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Sample records for 141ce 144ce fission

  1. Chromatographic isolation of 144Ce and 144Pr from the wastes of irradiated uranium treatment

    A two-step chromatographic technique was elaborated to isolate 144Ce, 144Pr from a solution of uranium fission products in 6M HNO3. The oxidation to Ce(III) by bromate and selective adsorption of 144Ce(IV) on anion exchange column were used to concentrate and purify 144Ce. Some impurities of uranium, 95Zr, 95Nb, 106Ru remain in 144Ce solution after the first step of its isolation. The final purification is achieved by passing the 6M HNO3 solution of 144Ce(IV) through the HDEHP-coated teflon column. The decontamination factors of 144Ce from main fission products are given. 7.2 mCi of (144Ce+144Pr) are recovered from each gram of irradiated uranium trioxide with the yield greater than 99%. An improvement of known generator was carried out to elute a purer 144Pr from maternal 144Ce(IV) adsorbed on the anion exchange column. (author)

  2. Quantitative analysis of fission products by γ spectrography

    The activity of the fission products present in treated solutions of irradiated fuels is given as a function of the time of cooling and of the irradiation time. The variation of the ratio (144Ce + 144Pr activity)/ 137Cs activity) as a function of these same parameters is also given. From these results a method is deduced giving the 'age' of the solution analyzed. By γ-scintillation spectrography it was possible to estimate the following elements individually: 141Ce, 144Ce + 144Pr, 103Ru, 106Ru + 106Rh, 137Cs, 95Zr + 95Nb. Yield curves are given for the case of a single emitter. Of the various existing methods, that of the least squares was used for the quantitative analysis of the afore-mentioned fission products. The accuracy attained varies from 3 to 10%. (author)

  3. Assessment of selected fission products in the Savannah River Site environment

    Most of the radioactivity produced by the operation of a nuclear reactor results from the fission process, during which the nucleus of a fissionable atom (such as 235U) splits into two or more nuclei, which typically are radioactive. The Radionuclide Assessment Program (RAP) has reported on fission products cesium, strontium, iodine, and technetium. Many other radionuclides are produced by the fission process. Releases of several additional fission products that result in dose to the offsite population are discussed in this publication. They are 95Zr, 95Nb, 103Ru, 106Ru, 141Ce, and 144Ce. This document will discuss the production, release, migration, and dose to humans for each of these selected fission products

  4. A new 144Ce/144Pr radioisotope generator system

    A miniaturized generator system was developed containing manganese dioxide-coated alumina on which 144Ce is deposited and from which 144Pr is eluted with an aqueous solution of 1% KIO3 in 1 N nitric acid. More than 60% of the 144Pr was recovered with a 99.9% radionuclide purity even after 2000 ml eluant and 1000 1 or air had been passed through the column. (author)

  5. Toxicity of 144Ce inhaled in a relatively insoluble form by immature beagle dogs. VI

    Immature Beagle dogs (approximately equal to 3 months of age at exposure) have been exposed by inhalation to a relatively insoluble form of 144Ce (in fused aluminosilicate particles) to compare the resulting patterns of metabolism, dosimetry and biological effects with those seen in dogs exposed at 12 and 14 months of age and at 8 to 10.5 years of age. Five blocks of longevity animals, each consisting of 10 exposed dogs and one control, are currently on experiment. The initial lung burdens of the 144Ce-exposed dogs range from 0.004 to 140 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight. Three dogs with initial lung burdens of 73 to 120 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight died at 66 to 121 days after exposure with pulmonary injury and congestive heart failure. One dog with an initial lung burden of 140 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight died at 91 days after exposure with severe radiation pneumonitis and minimal pulmonary fibrosis and another dog whose initial lung burden was 70 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight died at 511 days after exposure with pulmonary injury that was mainly fibrotic in nature. Two dogs with initial lung burdens of 52 and 64 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight had primary pulmonary hemangiosarcomas and died at 618 and 689 days, respectively, with cumulative average absorbed beta doses to lung of 23,000 and 29,000 rads. One dog with an initial lung burden of 28 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight was euthanized at 1227 days after exposure with a hemangiosarcoma of the mediastinum, and another dog with an initial lung burden of 12 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight died at 1520 days after exposure from epilepsy. Serial observations are continuing on the surviving 40 exposed and five control dogs

  6. Toxicity of 144Ce inhaled in a relatively insoluble form by immature Beagle dogs. XVII

    Immature Beagle dogs (3-mo old) received a single, brief inhalation exposure to 144Ce in fused aluminosilicate particles as part of a series of studies designed to study the effects of age on dose response relationships for inhaled radionuclides. Forty-nine dogs inhaled graded levels of 144Ce that resulted in initial lung burdens ranging from 0.004-140 μCi/kg 0.15-5200 kBq/kg) body weight. Five control dogs inhaled nonradioactive fused aluminosilicate particles. Forty-one of the 144Ce-exposed dogs have died: 11 with lung tumors 4 with tumors of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes, with a nasal cavity tumor, and 9 with non neoplastic diseases of the respiratory tract. Observations are continuing on the 8 144Ce-exposed dogs that are surviving at this time. (author)

  7. Toxicity of inhaled 144CeCl3 in beagle dogs. VIII

    Studies on the metabolism, dosimetry, and effects of inhaled 144CeCl3 in the Beagle dog are continuing to provide information that will aid in assessing the biological consequences of inhaling 144Ce such as might be released in certain nuclear accidents. Studies on the tissue distribution of inhaled 144CeCl3 have shown that the 144Ce deposited in lung is translocated at a moderately rapid rate to liver and skeleton and that significant radiation doses are accumulated by all three organs. Fifty-five dogs that inhaled 144CeCl3 and 15 control dogs were placed in a longevity study and are being observed for their lifespan. The 144Ce dogs had long-term retained burdens with values ranging from 20 to 2900 μCi. Thirty-one of the dogs exposed to 144CeCl3 have died; 8 at 21 to 44 days after inhalation with signs attributed to severe bone marrow damage and associated pancytopenia; 2 at 138 and 144 days with radiation pneumonitis; 3 at 309 to 874 days with hepatic necrosis; 1 at 510 days with marrow aplasia; 1 at 375 days with pulmonary fibrosis; and 16 at 799 to 3081 days, most with neoplasms or myeloproliferative disorders. In this last group, 1 dog had an osteosarcoma, 3 had squamous cell carcinomas of the maxilla, 2 of the latter also having primary pulmonary neoplasms, 5 had hemangiosarcomas of the liver, 1 had a hemangiosarcoma of the nasal cavity, 2 had myelogenous leukemia, 1 had myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia, 1 had spinal cord ependymomas, and 2 did not have neoplasms. One of these had severe myelomalacia and the other diffuse hepatic lipidosis with severe degeneration. Two controls died; 1 with a thyroid carcinoma and 1 with aspiration pneumonia. Serial observations are continuing on the 24 surviving 144CeCl3 dogs and 13 control dogs. (U.S.)

  8. Toxicity of inhaled 144CeCl3 in beagle dogs. XI

    Studies on the metabolism, dosimetry and effects of inhaled 144CeCl3 in Beagle dogs are being conducted to assess the biological consequences of inhaling 144Ce such as might be released in certain nuclear accidents. Studies on the organ distribution of inhaled 144CeCl3 have shown that the 144Ce deposited in the lung is translocated at a moderately rapid rate to liver and skeleton and that significant radiation doses are accumulated by all three organs. Fifty-five dogs that inhaled 144CeCl3 and 15 control dogs are being observed for their life span. The 144Ce dogs have long-term retained burdens with values ranging from 20 to 2900 μCi. Forty-five of the dogs exposed to 144CeCl3 have died; eight from 21 to 44 days after inhalation with severe bone marrow damage and associated pancytopenia; two at 138 and 144 days with radiation pneumonitis; three from 309 to 874 days with hepatic necrosis; one at 510 days with marrow aplasia; one at 375 days with pulmonary fibrosis; and 30 from 799 to 4085 days, most with neoplasms or myeloproliferative disorders. In this last group, one dog had an osteosarcoma, five had squamous cell carcinomas of the nasal cavity (two also having primary pulmonary neoplasms), six had hemangiosarcomas of the liver, one had a hemangiosarcoma of the nasal cavity, two had myelogenous leukemia, one had myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia, one had spinal cord ependymomas, one had a malignant melanoma (also an ependymoma) and two had mammary adenocarcinomas. Three dogs had primary pulmonary neoplasms including two with bronchogenic adenocarcinomas and one with an adenoma. Seven did not have malignant neoplasms. Two of these had severe myelomalacia, one had pulmonary edema, three had congestive heart failure and one had diffuse hepatic lipidosis with severe hepatic degeneration

  9. Toxicity of 144Ce inhaled in a relatively insoluble form by aged Beagle dogs. XII

    The toxicity of relatively insoluble 144Ce inhaled by 8- to 10.5-year-old Beagle dogs is being investigated to determine possible age-related differences in long-term biological responses. Forty-two dogs were exposed to aerosols of 144Ce in fused aluminosilicate particles to yield initial lung burdens of 2.2 to 75 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight, and 12 control dogs were exposed to non-radioactive fused aluminosilicate particles. All 144Ce-exposed and control dogs have died or were euthanized between 197 and 2726 days after the inhalation exposure. Prominent findings in the 144Ce-exposed dogs were radiation pneumonitis in 19 of the 23 dogs that died during the first 943 days after exposure, and neoplastic disease in 13 of the 20 dogs that died beyond 904 days after exposure. Pulmonary tumors were found in five of these dogs. In contrast to the study with young adult dogs, in which pulmonary hemangiosarcomas were one of the prominent findings, all of these tumors were carcinomas

  10. Toxicity of 144Ce inhaled in a relatively insoluble form by immature Beagle dogs. XII

    Immature Beagle dogs (3 months old) were exposed once by inhalation to an aerosol of 144Ce incorporated in fused aluminosilicate particles. The influence of this age on the dose-response relationships is being compared to that of 13-mo-old and 8 to 10.5-yr-old dogs. This study involves 49 dogs that received graded initial lung burdens from 0.004 to 140 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight and five control dogs. To date, 19 of the 144Ce-exposed dogs and one of the controls have died. Dogs with the highest initial lung burdens of 144Ce died during the first 4 months with radiation pneumonitis, pulmonary fibrosis, and congestive heart failure. Pulmonary hemangiosarcoma was the primary finding in dogs that died at 1.5 to 2 years after exposure. Deaths beyond that time have been due primarily to extrapulmonary hemangiosarcomas. Observations are continued on the surviving 30 144Ce-exposed and four control dogs at 7.0 to 11.2 years after exposure

  11. Toxicity of inhaled 144Ce in fused aluminosilicate particles in aged beagle dogs. V

    The toxicity of 144Ce in fused aluminosilicate particles inhaled by 8- to 10.5-yr-old dogs is being investigated to provide information on age-related differences in the response of older members of the human population to accidental inhalation of radioactive aerosols. These data on aged dogs will be compared to the results of similar studies of dogs exposed at approximately 3 mo or 12 to 14 mo of age. Six blocks of five female dogs each have been divided into four exposure levels with mean initial lung burdens of 7.2, 14, 28 and 57 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight. Six blocks of four male dogs have been divided into three exposure levels with mean initial lung burdens of 7.2, 14 and 28 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight. Controls in each block were exposed to fused aluminosilicate particles containing stable cerium. Fifteen dogs with initial lung burdens ranging from 20 to 75 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight and cumulative doses to lung of from 22,000 to 74,000 rads have died or were euthanized 197 to 1207 days after exposure with clinicopathologic findings of radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis.Pulmonary retention of the inhaled 144Ce was similar to that observed previously in dogs exposed at 18 to 22 mo of age in a radiation dose pattern study. Serial observations are continuing on the 19 surviving 144Ce-exposed and eight control dogs

  12. Toxicity of 144Ce fused clay particles inhaled by aged dogs. III

    The toxicity of 144Ce fused clay particles inhaled by 8- to 10.5-year-old dogs is being investigated to provide information on age-related differences in the response of older members of the human population to accidental inhalation of radioactive aerosols. These data on aged dogs will be compared to the results of similar studies using dogs exposed at approximately 3 months or 12 to 14 months of age. To date, 7 blocks of 5 dogs each, divided into 4 exposure levels with mean initial lung burdens of 7.5, 14, 24, and 57 μCi/kg body weight and control dogs exposed to non-labeled fused clay particles have been entered into a longevity study. Twelve dogs with initial lung burdens ranging from 20 to 75 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight and cumulative doses to lung of from 22,000 to 74,000 rads have died at 197 to 943 days post-inhalation with clinico-pathologic findings of radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. Two of these also had congestive heart failure. In addition, 4 dogs with ILBs of 8 to 14 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight have died of mammary neoplasms or congestive heart failure but without radiation pneumonitis. One dog with an ILB of 9 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight died with a chronic interstitial foreign body pneumonia. Two control dogs have died, one with a mammary carcinoma and one with pyometra. Pulmonary retention of the inhaled 144Ce was similar to that observed previously in dogs exposed at 18 to 22 months of age in a radiation dose pattern study. Serial observations are continuing on the 11 surviving 144Ce-exposed dogs and 5 controls. (U.S.)

  13. Toxicity of 144Ce inhaled in a relatively insoluble form by immature Beagle dogs. VIII

    The influence of age at exposure on the resulting patterns of deposition, retention, dosimetry and biological effects from a single inhalation exposure to a relatively insoluble form of a beta-emitting radionuclide with a relatively long physical half-life is being investigated. Immature Beagle dogs (3 months of age) have been exposed once, by inhalation, to an aerosol of 144Ce incorporated in fused aluminosilicate particles. Eighteen of these dogs were serially sacrificed to study the patterns of deposition, retention and dosimetry and the remaining 49 dogs received graded initial lung burdens that ranged from 0.004 to 140 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight and are being observed over their life span for study of the resulting long-term biological effects. Five control dogs are also included in this study. To date, 13 of the 144Ce-exposed dogs in the longevity study and none of the controls have died. Dogs with the highest initial lung burdens of 144Ce died first (during the first 4 months) with radiation pneumonitis, pulmonary fibrosis and congestive heart failure. Pulmonary hemangiosarcoma was the primary finding in dogs that died at 1.5 to 2 years after exposure. Deaths beyond that time have primarily involved extrapulmonary hemangiosarcomas. One dog, 627B, with an initial lung burden of 24 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight died during the past year at 2341 days after exposure with a widely disseminated hemangiosarcoma showing heavy involvement of the liver and skin. Observations are continuing on the surviving 36 144Ce-exposed and five control dogs

  14. Toxicity of 144Ce inhaled in a relatively insoluble form by aged beagle dogs. VI

    The toxicity of 144Ce inhaled in fused aluminosilicate particles by 8 to 10.5-year-old dogs is being investigated to provide information on age-related differences in the response of older members of the human population to accidental inhalation of radioactive aerosols. These data on aged dogs will be compared to the results of similar studies of dogs exposed at approximately 3 months or 12 to 14 months of age. Six blocks of five female dogs each have been divided into four exposure levels with mean initial lung burdens of 7.2, 14, 28 and 57 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight. Six blocks of four male dogs each have been divided into three exposure levels with mean initial lung burdens of 7.2, 14 and 28 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight. Controls in each block were exposed to fused aluminosilicate particles containing stable cerium. Eighteen dogs with initial lung burdens ranging from 14 to 75 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight and cumulative doses to lung of from 22,000 to 74,000 rads have died or were euthanized 197 to 1207 days after exposure with clinicopathologic findings of radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis

  15. Effect of 144Ce inhaled in fused clay particles on the tracheobronchial lymph nodes

    Tracheobronchial lymph node changes and lymphopenia are sequelae to inhalation of relatively insoluble radioactive aerosols by Beagle dogs. To assess the development of these lesions, tracheobronchial lymph nodes from dogs that inhaled 144Ce in fused clay particles were examined at intervals from 2 to 730 days after exposure. Initial lung burdens in the dogs studied ranged from 33 to 63 μCi/kg body weight. The concentration of radioisotope in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes increased during the first year after exposure and exceeded that in the lung about 100 days after exposure. Autoradiographs of the lymph nodes showed that 144Ce particles were present in macrophages in the paracortical zone two days after exposure and that concentrations continued to increase in the paracortical zone and medullary cords. Histologic changes in the nodes included atrophy of the germinal centers and lymphocytic follicles, loss of lymphocytes and accumulation of macrophages in the paracortical zone, accumulation of pigment and isotope-laden macrophages in the medullary cords, occasional infiltrates of neutrophils in the medullary cords and, at later time periods, focal fibrosis of the medullary cords. Tracheobronchial lymph node weights of the dogs exposed to 144Ce in fused clay were not decreased until 512 days after exposure. These findings indicate that tracheobronchial lymph nodes accumulate relatively high burdens of 144Ce after inhalation of 144Ce in a relatively insoluble form and that the pathologic changes resulting from these burdens are basically atrophic in nature. Primary neoplasms in lymph nodes have not been observed in dogs with initial lung burdens from 0.0024 to over 30 μCi/kg body weight followed for up to 2000 days post-exposure. At the higher levels, however, a high incidence of primary pulmonary neoplasia has been observed. (U.S.)

  16. Toxicity of 144Ce inhaled in a relatively insoluble form by immature Beagle dogs. VII

    Immature Beagle dogs (approx. = 3 months of age at exposure) have been exposed by inhalation to a relatively insoluble form of 144Ce (in fused aluminosilicate particles) to compare the resulting patterns of metabolism, dosimetry and biological effects with those seen in dogs exposed at 12 and 14 months of age and at 8 to 10.5 years of age. Five blocks of longevity animals, each consisting of 10 exposed dogs and one control, are currently being studied. The initial lung burdens of the 144Ce-exposed dogs range from 0.004 to 140 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight. Three dogs with initial lung burdens of 73 to 120 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight died at 66 to 121 days after exposure with pulmonary injury and congestive heart failure. One dog with an initial lung burden of 140 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight died at 91 days after exposure with severe radiation pneumonitis and minimal pulmonary fibrosis and another dog whose initial lung burden was 70 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight died at 511 days after exposure with pulmonary injury that was mainly fibrotic in nature. Four dogs with initial lung burdens of 52 to 79 μCi/kg body weight had primary pulmonary hemangiosarcomas and died between 618 and 738 days, with cumulative average absorbed beta doses to lung of 23,000 to 31,000 rads. Two of these dogs, 1027S and 1024D, died within the past year. One dog with an initial lung burden of 28 μCi/kg body weight was euthanized at 1227 days after exposure with an hemangiosarcoma of the mediastinum. Within the past year, Dog 627S, with an initial lung burden of 48 μCi/kg body weight, died 1732 days after exposure with hemangiosarcoma primary in the liver or spleen. A dog with an initial lung burden of 12 μCi/kg body weight died from epilepsy at 1520 days after exposure. Serial observations are continuing on the surviving 37 exposed and five control dogs

  17. Toxicity of inhaled 144Ce fused clay particles in beagle dogs. VII

    The metabolism, dosimetry, and effects of inhaled 144Ce in fused clay particles are being investigated in the Beagle dog to aid in assessing the biological consequences of release of 144Ce in a relatively insoluble form such as might occur in certain types of nuclear accidents. The toxicity of inhaled 144Ce fused clay is also of general interest since it is representative of intermediate-lived beta-emitting radionuclides. Two major studies with young adult dogs (12 to 14 months of age at exposure) are involved: (1) a metabolism and dosimetry study in which 24 dogs were serially sacrificed over an extended period of time, and (2) a longevity study with 2 series of dogs; Series I with 15 dogs exposed to aerosols of 144Ce in fused clay particles to yield initial lung burdens of 11 to 210 μCi/kg body weight and 3 control dogs exposed to nonradioactive fused clay particles and Series II with 96 dogs exposed to aerosols of 144Ce in fused clay particles to yield initial lung burdens of 0.0024 to 66 μCi/kg body weight and 12 control dogs exposed to nonradioactive fused clay particles. Twenty-eight dogs died or were euthanized at 143 to 2396 days after inhalation of 144Ce. The prominent findings were radiation pneumonitis in 17 dogs that died or were euthanized at early time periods and neoplastic disease in 10 of the 11 dogs that died or were euthanized at 750 days or later; 5 with hemangiosarcoma of the lung, 1 with both a hemangiosarcoma and a fibrosarcoma of the lung, 1 with both a bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma and a hemangiosarcoma of lung, 1 with a hemangiosarcoma of lung, bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma, and a bronchiogenic adenocarcinoma, and 1 each with a hemangiosarcoma of the mediastinum and of the spleen. The cumulative radiation dose to the lung at time of death has ranged from 22,000 to 140,000 rads. Serial observations are continuing on the 83 survivors and 15 controls. (U.S.)

