation. We conclude that light affects gorgonian δ 15N fractionation and should be considered in sampling designs for N pollution monitoring. However, these fractionations are small relative to differences observed between natural and anthropogenic N sources.

  2. Utilization of 15N-Diammonium Phosphate by Ruminants to Produce Milk and Meat Proteins

    The authors investigated the alimentary role of diammonium phosphate (DAP) in ruminants. For this study DAP labelled with 15N was used; analysis of the 15N atomic per cent excess was made with an Italelettronica mass spectrophotometer (model SP 21 F) and the amino acid determination by a Beckman-Spinco amino acid analyser (model 120B) fitted with a preparative column. For the experiment 7 g of DAP at 15 and 20 at. % excess 15N were administered once to mature lactating and non-lactating sheep, respectively. The measurement of 15N in the protein and isolated amino acids of milk and meat showed: (1) The milk protein produced in the first 24 h contained the highest atomic per cent excess of 15SN, 0.093; (2) That the supplemental 15N was found in all the amino acids of milk proteins except tryptophane. The atomic per cent excess of 15N was observed to vary between the various amino acids. These results confirmed previous observations on bacterial protein synthesized from DAP. (3) Muscle protein 15N maximized on the third day after administration of the 15N-DAP, with an atomic per cent excess of 0.040; (4) The atomic per cent excess of 15N in the individual amino acids of muscle protein is significant in only two amino' acids, serine and cystine; and (5) That after 8 d of adaptation there are no traces of DAP in milk or meat proteins, urine or faeces. The authors conclude that the ruminant, after a period of adaptation and through the mediation of ruminant microorganisms, is able to use the nitrogen of diammonium phosphate for the synthesis of milk and meat proteins. (author)

  3. Absorption and metabolization of orally administered D-[α-15N]lysine and L-[α-15N]lysine with regard to the metabolism of intestinal bacteria

    Absorption of D-[α-15N]lysine and L-[α-15N]lysine following oral single pulse-labelling at a dosage of 5 mg 15N'/kg body weight was compared in four subjects aged 4 to 14 months. The wastages of 15N' in the feces ranged from 0.3 to 5% of the input implying comparably high absorption rates of both the lysine enantiomers. Only about 7.6% of the 15N from the α-amino groups were found in the urine after loading with L-[α-15N]lysine. In contrast, about 80.2% of the 15N' dose from D-[α-15N]lysine were eliminated renally. However, 18.5% of the 15N' dose on an average were retained after D-[α-15N]lysine administration. This is certainly due to a partial desamination of D-lysine. The fecal bacteria isolated from the feces contained no or only small amounts of 15N' after D-[α-15N]lysine loading. Following L-[α-15N]lysine administration a measurable 15N enrichment of the fecal bacteria of up to 0.09 at.% excess was achieved in almost all cases. (author)

  4. Radiative p 15N Capture in the Region of Astrophysical Energies

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Burtebaev, N.; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, A. V.; Alimov, D. K.

    2016-06-01

    Within the framework of the modified potential cluster model with classification of orbital states according to the Young schemes, the possibility of describing experimental data for the astrophysical S-factor of p 15N radiative capture at energies from 50 to 1500 keV is considered. It is shown that on the basis of M1 and E1 transitions from various p 15N scattering states to the ground state of the 16O nucleus in the p 15N channel it is entirely possible to successfully explain the overall behavior of the S-factor in the considered energy region in the presence of two resonances.

  5. Nitrogen distribution a 15 N fertilizer in different soil fractions of a barley cultivation

    A culture of barley in the open fields has been fertilized on 9 m2 with Ca(NO3)2 containing 20,8% 15N excess. At the crop, 15 N distribution shows that half of the fertilized nitrogen which is exported by the crop has become organic in the Ap horizon. The use of different methods of fractionation of the soil, shows the biological character of this reorganization, in which the biomass appears to be the main 15 N nitrogen stock

  6. Inhibition of alanine racemase by alanine phosphonate: detection of an imine linkage to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate in the enzyme-inhibitor complex by solid-state 15N nuclear magnetic resonance

    Inhibition of alanine racemase from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus by (1-aminoethyl)phosphonic acid (Ala-P) proceeds via a two-step reaction pathway in which reactivation occurs very slowly. In order to determine the mechanism of inhibition, the authors have recorded low-temperature, solid-state 15N NMR spectra from microcrystals of the [15N]Ala-P-enzyme complex, together with spectra of a series of model compounds that provide the requisite database for the interpretation of the 15N chemical shifts. Proton-decoupled spectra of the microcrystals exhibit a line at ∼ 150 ppm, which conclusively demonstrates the presence of a protonated Ala-P-PLP aldimine and thus clarifies the structure of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. They also report the pH dependence of Ala-P binding to alanine racemase

  7. NMR spectroscopic and bioinformatic analyses of the LTBP1 C-terminus reveal a highly dynamic domain organisation.

    Ian B Robertson

    Full Text Available Proteins from the LTBP/fibrillin family perform key structural and functional roles in connective tissues. LTBP1 forms the large latent complex with TGFβ and its propeptide LAP, and sequesters the latent growth factor to the extracellular matrix. Bioinformatics studies suggest the main structural features of the LTBP1 C-terminus are conserved through evolution. NMR studies were carried out on three overlapping C-terminal fragments of LTBP1, comprising four domains with characterised homologues, cbEGF14, TB3, EGF3 and cbEGF15, and three regions with no homology to known structures. The NMR data reveal that the four domains adopt canonical folds, but largely lack the interdomain interactions observed with homologous fibrillin domains; the exception is the EGF3-cbEGF15 domain pair which has a well-defined interdomain interface. (15N relaxation studies further demonstrate that the three interdomain regions act as flexible linkers, allowing a wide range of motion between the well-structured domains. This work is consistent with the LTBP1 C-terminus adopting a flexible "knotted rope" structure, which may facilitate cell matrix interactions, and the accessibility to proteases or other factors that could contribute to TGFβ activation.

  8. Proton-detected scalar coupling based assignment strategies in MAS solid-state NMR spectroscopy applied to perdeuterated proteins

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2008-07-01

    Assignment of proteins in MAS (magic angle spinning) solid-state NMR relies so far on correlations among heteronuclei. This strategy is based on well dispersed resonances in the 15N dimension. In many complex cases like membrane proteins or amyloid fibrils, an additional frequency dimension is desirable in order to spread the amide resonances. We show here that proton detected HNCO, HNCA, and HNCACB type experiments can successfully be implemented in the solid-state. Coherences are sufficiently long lived to allow pulse schemes of a duration greater than 70 ms before incrementation of the first indirect dimension. The achieved resolution is comparable to the resolution obtained in solution-state NMR experiments. We demonstrate the experiments using a triply labeled sample of the SH3 domain of chicken α-spectrin, which was re-crystallized in H 2O/D 2O using a ratio of 1/9. We employ paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) using EDTA chelated Cu II to enable rapid data acquisition.

  9. Nuclear spin relaxation in systems of magnetic spheres

    A new approach to the NMR relaxation theory for a system of magnetic spheres (sufficiently big spherical molecules) is presented. In this paper the NMR spin-lattice relaxation time T1 and spin-spin relaxation time T2 are calculated for nuclear spins I→j, taking into account intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions between the spins I→j, and spins S→k in the magnetic spheres. By an expansion of the dipole-dipole interaction in a series of spherical harmonics, it is possible to separate spatial variables of the interacting spins in a laboratory frame. A simultaneous effect of isotropic rotational and translation diffusion of the spins and relaxation rate of spins S→k is also taken into account

  10. Rapid solid-state NMR of deuterated proteins by interleaved cross-polarization from 1H and 2H nuclei

    Bjerring, Morten; Paaske, Berit; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Akbey, Ümit; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel sampling strategy, interleaving acquisition of multiple NMR spectra by exploiting initial polarization subsequently from 1H and 2H spins, taking advantage of their different T1 relaxation times. Different 1H- and 2H-polarization based spectra are in this way simultaneously recorded improving either information content or sensitivity by adding spectra. The so-called Relaxation-optimized Acquisition of Proton Interleaved with Deuterium (RAPID) 1H → 13C/ 2H → 13C CP/MAS multiple-acquisition method is demonstrated by 1D and 2D experiments using a uniformly 2H, 15N, 13C-labeled α-spectrin SH3 domain sample with all or 30% back-exchanged labile 2H to 1H. It is demonstrated how 1D 13C CP/MAS or 2D 13C- 13C correlation spectra initialized with polarization from either 1H or 2H may be recorded simultaneously with flexibility to be added or used individually for spectral editing. It is also shown how 2D 13C- 13C correlation spectra may be recorded interleaved with 2H- 13C correlation spectra to obtain 13C- 13C correlations along with information about dynamics from 2H sideband patterns.

  11. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  12. Breathing and Relaxation

    ... related breathing difficulties. Learn some ways to control breathing and some techniques to help you reach a greater level of relaxation during your day: Diaphragmatic Breathing Minimizing Shortness of Breath Instant Relaxation Drill Meditation ...

  13. Measurement of marine productivity using 15N and 13C tracers: Some methodological aspects

    Naveen Gandhi; Sanjeev Kumar; S Prakash; R Ramesh; M S Sheshshayee

    2011-02-01

    Various experiments involving the measurement of new, regenerated and total productivity using 15N and 13C tracers were carried out in the Bay of Bengal (BOB) and in the Arabian Sea. Results from 15N tracer experiments indicate that nitrate uptake can be underestimated by experiments with incubation time > 4 hours. Indirect evidence suggests pico- and nano-phytoplankton, on their dominance over microphytoplankton, can also influence the f-ratios. Difference in energy requirement for assimilation of different nitrogen compounds decides the preferred nitrogen source during the early hours of incubation. Variation in light intensity during incubation also plays a significant role in the assimilation of nitrogen. Results from time course experiments with both 15N and 13C tracers suggest that photoinhibition appears significant in BOB and the Arabian Sea during noon. A significant correlation has been found in the productivity values obtained using 15N and 13C tracers.

  14. Evaluation of the protein metabolism during hepatic coma evidenced by 15N tracer data

    In patients in coma hepaticum as well as in pigs with experimental hepatic coma the protein metabolism was studied under conditions of parenteral application of an amino acid diet using 15N-glycine as tracer

  15. 14N and 15N imaging by SIMS microscopy in soybean leaves

    The distribution of 15N and 14N compounds in cryofixed and resin embedded sections of soybean (Glycine max L) leaves was studied by SIMS microscopy. The results indicate that, with a mass resolution M/ΔM higher than 6000, images of the nitrogen distribution can be obtained from the mapping of the two secondary cluster ions 12C14N− and 12C15N−, in samples of both control and 15N-labeled leaves. The ionic images were clearly related to the histological structure of the organ, and allow the detection of 14N and 15N at the subcellular level. Furthermore, relative measurements of the 12C14N− and 12C15N− beams made possible the quantification of the 15N atom% in the various tissues of the leaf. (author)

  16. Metabolic studies in colostomized laying hens using 15N-labelled wheat. 3

    In colostomized laying hens fed with 15N-labelled wheat protein the atomic percentage 15N excess (15N') was determined in the total, lysine, histidine, and arginine N, respectively, of isolated ovarian follicles of the residual ovary and of the oviduct. The labelling of the basic amino acids became smaller with decreasing size of the follicles. The proportions between the 3 amino acids were inconsistent and typical for the individual hens, whereas in the yolk a constant ratio of the amino acids was found. The 15N' in the 3 amino acids of the residual ovary and of the oviduct revealed greater differences between the individual hens. In the lysine, histidine and arginine 21.2% of the labelled N of the follicles was demonstrated

  17. Synthesis of nitric oxide releasing, vasodilating and platelet aggregation inhibiting S-[15N]nitroso compounds

    [15N]Nitric oxide (15NO) was produced in a ''gastight'' flask from [15N]nitrite by reaction with iodide in acetic acid acidified water and purged for 60 min by a continuous nitrogen gas stream applied through an uncoated polytetrafluoroethylene flate membrane into a second flask which contained a methanolic solution of N-acetyl-L-cysteine or N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine. Analysis of these solutions by UV spectroscopy, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and capillary isotachophoresis showed formation of the corresponding S-nitroso compounds. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis for [15N]nitrite which was formed by dissolving these compounds in aqueous buffered solutions gave an isotopic purity higher than 95% at 15N. The S-nitroso compounds were shown to inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation. (author)

