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Sample records for 140-ghz long-pulsed gyrotron

  1. Velocity diagnostics of electron beams within a 140 GHz gyrotron

    Experimental measurements of the average axial velocity vparallel of the electron beam within the M.I.T. 140 GHz MW gyrotron have been performed. The method involves the simultaneous measurement of the radial electrostatic potential of the electron beam Vp and the beam current Ib. Vp is measured through the use of a capacitive probe installed near or within the gyrotron cavity, while Ib is measured with a previously installed Rogowski coil. Three capacitive probes have been designed and built, and two have operated within the gyrotron. The probe results are repeatable and consistent with theory. The measurements of vparallel and calculations of the corresponding transverse to longitudinal beam velocity ratio α = vperpendicular/vparallel at the cavity have been made at various gyrotron operation parameters. These measurements will provide insight into the causes of discrepancies between theoretical rf interaction efficiencies and experimental efficiencies obtained in experiments with the M.I.T. 140 GHz MW gyrotron. The expected values of vparallel and α are determined through the use of a computer code entitled EGUN. EGUN is used to model the cathode and anode regions of the gyrotron and it computes the trajectories and velocities of the electrons within the gyrotron. There is good correlation between the expected and measured values of α at low α, with the expected values from EGUN often falling within the standard errors of the measured values. 10 refs., 29 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Operational Characteristics of a 14-W 140-GHz Gyrotron for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    Joye, Colin D.; Griffin, Robert G.; Hornstein, Melissa K.; Hu, Kan-Nian; Kreischer, Kenneth E.; Rosay, Melanie; Shapiro, Michael A; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Woskov, Paul P.

    2006-01-01

    The operating characteristics of a 140-GHz 14-W long pulse gyrotron are presented. The device is being used in dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (DNP/NMR) spectroscopy experiments. The gyrotron yields 14 W peak power at 139.65 GHz from the TE(0,3) operating mode using a 12.3-kV 25-mA electron beam. Additionally, up to 12 W peak has been observed in the TE(2,3) mode at 136.90 GHz. A series of mode converters transform the TE(0,3) operating mode to the TE(1,1) mod...

  3. Experimental results of the 1 MW, 140 GHz, CW gyrotron for W7-X

    A 10 MW ECRH system will be provided by FZK in collaboration with several European associations for the stellarator W7-X. The RF power will be delivered by 10 gyrotrons operating at 140 GHz in CW with 1 MW each. The development of this gyrotron has been performed within a European collaboration in an industrial frame. Two R and D tubes have been built, up to know one serial tube has been passed the acceptance tests. The design of the gyrotron will be described and short pulse and long pulse results of the first serial gyrotron will be discussed. This gyrotron has been successfully operated at more then 900 kW with a pulse length of 30 min. (author)

  4. 140 GHz gyrotron development program. Quarterly report No. 4, January-March 1985

    The objective of this program is to develop a gyrotron oscillator capable of producing 100 kW CW at 140 GHz. Further analysis of the electron guns, interaction cavity, and beam tunnel designs for the first two experimental tubes, Experimental Tube 1 and preprototype Tube 1, is presented. A window deflection tester has been built and initial deflection test results are given. The first 140 GHz gyrotron magnet has successfully passed the major points in the acceptance test. The detailed results of the magnet acceptance test are discussed. Progress concerning the fabrication of 149 GHz gyrotron components, diagnostics, and protective devices, as well as the status of Experimental Tube 1, are summarized

  5. Design and operation of 140 GHz gyrotron oscillators for power levels up to 1 MW CW

    Jory, H.; Bier, R.; Craig, L.J.; Felch, K.; Ives, L.; Lopez, N.; Spang, S.

    1986-12-01

    Varian has designed and tested 140 GHz gyrotron oscillators that have generated output powers of 100 kW CW and 200 kW for 1 ms pulses. Upcoming tubes will be designed to operate at power levels of 200 kW CW and ultimately up to 1 MW CW. The important design considerations which are addressed in the higher power tubes include the design of the electron gun, interaction circuit, and output window. These issues will be discussed and the results of the earlier 140 GHz gyrotron work at Varian will be summarized.