  18. Extraction of carrier-free 144Ce with acetylacetone and 8-hydroxyquinoline

    The extraction of carrier-free 144Ce with 3.25 to 0.65 M solutions of acetylacetone in carbon tetrachloride and with 1.0 to 0.01 M solutions of 8-hydroxyquinoline in chloroform at a constant as well as variable pH was investigated. On the basis of the analysis of distribution curves it may be presumed that in both extraction systems the oxidation of cerium(III) to cerium(IV) microamounts takes place. The distribution curves of extraction and reextraction in the systems with 8-hydroxyquinoline show a considerable complexity. In the extraction system with acetylacetone constants were found which satisfactorily express the distribution of 144Ce in this system. (author)

  19. Biological effects of repeated exposure of beagle dogs to relatively insoluble aerosols of 144Ce. IV

    This experiment is being conducted to study the behavior and long-term biological effects in Beagle dogs of 144Ce inhaled in fused aluminosilicate particles in repeated inhalation exposures for comparison with similar data from dogs that were exposed only once to a similar aerosol. Four groups of nine dogs each were exposed once every eight weeks for two years (13 exposures) to achieve specified exposure goals. The 144Ce-exposed dogs received increasing or relatively constant beta radiation dose rates in contrast to the steadily decreasing dose rate seen after a single inhalation exposure. Exposures in the first and second groups were planned to yield a cumulative absorbed dose to lung of approximately equal to 35,000 rads and those in the third group approximately equal to 17,000 rads within two years after the first exposure. Singly exposed dogs that had died with pulmonary tumors when this experiment was initiated had cumulative doses to death of 29,000 to 61,000 rads. All 13 exposures have been completed. One dog in the 4.5-μCi 144Ce/kg body weight group died at 771 days after first exposure with emaciation, adrenal cortical degeneration and bone marrow aplasia. One control dog died accidentally during anesthesia. During the past year, two additional dogs have died. One dog in the repeated 2.5-μCi 144Ce/kg body weight group died at 1256 days after the first exposure with radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis and a control dog died at 1052 days with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The remaining 32 dogs appear to be in good physical condition except for a persistent lymphopenia at approximately equal to 4 years after the first exposure. They are being maintained for life span observations

  20. The uptake of 90Sr, 137Cs and 144Ce by leaves of spring wheat and rape

    The distribution and accumulation of 90Sr, 137Cs, 144Ce through the leaf surface into the plant have been studied. The results show that the uptake rate of 137Cs by crop plant is about 53%, while the uptake rate for 90Sr and 144Ce is about 0.4%. However 90Sr is absorbed in significant amount from soil whereas 137Cs is absorbed in negligible amount

  1. Influence of chelation therapy (DTPA) on 141Ce retention in rats

    We investigated the influence of oral and parenteral administration of chelation therapy on the retention of 141Ce in young rats. Opposite to results obtained in adult rats present results show high efficacy of oral chelation therapy in reducing radiocerium retention in the whole body and organs of suckling rats. (author) 3 refs

  2. Liver tumors in Beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to 144CeCl3

    Primary malignant hepatic neoplasms developed in 9 of 55 Beagle dogs (16 percent) exposed to 144CeCl3 in CsCl aerosol (seven primary hepatic hemangiosarcomas, one hepatocellular carcinoma and one intrahepatic bile duct carcinoma). Cerium-144 was rapidly translocated from the lung to the liver and skeleton; the liver received the highest cumulative beta dose. The latent periods of hepatic hemangiosarcomas appeared to be dose-related; death from hepatic hemangiosarcoma occurred earlier in dogs which received higher beta doses

  3. Development of a phantom and assessment of (141)Ce as a surrogate radionuclide for flood field uniformity testing of gamma cameras.

    Saxena, Sanjay Kumar; Kumar, Yogendra; Malpani, Basant; Rakshit, Sutapa; Dash, Ashutosh

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes an indigenous method for development and deployment of rechargeable liquid filled phantom with newly proposed radionuclide (141)Ce for determination of extrinsic uniformity of gamma cameras. Details about design of phantom, neutron irradiation of cerium targets, chemical processing of (141)Ce, charging of phantom with (141)Ce solution and their performance evaluation are presented. Suitability of (141)Ce in quality assurance of gamma cameras used in in-vivo diagnostic imaging procedures has been amply demonstrated. PMID:27031297

  4. Standard test method for gamma energy emission from fission products in uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solution

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of gamma energy emitted from fission products in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. It is intended to provide a method for demonstrating compliance with UF6 specifications C 787 and C 996 and uranyl nitrate specification C 788. 1.2 The lower limit of detection is 5000 MeV Bq/kg (MeV/kg per second) of uranium and is the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual reporting limits of the nuclides to be measured. The limit of detection was determined on a pure, aged natural uranium (ANU) solution. The value is dependent upon detector efficiency and background. 1.3 The nuclides to be measured are106Ru/ 106Rh, 103Ru,137Cs, 144Ce, 144Pr, 141Ce, 95Zr, 95Nb, and 125Sb. Other gamma energy-emitting fission nuclides present in the spectrum at detectable levels should be identified and quantified as required by the data quality objectives. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its us...

  5. K-shell ionization in the beta decay of 141Ce

    The total K-shell ionization probability accompanying the β- decay of 141Ce to the 0.145-MeV level in 141Pr was determined to be (1.79 +- 0.11) x 10-4 from Pr Kα x rays in coincidence with the 0.145-MeV gamma ray. This result is in very good agreement with the theoretical calculations of Law and Suzuki

  6. Biological effects of repeated inhalation exposure of Beagle dogs to relatively insoluble aerosols of 144Ce. V

    The behavior and long-term biological effects in Beagle dogs of 144Ce inhaled in fused aluminosilicate particles in repeated inhalation exposures are being studied for comparison with data from dogs that were exposed only once to a similar aerosol. Four groups of nine dogs each were exposed once every 8 weeks for 2 years (13 exposures) to achieve specified exposure goals. These goals were: to increase the lung burden by 2.5 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight with each exposure in the first group; to reestablish lung burdens of 9 or 4.5 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight in the second and third groups, respectively; and to expose controls (fourth group) to fused aluminosilicate particles containing stable cerium. With these exposure sequences, the 144Ce-exposed dogs received increasing or relatively constant beta radiation dose rates in contrast to the steadily decreasing dose rate seen after a single inhalation exposure. Exposures in the first and second groups were planned to yield a cumulative absorbed dose to lung of approx. = 35,000 rads and those in the third group approx. = 17,000 rads within two years after the first exposure. All 13 exposures have been completed. During the past year, one dog in the 9.0 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight group died at 1558 days after the first exposure with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The remaining 24 144Ce-exposed and seven control dogs generally appear to be in good physical condition with exception of a persistent lymphopenia at approx. = 5 years after the first exposure. They are continuing to be maintained for life span observations

  7. Effects of inhaled 144Ce on cardiopulmonary function and histopathology of the dog

    Twelve dogs inhaled single doses of relatively insoluble particles containing 144Ce and six dogs inhaled particles containing stable cerium as controls. Pulmonary function, clinical, and radiographic evaluations were performed serially. The dogs developed progressive radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis similar to that previously reported for whole-lung irradiation from internal or external sources. Focal histologic changes in bronchioles and alveoli were detected functionally during treadmill and tube-breathing stresses at a time when the dogs' clinical and radiographic appearances were normal. Moderate functional impairment was associated with more severe inflammatory and proliferative changes in airways and alveoli. Severe impairment resulted from progressive fibrosis and scarring. These were several strong correlations between functional indices and histological scores. There was a nonlinear relationship between cumulative radiation dose and effects, and once the functional alterations became clinically evident, the disease progressed with little further increase in dose

  8. Biological effects of repeated inhalation exposure of beagle dogs to aerosols of 144Ce in fused clay particles I

    This experiment was initiated to study the biological behavior and long-term effects of repeated inhalation exposures to 144Ce in fused clay particles compared with those seen in Beagle dogs that received a single exposure as young adults. The 36 dogs, divided into four equal groups, are exposed every 8 weeks to achieve the following: to maintain lung burdens of 9 and 4.5 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight in the first and second groups, respectively; to increase the lung burden by 2.5 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight in the third group with each exposure and to expose controls (fourth group) to fused clay containing stable cerium. With these exposure sequences, the 144Ce-exposed dogs will receive increasing or maintained β dose rates in contrast to the steadily decreasing dose rate seen after a single inhalation exposure. Exposures to the first and third groups will produce a cumulative absorbed dose to lung of approximately equal to 35,000 rads and those to the second group will yield approximately equal to 17,000 rads within 2 yr after the first exposure. Single exposure dogs that had died with pulmonary neoplasia when this experiment was initiated had cumulative doses to death of 29,000 to 61,000 rads. Six of the planned 13 exposures have been completed to date. All exposed dogs are surviving and will be maintained for lifespan observation. (U.S.)

  9. Effect on canine lymphocyte function of 144Ce inhaled in fused clay particles

    Beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to 144Ce in fused clay particles develop a persistent lymphopenia and the remaining peripheral lymphocytes in these dogs show a depressed in vitro response to plant mitogens. These studies were designed to evaluate the cellular basis for this defect. The survival and growth of lymphocytes from irradiated and control dogs were evaluated through 96 hours of culture. Many irradiated lymphocytes that were viable in vivo died within 24 hours in vitro. The remaining lymphocytes appeared to grow normally indicating that the early in vitro death was responsible for at least a portion of the difference between irradiated and control lymphocyte cultures. A second experiment was designed to determine if any humoral factors in plasma of irradiated dogs were responsible for the poor response of the lymphocytes. Lymphocytes from irradiated and control dogs were grown with plasma from both types of animals. Heterologous plasma had no apparent effect on lymphocyte growth, indicating that humoral factors were not involved. (U.S.)

  10. Effect of fasting on the transit time of 144Ce in the mouse gut

    Our work with G.I. absorption of actinide elements indicates greater absorption by fasted animals than by animals on regular diets (Weiss and Walburg, undated). Residence time of a metallic compound in the gut may be an important factor influencing G.I. absorption. Cerium-144 (III) chloride was administered by gavage to fasted mice and to mice on regular feed. The G.I. tract was excised, cut into sections, and the activity of each section determined as a function of time after dosing. Our results indicate rapid transit of 144CeCl3 along the empty mouse gut. One hour after dosing, about half the Ce is in the cecal contents; about 40% remains in stomach contents. Twelve hours after dosing, only about 2% remains in the cecum; by 16 hours, almost the entire dose has been cleared from the intestine. Transit times in mice with stomach and intestines containing food were 12 hours longer than in fasted mice. These results lead to the conclusion that factors other than G.I. residence time determine G.I. absorption of actinides in mice

  11. Kinetic study of the deposition of 144Ce, 143Pr and 147Nd on a platinum anode

    Investigation of the electrodeposition of radioactive rare earth metal isotopes confirm that, depending on the conditions of electrolysis, they can be deposited on the platinum either cathodically or anodically. The anodic deposition of these isotopes can take place with electrochemical oxidation or electrosorption without electron-transfer, depending on the lanthanide(III-IV) oxidation potentials. The present paper reports the results of the investigation connected with the anodic deposition of 144Ce, 143Pr and 147Nd. (author)

  12. Biological effects of repeated inhalation exposure of Beagle dogs to relatively insoluble aerosols of 144Ce. VI

    Beagle dogs were exposed repeatedly to a relatively insoluble form of 144Ce (in fused aluminosilicate particles) to study the deposition, retention and long-term biological effects for comparison with data from dogs that were exposed only once to a similar aerosol. Four groups of nine dogs each were exposed once every 8 weeks for 2 years (13 exposures) to achieve specified exposure goals. These goals were: to increase the lung burden by 2.5 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight with each exposure; to reestablish lung burdens of 9 or 4.5 μCi 144Ce/kg body weight and to expose controls to fused aluminosilicate particles containing nonradioactive cerium. With these exposure sequences, the 144Ce-exposed dogs received increasing or relatively constant beta radiation dose rates in contrast to the steadily decreasing dose rate seen after a single inhalation exposure. Following completion of the exposure series, the dogs are being observed for the development of long-term biological effects. To date, 11 dogs have died or were euthanized, nine exposed dogs and two controls. Although pulmonary hemangiosarcomas were a prominent finding in dogs exposed once to the same aerosol at a level that led to cumulative doses to lung similar to these repeatedly exposed dogs, only one has been observed in the repeatedly exposed dogs. Other effects of note to date include three pulmonary carcinomas, two hemangiosarcomas of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes and one splenic hemangiosarcoma. Observations are continuing on the surviving 18 exposed and seven control dogs

  13. Yield-Energy Dependence for 147Nd and 144Ce Under Strong Neutron Field

    QIAN; Jing; LIU; Ting-jin; SUN; Zheng-jun; SHU; Neng-chuan

    2012-01-01

    <正>The data of the fission product yield play an important role in the nuclear science technology and nuclear engineering because they are the key data in the calculation of the decay heat, shield design, nuclear verification, radiochemistry reprocessing and nuclear safety, etc. Especially, it is the essential data in fission power estimation for a fission device. It is well known that there exists a consecutive neutron spectrum with the energy from 1 keV to 15 MeV for a fission-fusion device. So in order to estimate the

  14. Use of 141Ce as a particulate digesta flow tracer in ruminants. II. Behavior of the tracer at the duodenum and in the feces

    A ration of 600 g chopped hay and 150 g ground sorghum is given twice daily to sheep fitted with a rumen cannula and a duodenal reentrant cannula. 141Ce flow rate at the duodenum and in the feces is compared to flow rate of stained hay particles after ingestion of a single labelled meal. After an adaptation period during which both daily meals are labelled, variations in 141Ce concentration are then measured in the duodenal and fecal dry matter. The tracer is used to estimate dry mater digestibility indirectly. Duodenal data show that the mean retention time of 141Ce in the rumen is about 15% less than that of stained particles. The meal after the radioactive one momentarily depresses 141Ce excretion rate while it accelerates that of the stained particles. Mean retention time in the whole gastro-intestinal tract of a meal of 600 g chopped hay 150 g ground sorghum is 40.4+-3.8 h or 32.4+-3.7 h, depending on whether stained particles or 141Ce is used. All the 141Ce ingested is recovered in the feces. Mean recovery of 141Ce in the feces excreted during 200 hours after dosage is 100.2+-5.0%. After a period of adaptation where all meals are radioactive, feces of 2 sheep are sampled either by total collection or directly in the rectum. Dry matter digestibility does not differ whether calculated from total collection or by the indirect method using 141Ce

  15. Decontamination of 60Co and 144Ce. low-activity liquid wastes with the Fe3+ /OH- /Ca2+ /PO-4-3- system

    The influence of reaction time, concentrations of Fe3+ and PO-4-3+, temperature and agitation velocity in the efficiency of decontamination of 60Co and 144Ce low-activity liquid wastes using the Fe3+ /OH-/Ca2+ /PO-4-3+ precipitator system was stud ied in this paper. The mathematical models of this process were obtained for 60Co and 144Ce. The best conditions for the decontamination we re calculated using the optimization program

  16. A Brief Review of Past INL Work Assessing Radionuclide Content in TMI-2 Melted Fuel Debris: The Use of 144Ce as a Surrogate for Pu Accountancy

    D. L. Chichester; S. J. Thompson

    2013-09-01

    This report serves as a literature review of prior work performed at Idaho National Laboratory, and its predecessor organizations Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), studying radionuclide partitioning within the melted fuel debris of the reactor of the Three Mile Island 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant. The purpose of this review is to document prior published work that provides supporting evidence of the utility of using 144Ce as a surrogate for plutonium within melted fuel debris. When the TMI-2 accident occurred no quantitative nondestructive analysis (NDA) techniques existed that could assay plutonium in the unconventional wastes from the reactor. However, unpublished work performed at INL by D. W. Akers in the late 1980s through the 1990s demonstrated that passive gamma-ray spectrometry of 144Ce could potentially be used to develop a semi-quantitative correlation for estimating plutonium content in these materials. The fate and transport of radioisotopes in fuel from different regions of the core, including uranium, fission products, and actinides, appear to be well characterized based on the maximum temperature reached by fuel in different parts of the core and the melting point, boiling point, and volatility of those radioisotopes. Also, the chemical interactions between fuel, fuel cladding, control elements, and core structural components appears to have played a large role in determining when and how fuel relocation occurred in the core; perhaps the most important of these reaction appears to be related to the formation of mixed-material alloys, eutectics, in the fuel cladding. Because of its high melting point, low volatility, and similar chemical behavior to plutonium, the element cerium appears to have behaved similarly to plutonium during the evolution of the TMI-2 accident. Anecdotal evidence extrapolated from open-source literature strengthens this logical feasibility for

  17. Biological alterations resulting from chronic lung irradiation. I. The pulmonary lipid composition, physiology, and pathology after inhalation by beagle dogs of 144Ce-labeled fused clay aerosols

    Three groups of four beagle dogs inhaled a 144Ce-labeled fused clay aerosol; two additional dogs per group, exposed to a stable cerium-labeled fused clay aerosol, were used as controls. At monthly intervals, one diaphragmatic lobe of each of two dogs exposed to 144Ce and one control animal from each group was lavaged with isotonic saline. The recovered lavage solutions were centrifuged to isolate lung cells (mostly macrophages) and surfactant for lipid analyses. The groups were sacrificed at 2, 4, and 6 mo after exposure, when the lungs of the dogs exposed to 144Ce had average cumulative radiation doses of 23, 36, and 59 krad, respectively. Chronic irradiation of the lung resulted in a progressive radiation pneumonitis which was assessed clinically and pathologically at various intervals. At sacrifice, the lungs were analyzed for 144Ce and the right apical and diaphragmatic lobes were minced and lyophilized and the lipids were extracted. Total lipids from all lung samples were determined gravimetrically and individual compounds were identified, isolated, and quantitated. The quantities of lipid in lung tissue, in pulmonary cells, and in surfactant increased as a function of time and radiation dose. Neutral lipids (sterol esters and triglycerides) accounted for most of the increase. (U.S.)

  18. Suppression of the pulmonary clearance of Staphylococcus aureus in mice that had inhaled either 144CeO2 or 239PuO2

    The rate of pulmonary clearance of inhaled Staphylococcus aureus in mice was determined at intervals after inhalation exposure to either 144CeO2 or 239PuO2. In mice with mean initial lung burdens between 0.6 and 4.7 μCi 144Ce the pulmonary clearance of S. aureus was suppressed up to 12 weeks after inhalation of 144CeO2. In mice with mean initial lung burdens between 1.3 and 29.0 μCi 239Pu the pulmonary clearance of S. aureus was suppressed up to 26 weeks after inhalation of 239PuO2. The suppressed pulmonary clearance of S. aureus appeared to correlate with the radiation dose rate to the lungs at the time of exposure to bacteria but not with the cumulative radiation dose to the lungs. The changes in bacterial clearance did not appear to be correlated with changes in body weight, hematological parameters, or radiation-induced histopathological changes. Altered bacterial clearance may be related to radiation damage to pulmonary macrophages. It was concluded that irradiation of the lung from radionuclides inhaled in relatively insoluble forms may result in increased bacterial invasion of the lungs

  19. Use of 141Ce as a particulate digesta flow tracer in ruminants. I. Determination of uptake on feed and behavior in rumen digesta in vivo

    The suitability of 141Ce as a particulate digesta flow tracer is studied in sheep. The amount and the factors of cerium uptake on feed particles by incubating alfalfa hay and sorghum seeds in water containing 141Ce in solution are determined. After soaking one hour, 80% radioactivity is retained on the hay 17% on the sorghum. Incubation time is the main factor determining uptake rate. This uptake is solid on the hay and more fragile on the sorghum. The evolution of 141Ce distribution among the different physical constituents of rumen digesta is studied on two sheep given a single radioactive meal (10μCi). These sheep are fitted with a rumen cannula and fed twice daily with hay (80%) and sorghum (20%). There is little 141Ce in solution in the supernatant liquid after centrifugation of digesta. At the end of the 'labelled' meal, specific radioactivity (RAS) of liquid-phase digesta, separated by filtering on two layers of gauze, is equal to or higher than the RAS of the solid phase. It increases up to the next unlabelled meal and then decreases. Microorganisms may cause this transfer of liquid-phase radioactivity to the large particles. Specific radioactivity of the microorganisms remains very high after the 'labelled' meal as compared to that of different granulometric fractions of solid digesta

  20. An experimental study of the time dependence of uptake from soil of 137Cs, 106Ru, 144Ce and 99Tc into green vegetables, wheat and potatoes

    In this study the experimental data were analysed using the CEGB's dynamic foodchain model, and were used to validate the relevant part of the model structure, to produce model-specific input data and to identify possible future improvements to the model structure. The root uptake of the specified radionuclides was studied and the concentration levels measured. The data were analysed using a simplified version of the general model. The compartment system incorporated within the model was shown to be capable of reproducing the data for 137Cs, 106Ru and 144Ce to an extent sufficient to justify its use in ingestion radiological dose assessments, but to be less successful in fitting the 99Tc data. The analysis resulted in the production of a well validated set of model-specific input data relevant to UK conditions and agricultural practice differing significantly from values obtained from global literature surveys. Possible future improvements to the model structure were also identified, aimed at providing improved estimates of crop contamination levels for timescales in excess of those considered in this study. (U.K.)

  1. CeLAND: search for a 4th light neutrino state with a 3 PBq 144Ce-144Pr electron antineutrino generator in KamLAND

    Gando, A; Hayashida, S; Ikeda, H; Inoue, K; Ishidoshiro, K; Ishikawa, H; Koga, M; Matsuda, R; Matsuda, S; Mitsui, T; Motoki, D; Nakamura, K; Oki, Y; Otani, M; Shimizu, I; Shirai, J; Suekane, F; Suzuki, A; Takemoto, Y; Tamae, K; Ueshima, K; Watanabe, H; Xu, B D; Yamada, S; Yamauchi, Y; Yoshida, H; Cribier, M; Durero, M; Fischer, V; Gaffiot, J; Jonqueres, N; Kouchner, A; Lasserre, T; Leterme, D; Letourneau, A; Lhuillier, D; Mention, G; Rampal, G; Scola, L; Veyssiere, Ch; Vivier, M; Yala, P; Berger, B E; Kozlov, A; Banks, T; Dwyer, D; Fujikawa, B K; Han, K; Kolomensky, Yu G; Mei, Y; O'Donnell, T; Decowski, P; Markoff, D M; Yoshida, S; Kornoukhov, V N; Gelis, T V M; Tikhomirov, G V; Learned, J G; Maricic, J; Matsuno, S; Milincic, R; Karwowski, H J; Efremenko, Y; Detwiler, A; Enomoto, S

    2013-01-01

    The reactor neutrino and gallium anomalies can be tested with a 3-4 PBq (75-100 kCi scale) 144Ce-144Pr antineutrino beta-source deployed at the center or next to a large low-background liquid scintillator detector. The antineutrino generator will be produced by the Russian reprocessing plant PA Mayak as early as 2014, transported to Japan, and deployed in the Kamioka Liquid Scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) as early as 2015. KamLAND's 13 m diameter target volume provides a suitable environment to measure the energy and position dependence of the detected neutrino flux. A characteristic oscillation pattern would be visible for a baseline of about 10 m or less, providing a very clean signal of neutrino disappearance into a yet-unknown, sterile neutrino state. This will provide a comprehensive test of the electron dissaperance neutrino anomalies and could lead to the discovery of a 4th neutrino state for Delta_m^2 > 0.1 eV^2 and sin^2(2theta) > 0.05.