  18. Study of correlations in molecular motion by multiple quantum NMR

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a very useful tool for characterizing molecular configurations through the measurement of transition frequencies and dipolar couplings. The measurement of spectral lineshapes, spin-lattice relaxation times, and transverse relaxation times also provide us with valuable information about correlations in molecular motion. The new technique of multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance has numerous advantages over the conventional single quantum NMR techniques in obtaining information about static and dynamic interactions of coupled spin systems. In the first two chapters, the theoretical background of spin Hamiltonians and the density matrix formalism of multiple quantum NMR is discussed. The creation and detection of multiple quantum coherence by multiple pulse sequence are discussed. Prototype multiple quantum spectra of oriented benzene are presented. Redfield relaxation theory and the application of multiple quantum NMR to the study of correlations in fluctuations are presented. A specific example of an oriented methyl group relaxed by paramagnetic impurities is studied in detail. The study of possible correlated motion between two coupled methyl groups by multiple quantum NMR is presented. For a six spin system it is shown that the four-quantum spectrum is sensitive to two-body correlations, and serves a ready test of correlated motion. The study of the spin-lattice dynamics of orienting or tunneling methyl groups (CH3 and CD3) at low temperatures is presented. The anisotropic spin-lattice relaxation of deuterated hexamethylbenzene, caused by the sixfold reorientation of the molecules, is investigated, and the NMR spectrometers and other experimental details are discussed

  19. Methodical investigation of the endogenous N excretion in feces by 15N-labelled rats

    Wistar rats (approximately 100g live weight, n = 8) received a wheat diet and were labelled over a period of 7 days with 15N-ammonium acetate. From day 1 - 5 of the experiment after the end of the labelling feces and urine were collected and analysed. After the animals were killed (day 5 of the experiment) the atom-% 15N excess (15N') in the contents of the digestive tract as well as in the tissues of stomach wall, intestinal wall, liver, pancreas and blood plasma was determined. The TCA-soluble fraction of the blood plasma showed 0.44 atom-% 15N' on day 5 after the end of 15N labelling. 3 hours before the killing fecal N also showed 0.44 and during the last collection period (24 hours before) an average of 0.51 atom-% 15N'. Urine decreased in the same period from 0.71 to 0.59 atom-% 15N'. The endogenous fecal N is calculated to 88%. As the tissues of the digestive tract are likely to supply the biggest part of the endogenous fecal protein, the values of atom-% 15N' from the TCA-precipitable fraction of the intestinal wall and of the pancreas gland was calculed to an average of 0.526. According to this the calculation endogenous fecal N is 84%. It is probable that the quota of endogenous fecal N in the total amount of fecal N varies in dependence on the fermentable crude fiber in the diet as well as on the age of the test animals and thus the bacterial protein synthesis in the colon. As the N used by the bacteria is likely to come from the TCA-soluble fraction of the blood, the calculation formula suggested, which uses the TCA-soluble fraction of the blood plasma, achieves good approximate values also for higher bacterial protein synthesis in the colon. (author)

  20. 15N abundance in Antarctica: origin of soil nitrogen and ecological implications

    The results of an investigation of the nitrogen cycle in Antartica are reported which show that nitrate in Antarctic soils is extremely depleted in 15N compared with biogenic nitrogen and that algae collected from a nitrate-rich saline pond and from a penguin rookery exhibit, respectively, the lowest and the highest 15N/14N ratios among terrestrial biogenic nitrogen so far observed. The possible causes of these extreme nitrogen isotopic compositions are discussed. (U.K.)

  1. Denitrification by intact soybean nodules in relation to natural 15N enrichment of nodules

    The natural 15N abundance of nodules of soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) which are actively fixing N2 is considerably higher than other tissues. To investigate the question of whether isotopic fractionation associated with denitrification by bacteroids causes this 15N enrichment, we inoculated soybeans with two strains of Rhizobium japonicum. Free-living cultures of one of these (strain USDA 33) were unable to denitrify or respire NO3-, while free-living cultures of the second (strain USDA 138) were capable of denitrification. USDA 138 formed nodules which fixed N2 very efficiently. The N of these nodules was enriched in 15N and the nodules reduced a substantial amount of NO3- to NO2- and N2O. Nodules infected with USDA 33 fixed about half as much N2 as those infected with USDA 138. The former nodules were enriched in 15N (although less so than nodules infected with USDA 138), despite the fact that the nodules formed by USDA 33 did not reduce NO3-. Clearly denitrification could not have been the cause of 15N enrichment of nodules infected with strain USDA 33. Alternative causes of 15N enrichment of soybean nodules and their possible metabolic significance are discussed

  2. Use of 15N to measure nitrogen uptake in eutrophic oceans; experimental considerations

    The use of 15N to measure the flux of nitrogen compounds has become increasingly popular as the techniques and instrumentation for stable isotope analysis have become more widely available. Questions concerning equations for calculating uptake, effect of isotope dilution (in the case of ammonium), duration of incubation, and relationship between disappearance of a nitrogen compound and the 15N uptake measurement have arisen, especially for the research conducted in oligotrophic regions. Fewer problems seem to have occurred ineutrophic areas. However, sufficient literature now exists to allow some generally accepted experimental procedures for 15N studies in eutrophic regions to be laid down. Incubation periods of 2-6 h appear to avoid problems related to isotope dilution and to overcome the bias introduced in some cases by initial high rate or surge uptake. During such incubation periods, assimilation is measured rather than uptake or transport into the cell. Incorporation of 15N into the particulate fraction is usually linear with time over the periods currently used. The 15N method provides a better estimate of incorporation into phytoplankton than 14N disappearance, but a small fraction appears to be lost. Although most workers suggest the loss to be a result of dissolved organic nitrogen production, direct evidence is lacking. If the considerations discussed here are applied with the 15N techniques currently available, reliable estimates of phytoplankton nitrogen flux in eutrophic areas can be obtained

  3. Synthesis of methotrexate-1-15N and methotrexate-4-15NH2

    This paper describes an application of the pterin synthesis of methotrexate specifically labelled at the N1-ring nitrogen and at the 4-amino group with 99 atom percent 15N. Oximination of ethyl cyanoacetate-15N followed by reduction afforded ethyl 2-aminocyanoacetate-C15N. Condensation with 3-bromopyruvaldoxime and 4-methylamino-benzoic acid afforded 2-amino-3-carbethoxy-5-N-methyl-p-carboxy-anilinomethylpyrazine-1-oxide-2-15NH2. Treatment with ammonium hydroxide at room temperature gave the 3-carboxamide. Reduction of the N-oxide (Pl3), esterification, and dehydration of the amide (POCl3) afforded the 2-amino-3-cyano-pyrazine benzoate ester. Ring closure with guanidine followed by benzoate ester hydrolysis, glutamate coupling and hydrolysis of the glutamate diester yielded methotrexate-1-15N. Animation of the unlabeled 2-amino-3-carbethoxy pyrazine intermediate with 15N-labelled ammonium hydroxide gave the 15N-carboxamide which was carried through the process described above to afford methotrexate-4-15NH2. (author)

  4. 15N-{1H} NOE experiment at high magnetic field strengths

    The heteronuclear 15N-{1H} NOE values are typically determined by taking the ratio of 15N signal intensities recorded in the presence and absence of 1H saturation prior to evolution of 15N magnetization. Since the intensity ratio of two independent experiments is taken, complete recovery of 15N magnetization during the scan repetition delay is critical to obtain reliable NOE values. Because it may not be practical to wait for the complete recovery of magnetization at high magnetic fields, Solomon equations may be used to correct measured NOE values. Here, based on experiments and simulations, we show that since the cross-correlation between 1H-15N dipole and 15N chemical shift anisotropy becomes significant at high fields for small or deuterated proteins, measured NOE values can not be accurately corrected based on the Solomon equations. We also discuss ranges of rotational correlation times and proton spin-flip rate, in which the NOE values can be corrected by the equations

  5. Metabolism of [15N]alanine in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus

    Chalot, M., Finlay, R. D., Ek, H., and Söderström, B. 1995. Metabolism of [15N]alanine in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus. Experimental Mycology 19, 297-304. Alanine metabolism in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus was investigated using [15N]alanine. Short-term exposure of mycelial discs to [15N]alanine showed that the greatest flow of 15N was to glutamate and to aspartate. Levels of enrichment were as high as 15-20% for glutamate and 13-18% for aspartate, whereas that of alanine reached 30%. Label was also detected in the amino-N of glutamine and in serine and glycine, although at lower levels. Preincubation of mycelia with aminooxyacetate, an inhibitor of transamination reactions. resulted in complete inhibition of the flow of the label to glutamate, aspartate, and amino-N of glutamine, whereas [15N]alanine rapidly accumulated. This evidence indicates the direct involvement of alanine aminotransferase for translocation of 15N from alanine to glutamate. Alanine may be a convenient reservoir of both nitrogen and carbon. (author)

  6. Quantifying below-ground nitrogen of legumes: Optimizing procedures for 15N shoot-labelling

    Quantifying below-ground nitrogen (N) of legumes is fundamental to understanding their effects on soil mineral N fertility and on the N economies of following or companion crops in legume-based rotations. Methodologies based on 15N-labelling of whole plants with subsequent measurement of 15N in recovered plant parts and in the root-zone soil have proved promising. We report four glasshouse experiments with objectives to develop appropriate protocols for in situ 15N labelling of four pulses, faba bean (Vicia faba), chickpea (Cicer arietinum), mung bean (Vigna radiata) and pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan). Treatments included 15N-urea concentration, feeding technique, leaflet/petiole position, and frequency of feeding. Nitrogen-15-labelling via the leaf-flap was best for faba bean, mung and pigeon pea, whilst petiole feeding was best for chickpea, in all cases using 0.2-mL volumes of 0.5% urea (98 atom% 15N excess). The implications of uneven enrichment of the nodulated roots because of effects of the 15N-depleted nodules when calculating root-derived N in soil are discussed. (author)

  7. Preparation of isotopically labeled ribonucleotides for multidimensional NMR spectroscopy of RNA.

    Batey, R T; Inada, M; Kujawinski, E; Puglisi, J D; Williamson, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    A general method for large scale preparation of uniformly isotopically labeled ribonucleotides and RNAs is described. Bacteria are grown on isotopic growth medium, and their nucleic acids are harvested and degraded to mononucleotides. These are enzymatically converted into ribonucleoside triphosphates, which are used in transcription reactions in vitro to prepare RNAs for NMR studies. For 15N-labeling, E.coli is grown on 15N-ammonium sulfate, whereas for 13C-labeling, Methylophilus methylotro...

  8. Quantitative evaluation of porous media wettability using NMR relaxometry.

    Fleury, M; Deflandre, F

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new method to determine wettability indices from NMR relaxometry. The new method uses the sensitivity of low field NMR relaxometry to the fluid distribution in oil-water saturated porous media. The model is based on the existence of a surface relaxivity for both oil and water, allowing the determination of the amount of surface wetted either by oil or by water. The proposed NMR wettability index requires the measurement of relaxation time distribution at four different saturation states. At the irreducible water saturation, we determine the dominant relaxation time of oil in the presence of a small amount of water, and at the oil residual saturation, we determine the dominant relaxation time of water in the presence of a small amount of oil. At 100% water and 100% oil saturation, we determine the surface relaxivity ratio. The interaction of oil with the surface is also evidenced by the comparison of the spin-lattice (T1) and spin-locking (T1rho) relaxation times. The new NMR index agrees with standard wettability measurements based on drainage-imbibition capillary pressure curves (USBM test) in the range [-0.3-1]. PMID:12850740

  9. Nitrogen dynamics in a Western Boundary Upwelling System (Cabo Frio, Brazil) based on δ15N-nitrate and δ15N of sinking particle signals

    Fontana, L.; Belem, A. L.; Venancio, I.; Duarte, C.; Chiara, S. D.; Albuquerque, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    To improve the efficiency of upwelling to control nitrogen dynamic in the ocean, better understanding of the occurring processes is necessary. This research explores δ15N of nitrate and sinking particles on a western boundary upwelling System (Cabo Frio, Brazil). The Continental Shelf of southeastern Brazil is dominated by the oligotrophic Brazil Current, whose instabilities promote the coastal upwelling of South Atlantic Central Water (SACW), and consequently increases of primary productivity. The coastal upwelling system plays an important role in the nitrogen dynamics on the Cabo Frio Upwelling System (CFUS). However, the interactions between biological induced processes, including biological N-fixation and nitrate inputs from upwelled waters in CFUS still have not been well explored. Then, this study aims clarify N-dynamics on CFUS based on a cross-shelf approach. δ15N-nitrate was characterized for each water masses present on the shelf (South Atlantic Central Water, Tropical Water and Coastal Water) and associated with physicochemical parameters (T/S, nutrients), as well as the δ15N of sinking particles at different depths (from surface to the bottom water). Samples were collected in a time interval of 1 month during ~4 years (2011 to 2014). Cross-shelf gradients of nitrogen species concentration (ammonium + nitrite + nitrate) and stable isotopes were observed. The δ15N of nitrate and sinking particles were interpreted according to the prevailing processes of the N-transformations. Considering the region as N-limited (N:P global average of deep ocean (5-6‰) characterizing the inner and mid-shelf conditions, where the input of new nitrate from upwelling is rapidly used by organisms in the euphotic zone without any fractionation. On the other hands, the dominance of N-limited Tropical Waters on the outer shelf provide a δ15N-nitrate and δ15N-sinking particles signals (-2.0 to 3.0‰) lower than the global average of deep ocean range indicating the

  10. Hyperpolarized 13C Urea Relaxation Mechanism Reveals Renal Changes in Diabetic Nephropathy

    Laustsen, Christoffer; Stokholm Nørlinger, Thomas; Christoffer Hansen, David; Qi, Haiyun; Nielsen, Per Mose; Bonde Bertelsen, Lotte; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Stødkilde Jørgensen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to assess a novel 13C radial fast spin echo golden ratio single shot method for interrogating early renal changes in the diabetic kidney, using hyperpolarized (HP) [13C,15N2]urea as a T2 relaxation based contrast bio-probe. Methods: A novel HP 13C MR contrast experiment was...... saturation level and the relaxation times were observed in the healthy controls. Conclusion: HP [13C,15N2]urea apparent T2 mapping may be a useful for interrogating local renal pO2 status and renal tissue alterations....