  6. The 140 GHZ, 1 MW Gyrotron - Status and Recent Results

    Gantenbein, G.; Dammertz, G.; Illy, S.; Kern, S.; Leonhardt, W.; Piosczyk, B.; Schmid, M.; Thumm, M.; Braune, H.; Erckmann, V.; Laqua, H. P.; Michel, G.; Kasparek, W.; Lechte, C.; Legrand, F.; Lievin, C.; Prinz, O.

    2009-04-01

    A 10 MW ECRH system is currently under construction for the stellarator W7-X which will be built up and operated by IPP in Greifswald, Germany. The present status of the complete system is reported in [1]. The RF power will be provided by 10 gyrotrons. A European collaboration has been established to develop and build the 10 gyrotrons each with an output power of 1 MW for continuous wave (CW) operation [2]. Nine gyrotrons are being manufactured by Thales Electron Devices (TED), Vélizy, France, one gyrotron was produced by CPI, Palo Alto, CA and passed the acceptance tests at IPP. The acceptance tests of the TED gyrotrons are performed at the test stand at FZK and on site at IPP. The first series tube yielded a total output power of 0.98 MW, with an efficiency of 31 % (without a single stage depressed collector) in short pulse operation and of 0.92 MW in pulses of 1800 s (efficiency of almost 45 % at a depression voltage of 29 kV) [3], The Gaussian mode output power was 0.91 MW. The RF power, measured in a calorimetric load at the end of a 25 m long quasi-optical transmission line with seven mirrors, was 0.87 MW. In this contribution typical results of the next series gyrotrons will be reported.

  7. Recent operating experience with Varian 70 GHz and 140 GHz gyrotrons

    The design features and initial test results of Varian 70 GHz and 140 GHz CW gyrotrons are presented. The first experimental 140 GHz tube has achieved an output power of 102 kW at 24% efficiency under pulsed conditions in the desired TE0310 cavity mode. Further tests aimed at achieving the design goal of 100 kW CW are currently underway. The 70 GHz tube has achieved an output power of 200 kW under pulsed conditions and possesses a wide dynamic range for output power variations. 6 refs., 8 figs

  8. Installation and operation of the 400 kW 140 GHZ gyrotron on the MTX experiment

    This paper describes the installation and operation of the 400 kW 140 GHz gyrotron used for plasma heating on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Varian VGT-8140 gyrotron has operated at a power level of 400 kW for 100 ms in conjunction with MTX plasma shots. The gyrotron system is comprised of a high voltage (- 80 kV) modulated power supply, a multistation CAMAC computer control, a 5-tesla superconducting magnet, a series of conventional copper magnets, a circulating fluorinert (FC75) window cooling system, a circulating oil cooling system, a water cooling system, and microwave frequency and power diagnostics. Additionally, a Vlasov launcher is used to convert the gyrotron TE 15,2 mode to a Gaussian beam. Two versions of the Vlasov launcher have been used on the gyrotron, one version designed by LLNL and one version designed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The Varian VGT-8140 gyrotron has been installed on the MTX tokamak experiment to provide electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) of the tokamak plasma. The gyrotron has been operated with the tokamak for periods as long as 100 ms at power levels of 400 kW. he gyrotron will also be used as the RF driver for the intense microwave prototype (IMP) wiggler associated with the electron test accelerator (ETA). In this configuration, the IMP wiggler will produce multigigawatt, 140 GHz, 50-ns pulses at a 5-kHz repetition rate. The plasma heating efficiency of the long RF pulse from the gyrotron can then be compared with the higher power but shorter RF pulses from the wiggler. The M2 mirror can be reversed to determine whether the gyrotron microwave beam or the IMP wiggler microwave beam is directed into the MTX tokamak. When the IMP wiggler is in operation, the gyrotron will be used as the master oscillator to drive the wiggler