  2. The study of the effect of gamma radiation on the ionic and collodial solutions of 144Ce/III/ at trace concentration by the method of self-diffusion and centrifugation

    Gamma irradiation of a solution of trace concentration of 144Ce/III/ at pH 3.0 causes an increase in the self-diffusion coefficient of 144Ce/III/ and small decrease in its centrifugable fraction. The significant increase in the self-diffusion coefficient is observed after irradiation at pH 9.0 and 11.0 and on the centrifugation of these solutions an increased susceptibility of particles containing 144Ce/III/ to the coagulation accurs. The measurements were performed by a method of the open end capillary immersed into the excess of inactive solution and the self-diffusion coefficient calculated as described earlier. The solutions were irradiated either directly in the capillaries for the self-diffusion measurment fixed in the glass tubes or in borosilicate Sial glass sample tubes with subsequent pipetting into the capillaries. The dose rate of 60Co γ-radiation was about 0.4 Mrad. hour-1, the time of irradiation was 1.5 to 15 hours. The period between the end of the irradiation and the beginning of the self-diffusion measurement amounted to about 15 to 30 min. (F.G.)

  3. Evaluation of fission product yields from fission spectrum n+239Pu using a meta analysis of benchmark data

    Chadwick, Mark B.

    2009-10-01

    Los Alamos conducted a dual fission-chamber experiment in the 1970s in the Bigten critical assembly to determine fission product data in a fast (fission neutron spectrum) environment, and this defined the Laboratory's fission basis today. We describe how the data from this experiment are consistent with other benchmark fission product yield measurements for 95,97Zr, 140Ba, 143,144Ce, 137Cs from the NIST-led ILRR fission chamber experiments, and from Maeck's mass-spectrometry data. We perform a new evaluation of the fission product yields that is planned for ENDF/B-VII.1. Because the measurement database for some of the FPs is small—especially for 147Nd and 99Mo—we use a meta-analysis that incorporates insights from other accurately-measured benchmark FP data. The %-relative changes compared to ENDF/B-VI are small for some FPs (less than 1% for 95Zr, 140Ba, 144Ce), but are larger for 99Mo (3%) and 147Nd (5%). We suggest an incident neutron energy dependence to the 147Nd fission product yield that accounts for observed differences in the FPY at a few-hundred keV average energy in fast reactors versus measurements made at higher average energies.

  4. Radiochemical methods used by the IAEA's laboratories at Siebersdorf for the determination of 90Sr, 144Ce and Pu radionuclides in environmental samples collected for the International Chernobyl Project

    During the IAEA's International Chernobyl Project to assess the radiological consequences of the nuclear reactor accident, the Agency's Laboratories at Seibersdorf participated in the collection and analyses of environmental samples from the Soviet Union. Under Task 2 of this effort, the determination of the activity concentrations of 90Sr and the alpha-emitting Pu radionuclides was important for the corroboration of the official USSR environmental contamination maps. The present paper describes in detail the sampling methods and radiochemical procedures used for the 90Sr, 144Ce, 238Pu and 239,240Pu analyses in these samples with emphasis on the grass and soil treatments. (Author)

  5. Preparative electrophoresis of industrial fission product solutions

    The aim of this work is to contribute to the development of the continuous electrophoresis technique while studying its application in the preparative electrophoresis of industrial fission product solutions. The apparatus described is original. It was built for the purposes of the investigation and proved very reliable in operation. The experimental conditions necessary to maintain and supervise the apparatus in a state of equilibrium are examined in detail; their stability is an important factor, indispensable to the correct performance of an experiment. By subjecting an industrial solution of fission products to preparative electrophoresis it is possible, according to the experimental conditions, to prepare carrier-free radioelements of radiochemical purity (from 5 to 7 radioelements): 137Cs, 90Sr, 141+144Ce, 91Y, 95Nb, 95Zr, 103+106Ru. (author)

  6. Behaviour of solid fission products in the HTGR coated fuel particles

    Results of profile measurements for volume concentrations of 134,137Cs, 144Ce, 155Eu, 106Ru and fissionable material in the HTGR coated fuel particles which have been subjected to standard tests in the temperature range of 1273-2133 K and at burnup up to 17% fima are presented. Values of the effective coefficients of cesium diffusion in kern and protective coating of fuel particles which were subjected to standard in-pile tests in spherical fuel elements at the temperature of 1273 K and the burnup up to 15% fima as well as the value of relative release of solid fission products from the samples studied are given

  7. Appendix to Health and Safety Laboratory environmental quarterly, March 1, 1976--June 1, 1976. [Tabulated data on content of lead in surface air and /sup 7/Be, /sup 95/Zr, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 144/Ce, and /sup 90/Sr in surface air, milk, drinking water, and foods sampled in USA

    Hardy, E.P. Jr.

    1976-07-01

    Tabulated data are presented on: the monthly deposition of /sup 89/Sr and /sup 90/Sr at some 100 world land sites; the content of lead and /sup 7/Be, /sup 95/Zr, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 144/Ce in samples of surface air from various world sites; and the content of /sup 90/Sr in samples of milk, drinking water, and animal and human diets collected at various locations throughout the USA. (CH)

  8. Influence of complex formation on extraction of some fission products by sorption on inorganic sorbents

    Sorption of fission products of radionuclides 137Cs, 89,90Sr, 90,91Y, 86Rb, 133Ba, 95Zr+95Nb, 95Nb, 103,106Ru, 141,144Ce, 115mCd, 113Sn, 125Sb by hydroxides Fe(III), Mn(IV) on the background of 1 mol/l of NaNO3 at the pretense of ions SO42-, C2O42- at a wide ph range (1+14) is studied in present work. Optimal conditions of extraction of each radionuclide by sorption on inorganic sorbents are defined.

  9. Fission product release from ZrC-coated fuel particles during postirradiation heating at 1600 C

    Release behavior of fission products from ZrC-coated UO2 particles was studied by a postirradiation heating test at 1600 C (1873 K) for 4500 h and subsequent postheating examinations. The fission gas release monitoring and the postheating examinations revealed that no pressure vessel failure occurred in the test. Ceramographic observations showed no palladium attack and thermal degradation of ZrC. Fission products of 137Cs, 134Cs, 106Ru, 144Ce, 154Eu and 155Eu were released from the coated particles through the coating layers during the postirradiation heating. Diffusion coefficients of 137Cs and 106Ru in the ZrC coating layer were evaluated from the release curves based on a diffusion model. 137Cs retentiveness of the ZrC coating layer was much better than that of the SiC coating layer. ((orig.))

  10. Distribution of fission products in graphite sleeves and blocks of the ninth and tenth OGL-1 fuel assemblies

    Distribution of fission products in graphite sleeves and blocks of the ninth and tenth OGL-1 fuel assemblies was measured by gamma spectrometry with lathe sectioning. The assemblies were loaded with HTGR fuel compacts, which had been produced by a scaled-up facility for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) being developed by JAERI; and they were irradiated in an in-pile gas loop, OGL-1. Fission products detected in the sleeves were 137Cs, 134Cs, 155Eu, 154Eu, 144Ce, 125Sb and 110mAg. The last nuclide, however, may have been produced by activation of a stable isotope, 109Ag, contained as impurity. Effective retention capability of the sleeve was observed for 155Eu, 154Eu, 144Ce and 125Sb; while, not for 137Cs and 134Cs. Concentration of 137Cs in the graphite blocks was markedly higher at the downstream side than at the upstream side of the coolant. This was ascribed to migration of the nuclide with the coolant flow and its subsequent sorption on the surface of the block. (author)

  11. Measurements of fission product concentrations in surface air at Bombay, India, during the period 1975-1981

    Measurements on airborne fallout radioactivity for the period 1975 up to the middle of 1981 are given. Normally, these measurements are confined to Bombay, but after nuclear tests, some of the other stations where these measurements were carried out in previous years are operated for some time to study the levels of fresh activity. The levels of the long-lived fission products 144Ce, 106Ru and 137Cs, and the short-lived fission products 95Zr and 140Ba, were measured, whenever they could be detected following nuclear tests, and tabulated. The data indicate that the activity varies by large factors from tests of similar yield, depending on the meteorological and other conditions. It was determined that the travel time for the Chinese test debris from Lop Nor, China to the West-coast of India is 14 to 16 days

  12. Fission Yields of Some Isotopes in the Fission of Th232 by Reactor Neutrons

    The fission yields of the longer-lived isotopes produced in the fission of Th232 are not very well known; existing data show rather large discrepancies and/or uncertainties. Since we feel that at least some of these discrepancies arise from difficulties in measuring the absolute activities of the fission products, we measured the fission yield of 10 selected isotopes whose decay schemes are well understood. The thorium foils were irradiated in a position at the edge of the core of the SAPHIR swimming pool reactor. Following irradiation, the thorium was dissolved after addition of appropriate carriers. The fission products of interest were determined by conventional radiochemical methods that had to be modified slightly to ensure good decontamination from the abundantly formed Pa233 . The chemical yields were determined by gravimetric methods. Counting was done preferentially on a γ-spectrometer that had been calibrated at 11 different energies by standards either obtained from the IAEA or prepared by 4πβ-counting. In the case of Sr90, Ru106 and Ce144 a β-proportional counter was used that had been calibrated for these isotopes. In addition to the sought elements, Mo99 was isolated from each foil to serve as an internal monitor for the number of fissions taking place. The experiment thus gave the ratio of the yield of the sought element to the yield of Mo99. This ratio ''R'' was obtained for Sr90, Ru103, Ru106, Ag111, Pd112, I131, Cs137, Ba140, Ba141, Ce141 and Ce144, Results indicate the existence of a third peak in the yield mass curve in the region of symmetric fission. Yields of fission products relative to the Mo99 yields are given, and the absolute yields calculated by assuming y Mo99 = 2.78%. This number was derived from the work of Iyer et al., and was obtained by normalizing the area under the yield mass curve to 200%. (author)

  13. Fission Product Yields from Fission Spectrum n+239Pu for ENDF/B-VII.1

    We describe a new cumulated fission product yield (FPY) evaluation for fission spectrum neutrons on plutonium that updates the ENDF/B-VI evaluation by England and Rider, for the forthcoming ENDF/B-VII.1 database release. We focus on FPs that are needed for high accuracy burnup assessments; that is, for inferring the number of fissions in a neutron environment. Los Alamos conducted an experiment in the 1970s in the Bigten fast critical assembly to determine fission product yields as part of the Interlaboratory Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration, and this has defined the Laboratory's fission standard to this day. Our evaluation includes use of the LANL-ILRR measurements (not previously available to evaluators) as well as other Laboratory FPY measurements published in the literature, especially the high-accuracy mass spectrometry data from Maeck and others. Because the measurement database for some of the FPs is small - especially for 99Mo - we use a meta-analysis that incorporates insights from other accurately-measured benchmark FP data, using R-value ratio measurements. The meta-analysis supports the FP measurements from the LANL-ILRR experiment. Differences between our new evaluations and ENDF/B-VI are small for some FPs (less than 1-2%-relative for 95Zr, 140Ba, 144Ce), but are larger for 99Mo (4%-relative) and 147Nd (5%-relative, at 1.5 MeV) respectively. We present evidence for an incident neutron energy dependence to the 147Nd fission product yield that accounts for observed differences in the FPY at a few-hundred keV average energy in fast reactors versus measurements made at higher average neutron energies in Los Alamos' fast critical assemblies. Accounting for such FPY neutron energy dependencies is important if one wants to reach a goal of determining the number of fissions to accuracies of 1-2%. An evaluation of the energy-dependence of fission product yields is given for all A values based on systematical trends in the measured data, with a focus on the

  14. Delayed fission

    Delayed fission is a nuclear process that couples beta decay and fission. In the delayed fission process, a parent nucleus undergoes beta decay or electron capture and thus populates excited states in the daughter nucleus. This review covers experimental methods for detecting and measuring delayed fission. Experimental results (ECDF activities and beta-DF activities) and theory are presented. The future prospects for study of delayed fission are discussed. 50 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Application of inorganic exchangers in fission product separation

    Synthetic ion exchangers ammonium phosphomolybdate/phosphotungstate (APW), polyantimonic acid (PA) and manganese dioxide have been investigated for separation of cesium, strontium and cerium respectively with a view to their use in fission product separation. Their breakthrough capacities and elution characteristics were determined using 137Cs, sup(85,89)Sr and 141Ce as tracers. Results indicate that : (1) Cs adsorbed on APW is easily eluted with 3M NH4NO3 at a temperature of 500C with an overall yield of 90% in about 10 column volumes, (2) strontium adsorbed on PA is completely eluted by 1M AgNo3 + 8M HNO3 at room temperature and (3) manganese sulphate (1 mg/ml) + 3M HNO3 elutes cerium adsorbed on manganese dioxide. Column characteristics (exchange capacity and flow rate) are not affected upto 6 cycles of sorption-elution. Based on these findings, a scheme of separation of fission products from waste solution is proposed. Pu uptake on PA is found to be governed by U/Pu ratio in the solution. The ratio > 104 inhibits the uptake. Pu on PA is eluted in 10 column volumes by 0.01M ascorbic acid +2M nitric acid. The exchange PA can be used over 20 cycles of sorption-elution. (M.G.B.)

  16. Ternary Fission

    The fission process in which heavy nuclei fragment into three large charged panicles, in place of the usual two, has been studied in the case of thermal-neutron-induced fission of U235 and the spontaneous fission of Cf252. Solid-state detectors, a fast triple coincidence system and a three-coincident-parameter analyser were used to measure the three fission fragment energies parallel with the detection of each ternary fission event. Experimental evidence is presented supporting the existence of ternary fission by specifically excluding recoil phenomena and accidental events as contributing to the observed three-fold coincidence events. Mass-energy-angular correlations of ternary fission have been determined and are summarized as follows: The total kinetic energy release in ternary fission appears to be slightly higher (by approximately 10 MeV) than that for binary fission. In the case of the spontaneous ternary fission of Cf252, the frequency of occurrence is observed to be greater than 2.2 x 10-6 ternary fission events per binary fission event. Tripartition of Cf252 results preferentially in division into two medium mass particle (one of which has a mass number near 56) and one larger mass. In the case of thermal-neutron-induced fission of U235, the frequency of occurrence is observed to be greater than 1.2 x 10-6 ternary fission events per binary fission event. Ternary fission of U236: results in the formation of one light fragment (near mass 36) and two large fragments or, as in the case of Cf252, two medium fragments and one large one. These results indicate that axially asymmetric distortion modes are possible in the pre-scission configurations of the fissioning nucleus. A description is given of experiments designed to radiochemically detect the light fragment resulting from ternary fission. (author)

  17. Nuclear fission

    The nuclear fission process is pedagogically reviewed from a macroscopic-microscopic point of view. The Droplet model is considered. The fission dynamics is discussed utilizing path integrals and semiclassical methods. (L.C.)

  18. Nuclear fission

    V.M. STRUTINSKY's semi-classical method is the most precise to determine the energy of the different states along the fission way. The double-humped fission barrier explains fission isomerism. V.M. STRUTINSKY's barrier explains the ''intermediate structure'' observed in the cross section under the threshold; it provides also the observed effect of ''vibrational resonances'' with an interpretation. Taking an asymmetry parameter in consideration, a triple-humped fission barrier seems to be essential now for the light actinides. There is still a microscopic fission barrier to be explained

  19. Determination of uranium fission products interference factors in neutron activation analysis

    Neutron activation analysis is a method used in the determination of several elements in different kinds of matrices. However, when the sample contains high U levels the problem of 235U fission interference occurs. A way to solve this problem is to perform the correction using the interference factor due to U fission for the radionuclides used on elemental analysis. In this study was determined the interference factor due to U fission for the radioisotopes 141Ce, 143Ce, 140La, 99Mo, 147Nd, 153Sm and 95Zr in the research nuclear reactor IEA-R1 on IPEN-CNEN/SP. These interference factors were determined experimentally, by irradiation of synthetic standards for 8 hours in a selected position in the reactor, and theoretically, determining the epithermal to neutron fluxes ratio in the same position where synthetic standards were irradiated and using reported nuclear parameters on the literature. The obtained interference factors were compared with values reported by other works. To evaluate the reliability of these factors they were applied in the analysis of studied elements in the certified reference materials NIST 8704 Buffalo River Sediment, IRMM BCR- 667 Estuarine Sediment e IAEA-SL-1 Lake Sediment. (author)

  20. Spontaneous fission

    Recent experimental results for spontaneous fission half-lives and fission fragment mass and kinetic-energy distributions and other properties of the fragments are reviewed and compared with recent theoretical models. The experimental data lend support to the existence of the predicted deformed shells near Z = 108 and N = 162. Prospects for extending detailed studies of spontaneous fission properties to elements beyond hahnium (element 105) are considered. (orig.)

  1. Linear free energy correlations for fission product release from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident.

    Abrecht, David G; Schwantes, Jon M

    2015-03-01

    This paper extends the preliminary linear free energy correlations for radionuclide release performed by Schwantes et al., following the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Through evaluations of the molar fractionations of radionuclides deposited in the soil relative to modeled radionuclide inventories, we confirm the initial source of the radionuclides to the environment to be from active reactors rather than the spent fuel pool. Linear correlations of the form In χ = −α ((ΔGrxn°(TC))/(RTC)) + β were obtained between the deposited concentrations, and the reduction potentials of the fission product oxide species using multiple reduction schemes to calculate ΔG°rxn (TC). These models allowed an estimate of the upper bound for the reactor temperatures of TC between 2015 and 2060 K, providing insight into the limiting factors to vaporization and release of fission products during the reactor accident. Estimates of the release of medium-lived fission products 90Sr, 121mSn, 147Pm, 144Ce, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, and 151Sm through atmospheric venting during the first month following the accident were obtained, indicating that large quantities of 90Sr and radioactive lanthanides were likely to remain in the damaged reactor cores. PMID:25675358

  2. Fission-Product Development Laboratory cell-decommissioning project plan

    The Fission Product Development Laboratory (FPDL) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was a full-scale processing facility for separating megacurie quantities of 90Sr, 137Cs, and 144Ce for a variety of source applications, operating at full capacity from 1958 to 1975. Since facility shutdown, the inactive portions of the FPDL have been maintained in a protective storage mode as part of the ORNL Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). Due to the significant radio-nuclide inventory remaining in the facility, the high surveillance and maintenance costs necessary to assure radionuclide containment, and the potential for reuse of the facility by other programs, the decommissioning of the inactive portions of the FPDL has been given a high priority by the SFMP. In response to this program direction, plans are being made for initiation of these activities in late FY 1983. This project plan has been prepared to satisfy the program documentation requirements for SFMP project planning. The plan outlines the scope of the proposed effort, describes the proposed methods of project accomplishment, and provides estimates of the project resource needs and schedule

  3. Spontaneous Fission

    Segre, Emilio

    1950-11-22

    The first attempt to discover spontaneous fission in uranium was made by [Willard] Libby, who, however, failed to detect it on account of the smallness of effect. In 1940, [K. A.] Petrzhak and [G. N.] Flerov, using more sensitive methods, discovered spontaneous fission in uranium and gave some rough estimates of the spontaneous fission decay constant of this substance. Subsequently, extensive experimental work on the subject has been performed by several investigators and will be quoted in the various sections. [N.] Bohr and [A.] Wheeler have given a theory of the effect based on the usual ideas of penetration of potential barriers. On this project spontaneous fission has been studied for the past several years in an effort to obtain a complete picture of the phenomenon. For this purpose the spontaneous fission decay constants {lambda} have been measured for separated isotopes of the heavy elements wherever possible. Moreover, the number {nu} of neutrons emitted per fission has been measured wherever feasible, and other characteristics of the spontaneous fission process have been studied. This report summarizes the spontaneous fission work done at Los Alamos up to January 1, 1945. A chronological record of the work is contained in the Los Alamos monthly reports.

  4. Inorganic oxides as alternative in the separation of non fissioned residual uranium

    The Al2O3, SiO2 and SnO2 as well as vegetable carbon have been studied for its possible use as sorbent in the concentration and separation of non fissioned residual uranium of some fission products such as: 141 Ce, 134 Cs, 125 Sb, 103 Ru, 95 Zr, 95 Nb of alkaline aqueous systems. The separation efficiency has been evaluated using natural uranium and radionuclides in static and dynamic processes, through liquid scintillation and gamma spectrometry. Therefore Al2O3, SiO2, SnO2 and carbon were pre-treated thermic and chemically and characterized through the technique of Nitrogen absorption analysis, X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. By means of the p H determination and the aqueous system potential the present hydrolysis products were determined. The inorganic oxides show structural and surface changes due to the treatment. The adsorption process is realized by different mechanism depending of the sorbent. The results show that the retention capacity is a dependence of the oxides pre-treatment and of the hydrolysis products in the aqueous system, as well as of the experimental conditions. Not in this way for carbon in which the results show the treatment and the experimental conditions significantly have not influence in its adsorption capacity. (Author)

  5. Fission Product Yields from Fission Spectrum n+ 239Pu for ENDF/B-VII.1

    Chadwick, M. B.; Kawano, T.; Barr, D. W.; Mac Innes, M. R.; Kahler, A. C.; Graves, T.; Selby, H.; Burns, C. J.; Inkret, W. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Lestone, J. P.; Sierk, A. J.; Talou, P.

    2010-12-01

    We describe a new cumulated fission product yield (FPY) evaluation for fission spectrum neutrons on plutonium that updates the ENDF/B-VI evaluation by England and Rider, for the forthcoming ENDF/B-VII.1 database release. We focus on FPs that are needed for high accuracy burnup assessments; that is, for inferring the number of fissions in a neutron environment. Los Alamos conducted an experiment in the 1970s in the Bigten fast critical assembly to determine fission product yields as part of the Interlaboratory Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration, and this has defined the Laboratory's fission standard to this day. Our evaluation includes use of the LANL-ILRR measurements (not previously available to evaluators) as well as other Laboratory FPY measurements published in the literature, especially the high-accuracy mass spectrometry data from Maeck and others. Because the measurement database for some of the FPs is small — especially for 99Mo — we use a meta-analysis that incorporates insights from other accurately-measured benchmark FP data, using R-value ratio measurements. The meta-analysis supports the FP measurements from the LANL-ILRR experiment. Differences between our new evaluations and ENDF/B-VI are small for some FPs (less than 1-2%-relative for 95Zr, 140Ba, 144Ce), but are larger for 99Mo (4%-relative) and 147Nd (5%-relative, at 1.5 MeV) respectively. We present evidence for an incident neutron energy dependence to the 147Nd fission product yield that accounts for observed differences in the FPY at a few-hundred keV average energy in fast reactors versus measurements made at higher average neutron energies in Los Alamos' fast critical assemblies. Accounting for such FPY neutron energy dependencies is important if one wants to reach a goal of determining the number of fissions to accuracies of 1-2%. An evaluation of the energy-dependence of fission product yields is given for all A values based on systematical trends in the measured data, with a focus on

  6. Ternary fission

    M Balasubramaniam; K R Vijayaraghavan; C Karthikraj

    2015-09-01

    We present the ternary fission of 252Cf and 236U within a three-cluster model as well as in a level density approach. The competition between collinear and equatorial geometry is studied by calculating the ternary fragmentation potential as a function of the angle between the lines joining the stationary middle fragment and the two end fragments. The obtained results for the 16O accompanying ternary fission indicate that collinear configuration is preferred to equatorial configuration. Further, for all the possible third fragments, the potential energy surface (PES) is calculated corresponding to an arrangement in which the heaviest and the lightest fragments are considered at the end in a collinear configuration. The PES reveals several possible ternary modes including true ternary modes where the three fragments are of similar size. The complete mass distributions of Si and Ca which accompanied ternary fission of 236U is studied within a level density picture. The obtained results favour several possible ternary combinations.