  11. 15N fractionation in star-forming regions and Solar System objects

    Wirström, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, Gilles; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.

    2015-08-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristine molecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N/15N ~ 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N/15N natal molecular cloud core and the outer protosolar nebula. Indeed, early chemical models of gas-phase ion-molecule nitrogen fractionation showed that HCN and HNC (nitriles) can hold significant 15N enrichments in cold dark clouds where CO is depleted onto dust grains. In addition, 15N fractionation in nitriles and amines (NH2, NH3) follow different chemical pathways. More recently we have shown that once the spin-state dependence in rates of reactions with H2 is included in the models, amines can either be enhanced or depleted in 15N, depending on the core’s evolutionary stage. Observed 15N fractionation in amines and nitriles therefore cannot be expected to be the same, instead their ratio is a potential chemical clock.Observations of molecular isotope ratios in dark cores are challenging. Limited published results in general show higher 15N/14N ratios in HCN and HNC than ammonia, but more measurements are necessary to confirm these trends. We will present recent results from our ongoing observing campaign of 14N/15N isotopic ratios in HCN, HNC and NH3 in dense cores and protostars which seem consistent with significant fractionation in nitriles as compared to other molecules in each object. The few 14N/15N ratios observed in N2H+ are similar to those in NH3, contrary to our model results which predict a significant 15N enhancement in N2 and N2H+. Model upgrades which may address this discrepancy will be

  12. Acetylene inhibition of N2O reduction in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays: evaluation by 15N tracer and 15N site preference of N2O

    Weymann, Daniel; Well, Reinhard; Lewicka-Szczebak, Dominika; Lena, Rohe

    2013-04-01

    The measurement of denitrification in soils and aquifers is still challenging and often enough associated with considerable experimental effort and high costs. Against this background, the acetylene inhibition technique (AIT) applied in laboratory soil and groundwater denitrification assays is by far the most effective approach. However, this method has been largely criticized, as it is susceptible to underestimate denitrification rates and adds an additional carbon source to the substrates to be investigated. Here we provide evidence that the AIT is not necessarily an inappropriate approach to measure denitrification, that its reliability depends on the drivers governing the process, and that the 15N site preference of N2O (SP) may serve as a tool to assess this reliability. Two laboratory batch experiments were conducted, where sandy aquifer material and a peat soil were incubated as slurries. We established (i) a standard anaerobic treatment by adding KNO3 (10 mg N L-1), (ii) an oxygen treatment by adding KNO3 and O2 (5 mg L-1), and (iii) a glucose treatment by adding KNO3 supplemented with glucose (200 mg C L-1). Both experiments were run under 10 % (v/v) acetylene atmosphere and as 15N tracer treatments using labeled K15NO3 (60 atom % 15N). In the case of the standard anaerobic treatments, we found a very good agreement of denitrification potential obtained by the AIT and 15N tracer methods. SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between -4.8 and 2.6 ‰ which is indicative for N2O production during bacterial denitrification but not for N2O reduction to N2. In contrast, we observed substantial underestimation of denitrification by AIT for the glucose treatments compared to the 15N method, i.e. denitrification was underestimated by 36 % (sandy aquifer material) and 47 % (peat soil). SP of N2O of the AIT samples from this treatment ranged between 4.5 and 9.6 ‰, which suggests occurrence of bacterial N2O reduction. In the case of the oxygen

  13. Stickstoffausnutzungseffizienz von 15N-markierter Schafsgülle und 15N-markiertem Mineraldünger in biologisch und konventionell bewirtschafteten Anbausystemen

    Bosshard, Christine; Sorensen, Peter; Frossard, Emmanuel; Mayer, Jochen; Mäder, Paul; Nanzer, Simone; Oberson, Astrid

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) utilisation by crops has to be improved to minimize losses to the environment. We investigated N use efficiency of animal manure and mineral fertiliser and fate of fertiliser N not taken up by crops in a bio-organic (BIOORG) and a conventional (CONMIN) cropping system of a long-term experiment over three vegetation periods (wheat-soybean-maize). Microplots received a single application of 15N-labelled slurries or mineral fertiliser. At the end of each vegetation pe...

  14. 13C-NMR assignment, structure, and dynamics of deoxyoligonucleotides

    The unique spectral properties of 13C-NMR for studying nucleic acids and some of the important features of 13C-NMR in oligonucleotide studies are demostrated. The main difficulty in studying oligonucleotides by 13C-NMR and recent improvements in NMR instrumentation and advances in oligonucleotide synthesis are presented. The high resolution 13C-NMR spectra, T1 relaxation times and NOEs were measured for duplex of the self-complementary oligo-DNAs: d(CG)3 and d(GGTATACC) are studied. The target of this study is to developed a systematic 13C-NMR spectral assignment and to investigate the structure and dynamics of these two sequences by this techniques. (M.J.C.)

  15. Absorption of ammonium sulphate {sup 15}N by coffee plants; Recuperacao do {sup 15}N do sulfato de amonio por plantas de cafe

    Fenilli, Tatiele Anete Bergamo; Reichardt, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny Oliveira Santos [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Fisica do Solo]. E-mail: tatiele@cena.usp.br; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Isotopos Estaveis; Dourado Neto, Durval [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Producao Vegetal

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the absorption of ammonium sulphate {sup 15}N by coffee plants. Treatments consisted of five sub-plots of 9 plants, of which the three central ones received 280 kg ha{sup -1} of {sup 15}N, applied at four times: 1/4 on 01 Set 03; 1/4 on 03 Nov 03; 1/4 on 15 Dec 03 and 1/4 on 30 Jan 04. The isotopic enrichment was 2,072 {+-} 0,001 atom % {sup 15}N. The dry matter of the shoot was evaluated every 60 days, using one plant per replicate, collected outside the sub-plot. They were as similar as possible to the labeled plants, which were used only for isotopic and Total N analysis, after being dried at 65 deg C until constant weight. At harvest, plants had absorbed 42,88% of the fertilizer N. Leaves accumulated the largest amount of fertilizer N, and were also the compartments that received most N from other parts of the plant. The following partition of the fertilizer N was found at harvest: 23.01% in young leaves, 6.23% in old leaves, 4,46% in stem, 3.46% in fruits, 3.10% in young branches and 2.63% in old branches. (author)

  16. Barley Benefits from Organic Nitrogen in Plant Residues Applied to Soil using 15N Isotope Dilution

    The experiment was carried out in pots (sandy soil cultivated with Barley plant) under greenhouse conditions, at Inshas, Egypt. The aim was to evaluate the transformation of nitrogen applied either as mineral form (15NH4)2SO4, or as organic-material-N (plant residues) .Basal recommended doses of P and K were applied. Labeled 15N as(15NH4)2SO4 (5 % a.e) or plant residues (ground leuceana forage, compost, and mixture of them) were applied at a rate of 20 kg N/ ha). 15N technique was used to evaluate N-uptake and fertilizer use efficiency. The treatments were arranged in a completely randomized block design under greenhouse conditions. The obtained results showed that the dry weight of barley shoots was positively affected by reinforcement of mineral- N with organic-N. On the other hand, the highest dry weight was estimated with leuceana either applied alone or reinforced with mineral N. Similar trend was noticed with N uptake but only with organic N, while with treatment received 50% organic-N. plus 50% mineral- N. the best value of N uptake was recorded with mixture of leuceana and compost. The amount of Ndff was lowest where fertilizer 15N was applied alone. Comparing Ndff for the three organic treatments which received a combination of fertilizer-15N+organic-material-N, results showed that the highest Ndff was occurred with mixture of leuceana and compost, whereas the lowest was induced with individual leuceana treatment. 15N recovery in shoots of barley ranged between 22.14 % to 82.16 %. The lowest occurred with application of mineral 15N alone and; the highest occurred where mineral 15N was mixed with compost or leucaena-compost mixture

  17. Determination of Multimodal Isotopic Distributions: The Case of a (15)N Labeled Protein Produced into Hairy Roots.

    Trouillard, Romain; Hubert-Roux, Marie; Tognetti, Vincent; Guilhaudis, Laure; Plasson, Carole; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Coquet, Laurent; Guerineau, François; Hardouin, Julie; Ele Ekouna, Jean-Pierre; Cosette, Pascal; Lerouge, Patrice; Boitel-Conti, Michèle; Afonso, Carlos; Ségalas-Milazzo, Isabelle

    2015-06-16

    Isotopic labeling is widely used in various fields like proteomics, metabolomics, fluxomics, as well as in NMR structural studies, but it requires an efficient determination of the isotopic enrichment. Mass spectrometry is the method of choice for such analysis. However, when complex expression systems like hairy roots are used for production, multiple populations of labeled proteins may be obtained. If the isotopic incorporation determination is actually well-known for unimodal distributions, the multimodal distributions have scarcely been investigated. Actually, only a few approaches allow the determination of the different labeled population proportions from multimodal distributions. Furthermore, they cannot be used when the number of the populations and their respective isotope ratios are unknown. The present study implements a new strategy to measure the (15)N labeled populations inside a multimodal distribution knowing only the peptide sequence and peak intensities from mass spectrometry analyses. Noteworthy, it could be applied to other elements, like carbon and hydrogen, and extended to a larger range of biomolecules. PMID:25973921

  18. Continuous field measurement of N2O isotopologues using FTIR spectroscopy following 15N addition

    Phillips, R. L.; Griffith, D. W.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Lugg, G.; Lawrie, R.; Macdonald, B.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic additions of fertilizer nitrogen (N) have significantly increased the mole fraction of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the troposphere. Tracking the fate of fertilizer N and its transformation to N2O is important to advance knowledge of greenhouse gas emissions from soils. Transport and transformations are frequently studied using 15N labeling experiments, but instruments capable of continuous measurements of 15N-N2O at the surface of soil have only recently come to the fore. Our primary aim was to quantify emissions of N2O and the fraction of 15N emitted as N2O from an agricultural soil following 15N addition using a mobile Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. We set up a short-term field experiment on a coastal floodplain site near Nowra, New South Wales. We deployed an automated chamber system connected to a multi-pass cell (optical pathlength 24 m) and low resolution FTIR spectrometer to measure fluxes of all N2O isotopologues collected from five 0.25 m2 chambers every three hours. We measured N2O fluxes pre and post-application of 15N-labeled substrate as potassium nitrate (KNO3) or urea [CO(NH2)2] to the soil surface. Root mean square uncertainties for all isotopologue measurements were less than 0.3 nmol mol-1 for 1 minute average concentration measurements, and minimum detectable fluxes for each isotopologue were isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Approximately 1% (range 0.7 - 1.9%) of the total amount of 15N applied was emitted as N2O. Average fractions of 15N recovered in soil, root, shoot, and microbial biomass pools varied between trials but were approximately 0.4, 0.08, 0.1 and 0.03, respectively. The results indicate that the portable FTIR spectroscopic technique can effectively trace transfer of 15N to the atmosphere as N2O after 15N addition, allowing for powerful quantification of N2O emissions under field conditions.

  19. Transport and relaxation processes in supercritical fluids. Technical progress report, April 1, 1983-June 30, 1983

    Jonas, J.