  9. 140 GHz high-power gyrotron development for the stellarator W7-X

    Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) has proven to be one of the most attractive heating schemes for stellarators. Therefore, ECRH was chosen to be the main heating method for the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator (W7-X) now under construction at IPP Greifswald, Germany. A 10 MW ECRH system with continuous wave (CW) possibilities, operating at 140 GHz will be built up to meet the scientific goals of the stellarator. Two prototype gyrotrons with an output power of 1 MW were developed in collaboration between European research laboratories and European industry (Thales Electron Devices, France). The gyrotrons are equipped with a single-stage depressed collector, an optimised quasi-optical mode converter and a CVD-diamond window. The prototypes have been successfully tested at FZK. With the second one, an output power of 0.89 MW at a pulse duration of 3 min and an output power of 0.54 MW for about 15 min have been obtained

  10. Installation and operation of the 400 kW 140 GHz gyrotron on the MTX experiment

    This paper describes the installation and operation of the 400 kW 140 GHz gyrotron used for plasma heating on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Varian VGT-8140 gyrotron has operated at a power level of 400 kW for 100 ms in conjunction with MTX plasma shots. The gyrotron system is comprised of a high voltage (-80 kV) modulated power supply, a multistation CAMAC computer control, a 5-tesla superconducting magnet, a series of conventional copper magnets, a circulating fluorinert (FC75) window cooling system, a circulating oil cooling system, a water cooling system, and microwave frequency and power diagnostics. Additionally, a Vlasov launcher is used to convert the gyrotron TE 15,2 mode to a Gaussian beam. Two versions of the Vlasov launcher have been used on the gyrotron, one version designed by LLNL and one version designed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The Gaussian beam from the Vlasov launcher is transported to the MTX tokamak by a series of 5 mirrors in a 35-meter-long, high-efficiency, quasioptical beam transport system. A twist polarizer is built into one of the mirrors to adjust for horizontal polarization in the tokamak. No windows are used between the Vlasov reflector and the MTX tokamak. A laser alignment system is used to perform the initial system alignment. A summary of the design and operating characteristics of each of these systems is included. Also included is a summary of the system operation and performance

  11. Experimental results of the 1 MW, 140 GHz, CW gyrotron for W7-X

    For the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X now under construction at IPP Greifswald, Germany, a 10 MW ECRH system is foreseen. A European collaboration has been established between Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), IPP Garching/Greifswald, IPF Stuttgart, CRPP Lausanne, CEA Cadarache and TED Velizy, to develop and build the 10 gyrotrons each with an output power of 1 MW for continuous wave (CW) operation. The dependence of the output power and efficiency of the first series tube versus the beam current will be shown in short pulse operation (without depressed collector) and in CW operation (up to 30 minutes, depressed collector operation). RF-field measurements have been performed in order to characterise the output field of the gyrotron and to minimise losses during the transmission to the W7-X device. Several parameters have been optimised (e.g. beam radii, magnetic field) to maximise output power and efficiency of the tube. At FZK site, long pulse tests up to 180 s have been performed (limited by the available power supply), at IPP site the pulse length could be extended to 30 min, both at a power level of 1 MW and high efficiency. (author)

  12. Matched calorimetric loads for high power, long pulse millimeter-wave gyrotrons

    A compact matched load for high power gyrotron testing in ECRH plants for fusion research applications is in development, with the main goal of providing reflection-free absorption and fast calorimetric measurement of the millimeter-wave power, also at long pulse duration. It is based on the results of the tests at full power and pulse length (140 GHz, 0.5 MW, 0.5 s) on similar loads installed on the ECRH plant of the FTU Tokamak in Frascati. Basically, the load is made of an integrating sphere in copper, with the inner wall covered by plasma spray with a mixture of lossy ceramics, providing an average wall reflectivity in the order of 40%. Absorbing material degradation, small-scale and large-scale damage patterns, caused by fatigue and long-term exposure to high power mm-wave, have been analyzed in detail, with the aim of improving the performances in terms of power handling capability and energy extraction efficiency. Physical-chemical analyses, performed on the original and on the degraded absorbing material, showed the effects of the mm-wave exposure. Damage patterns were recognized as interference of multiple reflections inside the load, with radiation accumulation close to the entrance port, as confirmed by a detailed numerical analysis. Increase in power and energy deposition capabilities require improvements of the present design in different areas: - strategies for the mitigation of the different causes of non-homogeneous deposition; - use of different plasma-sprayed materials as mm-wave absorbers; - improved cooling channel geometry with increased heat transfer rate to the cooling medium, for achieving 1 MW-CW power capability. (authors)