  7. Benchmarking Nuclear Fission Theory

    G. F. Bertsch(INT, Seattle, USA); Loveland, W.; Nazarewicz, W.; Talou, P.

    2015-01-01

    We suggest a small set of fission observables to be used as test cases for validation of theoretical calculations. The purpose is to provide common data to facilitate the comparison of different fission theories and models. The proposed observables are chosen from fission barriers, spontaneous fission lifetimes, fission yield characteristics, and fission isomer excitation energies.

  8. Fission Spectrum

    Bloch, F.; Staub, H.

    1943-08-18

    Measurements of the spectrum of the fission neutrons of 25 are described, in which the energy of the neutrons is determined from the ionization produced by individual hydrogen recoils. The slow neutrons producing fission are obtained by slowing down the fast neutrons from the Be-D reaction of the Stanford cyclotron. In order to distinguish between fission neutrons and the remaining fast cyclotron neutrons both the cyclotron current and the pusle amplifier are modulated. A hollow neutron container, in which slow neutrons have a lifetime of about 2 milliseconds, avoids the use of large distances. This method results in much higher intensities than the usual modulation arrangement. The results show a continuous distribution of neutrons with a rather wide maximum at about 0.8 MV falling off to half of its maximum value at 2.0 MV. The total number of netrons is determined by comparison with the number of fission fragments. The result seems to indicate that only about 30% of the neutrons have energies below .8 MV. Various tests are described which were performed in order to rule out modification of the spectrum by inelastic scattering. Decl. May 4, 1951

  9. Singlet Fission

    Smith, M. B.; Michl, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 11 (2010), s. 6891-6936. ISSN 0009-2665 Grant ostatní: Department of Energy(US) DE-FG36-08GO18017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : solar energy conversion * photovoltaics * singlet fission Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 33.033, year: 2010

  10. Ideological Fission

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    materialisation of an ideological fission which attempts to excise certain ideological constructions, yet paradoxically casting them in a form that is recognizable and familiar. The monstrous metonomy which is used shows us glimpses of a horrid being, intended to vilify the attack on New York City. However, it is...

  11. Fission meter

    Rowland, Mark S.; Snyderman, Neal J.

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source.

  12. Studies of the coagulation flotation of bentonite and its application to the removal of Co2+ ions and fission products, Ce and Eu

    The regions of dispersion, coagulation precipitation, coagulation flotation, and redispersion were determined for aqueous bentonite-cationic surfactant and bentonite-cationic surfactant-polyacrylamide(PAA) systems. The region of coagulation flotation was markedly extended by the addition of PAA to both the lower and higher concentration regions of the cationic surfactant, hexadecyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride(HDBAC), and to the lower concentration region of bentonite. The phenomenon of coagulation flotation was investigated in detail and was applied to the removal of Co2+ ions and nuclear fission products, 144Ce and 155Eu, from an aqueous solution. The composition of the reagents for the maximum efficiency of bentonite flotation corresponded to that of the maximum efficiency of Co2+-ion flotation. The effect of the pH on the flotation efficiency was studied in particular. The maximum flotation efficiency of 96% was obtained at pH 11 for Co2+ ions, 86% at pH 9.7 for 144Ce, and 93% at pH 10.5 for 155Eu. These radioactive elements were almost completely adsorbed on the surface of bentonite particles and were floated with them in the pH region of the maximum flotation efficiency. It was confirmed that Co2+ ions could be floated also from an extremely low concentration (10-9 mol/l) of Co2+ ions with nearly the same efficiency of flotation and with the additives in the same condition. Co2+ ions could also be effectively removed by using the step-by-step flotation, showing as high a flotation efficiency as 99.8%. (auth.)

  13. Determination of uranium fission products interference factors in neutron activation analysis; Determinacao de fatores de interferencia de produtos de fissao de uranio na analise por ativacao neutronica

    Ribeiro Junior, Ibere Souza

    2014-09-01

    Neutron activation analysis is a method used in the determination of several elements in different kinds of matrices. However, when the sample contains high U levels the problem of {sup 235}U fission interference occurs. A way to solve this problem is to perform the correction using the interference factor due to U fission for the radionuclides used on elemental analysis. In this study was determined the interference factor due to U fission for the radioisotopes {sup 141}Ce, {sup 143}Ce, {sup 140}La, {sup 99}Mo, {sup 147}Nd, {sup 153}Sm and {sup 95}Zr in the research nuclear reactor IEA-R1 on IPEN-CNEN/SP. These interference factors were determined experimentally, by irradiation of synthetic standards for 8 hours in a selected position in the reactor, and theoretically, determining the epithermal to neutron fluxes ratio in the same position where synthetic standards were irradiated and using reported nuclear parameters on the literature. The obtained interference factors were compared with values reported by other works. To evaluate the reliability of these factors they were applied in the analysis of studied elements in the certified reference materials NIST 8704 Buffalo River Sediment, IRMM BCR- 667 Estuarine Sediment e IAEA-SL-1 Lake Sediment. (author)

  14. Neutron cross sections of 28 fission product nuclides adopted in JENDL-1

    This is the final report concerning the evaluated neutron cross sections of 28 fission product nuclides adopted in the first version of Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL-1). These 28 nuclides were selected as being most important for fast reactor calculations, and are 90Sr, 93Zr, 95Mo, 97Mo, 99Tc, 101Ru, 102Ru, 103Rh, 104Ru, 105Pd, 106Ru, 107Pd, 109Ag, 129I, 131Xe, 133Cs, 135Cs, 137Cs, 143Nd, 144Ce, 144Nd, 145Nd, 147Pm, 147Sm, 149Sm, 151Sm, 153Eu and 155Eu. The status of the experimental data was reviewed over the whole energy range. The present evaluation was performed on the basis of the measured data with the aid of theoretical calculations. The optical and statical models were used for evaluation of the smooth cross sections. An improved method was developed in treating the multilevel Breit-Wigner formula for the resonance region. Various physical parameters and the level schemes, adopted in the present work are discussed by comparing with those used in the other evaluations such as ENDF/B-IV, CEA, CNEN-2 and RCN-2. Furthermore, the evaluation method and results are described in detail for each nuclide. The evaluated total, capture and inelastic scattering cross sections are compared with the other evaluated data and some recent measured data. Some problems of the present work are pointed out and ways of their improvement are suggested. (author)

  15. Fission Research at IRMM

    Al-Adili A.; Fabry I.; Borcea R.; Zeynalov S.; Kornilov N.; Hambsch F.-J.; Oberstedt S.

    2010-01-01

    Fission Research at JRC-IRMM has a longstanding tradition. The present paper is discussing recent investigations of fission fragment properties of 238 U(n,f), 234 U(n,f), prompt neutron emission in fission of 252 Cf(SF) as well as the prompt fission neutron spectrum of 235 U(n,f) and is presenting the most important results.

  16. Inorganic oxides as alternative in the separation of non fissioned residual uranium; Oxidos inorganicos como alternativa en la separacion del uranio residual no fisionado

    Baca G, A

    1997-07-01

    The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2} as well as vegetable carbon have been studied for its possible use as sorbent in the concentration and separation of non fissioned residual uranium of some fission products such as: {sup 141} Ce, {sup 134} Cs, {sup 125} Sb, {sup 103} Ru, {sup 95} Zr, {sup 95} Nb of alkaline aqueous systems. The separation efficiency has been evaluated using natural uranium and radionuclides in static and dynamic processes, through liquid scintillation and gamma spectrometry. Therefore Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, SnO{sub 2} and carbon were pre-treated thermic and chemically and characterized through the technique of Nitrogen absorption analysis, X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. By means of the p H determination and the aqueous system potential the present hydrolysis products were determined. The inorganic oxides show structural and surface changes due to the treatment. The adsorption process is realized by different mechanism depending of the sorbent. The results show that the retention capacity is a dependence of the oxides pre-treatment and of the hydrolysis products in the aqueous system, as well as of the experimental conditions. Not in this way for carbon in which the results show the treatment and the experimental conditions significantly have not influence in its adsorption capacity. (Author)

  17. Energy released in fission

    The effective energy released in and following the fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 by thermal neutrons, and of U-238 by fission spectrum neutrons, is discussed. The recommended values are: U-235 ... 192.9 ± 0.5 MeV/fission; U-238 ... 193.9 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-239 ... 198.5 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-241 ... 200.3 ± 0.8 MeV/fission. These values include all contributions except from antineutrinos and very long-lived fission products. The detailed contributions are discussed, and inconsistencies in the experimental data are pointed out. In Appendix A, the contribution to the total useful energy release in a reactor from reactions other than fission are discussed briefly, and in Appendix B there is a discussion of the variations in effective energy from fission with incident neutron energy. (author)

  18. Assessment of a Compton-event suppression γ-spectrometer for the detection of fission products at trace levels

    The improvement in detection limits for low and high activity samples measured with the Compton-suppression γ-spectrometer installed at the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) for environmental monitoring of radioactivity, as well as nuclear safeguards, is discussed. The advantage of using two parallel acquisition lines for simultaneous measurement with and without Compton-event suppression is outlined with respect to cascade and non-cascade γ-emitters. The background reduction by Compton-event suppression made it possible to detect small peaks, which otherwise would not have been found in a conventional spectrum. In Compton-event suppression mode, the detection limit for 137Cs was improved by a factor of about 3, for 241Am we found a factor of 1.2 both in high and low active samples. The measurements of environmental reference samples showed good agreement with certified values in both acquisition modes. The application of this instrument for the determination of fission products in smear samples is described. In particular, for nuclides like 54Mn, 125Sb and 144Ce, an improvement in the detection limits by a factor of 1.6-2.4 was obtained

  19. Release behavior of metallic fission products from pyrocarbon-coated uranium-dioxide particles at extremely high temperatures

    Hayashi, Kimio; Fukuda, Kousaku (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment)

    1990-04-01

    Uranium-dioxide particles coated by pyrocarbon (BISO), which were irradiated at 1,300 {approx} 1,400degC to burnups of ca. 1% FIMA, were heated isochronally and isothermally at temperatures between 1,600 and 2,300degC. Release fractions of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 155}Eu and {sup 106}Ru were larger than 10{sup -2} after heating at 2,000degC for 2 h; the results were in contrast to much smaller release fractions from TRISO particles with intact silicon-carbide (SiC) coating. The release of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 144}Ce from the BISO particle was controlled by diffusion in the dense pyrocarbon layer at temperatures between 1,600 and 2,300degC, while that of {sup 155}Eu and {sup 106}Ru was controlled by diffusion in the fuel kernel above 1,800degC. These results can be used as reference data on release behavior of the fission products from TRISO particles with defective SiC layers. (author).

  20. Release behavior of metallic fission products from pyrocarbon-coated uranium-dioxide particles at extremely high temperatures

    Uranium-dioxide particles coated by pyrocarbon (BISO), which were irradiated at 1,300 ∼ 1,400degC to burnups of ca. 1% FIMA, were heated isochronally and isothermally at temperatures between 1,600 and 2,300degC. Release fractions of 137Cs, 155Eu and 106Ru were larger than 10-2 after heating at 2,000degC for 2 h; the results were in contrast to much smaller release fractions from TRISO particles with intact silicon-carbide (SiC) coating. The release of 137Cs and 144Ce from the BISO particle was controlled by diffusion in the dense pyrocarbon layer at temperatures between 1,600 and 2,300degC, while that of 155Eu and 106Ru was controlled by diffusion in the fuel kernel above 1,800degC. These results can be used as reference data on release behavior of the fission products from TRISO particles with defective SiC layers. (author)

  1. Fission Mass Yield Studies

    Mass yields from fission induced by a span of neutron energies up to 18 MeV have been measured for Th232, U235 and U238 target nuclei. Particular attention has been given to the dependence of symmetric fission yields on energy. To study the effect of angular momentum, fission yields from the U236 compound nucleus formed by alpha-particle irradiations of Th232 were also studied over the same span of excitation energies. A standard set of Pd109, Ag111, Pd112 and Ag113 symmetric fission yields was generally measured for all irradiations. In addition, yields of Eu156, Cs136 and 2.3-d Cd115 were measured for some selected combinations of projectile, energy and target nucleus. Assays for Zr97 and sometimes also Ba139 served as fission monitors. Altogether 150 fission yields were measured for these combinations of target nucleus, projectile and incident energy. About one-third of these were checked by replicated irradiations. At highest energies for the U236 compound nucleus the symmetric fission yield from alpha-particle-induced fission is about 13% higher than for neutron-induced fission. Dips in symmetric fission yield were observed at the energy onset of third-chance fission for each target and projectile. Some indication of a small central peak in the mass distribution was observed in the yields from U236 compound nucleus fission, but not from the Th233 compound nucleus fission. Detailed mathematical methods have been developed to separate the effects of fissions preceding and following neutron emission. These methods were used to remove the effects of second- and third-chance fissions from the measured symmetric fission yields. These calculated yields for first-chance fission show no dips with energy. The calculations also show that perhaps half the difference between symmetric yields for alpha- particle-induced fission of Th232 and neutron-induced fission of U235 is attributable to angular momentum effects. Both calculated first-chance yields and measured yields

  2. Complex fission phenomena

    Poenaru, D N; Greiner, W

    2005-01-01

    Complex fission phenomena can be studied in a unified way. Very general reflection asymmetrical equilibrium (saddle-point) nuclear shapes, may be obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. The mass asymmetry in cold fission phenomena can be explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to binary, ternary, and quaternary fission are outlined. Predictions of two alpha accompanied fission are experimentally confirmed.

  3. Fission Research at IRMM

    Al-Adili A.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fission Research at JRC-IRMM has a longstanding tradition. The present paper is discussing recent investigations of fission fragment properties of 238 U(n,f, 234 U(n,f, prompt neutron emission in fission of 252 Cf(SF as well as the prompt fission neutron spectrum of 235 U(n,f and is presenting the most important results.

  4. To fission or not to fission

    Pomorski, Krzysztof; Ivanyuk, Fedir A

    2016-01-01

    The fission-fragments mass-yield of 236U is obtained by an approximate solution of the eigenvalue problem of the collective Hamiltonian that describes the dynamics of the fission process whose degrees of freedom are: the fission (elongation), the neck and the mass-asymmetry mode. The macroscopic-microscopic method is used to evaluate the potential energy surface. The macroscopic energy part is calculated using the liquid drop model and the microscopic corrections are obtained using the Woods-Saxon single-particle levels. The four dimensional modified Cassini ovals shape parametrization is used to describe the shape of the fissioning nucleus. The mass tensor is taken within the cranking-type approximation. The final fragment mass distribution is obtained by weighting the adiabatic density distribution in the collective space with the neck-dependent fission probability. The neck degree of freedom is found to play a significant role in determining that final fragment mass distribution.

  5. Fission neutron statistical emission

    The statistical model approach FINESSE (FIssion NEutronS' Statistical Emission) for the description of fission neutron multiplicities, energy spectra and angular distributions is described. Based on an extended Weisskopf ansatz and on a realistic temperature distribution it provides a fragment mass number dependent description of fission neutron data. Model parameters (optical potential, n/γ competition) were fixed on the basis of the 252Cf(sf) (nuclear data standard). Combined with a phenomenological fission model for predicting relevant fragment data as function of asymmetry. FINESSE can be applied to any fission reaction of actinides in the Th-Cf region without further parameter adjustment. Results are presented for 252Cf(sf) and neutron induced fission of 235U, 239Pu, 232Th. Effects of multiple-chance fission are discussed for 232Th(n,xnf) reacation. (author). 46 refs, 11 figs

  6. Fast fission phenomena

    Experimental studies of fast fission phenomena are presented. The paper is divided into three parts. In the first part, problems associated with fast fission processes are examined in terms of interaction potentials and a dynamic model is presented in which highly elastic collisions, the formation of compound nuclei and fast fission appear naturally. In the second part, a description is given of the experimental methods employed, the observations made and the preliminary interpretation of measurements suggesting the occurence of fast fission processes. In the third part, our dynamic model is incorporated in a general theory of the dissipative processes studied. This theory enables fluctuations associated with collective variables to be calculated. It is applied to highly inelastic collisions, to fast fission and to the fission dynamics of compound nuclei (for which a schematic representation is given). It is with these calculations that the main results of the second part can be interpreted

  7. Complex fission phenomena

    Poenaru, Dorin N.; Gherghescu, Radu A.; Greiner, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Complex fission phenomena are studied in a unified way. Very general reflection asymmetrical equilibrium (saddle point) nuclear shapes are obtained by solving an integro-differential equation without being necessary to specify a certain parametrization. The mass asymmetry in binary cold fission of Th and U isotopes is explained as the result of adding a phenomenological shell correction to the liquid drop model deformation energy. Applications to binary, ternary, and quaternary fission are ou...

  8. Fission product yields

    Data are summed up necessary for determining the yields of individual fission products from different fissionable nuclides. Fractional independent yields, cumulative and isobaric yields are presented here for the thermal fission of 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu and for fast fission (approximately 1 MeV) of 235U, 238U, 239Pu, 241Pu; these values are included into the 5th version of the YIELDS library, supplementing the BIBFP library. A comparison is made of experimental data and possible improvements of calculational methods are suggested. (author)

  9. Intermediate energy nuclear fission

    Nuclear fission has been investigated with the double-kinetic-energy method using silicon surface barrier detectors. Fragment energy correlation measurements have been made for U, Th and Bi with bremsstrahlung of 600 MeV maximum energy. Distributions of kinetic energy as a function of fragment mass are presented. The results are compared with earlier photofission data and in the case of bismuth, with calculations based on the liquid drop model. The binary fission process in U, Yb, Tb, Ce, La, Sb, Ag and Y induced by 600 MeV protons has been investigated yielding fission cross sections, fragment kinetic energies, angular correlations and mass distributions. Fission-spallation competition calculations are used to deduce values of macroscopic fission barrier heights and nuclear level density parameter values at deformations corresponding to the saddle point shapes. We find macroscopic fission barriers lower than those predicted by macroscopic theories. No indication is found of the Businaro Gallone limit expected to occur somewhere in the mass range A = 100 to A = 140. For Ce and La asymmetric mass distributions similar to those in the actinide region are found. A method is described for the analysis of angular correlations between complementary fission products. The description is mainly concerned with fission induced by medium-energy protons but is applicable also to other projectiles and energies. It is shown that the momentum and excitation energy distributions of cascade residuals leading to fission can be extracted. (Author)

  10. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    Zhu, Yi; Pei, Junchen

    2016-01-01

    The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and collective ...

  11. Study on separation of 137Cs from 235U fission process waste - utilization of silica gel-supported ferrocyanide complex salt for 137Cs picking

    In connection with the potential domestic demand especially in the fields of industry and nuclear medicine, the separation of 137Cs from 235U fission process waste is to be of interest although its economic value could be a polemic. A preliminary study on the separation of 137Cs from the 235U fission process waste generated in the production of 99Mo in P.T. BATAN Teknologi, Serpong, was performed through experiments on 137Cs picking from sample solution of the radioactive fission waste (RFW). The presented study is aimed to gain experimental data supporting utilization of the matrix of silica gel-supported ferrocyanide complex salt for the separation of 137Cs from RFW. Subsequent step would be the recovery and purification of 137Cs as part of production technology of 137Cs. The RFW sample was batch-treated with the matrix of silica gel-supported ferrocyanide complex salt which was synthesized from silica gel, potassium hexacyanoferrate(II) and copper(II) chloride. The binding of radioisotopes in RFW on the matrix was observed by γ-spectrometry of the RFW solution before and during the treatment. The results showed that approximately 85% of 137Cs could be picked from the RFW sample into the matrix. Less amount of 95Zr and 95Nb was bound into the matrix. 103Ru was slightly bound into the matrix whereas 141/144Ce and 129mTe were not. It was observed that by using 0.2 and 0.4 g of matrix for 10 ml of RFW, the amount of matrix influenced the binding quantity of 95Zr and 95Nb but not that of 137Cs. (author)

  12. Muon-induced fission

    A review of recent experimental results on negative-muon-induced fission, both of 238U and 232Th, is given. Some conclusions drawn by the author are concerned with muonic atoms of fission fragments and muonic atoms of the shape isomer of 238U. (author)

  13. Fission gas detection system

    Colburn, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A device for collecting fission gas released by a failed fuel rod which device uses a filter to pass coolant but which filter blocks fission gas bubbles which cannot pass through the filter due to the surface tension of the bubble.

  14. Fission Xenon on Mars

    Mathew, K. J.; Marti, K.; Marty, B.

    2002-01-01

    Fission Xe components due to Pu-244 decay in the early history of Mars have been identified in nakhlites; as in the case of ALH84001 and Chassigny the fission gas was assimilated into indigenous solar-type Xe. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    \\item[Background] The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. \\item[Purpose] We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and mass parameters. \\item[Methods] The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures ...