    1983-01-01

    A new project on the measurement of self-diffusion coefficients in supercritical toluene was successfully started. The preliminary work on measurement of self-diffusion in supercritical toluene has involved two stages. First, equipment previously developed for proton NMR studies of relaxation in supercritical compressed steam was rejuvenated, reassembled, and tested. Secondly, design changes were made to allow NMR observation of deuterium nuclei.

  20. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2013-12-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner.

  1. Rivermouth alteration of agricultural impacts on consumer tissue δ(15N.

    James H Larson

    Full Text Available Terrestrial agricultural activities strongly influence riverine nitrogen (N dynamics, which is reflected in the δ(15N of riverine consumer tissues. However, processes within aquatic ecosystems also influence consumer tissue δ(15N. As aquatic processes become more important terrestrial inputs may become a weaker predictor of consumer tissue δ(15N. In a previous study, this terrestrial-consumer tissue δ(15N connection was very strong at river sites, but was disrupted by processes occurring in rivermouths (the 'rivermouth effect'. This suggested that watershed indicators of N loading might be accurate in riverine settings, but could be inaccurate when considering N loading to the nearshore of large lakes and oceans. In this study, the rivermouth effect was examined on twenty-five sites spread across the Laurentian Great Lakes. Relationships between agriculture and consumer tissue δ(15N occurred in both upstream rivers and at the outlets where rivermouths connect to the nearshore zone, but agriculture explained less variation and had a weaker effect at the outlet. These results suggest that rivermouths may sometimes be significant sources or sinks of N, which would cause N loading estimates to the nearshore zone that are typically made at discharge gages further upstream to be inaccurate. Identifying definitively the controls over the rivermouth effect on N loading (and other nutrients will require integration of biogeochemical and hydrologic models.

  2. Fate of 15N-urea applied to wheat-soybean succession crop

    The wheat crop in Sao Paulo State, Brazil, is fertilized with N, P and K. The rate of applied N (0 to 120 kg.ha-1) depends on the previous grown crop and the irrigation possibility. The response of wheat to rates and time of N application and the fate of N applied to irrigated wheat were studied during two years. Residual N recovery by soybean grown after the wheat was also studied. The maximum grain productivity was obtained with 92 kg.ha-1 of N. The efficiency of 15N-urea utilization ranged from 52% to 85%. The main loss of applied 15 N, 5% to 12% occurred as ammonia volatilized from urea applied on soil surface. The N loss by leaching even at the N rate of 135 kg.ha-1, was less than 1% of applied 15N, due to the low amount of rainfall during the wheat grown season and a controlled amount of irrigated water, that were sufficient to moisten only the wheat root zone. The residual 15 N after wheat harvest represents around 40% of N applied as urea: 20% in soil, 3% in wheat root system and 16% in the wheat straw. Soybean recovered less than 2% of the 15 N applied to wheat at sowing or at tillering stage. (author)

  3. Fate of {sup 15}N-urea applied to wheat-soybean succession crop

    Boaretto, Antonio Enedi; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze; Muraoka, Takashi [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: aeboaret@cena.usp.br; pcotrive@cena.usp.br; muraoka@cena.usp.br; Spolidorio, Eduardo Scarpari [SN Centro de Pesquisa e Promocao de Sulfato de Amonio, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: sncentro@merconet.com.br; Freitas, Jose Guilherme de; Cantarella, Heitor [Instituto Agronomico de Campinas, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: jfreitas@iac.sp.gov.br; hcantare@iac.sp.gov.br

    2004-07-01

    The wheat crop in Sao Paulo State, Brazil, is fertilized with N, P and K. The rate of applied N (0 to 120 kg.ha{sup -1}) depends on the previous grown crop and the irrigation possibility. The response of wheat to rates and time of N application and the fate of N applied to irrigated wheat were studied during two years. Residual N recovery by soybean grown after the wheat was also studied. The maximum grain productivity was obtained with 92 kg.ha{sup -1} of N. The efficiency of {sup 15}N-urea utilization ranged from 52% to 85%. The main loss of applied {sup 15} N, 5% to 12% occurred as ammonia volatilized from urea applied on soil surface. The N loss by leaching even at the N rate of 135 kg.ha{sup -1}, was less than 1% of applied {sup 15}N, due to the low amount of rainfall during the wheat grown season and a controlled amount of irrigated water, that were sufficient to moisten only the wheat root zone. The residual {sup 15} N after wheat harvest represents around 40% of N applied as urea: 20% in soil, 3% in wheat root system and 16% in the wheat straw. Soybean recovered less than 2% of the {sup 15} N applied to wheat at sowing or at tillering stage. (author)

  4. The 15N isotope to evaluate fertilizer nitrogen absorption efficiency by the coffee plant

    The use of the 15N label for agronomic research involving nitrogen (N) cycling and the fate of fertilizer-N is well established, however, in the case of long term experimentation with perennial crops like citrus, coffee and rubber tree, there are still shortcomings mainly due to large plant size, sampling procedures, detection levels and interferences on the system. This report tries to contribute methodologically to the design and development of 15N labeled fertilizer experiments, using as an example a coffee crop fertilized with 15N labeled ammonium sulfate, which was followed for two years. The N of the plant derived from the fertilizer was studied in the different parts of the coffee plant in order to evaluate its distribution within the plant and the agronomic efficiency of the fertilizer application practice. An enrichment of the fertilizer-N of the order of 2% 15N abundance was sufficient to study N absorption rates and to establish fertilizer-N balances after one and two years of coffee cropping. The main source of errors in the estimated values lies in the inherent variability among field replicates and not in the measurements of N contents and 15N enrichments of plant material by mass-spectrometry. (author)

  5. Incorporation of 15N-inorganic nitrogen into free-amino acids in germinating corn

    Incorporation of 15N-labeled compounds, (K15NO3) and (15NH4)2SO4, into free-amino acids was measured in germinating corn. Sterilized seeds of sweet corn (Choko No. 865) were sown on the filter papers soaked in 10 ml of the solution containing one of the labeled compounds (40 ppm N, 99 atom % excess) in petri dishes and germinated at 30 deg C. After 48 hours and 72 hours, 15N-incorporation was measured in 5 seedlings selected owing to uniform growth. A GC-MS was used for measuring the ratio of 15N isotopes present in free-amino acids. 15N incorporation into free-amino acids hardly occurred when corn was germinated in the solution containing K15NO3, which suggested that endogenous nitrogen was used during the early germination stage of corn when nitrate is present. Incorporation into amino acids was greater when corn was germinated in the medium containing (15NH4)2SO4, than the case of the solution containing K15NO3. When corn was germinated in the solution containing (15NH4)2SO4, assimilation of 15N into asparagine or aspartic acid was comparatively higher than that into the other amino acids, though the incorporation rate was low. Thus, in intact germinating corn, the hydrolyzed product of protein was utilized for germination with priority, and dependence on exogenous nitrogen was low. (Kaihara, S.)

  6. The {sup 15}N isotope to evaluate fertilizer nitrogen absorption efficiency by the coffee plant

    Fenilli, Tatiele A.B. [Universidade Regional de Blumenau, (FURB), SC (Brazil); Reichart, Klaus; Bacchi, Osny O.S.; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: klaus@cena.usp.br; Dourado-Neto, Durval [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ)

    2007-12-15

    The use of the {sup 15}N label for agronomic research involving nitrogen (N) cycling and the fate of fertilizer-N is well established, however, in the case of long term experimentation with perennial crops like citrus, coffee and rubber tree, there are still shortcomings mainly due to large plant size, sampling procedures, detection levels and interferences on the system. This report tries to contribute methodologically to the design and development of {sup 15}N labeled fertilizer experiments, using as an example a coffee crop fertilized with {sup 15}N labeled ammonium sulfate, which was followed for two years. The N of the plant derived from the fertilizer was studied in the different parts of the coffee plant in order to evaluate its distribution within the plant and the agronomic efficiency of the fertilizer application practice. An enrichment of the fertilizer-N of the order of 2% {sup 15}N abundance was sufficient to study N absorption rates and to establish fertilizer-N balances after one and two years of coffee cropping. The main source of errors in the estimated values lies in the inherent variability among field replicates and not in the measurements of N contents and {sup 15}N enrichments of plant material by mass-spectrometry. (author)

  7. Utilization of 15N in the sequence of mineral fertilizer - forage - animal - slurry - forage

    After systematic application of 15N-ammonium nitrate, the change of the dinuclidic composition and 15N quantity was studied by isotope analysis of several open systems in the sequence mineral fertilizer - (soil) - forage - (animal) - slurry - (soil) - forage. The relative 15N isotope frequency of 50 atom% in the mineral fertilizer declined to 12.2 to 21.4 atom% in the forage (beet, oats, hay) and went down to 3.15 atom% in the slurry of a dairy cow fed on this forage. Silage maize manured with the slurry of the dairy cow only showed 1.98 atom %, green oats grown after the silage maize on the same area was found to have 0.45 atom%. The 15N quantity of 104.5 g N in the fertilizer gradually decreased to 41.6 g N in the forage, 30.5 g N in the slurry and 22.6 g N in the silage maize. The causes discussed are 15N isotope dilution as qualitative factor and productive and unproductive N losses as quantitative factors. (author)

  8. Utilization of 15N-labelled urea in laying hens. 5

    In the series of experiments with labelled urea three colostomized laying hybrids were butchered after a six-day application of 1% urea with 96.06 atom-% 15N excess (15N') in the ration and another 2 days with a supplement of 1% unlabelled urea. Out of the individual samples from crop, gizzard, small intestine, caecum and rectum, the content of the small intestine and the caecum showed the highest labelling with > 1 atom-% 15N'. The TCA soluble fraction of the content of the gizzard was more highly and that of the intestines less labelled than the total nitrogen. The tissue of the gizzard is distinctly less labelled than the 'omasum system' and the small intestine. The atom-% 15N' of the oesophagus with crop and glandular stomach largely showed agreement in the individual hens with that of intestinal tissue and ranged between 0.71 and 0.89 atom-%. 2% of the 15N' supplemented with the urea could be recovered in the content and the tissue of the gastro-intestinal tract. (author)

  9. Grafting and carbonated irrigation water in transport of 15N and in the tomato production

    The effects of CO2 application through irrigation water, and of grafting in transport of 15N and in the tomato production, were studied. These treatments were arranged in a 2 x 2 factorial scheme (with and without CO2 in irrigation water and grafted and non-grafted tomato), in a completely randomized design, with four replications. The injection of CO2 into the water began at 34 days after transplant of seedlings (DAT) and continued for all irrigations. The application of the sulfate of ammonium with abundance in atoms of 15N of 3.13% in plants destined to analysis was done at 45 DAT when the plants were in the middle of fructification. After 14 days of fertilizer (15N) application the plants were harvested, washed, dried and sent for analysis of 15N in plant tissue. The results demonstrated that CO2 and the grafting did not alter the transport of 15N in the plant. The production of commercial fruits was larger when CO2 was applied in water. (author)

  10. Solid-state NMR of polymers

    Mirau, P

    2001-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as one of the most important methods for the solid-state characterisation of polymers. The popularity of NMR is due to the fact that many molecular level features can be measured from the NMR spectra, including the polymer chain conformation, the morphology and the dynamics. The spectral features and relaxation times are affected by local interactions, so they provide information about the structure of polymers on a length scale (2-200 A) that is difficult to measure by other methods. In favourable cases, the NMR experiments provide a molecular-level explanation for the transitions observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and other methods, and the NMR properties can often be related to the bulk properties. Solid-state NMR has long been of interest in polymer science, and the first solid-state NMR studies of polymers were reported approximately a year after the discovery of nuclear resonance in bulk matter. It was reported in this initial study that the proton line width for natural rubber at room temperature is more like that of a mobile liquid than of a solid, but that the resonance broadens near the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). This was recognised as being related to a change in chain dynamics above and below the T{sub g}. NMR methods developed rapidly after these initial observations, first for polymers in solution and, more recently, for polymers in the solid-state. Solid-state NMR studies of polymers were developed more slowly than their solution-state counterparts because solid-state NMR requires more specialised equipment. Solid-state NMR is now such an important tool that most modern spectrometers are capable of performing these studies. The interest in the NMR of solid polymers is due in part to the fact that most polymers are used in the solid state, and in many cases the NMR properties can be directly related to the macroscopic properties. Polymers have restricted mobility