  13. Development of high power long pulse gyrotron for ITER

    A development of 170GHz gyrotron has been carried out as a task of ITER/EDA, and remarkable progress was obtained. Critical issues on the gyrotron development; low efficiency, high heat load at the resonator, window problem, have been solved by breakthroughs; a depressed collector, 1MW single mode oscillation with a high order mode TE31,8, and development of the diamond window gyrotron, respectively. The prototype ITER gyrotron which integrated these technologies were fabricated and tested. Up to now, the power output of 0.45MW, 8sec has been obtained with a diamond window gyrotron. These results give a clear prospect of the 1MW/CW 170GHz gyrotron. (author)

  14. High-power and long-pulse gyrotron development in JAERI

    A maximum pulse duration of 1.3s was achieved with a power of 410kW at a frequency of 110GHz and a maximum power of 550kW was obtained with short-pulse operations (ca. 2ms). The oscillation mode of the gyrotron is the TE22,2 whispering gallery mode, which is transformed into a gaussian-like beam by a built-in quasi-optical mode converter. R.f. power is extracted through a sapphire double-disc window cooled by FC-75. In long-pulse operation, no damage was observed in the gyrotron. ((orig.))

  15. Progress on the Development of High Power Long Pulse Gyrotron and Related Technologies

    Full text: In the development of a higher power dual-frequency gyrotron, a high order mode gyrotron, which permits to select the oscillation at 170 GHz or 137 GHz, has been fabricated and tested. Short pulse experiments (0.5 ms) were performed with 1.3 MW power output at more than 30% of the oscillation efficiency for both frequencies. In long pulse experiments, 760 kW/46%/60 s at 170 GHz and 540 kW/42%/20 s at 137 GHz are achieved. It is the first time long pulse experiments with the dual-frequency gyrotron/triode electron gun. Since the RF beam direction from the output window is designed to be almost the same for both frequencies, good power couplings to the transmission line, which are 96% for 170 GHz and 94% for 137 GHz, are obtained by using a pair of identical phase correcting mirrors. Pulse extension is underway aiming for > 1 MW at CW operation. A 5 kHz full power modulation experiment was performed using the 170 GHz gyrotron of TE31,8 mode oscillation. The 5 kHz full power modulation was achieved with the full beam modulation by employing a fast voltage switching between the anode and cathode of the triode type electron gun. This satisfies the requirement of ITER. For further improvement, an advanced anode power supply system is proposed to reduce the oscillation period of adjacent mode at the start-up phase of each pulse. (author)

  16. Status of the 140 GHz, 10 MW CW transmission system for ECRH on the stellarator W7-X

    The stellarator W7-X, which is currently under construction at IPP Greifswald, Germany, will be equipped with a 10 MW ECRH system working at 140 GHz in CW regime. The microwave power will be generated by 10 gyrotrons delivering 1 MW each and will be transmitted from the gyrotron hall to the W7-X stellarator ports via a fully optical system. The status of the construction of the transmission lines and the design of the launchers is reported. Low-power tests of a prototype system at IPF Stuttgart are reviewed. Now, the first two gyrotrons are operating at IPP Greifswald, and high-power long-pulse tests have started. Measurements on transmission performance, behaviour of the water-cooled mirrors under thermal and microwave loads as well as alignment issues, characteristics of directional couplers, calorimetric loads, and other diagnostics are discussed