  16. Fission 2009 4. International Workshop on Nuclear Fission and Fission Product Spectroscopy - Compilation of slides

    This conference is dedicated to the last achievements in experimental and theoretical aspects of the nuclear fission process. The topics include: mass, charge and energy distribution, dynamical aspect of the fission process, nuclear data evaluation, quasi-fission and fission lifetime in super heavy elements, fission fragment spectroscopy, cross-section and fission barrier, and neutron and gamma emission. This document gathers the program of the conference and the slides of the presentations

  17. Fission Fragments Discriminator

    Nuclear fission reaction between Uranium-235 nucleus and thermal neutron caused the high energy fission fragments with uncertainly direction. The particle direction discrimination was determined. The 2.5 x 3.0 mm2 polyethylene gratings with 1-6 mm thickness were used. The grating was placed between uranium screen that fabricated from ammonium-diurinate compound and polycarbonate nuclear track film recorder irradiated by neutron from Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1) facility. The nuclear track density was inversely with grating thickness. It's only fission fragments normal to uranium screen pass through film recorder when grating thickness was 4-6 mm

  18. Fission fragment rocket concept

    A new propulsion scheme is outlined which may permit interstellar missions for spacecraft. This scheme is based on the idea of allowing fission fragments to escape from the core of a nuclear reactor. (orig.)

  19. Fission Systems for Mars Exploration

    Houts, Michael G.; Kim, T.; Dorney, D. J.; Swint, Marion Shayne

    2012-01-01

    Fission systems are used extensively on earth, and 34 such systems have flown in space. The energy density of fission is over 10 million times that of chemical reactions, giving fission the potential to eliminate energy density constraints for many space missions. Potential safety and operational concerns with fission systems are well understood, and strategies exist for affordably developing such systems. By enabling a power-rich environment and highly efficient propulsion, fission systems could enable affordable, sustainable exploration of Mars.

  20. Review of Fission Theory

    A survey of the present state of fission theory is attempted. The basic requirements of a theory of a physical process are outlined and against this background the state of fission theory is summarized, with special emphasis on developments in the past few years. An attempt is made to bring out the most important outstanding problems to be settled by future experiments and theory. (author)

  1. Fission product detection

    The response of photovoltaic cells to heavy ions and fission products have been tested on beam. Their main advantages are their extremely low price, their low sensitivity to energetic light ions with respect to fission products, and the possibility to cut and fit them together to any shape without dead zone. The time output signals of a charge sensitive preamplifier connected to these cells allows fast coincidences. A resolution of 12ns (F.W.H.M.) have been measured between two cells

  2. Fission gas release (FGASRL)

    During irradiation of water reactor fuel rods, gaseous fission products are produced in the fuel and are slowly released to various voipd volumes in the fuel rods. The released fission gases degrade the initial fill gas thermal conductivity and thus change the thermal response of the fuel rods. Moreover, fuel rod internal pressure is increased so that the cladding mechanical response is affected. The fission gas release subcode FGASRL is intended for use in analytical codes which predict water reactor fuel pin behavior. The development effort was directed primarily at improving code predictions of the gas release model used in FRAP-S3 which overpredicts release of fuels irradiated at relatively low operating temperatures and therefore small gas release fractions. The fission gas release subcode (FGASRL) presented in the report describes a two-step gas release process: (a) fission gas release from fuel grains to the grain boundaries, and (b) fission gas release from the grain boundaries to internal free volume of the fuel pin

  3. Prompt Neutrons from Fission

    A survey is given of the present state of knowledge of the spectrum, angular distribution and number of prompt fission neutrons, as functions of incident neutron energy and individual fragment mass, for low-energy fission. The energy spectrum of prompt neutrons has been found to be of the same form (nearly Maxwellian) for many different types of fission. It has been shown that this type of spectrum is to be expected on the basis of evaporation from moving fragments, and theoretical predictions of the spectrum agree very accurately with experimental data. Some data are now available on the variation of the neutron spectrum with fragment mass and angle of emission. Only recently has it become possible to take accurate data on the angular distribution of the neutrons. It appears that the neutrons have the angular distribution to be expected if emitted almost isotropically from the moving fragments, with a possibility that some small fraction are not emitted in this way, but directly from the fissioning nuclide. Much work has been done on the variation of fission neutron number v with incident neutron energy for neutron-induced fission. The neutron number increases roughly linearly with energy, with a slope of about 0.15 n/MeV. There is now evidence that this slope changes somewhat with energy. This change must be associated with other changes in the-fission process. The most interesting recent discovery concerning fission neutrons is the strong dependence of neutron number on individual fragment mass. The data are being rapidly improved by means of the newer techniques of determining fragment mass yields from velocity and pulse-height data, and of determining neutron yields from cumulative mass yields. There is evidence of similar dependence of neutron yield on fragment mass in a number of cases. It has been suggested that this property is directly connected with the deformability of the fragments, and in particular with the near-spherical shapes of magic

  4. Biological effects of radiation: The induction of malignant transformation and programmed cell death

    In the Chernobyl explosions and fire, powderized nuclear fuel was released from the reactor core, causing an unexpected fallout. X-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy showed that the isolated single particles were essentially pure uranium. These uranium aerosols contained all of the nonvolatile fission products, including the b-emitters, 95Zr, 103Ru, 106Ru, 141Ce, and 144Ce. The hot particles are extremely effective in inducing malignant transformation in mouse fibroblast cells in vitro. The major factor responsible for this effect is focus promotion caused by a wound-mediated permanent increase in cell proliferation (mitogenesis associated with mutagenesis). Transformed foci were analysed for the activation of c-abl, c-erb-A, c-erb-B, c-fms, c-fos, c-myb, c-myc, c-Ha-ras, c-Ki-ras, c-sis, and c-raf oncogenes at the transcriptional level. The pattern of oncogene activation was found to vary from focus to focus. Long interspersed repeated DNA (L1 or LINE makes up a class of mobile genetic elements which can amplify in the cell genome by retroposition. This element is spontaneously transcriptionally activated at a critical population density and later amplified in rat chloroleukaemia cells. UV light and ionizing radiation induce this activation prematurely, and the activation is followed by programmed cell death (apoptosis) in a sequence of events identical to that seen in LIRn activation occurring spontaneously

  5. Fission waves can oscillate

    Osborne, Andrew G

    2016-01-01

    Under the right conditions, self sustaining fission waves can form in fertile nuclear materials. These waves result from the transport and absorption of neutrons and the resulting production of fissile isotopes. When these fission, additional neutrons are produced and the chain reaction propagates until it is poisoned by the buildup of fission products. It is typically assumed that fission waves are soliton-like and self stabilizing. However, we show that in uranium, coupling of the neutron field to the 239U->239Np->239Pu decay chain can lead to a Hopf bifurcation. The fission reaction then ramps up and down, along with the wave velocity. The critical driver for the instability is a delay, caused by the half-life of 239U, between the time evolution of the neutron field and the production of 239Pu. This allows the 239Pu to accumulate and burn out in a self limiting oscillation that is characteristic of a Hopf bifurcation. Time dependent results are obtained using a numerical implementation of a reduced order r...

  6. Current position on fission product behavior

    The following phenomena are treated and modeled: fission product release from fuel, both in-vessel and ex-vessel; fission product deposition in the primary system, fission product deposition in the containment, and fission product revolatization

  7. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Léonie

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ , e-) . The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for the

  8. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Leonie [CEA, DEN, DER, SPRC, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-12-15

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ, e{sup -}). The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for

  9. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ, e-). The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for the

  10. Characteristics of Coulomb fission

    Oberacker, Volker; Greiner, Walter; Kruse, Hans; Pinkston, William T.

    2006-01-01

    Within an extended semiquantal theory we perform large-sized coupled-channel calculations involving 260 collective levels for Coulomb fission of 238U. Differential Coulomb fission cross sections are studied as a function of bombarding energy and impact parameter for several projectiles. In the Xe + U case, total cross sections are also given. We find a strong dependence on projectile charge number, PCF(180°)∼(Zp)6 in the region 50≤Zp≤92 for a fixed ratio E/ECoul, which might...

  11. Status of fission yield measurements

    Fission yield measurement and yield compilation activities in the major laboratories of the world are reviewed. In addition to a general review of the effort of each laboratory, a brief summary of yield measurement activities by fissioning nuclide is presented. A new fast reactor fission yield measurement program being conducted in the US is described

  12. Discoveries of isotopes by fission

    M Thoennessen

    2015-09-01

    Of the about 3000 isotopes presently known, about 20% have been discovered in fission. The history of fission as it relates to the discovery of isotopes as well as the various reaction mechanisms leading to isotope discoveries involving fission are presented.

  13. Microscopic Description of Induced Fission

    Schunck, N

    2013-01-01

    Selected aspects of the description of neutron-induced fission in 240Pu in the framework of the nuclear energy density functional theory at finite temperature are presented. In particular, we discuss aspects pertaining to the choice of thermodynamic state variables, the evolution of fission barriers as function of the incident neutron energy, and the temperatures of the fission fragments.

  14. Fission dynamics of hot nuclei

    Santanu Pal; Jhilam Sadhukhan

    2014-04-01

    Experimental evidence accumulated during the last two decades indicates that the fission of excited heavy nuclei involves a dissipative dynamical process. We shall briefly review the relevant dynamical model, namely the Langevin equations for fission. Statistical model predictions using the Kramers’ fission width will also be discussed.

  15. Fission product data library

    A library is described of data for 584 isotopes of fission products, including decay constants, branching ratios (both burn-up and decay), the type of emitted radiation, relative and absolute yields, capture cross sections for thermal neutrons, and resonance integrals. When a detailed decay scheme is not known, the mean energies of beta particles and neutrino and gamma radiations are given. In the ZVJE SKODA system the library is named BIBFP and is stored on film No 49 of the NE 803 B computer. It is used in calculating the inventory of fission products in fuel elements (and also determining absorption cross sections for burn-up calculations, gamma ray sources, heat generation) and in solving radioactivity transport problems in the primary circuit. It may also be used in the spectrometric method for burn-up determination of fuel elements. The library comprises the latest literary data available. It serves as the basis for library BIBGRFP storing group constants of fission products with independent yields of isotopes from fission. This, in turn, forms the basis for the BIBDN library collecting data on the precursors of delayed neutron emitters. (author)

  16. Fission yields in the thermal neutron fission of plutonium-239

    Fission yields for 27 mass numbers were determined in the thermal neutron fission of 239Pu using high resolution gamma ray spectrometry and radiochemical method. The results obtained using gamma ray spectrometry and from the investigations on the fission yield of 99Mo using radiochemical method were reported earlier. These data along with fission yields for 19 mass numbers determined using radiochemical method formed a part of Ph.D. thesis. The data given here are a compilation of all the results and are presented considering the neutron temperature correction to 239Pu fission cross-section which is used for calculating the total number of fissions in these studies. A comparison is made of the resulting fission yield values with the latest experimentally determined values and those given in two recent compilations. (author)

  17. Fission modes of mercury isotopes

    Warda, M; Nazarewicz, W

    2012-01-01

    Recent experiments on beta-delayed fission in the mercury-lead region and the discovery of asymmetric fission in $^{180}$Hg [1] have stimulated renewed interest in the mechanism of fission in heavy nuclei. Here we study fission modes and fusion valleys in $^{180}$Hg and $^{198}$Hg using the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory employing Skyrme and Gogny energy density functionals. We show that the observed transition from asymmetric fission in $^{180}$Hg towards more symmetric distribution of fission fragments in $^{198}$Hg can be explained in terms of competing fission modes of different geometries that are governed by shell effects in pre-scission configurations. The density distributions at scission configurations are studied and related to the experimentally observed mass splits.

  18. Dynamical features of nuclear fission

    Santanu Pal

    2015-08-01

    It is now established that the transition-state theory of nuclear fission due to Bohr and Wheeler underestimates several observables in heavy-ion-induced fusion–fission reactions. Dissipative dynamical models employing either the Langevin equation or equivalently the Fokker–Planck equation have been developed for fission of heavy nuclei at high excitations (T ∼1 MeV or higher). Here, we first present the physical picture underlying the dissipative fission dynamics. We mainly concentrate upon the Kramers’ prescription for including dissipation in fission dynamics. We discuss, in some detail, the results of a statistical model analysis of the pre-scission neutron multiplicity data from the reactions 19F+194,196,198Pt using Kramers’ fission width. We also discuss the multi-dimensional Langevin equation in the context of kinetic energy and mass distribution of the fission fragments.

  19. Fission product revaporization

    One of the major developmental advances in severe accident analysis since the Reactor Safety Study relates to the accounting for radionuclide retention in the reactor coolant system (RCS). The retention is predicted to occur as materials released during core heatup and degradation are transported through the RCS to the break (broken pipe, relief valve, etc.). For accidents involving relatively long RCS-transit times (e.g., station blackout in PWRs), the fraction of released material predicted to remain in the RCS can be large. For example, calculations for the Surry station blackout sequence showed retention of approximately 80% of the cesium and iodine species. Factors affecting fission product revaporization are post-vessel-failure thermal hydraulics, heat loss through vessel and pipe walls, and revaporization chemistry. The accident conditions relevant to this issue range from those present immediately after vessel failure to those present after containment failure. The factors that affect fission product revaporization are discussed

  20. Fission fragment angular distributions

    Recently a Letter appeared (Phys. Rev. Lett., 522, 414(1984)) claiming that the usual expression for describing the angula distribution of fission fragments from compound nuclear decay is not a necessarily valid limit of a more general expression. In this comment we wish to point out that the two expressions arise from distinctly different models, and that the new expression as used in the cited reference is internally inconsistent

  1. Statistical theory of fission

    In nuclear reactions where a compound nucleus is formed at high excitation energies, one is forced to use a statistical theory to explain the observables of the reaction. The statistical theory of fission of Weisskopf-Ewing-Newton and Ericson is applied to binary spallation of 16O, 20Ne, and 14N by protons in the proton energy range of 20 to 150 MeV, 0 to 105 MeV, and 0 to 41.9 MeV, respectively. The capture cross section of the incident proton is calculated from the reaction cross section using appropriate optical model potentials. The differential and total cross sections for binary fragmentation into near symmetric mass nuclei are calculated which are in reasonable agreement with experimental results. The kinetic energy spectrum and decay widths in the final channels are also calculated, however these have not been measured experimentally for comparison. All of these calculations are done using three different ion-ion optical potentials suggested by others. One then reformulated the statistical theory to include the second law of thermodynamics. Both theories are applied to neutron induced fission of 239Pu, 235U, 233U, 229Th, and 226Ra at several different neutron and alpha energies using the recently proposed external barrier between the saddle and the scission point. The transmission functions are calculated using a set of coupled equations in the exit channels. The computed results indicate that the model can account for the observed variation of the percentage mass yield spectra. Furthermore one calculated the most probable kinetic energy in the fission in all cases and found it to agree with the observation. The spontaneous and isomer fission half lives are calculated giving good agreement with experimental data. The kinetic energy spectrums are also computed for some representative daughter pairs. The inclusion of the second law of thermodynamics improves the agreement between theory and experiment

  2. Extended optical model for fission

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier is used for U,235234(n ,f ) , while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n ,f ) reactions. The 239Pu(n ,f ) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for U,238235(n ,f ) and 239Pu(n ,f ) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. The extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.

  3. Oral Zn-DTPA therapy for reducing 141Ce retention in suckling rats

    In neonatal rats DTPA reduced the intestinal retention of cerium ingested as an additive in its chloride form to milk. It also reduced retention of absorbed cerium. A similar decrease of cerium retention in gut and whole body was obtained after simultaneous or 24 hours' delayed DTPA administration. (author)

  4. Low-energy ternary fission

    With the detector system DIOGENES thermal neutron induced and spontaneous α particle associated fission and spontaneous nuclear tripartition into three fragments of similar masses has been investigated. DIOGENES is a concentric arrangement of toroidal angular position sensitive ionization chambers and proportional counters to measure the kinetic energies and relative angular distributions of the three reaction products of ternary fission. For α-particle accompanied fission some of the many possible α particle fission-fragment parameter correlations will be discussed. For nearly symmetric low-energy nuclear tripartition new upper limits are presented. Former experimental results which pretended evidence for so called true ternary fission could be explained by charged-particle associated fission with a light particle in the mass range of 13 < A < 23

  5. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Lantz M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f and Th(p,f have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  6. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    Lantz, M.; Al-Adili, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.

    2016-06-01

    The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f) and Th(p,f) have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn) reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  7. Fission approach to cluster radioactivity

    D N Poenaru; R A Gherghescu

    2015-09-01

    Fission theory is used to explain decay. Also, the analytical superasymmetric fission (ASAF) model is successfully employed to make a systematic search and to predict, with other models, cluster radioactivity. The macroscopic–microscopic method is illustrated for the superheavy nucleus 286Fl. Then a few results of the theoretical approach of decay (ASAF, UNIV and semFIS models), cluster decay (ASAF and UNIV) and spontaneous fission dynamics are described with Werner–Wheeler and cranking inertia. UNIV denotes universal curve and semFIS the fission-based semiempirical formula.

  8. Fission in Rapidly Rotating Nuclei

    A. K. Rhine Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the effect of rotation in fission of the atomic nucleus 256Fm using an independent-particle shell model with the mean field represented by a deformed Woods-Saxon potential and the shapes defined through the Cassinian oval parametrization. The variations of barrier height with increasing angular momentum, appearance of double hump in fission path are analysed. Our calculations explain the appearance of double hump in fission path of 256Fm nucleus. The second minimum vanishes with increase in angular momentum which hints that the fission barrier disappears at large spin.

  9. Hidden systematics of fission channels

    Schmidt Karl-Heinz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is a common procedure to describe the fission-fragment mass distributions of fissioning systems in the actinide region by a sum of at least 5 Gaussian curves, one for the symmetric component and a few additional ones, together with their complementary parts, for the asymmetric components. These components have been attributed to the influence of fragment shells, e.g. in the statistical scission-point model of Wilkins, Steinberg and Chasman. They have also been associated with valleys in the potential-energy landscape between the outer saddle and the scission configuration in the multi-channel fission model of Brosa. When the relative yields, the widths and the mean mass-asymmetry values of these components are fitted to experimental data, the mass distributions can be very well reproduced. Moreover, these fission channels are characterised by specific values of charge polarisation, total kinetic energy and prompt-neutron yields. The present contribution investigates the systematic variation of the characteristic fission-channel properties as a function of the composition and the excitation energy of the fissioning system. The mean position of the asymmetric fission channels in the heavy fragment is almost constant in atomic number. The deformation of the nascent fragments at scission, which is the main source of excitation energy of the separated fission fragments ending up in prompt-neutron emission, is found to be a unique function of Z for the light and the heavy fragment of the asymmetric fission channels. A variation of the initial excitation energy of the fissioning system above the fission saddle is only seen in the neutron yield of the heavy fragment. The charge polarisation in the two most important asymmetric fission channels is found to be constant and to appreciably exceed the macroscopic value. The variation of the relative yields and of the positions of the fission channels as a function of the composition and excitation energy

  10. Study on the effect factor of the absolute fission rates measured by depleted uranium fission chamber

    The absolute fission rates was measured by the depleted uranium fission chamber. The efficiency of the fission fragments recorded in the fission chamber was analyzed. The factor influencing absolute fission rates was studied in the experiment, including the disturbing effect between detectors and the effect of the structural material of the fission chamber, etc

  11. Fast fission phenomenon

    In these lectures we have described two different phenomena occuring in dissipative heavy ion collisions : neutron-proton asymmetry and fast fission. Neutron-proton asymmetry has provided us with an example of a fast collective motion. As a consequence quantum fluctuations can be observed. The observation of quantum or statistical fluctuations is directly connected to the comparison between the phonon energy and the temperature of the intrinsic system. This means that this mode might also provide a good example for the investigation of the transition between quantum and statistical fluctuations which might occur when the bombarding energy is raised above 10 MeV/A. However it is by no means sure that in this energy domain enough excitation energy can be put into the system in order to reach such high temperatures over the all system. The other interest in investigating neutron-proton asymmetry above 10 MeV/A is that the interaction time between the two incident nuclei will decrease. Consequently, if some collective motion should still be observed, it will be one of the last which can be seen. Fast fission corresponds on the contrary to long interaction times. The experimental indications are still rather weak and mainly consist of experimental data which cannot be understood in the framework of standard dissipative models. We have seen that a model which can describe both the entrance and the exit configuration gives this mechanism in a natural way and that the experimental data can, to a good extend, be explained. The nicest thing is probably that our old understanding of dissipative heavy ion collisions is not changed at all except for the problems that can now be understood in terms of fast fission. Nevertheless this area desserve further studies, especially on the experimental side to be sure that the consistent picture which we have on dissipative heavy ion collisions still remain coherent in the future.

  12. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) has been developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products has been utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, has been assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). Mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement

  13. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Shields, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Arnold, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Blakeley, R. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Bredeweg, T.; Devlin, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hecht, A.A.; Heffern, L.E. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Jorgenson, J.; Laptev, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mader, D. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); O' Donnell, J.M.; Sierk, A.; White, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2015-07-11

    The SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) has been developed for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products has been utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). The SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, has been assembled and tested using {sup 229}Th and {sup 252}Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf. Individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). Mass yield results measured from {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.

  14. Energy from nuclear fission(*

    Ripani M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main features of nuclear fission as physical phenomenon will be revisited, emphasizing its peculiarities with respect to other nuclear reactions. Some basic concepts underlying the operation of nuclear reactors and the main types of reactors will be illustrated, including fast reactors, showing the most important differences among them. The nuclear cycle and radioactive-nuclear-waste production will be also discussed, along with the perspectives offered by next generation nuclear assemblies being proposed. The current situation of nuclear power in the world, its role in reducing carbon emission and the available resources will be briefly illustrated.

  15. Observation of cold fission in 242Pu spontaneous fission

    Coincidence γ-ray data from the spontaneous fission of 242Pu were collected at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory high purity Ge (HPGe) array, GAMMASPHERE. Data from several cold-fission (0 neutron emission) isotopic pairs were observed and are presented. An interesting trend in the fractional population of cold-fission events was observed and is discussed. Relative yields of Zr-Xe, Sr-Ba, and Mo-Te pairs were measured. The Zr-Xe system has the most complete data set. Some speculations on the trend in the number of neutrons emitted as a function of the mass of the Xe isotope populated are presented. Comparisons between the yields from the spontaneous fission of 242Pu and the yields from thermal-neutron-induced fission of 241Pu are also presented. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  16. Entrance-channel dependence of fission transients

    Charity, R. J.

    2004-01-01

    Fission transients describe the fission rate as it evolves towards the quasistationary value given by Kramers' formula. The nature of fission transients is dependent on the assumed initial distribution of the compound nuclei along the fission coordinate. Although the standard initial assumption of a near-spherical object leads to a transient suppression of the fission rate (fission delay), a moderate initial fissionlike deformation can reduce the magnitude of this suppression. For still large...