  11. Solid-state NMR of polymers

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as one of the most important methods for the solid-state characterisation of polymers. The popularity of NMR is due to the fact that many molecular level features can be measured from the NMR spectra, including the polymer chain conformation, the morphology and the dynamics. The spectral features and relaxation times are affected by local interactions, so they provide information about the structure of polymers on a length scale (2-200 A) that is difficult to measure by other methods. In favourable cases, the NMR experiments provide a molecular-level explanation for the transitions observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and other methods, and the NMR properties can often be related to the bulk properties. Solid-state NMR has long been of interest in polymer science, and the first solid-state NMR studies of polymers were reported approximately a year after the discovery of nuclear resonance in bulk matter. It was reported in this initial study that the proton line width for natural rubber at room temperature is more like that of a mobile liquid than of a solid, but that the resonance broadens near the glass transition temperature (Tg). This was recognised as being related to a change in chain dynamics above and below the Tg. NMR methods developed rapidly after these initial observations, first for polymers in solution and, more recently, for polymers in the solid-state. Solid-state NMR studies of polymers were developed more slowly than their solution-state counterparts because solid-state NMR requires more specialised equipment. Solid-state NMR is now such an important tool that most modern spectrometers are capable of performing these studies. The interest in the NMR of solid polymers is due in part to the fact that most polymers are used in the solid state, and in many cases the NMR properties can be directly related to the macroscopic properties. Polymers have restricted mobility in solids

  12. Sequence-specific assignment of histidine and tryptophan ring 1H, 13C and 15N resonances in 13C/15N- and 2H/13C/15N-labelled proteins

    Methods are described to correlate aromatic 1Hδ2/13Cδ2 or 1Hε1/15Nε1 with aliphatic 13Cβ chemical shifts of histidine and tryptophan residues, respectively. The pulse sequences exclusively rely on magnetization transfers via one-bond scalar couplings and employ [15N, 1H]- and/or [13C, 1H]-TROSY schemes to enhance sensitivity. In the case of histidine imidazole rings exhibiting slow HN-exchange with the solvent, connectivities of these proton resonances with β-carbons can be established as well. In addition, their correlations to ring carbons can be detected in a simple [15N, 1H]-TROSY-H(N)Car experiment, revealing the tautomeric state of the neutral ring system. The novel methods are demonstrated with the 23-kDa protein xylanase and the 35-kDa protein diisopropylfluorophosphatase, providing nearly complete sequence-specific resonance assignments of their histidine δ-CH and tryptophan ε-NH groups

  13. Cross-relaxation of 8Li+ in copper

    The 'cross-relaxation' method (also called 'level-crossing resonance' or 'avoided level-crossing') is a powerful technique that can be used to provide detailed structural and site information on impurities in materials. In this paper, we report on the development of the cross-relaxation technique for 8Li+ at the β-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (β-NMR) facility located in TRIUMF in Vancouver. The measurements were carried out on a Cu single crystal where the relaxation rate of the 8Li polarization was monitored as a function of the applied longitudinal magnetic field. The occurrence of cross-relaxation, at a particular magnetic field, between the 8Li and the surrounding nuclei is evident as a resonant enhancement of the relaxation rate at the level crossing field. We discuss inferences about the site and structure of 8Li+ in Cu from this data.

  14. Applications of the 18O-isotope shift on 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to the study of bioorganic reaction mechanisms

    The study of reactions involving the formation and cleavage of carbon-oxygen or nitrogen-oxygen bonds has been significantly aided by recent demonstrations of the generality and characteristics of the 18O-isotope shift in 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In many instances, the magnitudes of the 18O-induced isotopic shifts are sufficiently large as to permit the use of even modest NMR instrumentation and natural abundance 13C. Studies involving less soluble compounds, higher molecular weight materials or relatively rapid reactions may often be carried out using 13C enrichment. Because NMR spectroscopy is non-destructive, it has proven to be extremely useful in the study of natural product biosynthetic pathways. Another area where important applications are being made is in the study of enzymatic and non-enzymatic reaction mechanisms. The characteristics of the 18O isotope shift in 13C NMR spectroscopy are reviewed. Several examples from the work of other groups in the area of natural product biosynthesis are briefly mentioned. This is followed by a number of illustrative applications in the area of bioorganic and enzymatic reaction mechanism that have been examined in our laboratory. The enzymatic examples include acid phosphatases, epoxide hydratase, acetylcholinesterase and asparaginase. 20 refs.; 1 figure

  15. Dynamics of Antibody Domains Studied by Solution NMR

    Vu, Bang K.; Walsh, Joseph D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Ishima, Rieko

    2009-01-01

    Information on local dynamics of antibodies is important to evaluate stability, to rationally design variants, and to clarify conformational disorders at the epitope binding sites. Such information may also be useful for improved understanding of antigen recognition. NMR can be used for characterization of local protein dynamics at the atomic level through relaxation measurements. Due to the complexity of the NMR spectra, an extensive use of this method is limited to small protein molecules, ...

  16. NMR Probe of Metallic States in Nanoscale Topological Insulators

    Koumoulis, Dimitrios; Chasapis, Thomas C.; Taylor, Robert E; Lake, Michael P.; King, Danny; Jarenwattananon, Nanette N.; Fiete, Gregory A.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2013-01-01

    A 125Te NMR study of bismuth telluride nanoparticles as function of particle size revealed that the spin-lattice relaxation is enhanced below 33 nm, accompanied by a transition of NMR spectra from single to bimodal regime. The satellite peak features a negative Knight shift and higher relaxivity, consistent with core polarization from p-band carriers. Whereas nanocrystals follow a Korringa law in the range 140-420K, micrometer particles do so only below 200K. The results reveal increased meta...

  17. Origin and tracing techniques of high 15N nitrogen compounds in industrial environments

    Effluents and process waters from various industrial plants were investigated for the 15N/14N isotope ratio in nitrate and ammonia. It was found that large isotope fractionation occurs in cases where ammonia is involved in gas-liquid phase changes. This feature was found to occur in two coke oven plants where ammonia gas is removed from a gas stream by solution in water, in an ammonia sulphate plant where ammonia gas is absorbed in sulphuric acid and in a water treatment plant where ammonia is removed from (high pH) water by blowing air through the process water. In all these cases 15N isotope enrichments (in the range of 10 to 30 per mille) occurred. These enrichments are in excess of those found naturally. Ammonia in such wastewaters essentially retains this high 15N content when it is converted to nitrate underground: which occurs rapidly under well-oxidised conditions. Nitrate is a fairly conservative tracer and its contamination in water can be followed readily. In the low recharge environment in the central parts of South Africa evidence of waste management practices of 10-20 years earlier were still quite evident using this isotopic label. The high 15N nitrate signal could be used to distinguish industrial nitrogen pollution from pollution by local sewage disposal systems. Vegetation that derives its nitrogen from such high 15N sources retains the isotope signature of its source. Grass and other annual plants then exhibit the isotope signature of the water of a specific year. Trees exhibit the isotope signature of deeper water, which shows the effects of longer term pollution events. The use of high 15N as tracer enables the source apportionment of nitrogen derived pollution in these specific circumstances. (author)

  18. Coral skeletal δ15N reveals isotopic traces of an agricultural revolution

    This study introduces a new method of tracing the history of nutrient loading in coastal oceans via δ15N analysis of organic nitrogen preserved in the skeleton of the massive Porites coral. Four coral cores were collected in Bali, Indonesia, from reefs exposed to high levels of fertilizers in agricultural run-off, from lagoonal corals impacted by sewage, and from a reef located 30 km offshore. Skeletal δ15N in the agriculturally exposed coral declined from 10.7 ± 0.4 per mille in 1970-1971, when synthetic fertilizers (-0.8 per mille ± 0.2 per mille ) were introduced to Bali, to a depleted 'anthropogenic' baseline of 3.5 per mille ± 0.4% in the mid-1990s. δ15N values were negatively correlated with rainfall, suggesting that marine δ15N lowers during flood-born influxes of waste fertilizers. Reef cores exposed to untreated sewage in terrestrial discharge were enriched (7.8 and 7.3 ± 0.4 per mille ), while the offshore core reflected background oceanic signals (6.2 ± 0.4 per mille). δ15N, N concentration, and C:N systematics indicate that the N isotopic composition of skeletal organic matter was generally well preserved over 30 years. We suggest that skeletal organic δ15N can serve as a recorder of past nitrogen sources. In Bali, this tracer suggests that the intensification of Western style agricultural practices since 1970 are contributing to the degradation of coastal coral reefs

  19. Modified micro-diffusion method for 15N-enriched soil solutions

    The preparation of solutions for determination of 15N/14N isotope ratios is described, with special reference to dilute samples. A micro-diffusion method has been simplified to be more suitable for rapid isotope-ratio determination in soil solutions collected in tensionics. Ammonia expelled during micro-diffusion is captured on acidified filter discs fixed to the caps of gas-tight vials. The discs are transferred to tin capsules for shipment to the Soil Science Unit for 15N-enrichment determination. (author)

  20. Optical $\\Lambda$ transitions and quantum computing in the $^{15}$N-V$^{-}$ Center in Diamond

    González, Gabriel; Leuenberger, Michael N.

    2009-01-01

    We present a thorough derivation of the excited state energy levels of the negatively charged $^{15}$N-V$^{-}$ center in diamond for the strong applied electric field case. We show that in the $^{15}$N-V$^{-}$ center a spin non-conserving two-photon $\\Lambda$ transition exists that is mediated by the hyperfine interaction, which provides the possibility to write quantum information. Using second order perturbation theory we obtain a $\\Lambda$ transition rate of the order of 10 MHz at room tem...

  1. 15N-urea tracing emission spectroscopy for detecting the infection of Helicobacter pylori

    Objective: To study a noninvasive and nonradioactive method, 15N-urea tracing emission spectroscopy, for detecting the Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection. Methods: A group of 26 patients was tested with a method of 15N-urea tracing emission spectroscopy for detecting the Hp infection. Results: Taking the bacterial culture or (and) Gram stain as a standard, the specificity, sensitivity and positive predicting rate of the test were 81%, 89% and 84%, respectively. Conclusion: The method could be considered useful for clinical practice

  2. 15N Fractionation in Star-Forming Regions and Solar System Objects

    Wirstrom, Eva; Milam, Stefanie; Adande, GIlles; Charnley, Steven; Cordiner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A central issue for understanding the formation and evolution of matter in the early Solar System is the relationship between the chemical composition of star-forming interstellar clouds and that of primitive Solar System materials. The pristinemolecular content of comets, interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites show significant bulk nitrogen isotopic fractionation relative to the solar value, 14N15N 440. In addition, high spatial resolution measurements in primitive materials locally show even more extreme enhancements of 14N15N 100.

  3. Constraints on oceanic N balance/imbalance from sedimentary 15N records

    M. A. Altabet

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available According to current best estimates, the modern ocean's N cycle is in severe deficit. N isotope budgeting provides an independent geochemical constraint in this regard as well as the only means for past reconstruction. Overall, it is the relative proportion of N2 fixation consumed by water column denitrification that sets average oceanic δ15N under steady-state conditions. Several factors (conversion of organic N to N2, Rayleigh closed and open system effects likely reduce the effective fractionation factor (ε for water column denitrification to about half the inherent microbial value for εden. If so, the average oceanic δ15N of ~5‰ is consistent with a canonical contribution from water column denitrification of 50% of the source flux from N2 fixation. If an imbalance in oceanic N sources and sinks changes this proportion then a transient in average oceanic δ15N would occur. Using a simple model, changing water column denitrification by ±30% or N2 fixation by ±15% produces detectable (>1‰ changes in average oceanic δ15N over one residence time period or more with corresponding changes in oceanic N inventory. Changing sedimentary denitrification produces no change in δ15N but does change N inventory. Sediment δ15N records from sites thought to be sensitive to oceanic average δ15N all show no detectible change over the last 3 kyr or so implying a balanced marine N budget over the latest Holocene. A mismatch in time scales is the most likely meaningful interpretation of the apparent conflict with modern flux estimates. Decadal to centennial scale oscillations between net N deficit and net surplus may occur but on the N residence timescale of several thousand years, net balance is achieved in sum. However, sediment δ15N records from the literature covering the period since the last glacial maximum show excursions of up to several ‰ that are consistent with sustained N deficit during the deglaciation followed by readjustment

  4. Constraints on oceanic N balance/imbalance from sedimentary 15N records

    M. A. Altabet

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available According to current best estimates, the modern ocean's N cycle is in severe deficit. N isotope budgeting provides an independent geochemical constraint in this regard as well as the only means for past reconstruction. Overall, it is the relative proportion of N2 fixation consumed by water column denitrification that sets average oceanic δ15N under steady-state conditions. Several factors (conversion of organic N to N2, Rayleigh closed and open system effects likely reduce the effective fractionation factor (ε for water column denitrification to about half the inherent microbial value for εden. If so, the average oceanic δ15N of ~5 is consistent with a canonical contribution from water column denitrification of 50% of the source flux from N2 fixation. If an imbalance in oceanic N sources and sinks changes this proportion then a transient in average oceanic δ15N would occur. Using a simple model, changing water column denitrification ±30% or N2 fixation by ±15% produces detectable (>1 changes in average oceanic δ15N over one residence time period or more with corresponding changes in oceanic N inventory. Changing sedimentary denitrification produces no change in δ15N but does change N inventory. Sediment δ15N records from sites thought to be sensitive to oceanic average δ15N all show no detectible change over the last 3 kyr or so implying a balanced marine N budget over the latest Holocene. A mismatch in time scales is the most likely meaningful interpretation of the apparent conflict with modern flux estimates. Decadal to centennial scale oscillations between net N deficit and net surplus may occur but on the N residence timescale of several thousand years, net balance is achieved in sum. However, sediment δ15N records from the literature covering the period since the last glacial maximum show excursions of up to several that are consistent with sustained N deficit during the deglaciation followed by readjustment and establishment of

  5. 15N2 incorporation and acetylene reduction by azospirillum isolated from rice roots and soils

    Nitrogen fixation by strains of Azospirillum isolated from several rice soils and rice cultivars was investigated by 15N2 incorporation and C2H2 reduction. C2H2 reducing ability markedly varied among the strains obtained from soils differing widely in their physico-chemical properties. Large variations in 15N2 incorporation by Azospirillum isolated from the roots of several rice cultivars were also noticed. The present study reveals that rice cultivars harbour Azospirillum with differential N2-fixing ability and that plant genotype is of importance for optimal associations. (orig.)