  17. Development in Russia of high power gyrotrons for fusion

    Full text: Electron cyclotron systems of fusion installations are based on powerful millimetre wave sources - gyrotrons, which are capable to produce now microwave power up to 1 MW in very long (hundreds of seconds) pulses. The paper presents the latest achievements in development at IAP/GYCOM of MW power level gyrotrons for fusion installations. Among them are a new versions of 170 GHz gyrotron for ITER and multi-frequency (105-140 GHz) gyrotron for Asdex-Up. The gyrotrons are equipped with diamond CVD windows and depressed collectors. The most efforts were spent for development of ITER gyrotron. The tests are carried out at specially prepared test stand in Kurchatov Institute. The following gyrotron output parameters were demonstrated so far in many pulses: 1MW/30 sec and 0.64 MW/300 sec. Also a gyrotron with a higher power -1.5 MW was designed and tested in short pulses. The tests continue. In two tested long-pulse dual-frequency gyrotrons, power in the output Gaussian beam exceeding 0.9MW at 140GHz and 0.7MW at 105GHz was attained at specified 10-s pulse duration. The multi-frequency gyrotron should operate at least at four frequencies in the frequency range 105GHz-140 GHz. Two window concepts for the gyrotron are considered: Brewster window and two-disc adjustable window. Last years significant efforts were done by IAP/GYCOM in order to solve the whole scope of problems associated with the use of CVD diamond windows in gyrotrons: growing of discs, their cutting and polishing, and then high-temperature brazing and mounting to a tube. Two setups for growing diamond discs have been put into operation. The first discs grown at IAP have acceptable mechanical and electrical parameters. The IAP/GYCOM discs have been successfully brazed at near 800 deg. C temperature to metal constructions and tested with high-power gyrotrons. (author)

  18. Operation of the 118 GHz very long pulse gyrotron for the ECRH experiment on Tore Supra

    An ECRH (Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating) system capable of delivering 2.4 MW CW is presently under development at CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) Cadarache, for the Tore Supra experiment, to provide plasma heating and current drive by Electron Cyclotron Resonance interaction. The generator is planned to consist of six gyrotrons TH 1506 B developed thanks to a collaboration between TED (Thales Electron Devices) and European laboratories; the gyrotrons are specified to provide RF waves with a frequency of 118 GHz and a unit power of 400 kW (500 kW) for a pulse length up to 600 s (5 s). At present, one prototype and one series tube are installed, which were first tested on dummy loads and then on plasma, individually and together. Even though the specification was not fulfilled, a record pulse of 300 kW during 110 s was achieved by the series gyrotron; the pulse was stopped by a strong degassing within the tube, due to the overheating of the internal mirror box. This seems to be the consequence of spurious frequencies generated in the injector. New upgraded tubes will be developed by TED and the next gyrotron is planned to be delivered during summer 2003. At the end of 2001, 800 kW generated by the two existing gyrotrons were coupled to the plasma, using various polarizations and injection angles allowed by the mobile mirrors of the antenna; the power was modulated at frequencies between 2 Hz and 25 Hz, on both tubes. As a result, about 50 ECRH pulses have successfully been coupled to the plasma, leading to a first comparison of theoretical deposition profiles with the experimental profiles observed through the ECE diagnostic. (authors)

  19. 1 MW and long pulse operation of Gaussian beam output gyrotron with CVD diamond window for fusion devices

    A 110 GHz-Gaussian beam output gyrotron with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond window was developed for electron cyclotron heating and current drive on JT-60U. A stable Gaussian output beam power of 1.0 MW for 2 s was obtained with depressed collector operation. The temperature at the center of the diamond window was stabilized at the ΔT∼25 K. Gaussian beam output from the gyrotron remarkably improved the coupling efficiency to the HE11 mode in the transmission waveguide. 94% of the gyrotron output power was coupled to the corrugated waveguide of 31.75 mm in diameter, via a matching optics unit with two mirrors. A combination of the Gaussian output and the diamond window are indispensable for high power gyrotron operation at more than 1 MW and efficient coupling to the transmission line

  20. Millimeter-wave, megawatt gyrotron development for ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) heating applications

    Jory, H.; Felch, K.; Hess, C.; Huey, H.; Jongewaard, E.; Neilson, J.; Pendleton, R.; Tsirulnikov, M. (Varian Associates, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