  17. Separation of plutonium from uranium and fission products in the zirconium pyrophospate column

    Distribution coefficients were of the following ions were determined in the system zirconium pyrophosphate - aqueous solution HNO3 : Pu3+, Pu4+, PuO22+, UO22+, 234Th2+, 95Zr, 95Nb, 106Ru, 144Ce3+, 90Sr2+, 137Cs+, 59Fe3+ and 59Fe2+. According to the distribution coefficients it can be concluded that the separation of some cations is possible. This was proved by using separation columns. The following successful separations were completed: 90Sr2+ from 90I3+, 90Sr2+ from 90I3+ and 1'37Cs+, UO2+ from 234Th4+, Pu4+ from UO22+, 95Zr, 95Nb, 106Ru, 144Ce3+, 90Sr2+, 137Cs+. Decontamination factors of plutonium from the mentioned cations were determined. It was found that the sorption of Cs+ and Sr2+ is based on ion exchange

  18. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  19. Fission at high angular momenta

    By studies on the system 40Ar+165Ho by means of selected measuring methods which made a differential selection of certain angular momentum ranges and by this a discrimination between ''fast fission'' and compound-nucleus fission possible the validity of fundamental predictions of the model of the ''fast fission'' hitherto experimentally no yet confirmed was studied: 1) At the turning point of the trajectory for ''fast fission'' calculated by Gregoire the corresponding shape of which must be responsible for the angular distribution the centers of the two fragments must be separated by about 11 fm. 2) The widths of the mass distributions after ''fast fission'' and compound-nucleus fission must be different by a factor 2. The measurements of the angular dependence showed that both prediction cannot be simultaneously brought into accordance with the experimental results. The results of coincidence measurements between fission fragments and alpha particles confirmed the assumption mentioned under topic 2. The analysis of the angular dependence then yielded for the shape of the nuclear complex leading to ''fast fission'' a more compact shape than that indicated by Gregoire, namely with a distance of the fragments of about 7 fm. (orig.)

  20. Fission throughout the periodic table

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1989-04-01

    The dualistic view of fission and evaporation as two distinct compound nucleus processes is substituted with a unified view in which fission, complex fragment emission, and light particle evaporation are seen as different aspects of a single process. 47 refs., 22 figs.

  1. Fission throughout the periodic table

    The dualistic view of fission and evaporation as two distinct compound nucleus processes is substituted with a unified view in which fission, complex fragment emission, and light particle evaporation are seen as different aspects of a single process. 47 refs., 22 figs

  2. Fission of Halving Edges Graphs

    Khovanova, Tanya; Yang, Dai

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an operation on halving edges graph that we call fission. Fission replaces each point in a given configuration with a small cluster of k points. The operation interacts nicely with halving edges, so we examine its properties in detail.

  3. Fission Dynamics of Compound Nuclei

    Iwata, Yoritaka; Heinz, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Collisions between $^{248}$Cm and $^{48}$Ca are systematically investigated by time-dependent density functional calculations with evaporation prescription. Depending on the incident energy and impact parameter, fusion, deep-inelastic and quasi-fission events are expected to appear. In this paper, possible fission dynamics of compound nuclei is presented.

  4. Ternary fission of nuclei into comparable fragments

    Karpeshin, F. F., E-mail: fkarpeshin@gmail.com [D.I. Mendeleev Institute forMetrology (VNIIM) (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    The problem of nuclear fission into three comparable fragments is considered. A mechanism of true ternary fission is proposed. In contrast to sequential fission, where the three fragments arise upon two sequential events of binary fission, the mechanism in question relies on a scenario that originally involves fission into three fragments. This mechanism is driven by a hexadecapole deformation of the fissioning nucleus, in contrast to binary fission associated with quadrupole vibrations of the nuclear surface. The fragment-mass ratios are estimated. The dynamics of formation of collinear fragments and their subsequent motion in opposite directions is traced. The calculated probability of true ternary fission complies with observed values.

  5. Ternary fission of nuclei into comparable fragments

    The problem of nuclear fission into three comparable fragments is considered. A mechanism of true ternary fission is proposed. In contrast to sequential fission, where the three fragments arise upon two sequential events of binary fission, the mechanism in question relies on a scenario that originally involves fission into three fragments. This mechanism is driven by a hexadecapole deformation of the fissioning nucleus, in contrast to binary fission associated with quadrupole vibrations of the nuclear surface. The fragment-mass ratios are estimated. The dynamics of formation of collinear fragments and their subsequent motion in opposite directions is traced. The calculated probability of true ternary fission complies with observed values

  6. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    This is the tenth issue of a report series on Fission Product Data, which informs us about all the activities in this field, which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The types of activities included are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission), neutron reaction cross sections of fission products, data related to the radioactive decay of fission products, delayed neutron data of fission products, lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption, etc.). There is also a section with recent references relative to fission product nuclear data

  7. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    The news of the discovery of nuclear fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fifieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, ''Fifty Years with Nuclear Fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent development in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicated a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two fully days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main site of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered in this Volume 1 by this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled: Preclude to the First Chain Reaction -- 1932 to 1942; Early Fission Research -- Nuclear Structure and Spontaneous Fission; 50 Years of Fission, Science, and Technology; Nuclear Reactors, Secure Energy for the Future; Reactors 1; Fission Science 1; Safeguards and Space Applications; Fission Data; Nuclear Fission -- Its Various Aspects; Theory and Experiments in Support of Theory; Reactors and Safeguards; and General Research, Instrumentation, and By-Product. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  8. Prompt Fission Neutron Emission in Resonance Fission of 239Pu

    Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Varapai, Natallia; Zeinalov, Shakir; Oberstedt, Stephan; Serot, Olivier

    2005-05-01

    The prompt neutron emission probability from neutron-induced fission in the resonance region is being investigated at the time-of-flight facility GELINA of the IRMM. A double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber is used as a fission-fragment detector. For the data acquisition of both the fission-fragment signals as well as the neutron detector signals the fast digitization technique has been applied. For the neutron detection, large-volume liquid scintillation detectors from the DEMON collaboration are used. A specialized data analysis program taking advantage of the digital filtering technique has been developed to treat the acquired data. Neutron multiplicity investigations for actinides, especially in resonance neutron-induced fission, are rather scarce. They are, however, important for reactor control and safety issues as well as for understanding the basic physics of the fission process. Fission yield measurements on both 235U and 239Pu without prompt neutron emission coincidence have shown that fluctuation of the fission-fragment mass distribution exists from resonance to resonance, larger in the case of 235U. To possibly explain these observations, the question now is whether the prompt neutron multiplicity shows similar fluctuations with resonance energy.

  9. Fission fragment angular distribution in heavy ion induced fission

    S. Soheyli

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available   We have calculated the fission fragment angular anisotropy for 16O + 232Th,12C + 236U , 11B + 237 Np , 14 N + 232 Th , 11B + 235U , 12C + 232Th systems with the saddle point statistical model and compared the fission fragment angular anisotropy for these systems. This comparison was done with two methods a without neutron correction and b with neutron correction. Also we studied normal and anomalous behavior of the fission fragment angular anisotropy. Finally, we have predicted the average emitted neutron from compound nuclei considering the best fit for each system.

  10. Fission fragment angular distribution in heavy ion induced fission

    S. Soheyli; I. Ziaeian

    2006-01-01

      We have calculated the fission fragment angular anisotropy for 16O + 232Th,12C + 236U , 11B + 237 Np , 14 N + 232 Th , 11B + 235U , 12C + 232Th systems with the saddle point statistical model and compared the fission fragment angular anisotropy for these systems. This comparison was done with two methods a) without neutron correction and b) with neutron correction. Also we studied normal and anomalous behavior of the fission fragment angular anisotropy. Finally, we have predicted the averag...

  11. Prompt fission neutron emission in resonance fission of 239Pu

    The prompt fission neutron emission probability was investigated at the time-of-flight facility GELINA at the IRMM. A double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber was used as a fission fragment detector. For the data acquisition of both fission fragment signals as well as the neutron detector signals the fast digitization technique has been applied. For the neutron detection large volume liquid scintillation detectors from the DEMON collaboration were used. A specialized data analysis program taking advantage of the digital filtering technique has been developed to treat the acquired data

  12. Fifty years with nuclear fission

    The news of the discovery of nucler fission, by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann in Germany, was brought to the United States by Niels Bohr in January 1939. Since its discovery, the United States, and the world for that matter, has never been the same. It therefore seemed appropriate to acknowledge the fiftieth anniversary of its discovery by holding a topical meeting entitled, ''Fifty years with nuclear fission,'' in the United States during the year 1989. The objective of the meeting was to bring together pioneers of the nuclear industry and other scientists and engineers to report on reminiscences of the past and on the more recent developments in fission science and technology. The conference highlighted the early pioneers of the nuclear industry by dedicating a full day (April 26), consisting of two plenary sessions, at the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington, DC. More recent developments in fission science and technology in addition to historical reflections were topics for two full days of sessions (April 27 and 28) at the main sites of the NIST in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The wide range of topics covered by Volume 2 of this topical meeting included plenary invited, and contributed sessions entitled, Nuclear fission -- a prospective; reactors II; fission science II; medical and industrial applications by by-products; reactors and safeguards; general research, instrumentation, and by-products; and fission data, astrophysics, and space applications. The individual papers have been cataloged separately

  13. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    High-resolution measurements on γ rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author)

  14. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    Phillips, W.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    High-resolution measurements on {gamma} rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author) 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Fission track studies of tektites

    The fission track analysis method was used for the age determination of tektites. The tektite samples were obtained from Hainan Island and Leizhou Peninsula. The method consists in cutting and polishing two sections of a sample, irradiating one of these with a known thermal neutron flux (5.90 x 1015/cm2), etching each section identically with hydrofluoric acid, and then comparing the fission track densities in two cases with a microscope. Their fission track age is found to be around 0.7 Ma

  16. Change over from compound nuclear fission to quasi-fission

    Bhattacharya P; Golda K. S.; Rana T. K.; Mukhopadhyay S; Mukherjee G; Meena J. K.; Kundu S.; Bhattacharya S; Bhattacharya C.; Banerjee K; Ghosh T. K.

    2010-01-01

    Fission fragment mass distribution has been measured in two reactions to populate compound nucleus 246Bk. Both the target nuclei were deformed. However, entrance channel mass asymmetry of the two systems was on the either side of the Businaro Gallone mass asymmetry parameter. Near the Coulomb barrier, at similar excitation energies, the width of the fission fragment mass distribution was found to be significantly different for the 14N+232Th reaction compared to the 11B+235U reaction. T...

  17. Chemical Production using Fission Fragments

    Some reactor design considerations of the use of fission recoil fragment energy for the production of chemicals of industrial importance have been discussed previously in a paper given at the Second United Nations International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy [A/Conf. 15/P.76]. The present paper summarizes more recent progress made on this topic at AERE, Harwell. The range-energy relationship for fission fragments is discussed in the context of the choice of fuel system for a chemical production reactor, and the experimental observation of a variation of chemical effect along the length of a fission fragment track is described for the irradiation of nitrogen-oxygen mixtures. Recent results are given on the effect of fission fragments on carbon monoxide-hydrogen gas mixtures and on water vapour. No system investigated to date shows any outstanding promise for large-scale chemical production. (author)

  18. Background radiation from fission pulses

    England, T.R.; Arthur, E.D.; Brady, M.C.; LaBauve, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    Extensive source terms for beta, gamma, and neutrons following fission pulses are presented in various tabular and graphical forms. Neutron results from a wide range of fissioning nuclides (42) are examined and detailed information is provided for four fuels: /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 239/Pu; these bracket the range of the delayed spectra. Results at several cooling (decay) times are presented. For ..beta../sup -/ and ..gamma.. spectra, only /sup 235/U and /sup 239/Pu results are given; fission-product data are currently inadequate for other fuels. The data base consists of all known measured data for individual fission products extensively supplemented with nuclear model results. The process is evolutionary, and therefore, the current base is summarized in sufficient detail for users to judge its quality. Comparisons with recent delayed neutron experiments and total ..beta../sup -/ and ..gamma.. decay energies are included. 27 refs., 47 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Measurement of fission cross sections

    A review is presented on the recent progress in the experiment of fission cross section measurement, including recent activity in Japan being carried out under the project of nuclear data measurement. (author)

  20. Microscopic Description of Nuclear Fission Dynamics

    Umar, A. S.; Oberacker, V. E.; Maruhn, J. A.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss possible avenues to study fission dynamics starting from a time-dependent mean-field approach. Previous attempts to study fission dynamics using the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory are analyzed. We argue that different initial conditions may be needed to describe fission dynamics depending on the specifics of the fission phenomenon and propose various approaches towards this goal. In particular, we provide preliminary calculations for studying fission following a heavy-io...

  1. Advanced Space Fission Propulsion Systems

    Houts, Michael G.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2010-01-01

    Fission has been considered for in-space propulsion since the 1940s. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) systems underwent extensive development from 1955-1973, completing 20 full power ground tests and achieving specific impulses nearly twice that of the best chemical propulsion systems. Space fission power systems (which may eventually enable Nuclear Electric Propulsion) have been flown in space by both the United States and the Former Soviet Union. Fission is the most developed and understood of the nuclear propulsion options (e.g. fission, fusion, antimatter, etc.), and fission has enjoyed tremendous terrestrial success for nearly 7 decades. Current space nuclear research and technology efforts are focused on devising and developing first generation systems that are safe, reliable and affordable. For propulsion, the focus is on nuclear thermal rockets that build on technologies and systems developed and tested under the Rover/NERVA and related programs from the Apollo era. NTP Affordability is achieved through use of previously developed fuels and materials, modern analytical techniques and test strategies, and development of a small engine for ground and flight technology demonstration. Initial NTP systems will be capable of achieving an Isp of 900 s at a relatively high thrust-to-weight ratio. The development and use of first generation space fission power and propulsion systems will provide new, game changing capabilities for NASA. In addition, development and use of these systems will provide the foundation for developing extremely advanced power and propulsion systems capable of routinely and affordably accessing any point in the solar system. The energy density of fissile fuel (8 x 10(exp 13) Joules/kg) is more than adequate for enabling extensive exploration and utilization of the solar system. For space fission propulsion systems, the key is converting the virtually unlimited energy of fission into thrust at the desired specific impulse and thrust

  2. Superheavy nuclei and fission barriers

    Lu, Bing-Nan; Zhao, Jie; Zhao, En-Guang; Zhou, Shan-Gui

    In this chapter, we will present relativistic mean field (RMF) description of heavy and superheavy nuclei (SHN). We will discuss the shell structure and magic numbers in the mass region of SHN, binding energies and α decay Q values, shapes of ground states and potential energy surfaces and fission barriers. We particularly focus on the multidimensionally-constrained covariant density functional theories (CDFT) and the applications of CDFT to the study of exotic nuclear shapes and fission barriers.

  3. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragment.

    Llanes Estrada, Felipe José; Martínez Carmona, Belén; Muñoz Martínez, José L.

    2016-01-01

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramers-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fr...

  4. Laser spectroscopy of fission fragments

    The study of the nuclear structure of fission fragments is discussed. They are neutron-rich nuclei the structure of which possesses some peculiarities. Two regions of fission fragments are discussed: near the shell closures N = 50 and N = 82 and at the boundary of the deformation. A view on the optical properties of these elements is presented and different laser spectroscopic methods for their investigation are proposed. (author)

  5. The microscopic theory of fission

    Younes, W.; Gogny, D.

    2009-01-01

    Fission-fragment properties have been calculated for thermal neutron-induced fission on a $^{239}\\textrm{Pu}$ target, using constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations with a finite-range effective interaction. A quantitative criterion based on the interaction energy between the nascent fragments is introduced to define the scission configurations. The validity of this criterion is benchmarked against experimental measurements of the kinetic energies and of multiplicities of neutrons emi...

  6. Hidden systematics of fission channels

    Schmidt Karl-Heinz; Jurado Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    It is a common procedure to describe the fission-fragment mass distributions of fissioning systems in the actinide region by a sum of at least 5 Gaussian curves, one for the symmetric component and a few additional ones, together with their complementary parts, for the asymmetric components. These components have been attributed to the influence of fragment shells, e.g. in the statistical scission-point model of Wilkins, Steinberg and Chasman. They have also been associated with valleys in th...

  7. Energy dependence of fission observables

    Paşca, Horia

    2016-01-01

    The mass, charge and isotopic distributions of fission fragments are studied within an improved scission-point statistical model in the reaction 235U+n at different energies of the incident neutron. The available experimental data are well reproduced and the energy-dependencies of the observable characteristics of fission are predicted for future experiments. The calculated mass distribution of 238U+n is also compared with experimental data.

  8. Fission hindrance and nuclear viscosity

    Indranil Mazumdar

    2015-08-01

    We discuss the role of nuclear viscosity in hindering the fission of heavy nuclei as observed in the experimental measurements of GDR -ray spectra from the fissioning nuclei. We review a set of experiments carried out and reported by us previously [see Dioszegi et al, Phys. Rev. C 61, 024613 (2000); Shaw et al, Phys. Rev. C 61, 044612 (2000)] and argue that the nuclear viscosity parameter has no apparent dependence on temperature. However, it may depend upon the deformation of the nucleus.

  9. Dynamin-mediated membrane fission

    Morlot, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    Membrane fission is required for vesicular traffic between intracellular compartments. Dynamin is a GTPase implicated in vesicle scission during Clathrin-mediated endocytosis. It polymerizes into a helix at the neck of endocytic buds. Upon GTP hydrolysis, conformational changes reduce the helical radius and pitch showing that fission proceeds through a constriction mechanism. We show that the deformation of Dynamin helices is highly concerted and damped by the friction between membrane and Dy...

  10. Alpha Particle Emission in Fission

    Soon after it was discovered that alpha particles are occasionally emitted in fission, it was concluded, on the basis of the energy and angular distributions of these particles, that they are emitted from the space between the fragments at times close to that of the snapping of the neck that connects them. It is shown that, independent of any (still unknown) dynamic features of the alpha-particle ejection process, the energy required to emit alpha particles from between the fragments at the indicated time is barely available. Presumably the rareness of alpha particles in fission, and the apparent absence of still heavier ''third'' particles, is associated with the marginal energy supply at the time of actual fragment division. The fact that the total kinetic energy release in so-called ternary fission is roughly equal to that in normal binary fission instead of being about 20 MeV larger is shown to imply that the mean fragment separation at the division time is larger in ternary fission. This is interpreted to indicate that alpha particles are emitted with greatest probability n those fissions where ample energy happens to be provided through the stretching of an abnormally long neck between the fragments before they actually divide. It is suggested that the release of the alpha particles is a sudden rather than adiabatic process. (author)

  11. Fission fragment angular distributions and fission cross section validation

    The present knowledge of angular distributions of neutron-induced fission is limited to a maximal energy of 15 MeV, with large discrepancies around 14 MeV. Only 238U and 232Th have been investigated up to 100 MeV in a single experiment. The n-TOF Collaboration performed the fission cross section measurement of several actinides (232Th, 235U, 238U, 234U, 237Np) at the n-TOF facility using an experimental set-up made of Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC), extending the energy domain of the incident neutron above hundreds of MeV. The method based on the detection of the 2 fragments in coincidence allowed to clearly disentangle the fission reactions among other types of reactions occurring in the spallation domain. I will show the methods we used to reconstruct the full angular resolution by the tracking of fission fragments. Below 10 MeV our results are consistent with existing data. For example in the case of 232Th, below 10 MeV the results show clearly the variation occurring at the first (1 MeV) and second (7 MeV) chance fission, corresponding to transition states of given J and K (total spin and its projection on the fission axis), and a much more accurate energy dependence at the 3. chance threshold (14 MeV) has been obtained. In the spallation domain, above 30 MeV we confirm the high anisotropy revealed in 232Th by the single existing data set. I'll discuss the implications of this finding, related to the low anisotropy exhibited in proton-induced fission. I also explore the critical experiments which is valuable checks of nuclear data. The 237Np neutron-induced fission cross section has recently been measured in a large energy range (from eV to GeV) at the n-TOF facility at CERN. When compared to previous measurements, the n-TOF fission cross section appears to be higher by 5-7 % beyond the fission threshold. To check the relevance of n-TOF data, we simulate a criticality experiment performed at Los Alamos with a 6 kg sphere of 237Np. This sphere was

  12. Status of fission power

    Fission energy is reviewed from the viewpoints of technology, economics, politics, manufacturers, consumers, and foreign countries. Technically, the reactor program is operating and the light water reactor industry shows signs of maturing, although recent business has been disappointing. Marketing of gas-cooled reactors depends, not on technical, but economic and political issues. Liquid metal fast breeder reactors have been demonstrated worldwide, while the gas-cooled fast breeder remains an undemonstrated option. Nuclear plants, currently costing the same as coal plants with scrubbers, are the cheapest option for utilities because most of the cost is imbedded. The defeat of nuclear initiatives in seven states indicates that public feeling is not as anti-nuclear as opponents to nuclear power claim. The harshness of last winter demonstrated the advantages of a power source that is not so sensitive to the weather for reliable operation and transport, as well as low cost energy. Other nations are proceeding to build a nuclear capability, which the U.S. may jeopardize because of concerns about the fuel cycle, nuclear waste disposal, uranium reserves, and nuclear proliferation

  13. Properties and detection of ionizing radiation resulting from instantaneous fission and fission product mixture

    The different types of ionizing radiation accompanying fission and mixtures of fission products, their activity, the determination of the age of fission products and the biological hazard of radiation caused by instantaneous fission are described. The possibility is described of detection, and of the dosimetry of ionizing radiation resulting from instantaneous fission and emitted by a mixture of fission products, the determination of the dose of neutron radiation, surface contamination, internal contamination and the contamination of water and foods. (J.P.)