  6. Protein dynamics in the solid state from 2H NMR line shape analysis: a consistent perspective.

    Meirovitch, Eva; Liang, Zhichun; Freed, Jack H

    2015-02-19

    Deuterium line shape analysis of CD3 groups has emerged as a particularly useful tool for studying microsecond-millisecond protein motions in the solid state. The models devised so far consist of several independently conceived simple jump-type motions. They are comprised of physical quantities encoded in their simplest form; improvements are only possible by adding yet another simple motion, thereby changing the model. The various treatments developed are case-specific; hence comparison among the different systems is not possible. Here we develop a new methodology for (2)H NMR line shape analysis free of these limitations. It is based on the microscopic-order-macroscopic-disorder (MOMD) approach. In MOMD motions are described by diffusion tensors, spatial restrictions by potentials/ordering tensors, and geometric features by relative tensor orientations. Jump-type motions are recovered in the limit of large orientational potentials. Model improvement is accomplished by monitoring the magnitude, symmetry, and orientation of the various tensors. The generality of MOMD makes possible comparison among different scenarios. CD3 line shapes from the Chicken Villin Headpiece Subdomain and the Streptomyces Subtilisin Inhibitor are used as experimental examples. All of these spectra are reproduced by using rhombic local potentials constrained for simplicity to be given by the L = 2 spherical harmonics, and by axial diffusion tensors. Potential strength and rhombicity are found to be ca. 2-3 k(B)T. The diffusion tensor is tilted at 120° from the C-CD3 axis. The perpendicular (parallel) correlation times for local motion are 0.1-1.0 ms (3.3-30 μs). Activation energies in the 1.1-8.0 kcal/mol range are estimated. Future prospects include extension to the (2)H relaxation limit, application to the (15)N and (13)C NMR nuclei, and accounting for collective motions and anisotropic media. PMID:25594631

  7. NMR studies of metabolism

    In this paper, the authors present applications of NMR to the study of different aspects of metabolism. The authors begin with a brief outline of localization methods that are commonly used to obtain in vivo NMR spectra. The authors then describe in more detail metabolic information recently obtained by NMR of perfused organs, intact animals, and humans. Previous reviews have already covered the applications of NMR to the study of metabolism in microorganisms, isolated or cultivated cells, and tumors. NMR spectroscopy of the brain, and human in vivo NMR spectroscopy have also been reviewed

  8. Some exercises in quantitative NMR imaging

    The articles represented in this thesis result from a series of investigations that evaluate the potential of NMR imaging as a quantitative research tool. In the first article the possible use of proton spin-lattice relaxation time T1 in tissue characterization, tumor recognition and monitoring tissue response to radiotherapy is explored. The next article addresses the question whether water proton spin-lattice relaxation curves of biological tissues are adequately described by a single time constant T1, and analyzes the implications of multi-exponentiality for quantitative NMR imaging. In the third article the use of NMR imaging as a quantitative research tool is discussed on the basis of phantom experiments. The fourth article describes a method which enables unambiguous retrieval of sign information in a set of magnetic resonance images of the inversion recovery type. The next article shows how this method can be adapted to allow accurate calculation of T1 pictures on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The sixth article, finally, describes a simulation procedure which enables a straightforward determination of NMR imaging pulse sequence parameters for optimal tissue contrast. (orig.)

  9. NMR Studies of Lithium Iodide Based Solid Electrolytes

    Dupree, R.; Howells, R. J.; Hooper, A.;

    1983-01-01

    In mixture of LiI with γAl2O3 the ionic conductivity is found to increase by up to three orders of magnitude over pure LiI. NMR measurements of7Li relaxation times were performed on both anhydrous LiI and a mixture of LiI with 30m/o γAl2O3. The relaxation is found to be purely dipolar in origin f...

  10. Integration of screening and identifying ligand(s) from medicinal plant extracts based on target recognition by using NMR spectroscopy

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Yalin Tang, Qian Shang, Junfeng Xiang, Qianfan Yang, Qiuju Zhou, Lin Li, Hong Zhang, Qian Li, Hongxia Sun, Aijiao Guan, Wei Jiang & Wei Gai ### Abstract This protocol presents the screening of ligand(s) from medicinal plant extracts based on target recognition by using NMR spectroscopy. A detailed description of sample preparation and analysis process is provided. NMR spectroscopies described here are 1H NMR, diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), relaxation-edited NMR, ...

  11. Separation of 15N by chemical exchange in NO, NO2 - HNO3 system under pressure

    The basic isotopic exchange reaction is responsible for the separation of 15N in the Nitrox system that between gaseous nitrogen oxides and aqueous nitric acid with a single stage separation factor α = 1.055 for 10M nitric acid, at 25 deg C and atmospheric pressure takes place. In order to know what happens in 15N separation at higher pressure, when the isotopic transport between two phases is improved, a stainless steel laboratory experimental plant with a 1000 mm long x 18 mm i.d. column, packed with triangular wire springs 1.8 x 1.8 x 0.2 mm2, was utilised. At 1.5 atm (absolute), and 2.36 ml x cm-2 x min-1 flow rate HETP was 7% smaller than at atmospheric pressure and 1.5 times smaller flow rate. HETP at 3.14 ml x cm-2 x min-1 flow rate and 1.8 atm is practically equal with that obtained at atmospheric pressure and 2 times smaller flow rate. The operation of the 15N separation plant at 1.8 atm (absolute), instead of atmospheric pressure, will permit doubling of the 10M nitric acid flow rate and of 15N production of the given column. (author)

  12. The use of δ15N in assessing sewage stress on coral reefs

    While coral reefs decline, scientists argue, and effective strategies to manage land-based pollution lag behind the extent of the problem. There is need for objective, cost-effective, assessment methods. The measurement of stable nitrogen isotope ratios, δ15N, in tissues of reef organisms shows promise as an indicator of sewage stress. The choice of target organism will depend upon study purpose, availability, and other considerations such as conservation. Algae are usually plentiful and have been shown faithfully to track sewage input. The organic matrix of bivalve shells can provide time series spanning, perhaps, decades. Gorgonians have been shown to track sewage, and can provide records potentially centuries-long. In areas where baseline data are lacking, which is almost everywhere, δ15N in gorgonians can provide information on status and trends. In coral tissue, δ15N combined with insoluble residue determination can provide information on both sewage and sediment stress in areas lacking baseline data. In the developed world, δ15N provides objective assessment in a field complicated by conflicting opinions. Sample handling and processing are simple and analysis costs are low. This is a method deserving widespread application.

  13. Using a Macroalgal δ15N Bioassay to Detect Cruise Ship Waste Water Effluent Inputs

    Nitrogen stable isotopes are a powerful tool for tracking sources of N to marine ecosystems. I used green macroalgae as a bioassay organism to evaluate if the δ15N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in Skagway Harbor, AK. Opportunistic green...

  14. Determination of level widths in 15N using nuclear resonance fluorescence

    Szücs T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Level widths in 15N have been measured with the nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF technique. Solid nitrogen compounds, bremsstrahlung, and HPGe detectors have been used as target, beam, and detectors, respectively. The preliminarily level widths are in agreement with the literature values, but more precise.

  15. An improved method for delta 15N measurements in ice cores

    M. Leuenberger

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of isotopic ratios of nitrogen gas (δ15N trapped in ice cores as a paleothermometer to characterise abrupt climate changes is becoming a widespread technique. The versatility of the technique could be enhanced, for instance in quantifying small temperature changes during the last glacial period in Antarctic ice cores, by using high precision methods. In this paper, we outline a method for measuring δ15N to a precision of 0.006permil (1σ, n=9 from replicate ice core samples. The high precision results from removing oxygen, carbon dioxide and water vapour from the air extracted from ice cores. The advantage of the technique is that it does not involve correction for isobaric interference due to CO+ ions. We also highlight the importance of oxygen removal from the sample, and how it influences δ15N measurements. The results show that a small amount of oxygen in the sample can be detrimental to achieving an optimum precision in δ15N measurements of atmospheric nitrogen trapped ice core samples.

  16. Pathways of nitrogen assimilation in cowpea nodules studied using 15N2 and allopurinol

    In the presence of 0.5 millimolar allopurinol (4-hydroxypyrazolo [3,4-d]pyrimidine), an inhibitor of NAD:xanthine oxidoreductase (EC 1.2.3.2), intact attached nodules of cowpea (vigna unguiculata L. Walp. cv Vita 3) formed [15N]xanthine from 15N2 at rates equivalent to those of ureide synthesis, confirming the direct assimilation of fixed nitrogen into purines. Xanthine accumulated in nodules and was exported in increasing amounts in xylem of allopurinol-treated plants. Other intermediates of purine oxidation, de novo purine synthesis, and ammonia assimilation did not increase and, over the time course of experiments (4 hours), allopurinol had no effect on nitrogenase (EC 1.87.99.2) activity. Negligible 15N -labeling of asparagine from 15N2 was observed, suggesting that the significant pool (up to 14 micromoles per gram of nodule fresh weight) of this amide in cowpea nodules was not formed directly from fixation but may have accumulated as a consequence of phloem delivery

  17. Experimental studies on porcine protein catabolism after thermic traumas using 15N

    Within studies on protein metabolism extensive third-degree burns were produced in pigs. During burn disease protein catabolism was determined by means of parenterally applied 15N-glycine and the improvement of the negative total N balance as well as modes of application of amino acids and proteins especially albumins are discussed

  18. Interregional training course on the use of 15N in soil science and plant nutrition

    In trials under greenhouse conditions the action of herbicides (2,4-D, Atrazine, Dicamba, Lenacil) on the nitrogen metabolism (total fertilizer nitrogen uptake, incorporation of fertilizer into composition of nitrogeneous substances) of sensitive and resistant plants (pea, maize, spring wheat, weeds) was studied by means of 15N-labelled fertilizer nitrogen. (author)

  19. Recovery of 15N-urea in soil-plant system of tanzania grass pasture

    The economic attractiveness and negative environmental impact of nitrogen (N) fertilization in pastures depend on the N use efficiency in the soil-plant system. However, the recovery of urea-15N by Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania pastures, one of the most widely used forage species in intensified pastoral systems, is still unknown. This experiment was conducted in a randomized complete block design with four treatments (0, 40, 80 and 120 kg ha-1 of N-urea) and three replications, to determine the recovery of 15N urea by Tanzania grass. Forage production, total N content and N yield were not affected by fertilization (p > 0.05), reflecting the high losses of applied N under the experimental conditions. The recovery of 15N urea (% of applied N) in forage and roots was not affected by fertilization levels (p > 0.05), but decreased exponentially in the soil and soil-plant system (p 15N (kg ha-1) in forage and roots (15 to 30 cm) increased with increasing urea doses (p < 0.05). (author)

  20. δ15N as a proxy for historic anthropogenic nitrogen loading in Charleston Harbor, SC, USA

    Payne, T. N.; Andrus, C. F. T.