    1990-09-17

    To address the electron cyclotron heating requirements of planned fusion experiments such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), Varian is developing gyrotrons at frequencies ranging from 100--300 GHz with output power capabilities up to 1 MW CW. Experimental gyrotrons have been built at frequencies between 100--140 GHz, and a study program has addressed the critical elements of designing 280--300 GHz gyrotrons capable of generating CW power levels up to 1 MW. Initial test vehicles at 140 GHz have utilized TE{sub 15,2,1} interaction cavities, and have been designed to generate short-pulse (up to 20 ms) power levels of 1 MW and up to 400 kW CW. Recently, short-pulse power levels of 1040 kW at 38% efficiency have been obtained and average powers of 200 kW have been achieved. Long-pulse operation has been extended to pulse durations of 0.5 seconds at power levels of 400 kW. Gyrotron oscillators capable of generating output powers of 500 kW CW at a frequency of 110 GHz have recently been designed and a prototype is currently being tested. Design work for a 1 MW CW gyrotron at 110 GHz, is in progress. The 1 MW CW tube will employ an output coupling approach where the microwave output is separated from the microwave output. 15 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Experimental results of series gyrotrons for the stellarator W7-X

    A powerful ECRH system with 10 MW RF power at 140 GHz and CW operation is foreseen for the stellarator W7-X, being under construction at IPP Greifswald. The RF power will be delivered by 10 gyrotrons, each capable of 1 MW, CW. Nine gyrotrons are being manufactured by Thales Electron Devices (TED), Velizy, France, one gyrotron was produced by CPI, Palo Alto, CA. Testing of the TED gyrotrons is performed at the test stand at FZK (pulse duration 3 min) and the final tests are performed at IPP (pulse length 30 min). Both, the first TED series gyrotron and the CPI gyrotron have passed the acceptance tests successfully. The acceptance tests of the TED series gyrotrons are ongoing. The RF output beam quality of all tubes tested so far is at a constant high level of about 97% in the Gaussian beam. In short pulse operation the gyrotrons have achieved the specified parameters. However, for long pulse operation the performance decreases due to the occurrence of parasitic oscillations which are assumed to be excited by the electron beam in the beam tunnel close to the cavity. Experimental results of this effect and possible modifications of the beam tunnel geometry will be discussed. (author)

  2. Gyrotrons

    The purpose of this study is to bring together some relevant ideas and developments in the field of gyrotrons. The development of the electron cyclotron resonance maser (ECRM or Gyrotron) was an important break through in microwave electronics in the 1970s. As we look to the 1980's, we find scientists channelling their collective efforts to shorten the wavelength and increase output power and efficiency, thereby yielding an important device for generating high power microwave radiation. 24 refs

  3. Research on long pulse ECRH system of EAST in support of ITER

    Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Fukun; Shan, Jiafang; Xu, Handong; Wu, Dajun; Li, Bo; Wei, Wei; Tang, Yunying; Zhang, Liyuan; Xu, Weiye; Hu, Huaichuan; Wang, Jiang; Yang, Yong; Xu, Li; Ma, Wendong; Feng, Jianqiang

    2015-12-01

    Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), as a fully superconducting tokamak in China, aims to achieve high performance plasma under steady-state operation. To fulfill the physical objectives of EAST, a program of 4-MW long pulse electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive (EC H&CD) system, which would offer greater flexibility for plasma shape and plasma stabilization has been launched on EAST since 2011. The system, composed of 4 gyrotrons with nominal 1MW output power and 1000s pulse length each, is designed with the feature of steerable power handling capabilities at 140 GHz, using second harmonic of the extraordinary mode(X2). The missions of the ECRH system are to provide plasma heating, current drive, plasma profile tailoring and control of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. Presently, the first two 140-GHz 1-MW gyrotrons, provided by GYCOM and CPI, respectively, have been tested at long pulse operation. The tubes, the associated power supplies, cooling system, cryogenic plant, 2 transmission lines and an equatorial launcher are now installed at EAST. The power generated from each tube will be transmitted by an evacuated corrugated waveguide transmission line and injected into plasma from the low field side (radial port) through a front steering equatorial launcher. Considering the diverse applications of the EC system, the beam's launch angles can be continuously varied with the optimized scanning range of over 30° in poloidal direction and ±25° in toroidal, as well as the polarization could be adjusted during the discharge by the orientations of a pair of polarizers in the transmission line to maintain the highest absorption for different operational scenarios. The commissioning of the first 2MW ECRH plant for EAST is under way. The design, R&D activities and recent progress of the long pulse 140-GHz ECRH system are presented in this paper. As the technological requirements for EAST ECRH have many similarities with ITER