  14. Relative quantifying technique to measure mass of fission plate in a fission chamber

    Under the same neutron radiation conditions, fission counts are proportional to the number of fission nuclei. Based on this concept, a relative quantifying method has been developed to measure the mass of fission plate in fission chamber on a 14 MeV accelerator neutron source at the Neutron Physics Laboratory, INPC, CAEP. The experimental assembly was introduced and mass of the fission material in several fission chambers was measured. The results by this method agree well (within 1%) with the α-quantifying method. Therefore, it is absolutely feasible to quantify the fission plate mass in fission chambers. The measurement uncertainty is 2%-4%. (authors)

  15. Fission product solvent extraction

    Two main objectives concerning removal of fission products from high-level tank wastes will be accomplished in this project. The first objective entails the development of an acid-side Cs solvent-extraction (SX) process applicable to remediation of the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and dissolved calcine waste (DCW) at INEEL. The second objective is to develop alkaline-side SX processes for the combined removal of Tc, Cs, and possibly Sr and for individual separation of Tc (alone or together with Sr) and Cs. These alkaline-side processes apply to tank wastes stored at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge. This work exploits the useful properties of crown ethers and calixarenes and has shown that such compounds may be economically adapted to practical processing conditions. Potential benefits for both acid- and alkaline-side processing include order-of-magnitude concentration factors, high rejection of bulk sodium and potassium salts, and stripping with dilute (typically 10 mM) nitric acid. These benefits minimize the subsequent burden on the very expensive vitrification and storage of the high-activity waste. In the case of the SRTALK process for Tc extraction as pertechnetate anion from alkaline waste, such benefits have now been proven at the scale of a 12-stage flowsheet tested in 2-cm centrifugal contactors with a Hanford supernatant waste simulant. SRTALK employs a crown ether in a TBP-modified aliphatic kerosene diluent, is economically competitive with other applicable separation processes being considered, and has been successfully tested in batch extraction of actual Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF)

  16. Contribution to the study of nuclear fission

    The author proposes an overview of his research activity during the past fifteen years and more particularly that dealing with nuclear fission. The first part reports works on nucleus physics at the scission via the investigation of ternary fission (experimental procedure, influence of fission modes, influence of resonance spin, influence of excitation energy of the fissioning nucleus, emission probabilities, energy spectra of ternary alphas and tritons, emission mechanism). The second part reports measurements and assessments of neutron-induced fission cross sections. The third part reports the investigation of some properties of fission products (efficiencies, branching ratios of the main delayed neutron precursors)

  17. The latest progress of fission track analysis

    Fission track analysis as a new nuclear track technique is based on fission track annealing in mineral and is used for oil and gas exploration successfully. The west part of China is the main exploration for oil and gas. The oil and gas basins there experienced much more complicated thermal history and higher paleotemperature. In order to apply fission track analysis to these basins, following work was be carried out: 1. The decomposition of grain age distribution of zircon fission tracks. 2. Study on thermal history of Ordos basin using zircon fission track analysis. 3. The fission track study on the Qiang Tang basin in tibet

  18. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    Chapline, G.; Matsuda, Y.

    1991-08-01

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: approximately twice the efficiency if the fission fragment energy can be directly converted into electricity; reduction of the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collection of the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem.

  19. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: Approximately twice as efficient if one can directly convert the fission fragment energy into electricity; by reducing the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor one could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collecting the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Compact fission counter for DANCE

    Wu, C Y; Chyzh, A; Kwan, E; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Carter, D; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Jandel, M; Ullmann, J

    2010-11-06

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) consists of 160 BF{sub 2} crystals with equal solid-angle coverage. DANCE is a 4{pi} {gamma}-ray calorimeter and designed to study the neutron-capture reactions on small quantities of radioactive and rare stable nuclei. These reactions are important for the radiochemistry applications and modeling the element production in stars. The recognition of capture event is made by the summed {gamma}-ray energy which is equivalent of the reaction Q-value and unique for a given capture reaction. For a selective group of actinides, where the neutron-induced fission reaction competes favorably with the neutron capture reaction, additional signature is needed to distinguish between fission and capture {gamma} rays for the DANCE measurement. This can be accomplished by introducing a detector system to tag fission fragments and thus establish a unique signature for the fission event. Once this system is implemented, one has the opportunity to study not only the capture but also fission reactions. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to {alpha} particles, which is important for experiments with {alpha}-emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. A PPAC with an ingenious design was fabricated in 2006 by integrating amplifiers into the target assembly. However, this counter was proved to be unsuitable for this application because of issues related to the stability of amplifiers and the ability to separate fission fragments from {alpha}'s. Therefore, a new design is needed. A LLNL proposal to develop a new PPAC for DANCE was funded by NA22 in FY09. The design goal is to minimize the mass for the proposed

  1. Compact fission counter for DANCE

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) consists of 160 BF2 crystals with equal solid-angle coverage. DANCE is a 4π γ-ray calorimeter and designed to study the neutron-capture reactions on small quantities of radioactive and rare stable nuclei. These reactions are important for the radiochemistry applications and modeling the element production in stars. The recognition of capture event is made by the summed γ-ray energy which is equivalent of the reaction Q-value and unique for a given capture reaction. For a selective group of actinides, where the neutron-induced fission reaction competes favorably with the neutron capture reaction, additional signature is needed to distinguish between fission and capture γ rays for the DANCE measurement. This can be accomplished by introducing a detector system to tag fission fragments and thus establish a unique signature for the fission event. Once this system is implemented, one has the opportunity to study not only the capture but also fission reactions. A parallel-plate avalanche counter (PPAC) has many advantages for the detection of heavy charged particles such as fission fragments. These include fast timing, resistance to radiation damage, and tolerance of high counting rate. A PPAC also can be tuned to be insensitive to α particles, which is important for experiments with α-emitting actinides. Therefore, a PPAC is an ideal detector for experiments requiring a fast and clean trigger for fission. A PPAC with an ingenious design was fabricated in 2006 by integrating amplifiers into the target assembly. However, this counter was proved to be unsuitable for this application because of issues related to the stability of amplifiers and the ability to separate fission fragments from α's. Therefore, a new design is needed. A LLNL proposal to develop a new PPAC for DANCE was funded by NA22 in FY09. The design goal is to minimize the mass for the proposed counter and still be able to maintain a stable

  2. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  3. Neutron emission prior to fission

    In recent years, many groups have measured neutrons and light charged particles in coincidence with fission fragments in heavy ion reactions. In most cases, particles emitted with an energy spectrum and angular distribution characteristic of that of compound nucleus evaporation have been measured in excess of statistical model predictions. They have chosen to investigate this effect in detail by studying neutron emission in the 158Er composite system. The advantage of this system is that it can be produced by a variety of projectile target combinations. They have chosen four combinations which form 158Er with similar critical angular momenta but varying excitation energy. The rationale is to form the same system with different neutron emission times; if the enhanced neutrons are being emitted during the fission process, the different emission time scales might possibly be used to time the fission process. In addition, they impose an additional constraint - that they have a significant fission barrier for most of the partial waves involved in the fission process. The reactions they have selected are 16O + 142Nd (207 MeV beam energy), 24Mg + 134Ba (180 MeV), 32S + 126Te (180 MeV), 50Ti + 108Pd (216 MeV)

  4. Nuclear fission and neutron-induced fission cross-sections

    James, G D; Michaudon, A; Michaudon, A; Cierjacks, S W; Chrien, R E

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Fission and Neutron-Induced Fission Cross-Sections is the first volume in a series on Neutron Physics and Nuclear Data in Science and Technology. This volume serves the purpose of providing a thorough description of the many facets of neutron physics in different fields of nuclear applications. This book also attempts to bridge the communication gap between experts involved in the experimental and theoretical studies of nuclear properties and those involved in the technological applications of nuclear data. This publication will be invaluable to those interested in studying nuclear fis

  5. Change over from compound nuclear fission to quasi-fission

    Bhattacharya P.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fission fragment mass distribution has been measured in two reactions to populate compound nucleus 246Bk. Both the target nuclei were deformed. However, entrance channel mass asymmetry of the two systems was on the either side of the Businaro Gallone mass asymmetry parameter. Near the Coulomb barrier, at similar excitation energies, the width of the fission fragment mass distribution was found to be significantly different for the 14N+232Th reaction compared to the 11B+235U reaction. The entrance channel mass asymmetry was found to play a significant role in deciding the fusion process.

  6. Status of fission yield data

    In this paper we summarize the current status of the recent US evaluation for 34 fissioning nuclides at one or more neutron incident energies and for spontaneous fission. Currently there are 50 yields sets, and for each we have independent and cumulative yields and uncertainties for approximately 1100 fission products. When finalized the recommended data will become part of Version VI of the US ENDF/B. Other major evaluations in progress that are included in a recently formed IAEA Coordinated Research Program are also summarized. In a second part we review two empirical models in use to estimate independent yields. Comparison of model estimates with measured data is presented, including a comparison with some recent data obtained from Lohengrin (Cf-249 T). 18 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Ternary fission of superheavy elements

    Balasubramaniam, M.; Vijayaraghavan, K. R.; Manimaran, K.

    2016-01-01

    Ternary fission of superheavy nuclei is studied within the three-cluster model potential energy surfaces (PESs). Due to shell effects, the stability of superheavy nuclei has been predicted to be associated with Z =114 , 120, and 126 for protons and N =184 for neutrons. Taking some representative nuclei we have extended the ternary fission studies to superheavy nuclei. We adopted two minimization procedures to minimize the potential and considered different arrangements of the fragments. The PES from one-dimensional minimization reveals a strong cluster region favoring various ternary breakups for an arrangement in which the lightest fragment is kept at the center. The PES obtained from two-dimensional minimization reveals strong preference of ternary fragmentation in the true ternary fission region. Though the dominant decay mode of superheavy nuclei is α decay, the α -accompanied ternary breakup is found to be a nonfavorable one. Further, the prominent ternary combinations are found to be associated with the neutron magic number.

  8. Report of fission study meeting

    This book is the report of fission Study Meeting held from September 19 to 21, 1985 in the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. The objective of this study meeting was to stimulate the research on nuclear physics in Japan, which began to show new development accompanying the advance of the research on heavy ion nuclear reaction, and to make this a new starting point. More than 50 participants from physical, chemical and engineering fields, who have interest in the theory and experiment related to nuclear fission, gathered, and the meeting was a success beyond expectation. The contents covered a wide range including nuclear smashing reaction as well as nuclear fission in a narrow sense. In this book, the gists of 28 papers are collected. (Kako, I.)

  9. Surface fission tracks in diamond

    Scanning Probe Microscope (SPM) images reveal important fingerprint features of latent tracks induced in diamond by fission fragments from a californium source. Collimated fission fragments with a binary distribution of the predominant energies of 79.4 and 103.8 MeV, are assumed. Cavities, reticular formations around these cavities, and black spots of graphite were found. A brief discussion on the possible track formation mechanism is given on the basis of the explosion spike theory; an attempt to determine latent track core and halo parameters is included

  10. Advanced Fission Reactor Program objectives

    The objective of an advanced fission reactor program should be to develop an economically attractive, safe, proliferation-resistant fission reactor. To achieve this objective, an aggressive and broad-based research and development program is needed. Preliminary work at Brookhaven National Laboratory shows that a reasonable goal for a research program would be a reactor combining as many as possible of the following features: (1) initial loading of uranium enriched to less than 15% uranium 235, (2) no handling of fuel for the full 30-year nominal core life, (3) inherent safety ensured by core physics, and (4) utilization of natural uranium at least 5 times as efficiently as light water reactors

  11. Search for Singlet Fission Chromophores

    Havlas, Z.; Akdag, A.; Smith, M. B.; Dron, P.; Johnson, J. C.; Nozik, A. J.; Michl, J.

    2012-01-01

    Singlet fission, in which a singlet excited chromophore shares its energy with a ground-state neighbor and both end up in their triplet states, is of potential interest for solar cells. Only a handful of compounds, mostly alternant hydrocarbons, are known to perform efficiently. In view of the large number of conditions that a successful candidate for a practical cell has to meet, it appears desirable to extend the present list of high performers to additional classes of compounds. We have (i) identified design rules for new singlet fission chromophores and for their coupling to covalent dimers, (ii) synthesized them, and (iii) evaluated their performance as neat solids or covalent dimers.

  12. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Frégeau M.O.; Bryś T.; Gamboni Th.; Geerts W.; Oberstedt S.; Oberstedt A.; Borcea R.

    2013-01-01

    The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF) technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This conf...

  13. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nuclei

    R A Gherghescu; D N Poenaru

    2015-09-01

    The macroscopic–microscopic method is extended to calculate the deformation energy and penetrability for binary nuclear configurations typical for fission processes. The deformed two-centre shell model is used to obtain single-particle energy levels for the transition region of two partially overlapped daughter and emitted fragment nuclei. The macroscopic part is obtained using the Yukawa-plus-exponential potential. The microscopic shell and pairing corrections are obtained using the Strutinsky and BCS approaches and the cranking formulae yield the inertia tensor. Finally, the WKB method is used to calculate penetrabilities and spontaneous fission half-lives. Calculations are performed for the decay of 282,292120 nuclei.

  14. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragments

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J; Martinez, Jose L Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramer-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fragments can be treated in effective theory if corrections to the velocity distribution are needed.

  15. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragments

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Carmona, Belén Martínez; Martínez, Jose L. Muñoz

    2016-02-01

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramers-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fragments can be treated in effective theory if corrections to the velocity distribution are needed.

  16. The wastes of nuclear fission

    In this paper the author presents the problems of the radioactive wastes generated by the nuclear fission. The first part devoted to the fission phenomenon explains the incident neutron energy and the target nuclei role. The second part devoted to the nuclear wastes sources presents the production of wastes upstream of the reactors, in the reactors and why these wastes are dangerous. The third part discusses the radioactive wastes management in France (classification, laws). The last part details the associated research programs: the radionuclides separation, the disposal, the underground storage, the transmutation and the thorium cycle. (A.L.B.)

  17. Absolute calibration technique for spontaneous fission sources

    An absolute calibration technique for a spontaneously fissioning nuclide (which involves no arbitrary parameters) allows unique determination of the detector efficiency for that nuclide, hence of the fission source strength

  18. Fission properties of the heaviest elements

    The authors discuss fission properties of the heaviest elements. In particular they focus on stability with respect to spontaneous fission and on the prospects of extending the region of known nuclei beyond the peninsula of currently known nuclides

  19. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    This is the 12th issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the IAEA. The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The type of activities included are: measurements, compilations and evaluations of fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission), neutron reaction cross sections of fission products, data related to the radioactive decay of fission products, delayed neutron data of fission products and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The first part of the report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS. The second part contains recent references relative to fission product nuclear data, which were not covered by the contributions submitted, and selected papers from conferences

  20. Nuclear fission in covariant density functional theory

    The current status of the application of covariant density functional theory to microscopic description of nuclear fission with main emphasis on superheavy nuclei (SHN) is reviewed. The softness of SHN in the triaxial plane leads to an emergence of several competing fission paths in the region of the inner fission barrier in some of these nuclei. The outer fission barriers of SHN are considerably affected both by triaxiality and octupole deformation. (authors)

  1. Correlation measurements of fission-fragment properties

    Oberstedt A.; Martinez T.; Kis Z.; Karlsson J.; Hambsch F.-J.; Cano-Ott D.; Göök A.; Borcea R.; Billnert R.; Belgya T.; Oberstedt S.; Szentmiklosi L.; Takác K.

    2010-01-01

    For the development of future nuclear fission applications and for a responsible handling of nuclear waste the a-priori assessment of the fission-fragments’ heat production and toxicity is a fundamental necessity. The success of an indispensable modelling of the fission process strongly depends on a good understanding of the particular mechanism of scission, the mass fragmentation and partition of excitation energy. Experimental observables are fission-fragment properties like mass- and energ...

  2. Shell effects and fission fragments angular anisotropy

    The impact of the shell corrections attenuation effect with growth of the fissionable nuclei temperature on the angular anisotropy of the fission fragments is considered. The experimental data on the anisotropy of the fission fragments angular distributions of the compound nucleus, formed in the 4He + 238U reactions, are analyzed within the frames of the transition states model in the fission barriers saddle point and statistic theory of nuclear reactions. The obvious kind of the shell corrections attenuation function is obtained

  3. Superfluid fission dynamics with microscopic approaches

    Simenel, C; Lacroix, D; Umar, A S

    2016-01-01

    Recent progresses in the description of the latter stage of nuclear fission are reported. Dynamical effects during the descent of the potential towards scission and in the formation of the fission fragments are studied with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach with dynamical pairing correlations at the BCS level. In particular, this approach is used to compute the final kinetic energy of the fission fragments. Comparison with experimental data on the fission of 258Fm are made.

  4. Nuclear fission in covariant density functional theory

    Afanasjev A.V.; Abusara H.; Ring P.

    2013-01-01

    The current status of the application of covariant density functional theory to microscopic description of nuclear fission with main emphasis on superheavy nuclei (SHN) is reviewed. The softness of SHN in the triaxial plane leads to an emergence of several competing fission pathes in the region of the inner fission barrier in some of these nuclei. The outer fission barriers of SHN are considerably affected both by triaxiality and octupole deformation.

  5. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock: Deformation-induced fission

    Rios Huguet, A; Stevenson, PD; Goddard, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus, and the daughter products. Purpose: To explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe fast fission processes beyond the fission barrier, using the nuclide $^{240}$Pu as an example. Met...

  6. Nuclear-fission studies with relativistic secondary beams: analysis of fission channels

    Boeckstiegel, C.; Steinhaeuser, S.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Clerc, H. -G.; Grewe, A.; Heinz, A.; de Jong, M; JUNGHANS A. R.; Mueller, J.; Voss, B.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear fission of several neutron-deficient actinides and pre-actinides from excitation energies around 11 MeV was studied at GSI Darmstadt by use of relativistic secondary beams. The characteristics of multimodal fission of nuclei around 226Th are systematically investigated and interpreted as the superposition of three fission channels. Properties of these fission channels have been determined for 15 systems. A global view on the properties of fission channels including previous results is...

  7. Search for singlet fission chromophores

    Havlas, Zdeněk; Akdag, Akin; Smith, M. B.; Dron, P.; Johnson, J. C.; Nozik, A. J.; Michl, Josef

    Philadelphia: American Chemical Society, 2012. 31PHYS. ISSN 0065-7727. [National Fall Meeting of the American Chemical Society /244./. 19.08.2012-23.08.2012, Philadelphia] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : singlet fission * chromophores Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  8. Brownian shape dynamics in fission

    Randrup Jørgen; Möller Peter

    2013-01-01

    It was recently shown that remarkably accurate fission-fragment mass distributions are obtained by treating the nuclear shape evolution as a Brownian walk on previously calculated five-dimensional potentialenergy surfaces; the current status of this novel method is described here.

  9. Brownian shape dynamics in fission

    Randrup Jørgen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It was recently shown that remarkably accurate fission-fragment mass distributions are obtained by treating the nuclear shape evolution as a Brownian walk on previously calculated five-dimensional potentialenergy surfaces; the current status of this novel method is described here.

  10. How spontaneous fission was discovered

    The 70th anniversary of the discovery of spontaneous fission by the young Russian physicists Konstantin A. Petrzhak and Georgii N. Flerov is commemorated. The situation in the 1940s is described and the activities of the 2 scientists, including their involvement in the development of the A-bomb, is outlined. (P.A.)

  11. Forage: A sensitive indicator for airborne radioactivity

    As a part of the radiological environmental monitoring program at the Joseph M. Parley Nuclear Plant to meet the requirements of NRC Regulations 10 CRF 50, Appendix I, routine sampling of forage was implemented. Indicator plots of forage (grass) were established at the plant site boundary in the two Meteorological sectors having the highest X/Q values for ground-level dispersion of airborne radioactivity. Likewise, a control plot was established in a sector having a significantly lower X/Q value at a distance of 18 miles. Procedures for maintenance of the grass plots, sampling of forage, and sample preparation for measurement of gamma radioactivity with a Ge (Li) detector were developed during the reported three year measurement period. Three atmospheric nuclear tests by the Peoples Republic of China in 1976 and 1977 has proven forage sampling to be convenient, sensitive, and in the judgement of the authors gives results which are superior to most other media sampled for airborne radioactivity. Typical measured levels of radioactivity from 150 to greater than 10,000 pCi/kg (dry weight) were obtained for the principal fission products in the Chinese bomb fallout, which included 95Zr-95Nb, 103Ru, 131I, 140Ba-140La, 141Ce, and 144Ce. On a unit weight basis the level of radioactivity measured was consistently higher for forage than for green leafy vegetables. This was attributed to the higher surface area for the forage. For comparison, plots of airborne concentrations for gross beta and particulate gamma emitters are shown during the time periods that include the Chinese nuclear tests. (author)

  12. Spontaneous fission. A many-body approach

    Iwamoto, Akira; Bonasera, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    We propose new model to calculate the fission phenomena in tunnel region. By the Vlasov equation and the imaginary time method, we could calculate actinides nuclear fission. This method makes possible to describe unified the motion of fission inside and outside of potential wall. The potential energy and mass parameters can be calculated by no means of the special model. The freedom of internal motion are calculated automatically both collective and a particle motion. Accordingly, particle released during fission process can be calculated. The kinetic energy of fragment after fission was very agreeable with the calculation results. (S.Y.)

  13. The Fission of Thorium with Alpha Particles

    Newton, Amos S.

    1948-04-15

    The fission distribution of fission of thorium with alpha particle of average energy 37.5 Mev has been measured by the chemical method. The distribution found shows that the characteristic dip in the fission yield mass spectrum has been raised to within a factor of two of the peaks compared to a factor of 600 in slow neutron fission of U{sup 235}. The raise in the deip has caused a corresponding lowering in fission yield of these elements at the peaks. The cross section for fission of thorium with 37.5 Mev alphas was found to be about 0.6 barn, and the threshold for fission was found to be 23 to 24 Mev.

  14. Fission dynamics at low excitation energy

    Aritomo, Y

    2013-01-01

    The origin of mass asymmetry in the fission of uranium at a low excitation energy is clarified by a trajectory analysis of the Langevin equation. The positions of the peaks in the mass distribution of fission fragments are mainly determined by fission saddle points originating from the shell correction energy. The widths of the peaks, on the other hand, result from a shape fluctuation around the scission point caused by the random force in the Langevin equation. We found that a random vibration in the oblate direction of fissioning fragments is essential for the fission process. According to this picture, fission does not occur with continuous stretching in the prolate direction, similarly to that observed in starch syrup. This is expected to lead to a new viewpoint of fission dynamics and the splitting mechanism.