    2015-12-01

    Bivalve shell geochemistry can serve as a useful indicator of changes in coastal environments. There is increasing interest in developing paleoenvironmental proxies from mollusk shell organic components. Numerous studies have focused on how the δ15N obtained from bivalve tissues can be used to trace present-day wastewater input into estuaries. However, comparatively little attention has been paid to tracing the impact of anthropogenic nitrogen loading into estuaries over time. By measuring historic levels of δ15N in the organic fraction of oyster shells (Crassostrea virginica) from archaeological sites around Charleston Harbor and comparing those levels to the δ15N content of modern shells, it is possible to assess how nitrogen has fluctuated historically in the area. Whole-shell samples from the Late Archaic Period (~3000-4000 BP, Late Woodland Period (~1400-800 BP), 18th and 19th centuries, and modern controls were measured for %N and d15N. Evidence of increased anthropogenic input of N is expected to begin in the early historic period based on similar analysis in Chesapeake Bay. More ancient samples may give insight into baseline conditions prior to recent population growth and industrialization. This information could help understand how large-scale anthropogenic nitrogen loading has affected coastal ecosystems over time and guide future remediation. Furthermore, this project will help refine and improve this novel proxy of past environmental conditions.

  1. Impact of seaweed beachings on dynamics of δ15N isotopic signatures in marine macroalgae

    Highlights: • Two coastal sites (COU, GM) in the Bay of Seine affected by summer seaweed beachings. • The same temporal dynamics of the algal δ15N at the two sites. • N and P concentrations in seawater of the two sites dominated by riverine sources. • A coupling between seaweed beachings and N sources of intertidal macroalgae. - Abstract: A fine-scale survey of δ15N, δ13C, tissue-N in seaweeds was conducted using samples from 17 sampling points at two sites (Grandcamp-Maisy (GM), Courseulles/Mer (COU)) along the French coast of the English Channel in 2012 and 2013. Partial triadic analysis was performed on the parameter data sets and revealed the functioning of three areas: one estuary (EstA) and two rocky areas (GM∗, COU∗). In contrast to oceanic and anthropogenic reference points similar temporal dynamics characterized δ15N signatures and N contents at GM∗ and COU∗. Nutrient dynamics were similar: the N-concentrations in seawater originated from the River Seine and local coastal rivers while P-concentrations mainly from these local rivers. δ15N at GM∗ were linked to turbidity suggesting inputs of autochthonous organic matter from large-scale summer seaweed beachings made up of a mixture of Rhodophyta, Phaeophyta and Chlorophyta species. This study highlights the coupling between seaweed beachings and nitrogen sources of intertidal macroalgae

  2. Incorporation of 15N-labelled fertilizer nitrogen into wheat grain proteins during grain development

    The aim of our experiments was to study the incorporation of 15N-labelled fertilizer nitrogen into winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain and its protein fractions during grain development. The microplot N fertilization experiments were carried out on a eutric Cambisol of medium N status in Keszthely (Hungary). (author)

  3. Applications of stable isotopes of 2H, 13C and 15N to clinical problems

    The function of the Argonne Program is to provide synthetic, analytical instrumental capability in a core facility for the clinical investigator who needs to use 2H, 13C, or 15N labelled compounds for metabolic or clinical research on pregnant women, newborn infants, young children, or for mass screening. To carry out such application development, there were six stages which were recurrent steps in every application. Five fundamental strategies should be adopted to establish the use of stable isotopes in clinical work. The instrument required for measurements was a combined gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer, and its use was schematically illustrated. Some of the successful experiences with compounds labelled by stable isotopes, such as deuterium labelled chenodeoxycholic acid, and respective 13C and 15N-labelled glycine were described. Deutrium labelled bile acid enabled easy and safe determination of the size of the bile acid pool and the replacement rate, providing clearer diagnoses for cholestatic liver disease and gallstones. 13C and 15N labelled compounds were used in clinical studies, of children with genetic disorders of amino acid metabolism, i.e., non ketotic hyperflycinemia, B12-responsive methyl malonic acidemia, and Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. 15N-labelled glycine was also studied in a child with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. (Mukohata, S.)

  4. Carbon-rich presolar grains from massive stars. Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios and the mystery of 15N

    Pignatari, M; Hoppe, P; Jordan, C J; Gibson, B K; Trappitsch, R; Herwig, F; Fryer, C; Hirschi, R; Timmes, F X

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C, and low-density graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the SN shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the pu...

  5. Superparamagnetic particles as possible contrast agents for NMR imaging

    The development of 'magneto-pharmaceuticals' plays an important role in the extension of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for diagnostic medicine. Fundamental investigations leading to the new area of NMR contrast agents are considered. Superparamagnetic particles represent a new class of NMR contrast agents that usually referred to as T2 or T*2 contrast agents as opposed to T1 agents, such as paramagnetic chelates. Another novelty presented by superparamagnetic agents is their specific distribution. The synthesis and the transverse R2 and longitudinal R1 relaxivity measurements of some ferro-, ferri- and superparamagnetic particles suspensions are presented. (authors)

  6. Studies of the endogeneous N metabolism in 15N-labelled pigs. 2

    4 pigs were labelled with 15N-ammonium salt over a period of 10 days in the feeding of a fishmeal diet (1), a fishmeal diet + partly hydrolyzed straw meal (2), a field bean diet (3) and a field bean diet + partly hydrolyzed straw meal (4). The 14N-amino acids and the 15N-amino acids excreted in feces showed highly significant correlation coefficient with the increasing content of crude fiber in the diets, which amounted to 3.0, 5.3, 10.0 and 12.1% in the dry matter. The following sequence was established for the growth angle of the essential 14N-amino acids: Leu, Lys, Arg, Thr, Phe, Ile, Val, His and of the 15N-amino acids: Lys, Arg, Val, Leu, Ile, Thr, Phe and His. As Lys, His and Thr cannot incorporate 15N in transamination reactions in the intermediate metabolism, their level of labelling was considerable in case of diet 4. Nevertheless, tan α is highest for 15N-Lys and lowest for 15N-His. This means that His in contrast to Lys, parallel to increased synthesis, is also increasingly decomposed in the large intestine. In contrast to this, proline was not labelled with 15N even with the highest content of crude fiber in the diet. Despite this, 14N-proline excretion, next to glutamic acid, increased most with the growing content of crude fiber in the diet. Due to the hydrophilic character of glutamic acid and the increased water influx in the large intestine and the increased content of crude fiber in the diet, a growing proline transport parallel to the increased influx of crude fiber and water must be assumed. If the growth angle tan α for the excretion of 14N-amino acids is ascertained regressively for a crude fiber content of diet of 10 %, one can prove from the proportion of the amino acids and a comparison from literature for fecal bacteria and ileum digesta that the amino acid composition for this measuring point largely corresponds to that of bacterial protein. (author)

  7. Fertilizer 15N balance in a coffee cropping system: a case study in Brazil

    Knowledge about the fate of fertilizer nitrogen in agricultural systems is essential for the improvement of management practices in order to maximize nitrogen (N) recovery by the crop and reduce N losses from the system to a minimum. This study involves fertilizer management practices using the 15N isotope label applied in a single rate to determine the fertilizer-N balance in a particular soil-coffee-atmosphere system and to deepen the understanding of N plant dynamics. Five replicates consisting of plots of about 120 plants each were randomly defined within a 0.2 ha coffee plantation planted in 2001, in Piracicaba, SP, Brazil. Nine plants of each plot were separated in sub-plots for the 15N balance studies and treated with N rates of 280 and 350 kg ha-1 during 2003/2004 and 2004/ 2005, respectively, both of them as ammonium sulfate enriched to a 15N abundance of 2.072 atom %. Plant shoots were considered as separate parts: the orthotropic central branch, productive branches, leaves of productive branches, vegetative branches, leaves of vegetative branches and fruit. Litter, consisting of dead leaves accumulated below the plant canopy, was measured by the difference between leaves at harvest and at the beginning of the following flowering. Roots and soil were sampled down to a depth of 1.0 at intervals of 0.2 m. Samples from the isotopic sub-plots were used to evaluate total N and 15N, and plants outside sub-plots were used to evaluate dry matter. Volatilization losses of NH3 were estimated using special collectors. Leaching of fertilizer-N was estimated from deep drainage water fluxes and 15N concentrations of the soil solution at 1 m soil depth. At the end of the 2-year evaluation, the recovery of 15N applied as ammonium sulfate was 19.1 % in aerial plant parts, 9.4 % in the roots, 23.8 % in the litter, 26.3 % in the fruit and 12.6 % remaining in the 0-1.0 m soil profile. Annual leaching and volatilization losses were very small (2.0 % and 0.9 %, respectively

  8. Variable δ(15)N diet-tissue discrimination factors among sharks: implications for trophic position, diet and food web models.

    Olin, Jill A; Hussey, Nigel E; Grgicak-Mannion, Alice; Fritts, Mark W; Wintner, Sabine P; Fisk, Aaron T

    2013-01-01

    The application of stable isotopes to characterize the complexities of a species foraging behavior and trophic relationships is dependent on assumptions of δ(15)N diet-tissue discrimination factors (∆(15)N). As ∆(15)N values have been experimentally shown to vary amongst consumers, tissues and diet composition, resolving appropriate species-specific ∆(15)N values can be complex. Given the logistical and ethical challenges of controlled feeding experiments for determining ∆(15)N values for large and/or endangered species, our objective was to conduct an assessment of a range of reported ∆(15)N values that can hypothetically serve as surrogates for describing the predator-prey relationships of four shark species that feed on prey from different trophic levels (i.e., different mean δ(15)N dietary values). Overall, the most suitable species-specific ∆(15)N values decreased with increasing dietary-δ(15)N values based on stable isotope Bayesian ellipse overlap estimates of shark and the principal prey functional groups contributing to the diet determined from stomach content analyses. Thus, a single ∆(15)N value was not supported for this speciose group of marine predatory fishes. For example, the ∆(15)N value of 3.7‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the bonnethead shark (mean diet δ(15)N = 9‰) whereas a ∆(15)N value shark (mean diet δ(15)N = 15‰). These data corroborate the previously reported inverse ∆(15)N-dietary δ(15)N relationship when both isotope ellipses of principal prey functional groups and the broader identified diet of each species were considered supporting the adoption of different ∆(15)N values that reflect the predators' δ(15)N-dietary value. These findings are critical for refining the application of stable isotope modeling approaches as inferences regarding a species' ecological role in their community will be influenced with consequences for conservation and

  9. Variable δ(15N diet-tissue discrimination factors among sharks: implications for trophic position, diet and food web models.

    Jill A Olin

    Full Text Available The application of stable isotopes to characterize the complexities of a species foraging behavior and trophic relationships is dependent on assumptions of δ(15N diet-tissue discrimination factors (∆(15N. As ∆(15N values have been experimentally shown to vary amongst consumers, tissues and diet composition, resolving appropriate species-specific ∆(15N values can be complex. Given the logistical and ethical challenges of controlled feeding experiments for determining ∆(15N values for large and/or endangered species, our objective was to conduct an assessment of a range of reported ∆(15N values that can hypothetically serve as surrogates for describing the predator-prey relationships of four shark species that feed on prey from different trophic levels (i.e., different mean δ(15N dietary values. Overall, the most suitable species-specific ∆(15N values decreased with increasing dietary-δ(15N values based on stable isotope Bayesian ellipse overlap estimates of shark and the principal prey functional groups contributing to the diet determined from stomach content analyses. Thus, a single ∆(15N value was not supported for this speciose group of marine predatory fishes. For example, the ∆(15N value of 3.7‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the bonnethead shark (mean diet δ(15N = 9‰ whereas a ∆(15N value < 2.3‰ provided the highest percent overlap between prey and predator isotope ellipses for the white shark (mean diet δ(15N = 15‰. These data corroborate the previously reported inverse ∆(15N-dietary δ(15N relationship when both isotope ellipses of principal prey functional groups and the broader identified diet of each species were considered supporting the adoption of different ∆(15N values that reflect the predators' δ(15N-dietary value. These findings are critical for refining the application of stable isotope modeling approaches as inferences regarding a species

  10. Synthesis of [15N] and [side-chain 1-13C] isotopomers of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl phosphates

    Nitration of 1-phenylethyl acetate with NH4NO3-trifluoroacetic anhydride gave a mixture of ortho- and para-nitro products, which were separable by chromatography after saponification of the acetate. The ortho-isomer [1-(2-nitrophenyyl)ethanol] was converted to the 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl esters of monomethyl phosphate and of the γ-phosphate of ATP. The title isotopomers were prepared using either ammonium [15N]nitrate or [side-chain 1-13C]1-phenylethyl acetate as starting materials. A correction is made to the reported 1H NMR spectrum of caged ATP and the effects of isotopic substitution on the mass spectra fragmentation of 1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethanol are tabulated. (author)

  11. Nuclear magnetic relaxation of liquids in porous media

    Nuclear magnetic relaxation is useful for probing physical and chemical properties of liquids in porous media. Examples are given on high surface area porous materials including calibrated porous silica glasses, granular packings, plaster pastes, cement-based materials and natural porous materials, such as sandstone and carbonate rocks. Here, we outline our recent NMR relaxation work for these very different porous materials. For instance, low field NMR relaxation of water in calibrated granular packings leads to striking different pore-size dependencies of the relaxation times T1 and T2 when changing the amount of surface paramagnetic impurities. This allows separation of the diffusion and surface limited regimes of relaxation in these macroporous media. The magnetic field dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1(ω0) is also a rich source of dynamical information for characterizing the molecular dynamics of liquids in porous media. This allows a continuous characterization of the evolving microstructure of various cementitious materials. Our recent applications of two-dimensional (2D) T1-T2 and T2-z-store-T2 correlation experiments have evidenced the water exchange in connected micropores of cement pastes. The direct probing of water adsorption time on a solid surface gives access to an original characterization of the surface nano-wettability of porous plaster pastes. We show that such a parameter depends directly on the physical chemistry of the pore surfaces. Lastly, we outline our recent measurements of wettability in oil/brine/reservoir carbonate rocks.