  4. Recent Progress of 2MW 140GHz ECRH System on HL-2A

    Lu Z.H.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide more capability of physics study for high-performance plasma, such as current profile control, neoclassical tearing modes suppression, transport study and so on, a new 2MW/140GHz/3s second-harmonic ECRH system with X-mode injection is on schedule on HL-2A. The total power of this system is 2MW and the pulse duration is 3 sec, which is generated by two gyrotrons manufactured by GYCOM. Two evacuated Φ63.5mm transmission lines were used to propagate these two 1MW/3s wave beams. A fast steerable launcher has been designed and installed on the HL-2A tokamak to inject four beams with narrow beam width and enable continuous beam scanning in toroidal and poloidal directions independently.

  5. Research on long pulse ECRH system of EAST in support of ITER

    Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), as a fully superconducting tokamak in China, aims to achieve high performance plasma under steady-state operation. To fulfill the physical objectives of EAST, a program of 4-MW long pulse electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive (EC H&CD) system, which would offer greater flexibility for plasma shape and plasma stabilization has been launched on EAST since 2011. The system, composed of 4 gyrotrons with nominal 1MW output power and 1000s pulse length each, is designed with the feature of steerable power handling capabilities at 140 GHz, using second harmonic of the extraordinary mode(X2). The missions of the ECRH system are to provide plasma heating, current drive, plasma profile tailoring and control of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. Presently, the first two 140-GHz 1-MW gyrotrons, provided by GYCOM and CPI, respectively, have been tested at long pulse operation. The tubes, the associated power supplies, cooling system, cryogenic plant, 2 transmission lines and an equatorial launcher are now installed at EAST. The power generated from each tube will be transmitted by an evacuated corrugated waveguide transmission line and injected into plasma from the low field side (radial port) through a front steering equatorial launcher. Considering the diverse applications of the EC system, the beam’s launch angles can be continuously varied with the optimized scanning range of over 30° in poloidal direction and ±25° in toroidal, as well as the polarization could be adjusted during the discharge by the orientations of a pair of polarizers in the transmission line to maintain the highest absorption for different operational scenarios. The commissioning of the first 2MW ECRH plant for EAST is under way. The design, R&D activities and recent progress of the long pulse 140-GHz ECRH system are presented in this paper. As the technological requirements for EAST ECRH have many similarities with ITER

  6. Research on long pulse ECRH system of EAST in support of ITER

    Wang, Xiaojie, E-mail: xjiew@ipp.ac.cn; Liu, Fukun; Shan, Jiafang; Xu, Handong; Wu, Dajun; Li, Bo; Tang, Yunying; Zhang, Liyuan; Xu, Weiye; Hu, Huaichuan; Wang, Jiang; Yang, Yong; Xu, Li; Ma, Wendong; Feng, Jianqiang [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shushan lake road 350, 230031, Hefei (China); Wei, Wei [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shushan lake road 350, 230031, Hefei (China); Hefei University of Technology, 230009, Hefei (China)