  15. Theory of nuclear fission. A textbook

    This book brings together various aspects of the nuclear fission phenomenon discovered by Hahn, Strassmann and Meitner almost 70 years ago. Beginning with an historical introduction the authors present various models to describe the fission process of hot nuclei as well as the spontaneous fission of cold nuclei and their isomers. The role of transport coefficients, like inertia and friction in fission dynamics is discussed. The effect of the nuclear shell structure on the fission probability and the mass and kinetic energy distributions of the fission fragments is presented. The fusion-fission process leading to the synthesis of new isotopes including super-heavy elements is described. The book will thus be useful for theoretical and experimental physicists, as well as for graduate and PhD students. (orig.)

  16. Progress in fission product nuclear data

    This is the eleventh issue of a report series on Fission Product Nuclear Data (FPND) which is published by the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of this series is to inform scientists working on FPND, or using such data, about all activities in this field which are planned, ongoing, or have recently been completed. The types of activities being included in this report are measurements, compilations and evaluations of: Fission product yields (neutron induced and spontaneous fission); Neutron reaction cross sections of fission products; Data related to the radioactive decay of fission products; Delayed neutron data of fission products; and lumped fission product data (decay heat, absorption etc.). The main part of this report consists of unaltered original contributions which the authors have sent to IAEA/NDS

  17. The nucleon phase of binary fission

    Full text: The main step of the fission process is a sharing-out of nucleons, within a 'nucleon-phase', between the valence shells of the primordial cluster of the internally-dissociated fissioning system and the valence shells of the 'A =126 nucleon core' of the nascent heavy fragment. The formation of an 'A = 82 nucleon core' in the nascent light fragment explains the asymmetric fission mode of the light actinide nuclei. The nucleon partition in the nucleon phase can be understood in the framework of chemical thermodynamics. The formation of an 'A = 126 nucleon core' in the nascent light fragment of heavier fissioning systems explains the symmetric fission mode of 258Fm and that of heavier nuclei. But the new phenomenon of 'barrier-free' fission, discovered in 258Fm (s.f.), plays in this system and all symmetrically fissioning superheavy nuclei a very important role. (author)

  18. Fission product behaviour in severe accidents

    The understanding of fission product (FP) behaviour in severe accidents is important for source term assessment and accident mitigation measures. For example in accident management the operator needs to know the effect of different actions on the behaviour and release of fission products. At VTT fission product behaviour have been studied in different national and international projects. In this presentation the results of projects in EU funded 4th framework programme Nuclear Fission Safety 1994-1998 are reported. The projects are: fission product vapour/aerosol chemistry in the primary circuit (FI4SCT960020), aerosol physics in containment (FI4SCT950016), revaporisation of test samples from Phebus fission products (FI4SCT960019) and assessment of models for fission product revaporisation (FI4SCT960044). Also results from the national project 'aerosol experiments in the Victoria facility' funded by IVO PE and VTT Energy are reported

  19. A fission fragment detector for correlated fission output studies

    Mosby, S., E-mail: smosby@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Tovesson, F.; Couture, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Duke, D.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Kleinrath, V. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83201 (United States); Meharchand, R.; Meierbachtol, K.; O' Donnell, J.M.; Perdue, B.; Richman, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Shields, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    A digital data acquisition system has been combined with a double Frisch gridded ionization chamber for use at both moderated and unmoderated neutron sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science (LANSCE) facility. The high efficiency of the instrument combined with intense LANSCE beams and new acquisition system permits fission output measurements across 11 orders of magnitude incident neutron energy. The acquisition and analysis system is presented along with the first in-beam performance tests of the setup.

  20. A fission fragment detector for correlated fission output studies

    A digital data acquisition system has been combined with a double Frisch gridded ionization chamber for use at both moderated and unmoderated neutron sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science (LANSCE) facility. The high efficiency of the instrument combined with intense LANSCE beams and new acquisition system permits fission output measurements across 11 orders of magnitude incident neutron energy. The acquisition and analysis system is presented along with the first in-beam performance tests of the setup

  1. Cluster fission from the standpoint of nuclear fission

    Lee, Sangmoo [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Physics

    1996-03-01

    Atomic nucleus belongs to a quantal finite many body system. Nucleus shows great resemblance to cluster, above all metal cluster, although the strength of interaction is different. The works of Brechignac group, Saunder, Martin and P. Froeblich are explained by the critical size Nc as the central term. The differences between cluster and nucleus are investigated and a future view of cluster fission is explained. (S.Y.)

  2. DSP Algorithms for Fission Fragment and Prompt Fission Neutron Spectroscopy

    Zeynalova, O.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Fabry, I.

    2009-10-01

    Digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms are in high demand for modern nuclear fission investigation due to importance of increase the accuracy of fissile nuclear data for new generation of nuclear power stations. DSP algorithms for fission fragment (FF) and prompt fission neutron (PFN) spectroscopy are described in the present work. The twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber (GTIC) is used to measure the kinetic energy-, mass- and angular distributions of the FF in the 252Cf(SF) reaction. Along with the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) measurement the correlation between neutron emission and FF mass and energy is investigated. The TOF is measured between common cathode of the GTIC and the neutron detector (ND) pulses. Waveform digitizers (WFD) having 12 bit amplitude resolution and 100 MHz sampling frequency are used for the detector pulse sampling. DSP algorithms are developed as recursive procedures to perform the signal processing, similar to those available in various nuclear electronics modules, such as constant fraction discriminator (CFD), pulse shape discriminator (PSD), peak-sensitive analogue-to-digital converter (pADC) and pulse shaping amplifier (PSA). To measure the angle between FF and the cathode plane normal to the GTIC a new algorithm is developed having advantage over the traditional analogue pulse processing schemes. Algorithms are tested by comparing the numerical simulation of the data analysis of the 252Cf(SF) reaction with data available from literature.

  3. Nuclear Dissipation from Fission Time

    Gontchar, I.; Morjean, M.; Basnary, S. [GANIL DSM/CEA, IN2P3/CNRS, BP 5027, 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

    2000-04-21

    Fission times, pre-scission neutron multiplicities and GDR pre-scission {gamma}-ray multiplicities measured for uranium or thorium nuclei formed with temperatures T {approx} 1.8 MeV have been compared with calculations performed with CDSM2, a two-dimensional dynamical model combined with a statistical one. Among the three experimental approaches considered, fission times give access to the most precise pieces of information on nuclear dissipation at high excitation energy. For the temperature range under consideration, an agreement between the model and data is achieved if one-body dissipation is used with a strength factor k{sub red} {approx} 0.45 {+-} 0.10 applied to the wall term for the mononuclear configuration. (authors)

  4. Fission product yields from 22 MeV neutron-induced fission of 235U

    The chain yields of 28 product nuclides were determined for the fission of 235U induced by 22 MeV neutrons for the first time. Absolute fission rate was monitored with a double-fission chamber. Fission product activities were measured by HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. Time of flight technique was used to measure the neutron spectrum in order to estimate fission events induced by break-up neutrons and scattering neutrons. A mass distribution curve was obtained and the dependence of fission yield on neutron energy is discussed

  5. Fission product yields from 19.1 MeV neutron induced fission of 238U

    36 chain yields were determined for the fission of 238U induced by 19.1 MeV neutrons for the first time. Absolute fission rate was monitored with a double-fission chamber. Fission product activities were measured by HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. Threshold detector method was used to measure the neutron spectrum in order to estimate the fission events induced by break-up neutrons and scattering neutrons. A mass distribution curve was obtained and the dependence of fission yield on neutron energy was discussed

  6. Sexual differentiation in fission yeast

    Egel, R; Nielsen, O; Weilguny, D;

    1990-01-01

    The regulation of sexual reproduction in yeast constitutes the highest level of differentiation observed in these unicellular organisms. The various ramifications of this system involve DNA rearrangement, transcriptional control, post-translational modification (such as protein phosphorylation) a......) and receptor/signal processing. A few basic similarities are common to both fission and budding yeasts. The wiring of the regulatory circuitry, however, varies considerably between these divergent yeast groups....

  7. Fission Data and Nuclear Technology

    Accurate nuclear data for fissile nuclei are required not only by reactor designers, but also by reactor physicists for the interpretation of integral experiments, e.g. studies of the change of reactivity with irradiation. Some of the requests that have been made for such fission data, and the reasons behind them, are discussed, along with the progress that has been made towards their fulfilment. An attempt is made to outline those areas where better data are required. (author)

  8. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF) technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD) diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD) show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution. (authors)

  9. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Frégeau M.O.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  10. Sensitivity of Makrofol fission track detectors

    Neutron fluence can be determined by means of fission track detectors consisting of fission foils in contact with suitable dielectrics (Makrofol E plastic was used in this case). Fission fragments emitted from the fissionable material into the plastic sheet generate permanent damage trails which can be made visible by an etching process. These tracks are then counted by means of an optical microscope or other methods and the number of tracks is proportional to the neutron fluence. The efficiency is defined as the ration of the number of tracks counted to the number of fissions in the fissionable layer. It is calculated from the mean range of the fission products in the fissionable material and in the plastic. The loss of very flat tracks with a small penetration angle caused by etching a certain bulk layer from the plastic foil is also taken into account. The formulas for the efficiency are deduced for thin fission layers and for thick fission foils. These calculations are made on the basis of the experimentally confirmed assumption that the ratio V of the track etching rate to the bulk etching rate is at least equal to 200. These high values for this ratio V are valid if an adequate period (several days) of oxygen influence to the damage trails is guaranteed. The calculated values of the efficiency are compared with experimental values and the uncertainty is discussed. (orig./HP)

  11. Experimental techniques for fission data measurements

    Progresses in the development of experimental techniques or fission data measurements are reviewed briefly. This review comprises techniques for the preparation of special compound nuclei leading to fission (fission entrance) as well as experimental techniques which permit the measurement of the diversified characteristics of the emitted radiations in fission (fission exit). The latter developments are only considered when also other parameters than yield, mass, and energy of fission fragments are determined. Ionization chambers developed at CBNM are described in more detail. A simple ionization chamber with Frisch grid was used to determine fission layer characteristics, e.g. the number of fissile nuclei of a sample with an accuracy of smaller than 0.3 %. A twin ionization chamber is described which has an advantageous 2 x 2π solid angle for fission fragment detection, a timing jitter of less than 0.7 ns, an energy resolution of smaller than 500 keV for fission fragments, and an angular resolution of ΔcosΘ < 0.005. Also the nuclear charge distribution of the fragments can be determined. A pulse pile-up rejection circuit was developed, which reduces pulse pile-up by more than a factor 30. This detector is well suited for correlation measurements between fission fragment parameters, like mass and total kinetic energy, and the characteristics of the different radiations emitted from the fragments. This type of ionization chamber was successfully used in several experiments and some results are shown to demonstrate its capabilities. (author)

  12. The discovery of uranium fission

    Uranium was discovered 200 years ago. Its radioactive character was first demonstrated in 1896 and two years later radium was extracted from uranium minerals. In 1911 studies with alpha rays from radioactive decay led to the unexpected discovery of the atomic nucleus. Exposure of beryllium to alpha rays yielded neutrons, first detected in 1932. Starting in 1934, neutron irradiation of uranium produced radioactive substances erroneously attributed to transuranium elements but with confusing properties. Painstaking experiments by chemists left no doubt on 17 December 1938 that barium was produced by these irradiations: the neutrons had split some uranium nuclei. The physics of the fission process was understood two weeks later; after a few months, neutron multiplication was found to be probable. This review deals with the eminent scientists involved, their successes, errors and disappointments, and the unexpected insights which occurred on the paths and detours of scientific research. It is, therefore, instructive also to discuss how fission was not discovered. The momentous discovery must be considered inevitable; the great tragedy was that Germany started World War II just at the time when the possibility of nuclear chain reactions and bombs became known. The consequences and anxieties that remain after 50 years of nuclear fission demand that mankind act with reason and conscience to maintain peace. (author)

  13. Technical Application of Nuclear Fission

    Denschlag, J. O.

    The chapter is devoted to the practical application of the fission process, mainly in nuclear reactors. After a historical discussion covering the natural reactors at Oklo and the first attempts to build artificial reactors, the fundamental principles of chain reactions are discussed. In this context chain reactions with fast and thermal neutrons are covered as well as the process of neutron moderation. Criticality concepts (fission factor η, criticality factor k) are discussed as well as reactor kinetics and the role of delayed neutrons. Examples of specific nuclear reactor types are presented briefly: research reactors (TRIGA and ILL High Flux Reactor), and some reactor types used to drive nuclear power stations (pressurized water reactor [PWR], boiling water reactor [BWR], Reaktor Bolshoi Moshchnosti Kanalny [RBMK], fast breeder reactor [FBR]). The new concept of the accelerator-driven systems (ADS) is presented. The principle of fission weapons is outlined. Finally, the nuclear fuel cycle is briefly covered from mining, chemical isolation of the fuel and preparation of the fuel elements to reprocessing the spent fuel and conditioning for deposit in a final repository.

  14. Status of fission yield evaluations

    Very few yield compilations are also evaluations, and very few contain an extensive global library of measured data and extensive models for unmeasured data. The earlier U.K. evaluations and US evaluations were comparable up to the retirements of the primary evaluators. Only the effort in the US has been continued and expanded. The previous U.K. evaluations have been published. In this paper we summarize the current status of the US evaluation, philosophy, and various integral yield tests for 34 fissioning nuclides at one or more neutron incident energies and/or for spontaneous fission. Currently there are 50 yield sets and for each we have independent and cumulative yields and uncertainties for approximately 1100 fission products. When finalized, the recommended data will become part of the next version of the US Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B-VI). The complete set of data, including the basic input of measured yields, will be issued as a sequel to the General Electric evaluation reports (better known by the authors' names: Rider - or earlier - Meek and Rider). 16 references

  15. Fission fusion hybrids- recent progress

    Kotschenreuther, M.; Valanju, P.; Mahajan, S.; Covele, B.

    2012-03-01

    Fission-fusion hybrids enjoy unique advantages for addressing long standing societal acceptability issues of nuclear fission power, and can do this at a much lower level of technical development than a competitive fusion power plant- so it could be a nearer term application. For waste incineration, hybrids can burn intransigent transuranic residues (with the long lived biohazard) from light water reactors (LWRs) with far fewer hybrid reactors than a comparable system within the realm of fission alone. For fuel production, hybrids can produce fuel for ˜4 times as many LWRs with NO fuel reprocessing. For both waste incineration or fuel production, the most severe kind of nuclear accident- runaway criticality- can be excluded, unlike either fast reactors or typical accelerator based reactors. The proliferation risks for hybrid fuel production are, we strongly believe, far less than any other fuel production method, including today's gas centrifuges. US Thorium reserves could supply the entire US electricity supply for centuries. The centerpiece of the fuel cycle is a high power density Compact Fusion Neutron Source (major+minor radius ˜ 2.5-3.5 m), which is made feasible by the super-X divertor.

  16. Collective spectra along the fission barrier

    Pigni M. T.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Discrete and continuous spectra of fissioning nuclei at the humps of fission barriers (Bohr transition states and in the intermediate wells (superdeformed and hyperdeformed states play a key role in the calculation of fission cross sections. A theoretical evaluation of the collective parts of the spectra is possible within the framework of the dinuclear system model, which treats the wave function of the fissioning nucleus as a superposition of a mononucleus configuration and two–cluster configurations in a dynamical way, permitting exchange of upper–shell nucleons between clusters. The impact of theoretical spectra on neutron–induced fission cross sections and, in combination with an improved version of the scission–point model, on angular distribution of fission fragments is evaluated for plutonium isotopes of interest to nuclear energy applications.

  17. Radiochemical studies on nuclear fission at Trombay

    Asok Goswami

    2015-08-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear fission in the year 1939, both physical and radiochemical techniques have been adopted for the study of various aspects of the phenomenon. Due to the ability to separate individual elements from a complex reaction mixture with a high degree of sensitivity and selectivity, a chemist plays a significant role in the measurements of mass, charge, kinetic energy, angular momentum and angular distribution of fission products in various fissioning systems. At Trombay, a small group of radiochemists initiated the work on radiochemical studies of mass distribution in the early sixties. Since then, radiochemical investigations on various fission observables have been carried out at Trombay in , , and heavy-ion-induced fissions. An attempt has been made to highlight the important findings of such studies in this paper, with an emphasis on medium energy and heavy-ion-induced fission.

  18. International conference on fifty years research in nuclear fission

    These proceedings contain extended abstracts of the papers presented at the named conference. They deal with static properties of fission, instrumentation for fission studies, fission in compound-nucleus reactions, fission dynamics, fission-like heavy ion reactions, and fusion reactions. See hints under the relevant topics. (HSI)

  19. Fission dynamics within time-dependent Hartree-Fock: deformation-induced fission

    Goddard, P M; Rios, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nuclear fission is a complex large-amplitude collective decay mode in heavy nuclei. Microscopic density functional studies of fission have previously concentrated on adiabatic approaches based on constrained static calculations ignoring dynamical excitations of the fissioning nucleus, and the daughter products. Purpose: To explore the ability of dynamic mean-field methods to describe fast fission processes beyond the fission barrier, using the nuclide $^{240}$Pu as an example. Methods: Time-dependent Hartree-Fock calculations based on the Skyrme interaction are used to calculate non-adiabatic fission paths, beginning from static constrained Hartree-Fock calculations. The properties of the dynamic states are interpreted in terms of the nature of their collective motion. Fission product properties are compared to data. Results: Parent nuclei constrained to begin dynamic evolution with a deformation less than the fission barrier exhibit giant-resonance-type behaviour. Those beginning just beyond the ...

  20. Comparative evaluation of solar, fission, fusion, and fossil energy resources. Part 2: Power from nuclear fission

    Clement, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Different types of nuclear fission reactors and fissionable materials are compared. Special emphasis is placed upon the environmental impact of such reactors. Graphs and charts comparing reactor facilities in the U. S. are presented.

  1. Improved Calculation of Thermal Fission Energy

    Ma, X. B.; Zhong, W. L.; Wang, L. Z.; Y. X. Chen; Cao, J

    2012-01-01

    Thermal fission energy is one of the basic parameters needed in the calculation of antineutrino flux for reactor neutrino experiments. It is useful to improve the precision of the thermal fission energy calculation for current and future reactor neutrino experiments, which are aimed at more precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this article, we give new values for thermal fission energies of some common thermal reactor fuel isotopes, with improvements on three aspects. ...

  2. Nuclear fission with a Langevin equation

    A microscopically derived Langevin equation is applied to thermally induced nuclear fission. An important memory effect is pointed out and discussed. A strong friction coefficient, estimated from microscopic quantities, tends to decrease the stationary limit of the fission rate and to increase the transient time. The calculations are performed with a collective mass depending on the collective variable and with a constant mass. Fission rates calculated at different temperatures are shown and compared with previous available results. (author) 23 refs.; 7 figs

  3. Rapid Separation of Fission Product 141La

    XIA; Wen; YE; Hong-sheng; LIN; Min; CHEN; Ke-sheng; XU; Li-jun; ZHANG; Wei-dong; CHEN; Yi-zhen

    2013-01-01

    141La was separated and purified from fission products in this work for physical measurements aimed at improving the accuracy of its decay parameters.As the impact of 142La and other fission products,cesium(141Cs,142Cs included)was rapid separated from the fission products,141Cs and 142Ba separation was prepared after a cooling time about 25 s when 142Cs decays to daughter 142Ba,141La purification then

  4. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Fission and Fusion

    van der Bliek, Alexander M.; Shen, Qinfang; Kawajiri, Sumihiro

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria continually change shape through the combined actions of fission, fusion, and movement along cytoskeletal tracks. The lengths of mitochondria and the degree to which they form closed networks are determined by the balance between fission and fusion rates. These rates are influenced by metabolic and pathogenic conditions inside mitochondria and by their cellular environment. Fission and fusion are important for growth, for mitochondrial redistribution, and for maintenance of a hea...

  5. Measurements of Fission Cross Sections of Actinides

    Wiescher, M; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M

    2002-01-01

    A measurement of the neutron induced fission cross sections of $^{237}$Np, $^{241},{243}$Am and of $^{245}$Cm is proposed for the n_TOF neutron beam. Two sets of fission detectors will be used: one based on PPAC counters and another based on a fast ionization chamber (FIC). A total of 5x10$^{18}$ protons are requested for the entire fission measurement campaign.

  6. Fission product retention in HTGR fuels

    Retention data for gaseous and metallic fission products are presented for both Triso-coated and Biso-coated HTGR fuel particles. Performance trends are established that relate fission product retention to operating parameters, such as temperature, burnup, and neutron exposure. It is concluded that Biso-coated particles are not adequately retentive of fission gas or metallic cesium, and Triso-coated particles which retain cesium still lose silver. Design implications related to these performance trends are identified and discussed

  7. Superfluid dynamics of 258Fm fission

    Scamps, Guillaume; Simenel, Cédric; Lacroix, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical description of nuclear fission remains one of the major challenges of quantum many-body dynamics. The slow, mostly adiabatic motion through the fission barrier is followed by a fast, non-adiabatic descent of the potential between the fragments. The latter stage is essentially unexplored. However, it is crucial as it generates most of the excitation energy in the fragments. The superfluid dynamics in the latter stage of fission is obtained with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theor...

  8. Fission dynamics at low excitation energy

    Aritomo, Y.; Chiba, S.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of mass asymmetry in the fission of uranium at a low excitation energy is clarified by a trajectory analysis of the Langevin equation. The positions of the peaks in the mass distribution of fission fragments are mainly determined by fission saddle points originating from the shell correction energy. The widths of the peaks, on the other hand, result from a shape fluctuation around the scission point caused by the random force in the Langevin equation. We found that a random vibrati...

  9. Fission of nuclei far from stability

    The secondary-beam facility of GSI provided the technical equipment for a new kind of fission experiment. Fission properties of short-lived neutron-deficient nuclei have been investigated in inverse kinematics. The measured element distributions reveal new kinds of systematics on shell structure and even-odd effects and lead to an improved understanding of structure effects in nuclear fission. Prospects for further experimental studies are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Fission barriers and half-lives

    The authors briefly review the development of theoretical models for the calculation of fission barriers and half-lives. They focus on how results of actual calculations in a unified macroscopic-microscopic approach provide an interpretation of the mechanisms behind some of the large number of phenomena observed in fission. As instructive examples they choose studies of the rapidly varying fission properties of elements at the end of the periodic system