  12. Effect of applying wheat stubble on preservation and utilization of n-fertilizer by 15N trace technique

    By using 15N trace technique, the effect of applying wheat stubble on the preservation and utilization rate of 15N- ammonium sulphate have been studied. The abundance of (15NH4)2SO4 fertilizer was 8.92%. After three years pot test and field plot test, the results showed that the yields with '15N+mulching' and '15N+incorporating' treated were increased by 5.4∼30.0% for spring wheat and millet(pot test), and 18∼23% for winter wheat and summer corn(field plot test), as compared with only '15N' treatment. The results of 15N-fertilizer labelled tests showed that the utilization rates of 15N-fertilizer treated by '15N+mulching' for cropping seasons were 57.8%, 65.8%, 36.6% and 8.5% respectively. These were increased 3.7%, 10.2%, 21.5% and 2.8% as compared with only '15N' treatment. Comparing with only '15N'treatment, the N leached off by percolation water was decreasing 50%, the loss of N caused by volatilization was decreasing 30.3% and the N in humus was increasing 21.1%. All of these proved that the applying of wheat stubble in different mode would adjust and control the activation of microbe in the soil, and the preservation and utilization rate of fertilizer in the soul would be increased

  13. Application time of nitrogen fertilizer 15N by a potato crop (Solanum Tuberosum L.)

    This study was performed at the ''San Jorge'' experimental farm of the Instituto Colombiano Agropecuario (ICA), Bogota, Colombia. The study was performed to investigate the effect of timing of application of nitrogen fertilizer on the productivity of, and the efficiency of utilization of 15N-labelled fertilizer by, a potato crop (Solanum tuberosum L.), cv. Tequendama. The crop was fertilized with 100, 200 and 100 Kg/ha-1 of N, P2O5 and K2O respectively. The N fertilizers were either added as 15N labelled urea (2.955 at.% 15N excess) or as labelled ammonium sulphate (2.071 at.% 15N excess). In all treatments with nitrogen, a total of 100 Kg N ha-1 was added, but the nitrogen was added either in two or three split doses (only one dose being labelled with 15N) at the following times: at planting, 35 days after emergence (DAE) and/or 60 DAE. It was found that: a) Nitrogen fertilization increased tuber production from 24 to 43 t/ha-1; b) The tubers constituted approximately 80% of total plant dry matter and 70% of the total nitrogen and fertilizer N accumulated by the plant; c) The fertilizer use efficiency varied between 49 and 68%, and the highest efficiency occurred when the nitrogen was split in three doses; d) The urea and ammonium sulphate gave similar results in all parameters evaluated; e) When the total nitrogen difference method was applied to interpretation of the results the fertilizer use efficiency was overestimated by 15 to 30%

  14. Araucaria cunninghamii Seedling Response to Different Forms and Rates of 15N-Labelled Fertiliser

    T.J.BLUMFIELD; XU Zhi-Hong

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogenous fertilisers are under consideration for promoting the growth of nursery-reared hoop pine (Araucaria cunninghamii Aiton ex A. Cunn) seedlings in the establishment phase of second rotation (2R) plantations. Using 15Nlabelled fertilisers, we investigated the effect of different forms (ammonium sulphate, ammonium nitrate, potassium nitrate and urea) and rates of application (0, 150 and 300 mg N kg-1 dried soil) of fertilisers on the growth, 15N recovery and carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of hoop pine seedlings in a 12-month glasshouse trial in southeast Queensland,Australia. The 15N-labelled fertilisers were applied to nursery-reared hoop pine seedlings, which were then grown in pots,containing ca. 1.2 kg dried soil, under well watered conditions for 12 months. Four seedlings from each treatment were harvested at 4-month intervals, divided into roots, stem and foliage, with a further subdivision for new and old foliage,and then analysed for 15N, total N, δ13C and total C. There was no significant response in the seedling growth to the form or rate of application of nitrogen (N) fertiliser within the 12-month period, indicating that the seedlings did not experience N deficiency when grown on second rotation hoop pine soils. While the combined 15N recovery from soil and plant remained at around 70% throughout the experiment, the proportion of 15N recovered from the plants increasing steadily over time. Nitrate containing fertilisers at 150 mg N kg-1 soil gradually increased seedling foliage δ13C over the 12-month period, indicating an increase in seedling water use efficiency.

  15. Bradyrhizobium strain and the 15N natural abundance quantification of biological N2 fixation in soybean

    In commercial plantations of soybean in both the Southern and the Cerrado regions, contributions from biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) are generally proportionately high. When using the 15N natural abundance technique to quantify BNF inputs, it is essential to determine, with accuracy, the 15N abundance of the N derived from BNF (the 'B' value). This study aimed to determine the effect of four recommended strains of Bradyrhizobium spp. (two B. japonicum and two B. elkanii) on the 'B' value of soybean grown in pots in an open field using an equation based on the determination of δ15N natural abundance in a non-labelled soil, and estimate of the contribution of BNF derived from the use of 15N-isotope dilution in soils enriched with 15N. To evaluate N2 fixation by soybean, three non-N2-fixing reference crops were grown under the same conditions. Regardless of Bradyrhizobium strain, no differences were observed in dry matter, nodule weight and total N between labelled and non-labelled soil. The N2 fixation of the soybeans grown in the two soil conditions were similar. The mean 'B' values of the soybeans inoculated with the B. japonicum strains were -1.84 per mille and -0.50 per mille, while those inoculated with B. elkanii were -3.67 per mille and -1.0 per mille, for the shoot tissue and the whole plant, respectively. Finally, the 'B' value for the soybean crop varied considerably in function of the inoculated Bradyrhizobium strain, being most important when only the shoot tissue was utilised to estimate the proportion of N in the plant derived from N2 fixation. (author)

  16. Distribution of 15N-labeled urea injected into field-grown corn plants

    Nitrogen (N) assimilate supply to developing corn (Zea mays L.) ears plays a critical role in grain dry weight accumulation. The use of stem-perfused/injected 15N labeled compounds to determine the effects of an artificial N source on the subsequent distribution of injected N and grain weight of field-grown corn plants has not been reported previously. Our objective was to assess the distribution of N added via an artificial source. Three soil N fertilizer levels (0, 180, and 270 kg N ha-1) and three N solutions (distilled water control and 15N enriched urea at 15 and 30 mM N) were arranged in a split-plot design. Three N concentrations were injected using a pressurized stem injection technique. The injection started fifteen days after silking and continued until immediately prior to plant physiological maturity. The average uptake volume was 256 mL over the 30-day injection period. The N supplied via injection represented 1.5 to 3% of the total plant N. Neither soil applied N fertilizer nor injected N altered dry matter distribution among plant tissues. As the concentration of N in the injected solutions increased, N concentrations increased in the grain and upper stalks, and % 15N atom excess in ear+1 leaves and leaves increased. The relative degree of 15N enrichment for each of the tissues measured was injected internode grain upper stalks leaves lower stalks cob husk ear + 1 leaf ear leaf. This study indicated that the exogenous N supplied via stem-injection, was incorporated into all the measured plant parts, although not uniformly. The distribution of the injected 15N was affected both by the proximity of sinks to the point of injection and the strength of the various sinks

  17. Evaluating δ(15)N-body size relationships across taxonomic levels using hierarchical models.

    Reum, Jonathan C P; Marshall, Kristin N

    2013-12-01

    Ecologists routinely set out to estimate the trophic position of individuals, populations, and species composing food webs, and nitrogen stable isotopes (δ(15)N) are a widely used proxy for trophic position. Although δ(15)N values are often sampled at the level of individuals, estimates and confidence intervals are frequently sought for aggregations of individuals. If individual δ(15)N values are correlated as an artifact of sampling design (e.g., clustering of samples in space or time) or due to intrinsic groupings (e.g., life history stages, social groups, taxonomy), such estimates may be biased and exhibit overly optimistic confidence intervals. However, these issues can be accommodated using hierarchical modeling methods. Here, we demonstrate how hierarchical models offer an additional quantitative tool for investigating δ(15)N variability and we explicitly evaluate how δ(15)N varies with body size at successively higher levels of taxonomic aggregation in a diverse fish assemblage. The models take advantage of all available data, better account for uncertainty in parameters estimates, may improve inferences on coefficients corresponding to groups with small to moderate sample sizes, and partition variation across model levels, which provides convenient summaries of the 'importance' of each level in terms of unexplained heterogeneity in the data. These methods can easily be applied to diet-based studies of trophic position. Although hierarchical models are well-understood and established tools, their benefits have yet to be fully reaped by stable isotope and food web ecologists. We suggest that hierarchical models can provide a robust framework for conceptualizing and statistically modeling trophic position at multiple levels of aggregation. PMID:23812110

  18. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  19. Influence of open ocean nitrogen supply on the skeletal δ15N of modern shallow-water scleractinian corals

    Wang, Xingchen T.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Cohen, Anne L.; Sinclair, Daniel J.; Sherrell, Robert M.; Cobb, Kim M.; Erler, Dirk V.; Stolarski, Jarosław; Kitahara, Marcelo V.; Ren, Haojia

    2016-05-01

    The isotopic composition of skeleton-bound organic nitrogen in shallow-water scleractinian corals (hereafter, CS-δ15N) is an emerging tool for studying the marine nitrogen cycle in the past. The CS-δ15N has been shown to reflect the δ15N of nitrogen (N) sources to corals, with most applications to date focusing on the anthropogenic/terrestrial N inputs to reef environments. However, many coral reefs receive their primary N sources from the open ocean, and the CS-δ15N of these corals may provide information on past changes in the open ocean regional and global N cycle. Using a recently developed persulfate/denitrifier-based method, we measured CS-δ15N in modern shallow-water scleractinian corals from 8 sites proximal to the open ocean. At sites with low open ocean surface nitrate concentrations typical of the subtropics and tropics, measured CS-δ15N variation on seasonal and annual timescales is most often less than 2‰. In contrast, a broad range in CS-δ15N (of ∼10‰) is measured across these sites, with a strong correlation between CS-δ15N and the δ15N of the deep nitrate supply to the surface waters near the reefs. While CS-δ15N can be affected by other N sources as well and can vary in response to local reef conditions as well as coral/symbiont physiological changes, this survey indicates that, when considering corals proximal to the open ocean, the δ15N of the subsurface nitrate supply to surface waters drives most of the CS-δ15N variation across the global ocean. Thus, CS-δ15N is a promising proxy for reconstructing the open ocean N cycle in the past.

  20. Ultrafast multidimensional Laplace NMR for a rapid and sensitive chemical analysis

    Ahola, Susanna; Zhivonitko, Vladimir V.; Mankinen, Otto; Zhang, Guannan; Kantola, Anu M.; Chen, Hsueh-Ying; Hilty, Christian; Koptyug, Igor V.; Telkki, Ville-Veikko

    2015-09-01

    Traditional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy relies on the versatile chemical information conveyed by spectra. To complement conventional NMR, Laplace NMR explores diffusion and relaxation phenomena to reveal details on molecular motions. Under a broad concept of ultrafast multidimensional Laplace NMR, here we introduce an ultrafast diffusion-relaxation correlation experiment enhancing the resolution and information content of corresponding 1D experiments as well as reducing the experiment time by one to two orders of magnitude or more as compared with its conventional 2D counterpart. We demonstrate that the method allows one to distinguish identical molecules in different physical environments and provides chemical resolution missing in NMR spectra. Although the sensitivity of the new method is reduced due to spatial encoding, the single-scan approach enables one to use hyperpolarized substances to boost the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude, significantly enhancing the overall sensitivity of multidimensional Laplace NMR.