    2015-12-10

    Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), as a fully superconducting tokamak in China, aims to achieve high performance plasma under steady-state operation. To fulfill the physical objectives of EAST, a program of 4-MW long pulse electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive (EC H&CD) system, which would offer greater flexibility for plasma shape and plasma stabilization has been launched on EAST since 2011. The system, composed of 4 gyrotrons with nominal 1MW output power and 1000s pulse length each, is designed with the feature of steerable power handling capabilities at 140 GHz, using second harmonic of the extraordinary mode(X2). The missions of the ECRH system are to provide plasma heating, current drive, plasma profile tailoring and control of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. Presently, the first two 140-GHz 1-MW gyrotrons, provided by GYCOM and CPI, respectively, have been tested at long pulse operation. The tubes, the associated power supplies, cooling system, cryogenic plant, 2 transmission lines and an equatorial launcher are now installed at EAST. The power generated from each tube will be transmitted by an evacuated corrugated waveguide transmission line and injected into plasma from the low field side (radial port) through a front steering equatorial launcher. Considering the diverse applications of the EC system, the beam’s launch angles can be continuously varied with the optimized scanning range of over 30° in poloidal direction and ±25° in toroidal, as well as the polarization could be adjusted during the discharge by the orientations of a pair of polarizers in the transmission line to maintain the highest absorption for different operational scenarios. The commissioning of the first 2MW ECRH plant for EAST is under way. The design, R&D activities and recent progress of the long pulse 140-GHz ECRH system are presented in this paper. As the technological requirements for EAST ECRH have many similarities with ITER

  7. Design of a 140 GHz, 100 W Gyroklystron Amplifier

    Joye, Colin; Shapiro, Michael; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar; Temkin, Richard

    2004-11-01

    We present the design and the simulation results for a 140 GHz, 100 watt CW gyroklystron amplifier for use in Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) experiments. The amplifier was designed for a 15 kV, 150 mA annular electron beam and simulations show a saturated gain of 36 dB at a pitch factor of 1.5 for the TE02 mode with an efficiency of 6% and output power of 130 watts. The -3dB bandwidth is 1 GHz (0.7%) and 1.2 GHz of bandwidth is available at the 50-watt level. This design is also capable of emitting pulses on the nanosecond scale. The circuit consists of an input cavity, three bunching cavities and an output cavity with a nonlinear uptaper. This project is supported by NIBIB grant #5R01EB1965.

  8. Components for transmission of very high power mm-waves (200 kW at 28, 70 and 140 GHz) in overmoded circular waveguides

    Optimized overmoded circular waveguide components of transmission lines developed for high-power (200 kW) millimeter wave applications at 28, 70 and 140 GHz, as e.g. electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) of plasmas for thermonuclear fusion research with gyrotrons, are described. Axisymmetric, narrow, pencil-like beams with well-defined polarization (HE11 hybrid mode) are used at open-ended corrugated waveguide antennas. The HE11 mode is generated from TEsub(On) gyrotron modes by the two multi-step mode conversion processes: (1) TEsub(On)->TE01->TE11->HE11 or (2) TEsub(On)->TE01->TM11->HE11. This paper reports computer-aided analyses and measurements on mode transducer systems of the first type at 28 and 70 GHz and of the second type at 140 GHz. In all cases the overall efficiency of the complete mode conversion sequence in the desired mode is approximately (92-95)%. The mode purity in the transmission lines is conserved by using corrugated gradual waveguide bends with optimized curvature distribution and diameter tapers with non-linear contours. Highly efficient corrugated-wall mode selective filters decouple the different waveguide sections. Mode content and reflected power are determined by a novel device (k-spectrometer). Absolute power calibration is done with newly developed calorimetric loads using an organic absorbing fluid. (orig.)

  9. On the origin of 140 GHz emission from the 4 July 2012 solar flare

    Tsap, Yuriy T.; Smirnova, Victoria V.; Morgachev, Alexander S.; Motorina, Galina G.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Nagnibeda, Valery G.; Strekalova, Polina V.

    2016-04-01

    The sub-THz event observed on the 4 July 2012 with the Bauman Moscow State Technical University Radio Telescope RT-7.5 at 93 and 140 GHz as well as Kislovodsk and Metsähovi radio telescopes, Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), GOES, RHESSI, and SDO orbital stations is analyzed. The spectral flux between 93 and 140 GHz has been observed increasing with frequency. On the basis of the SDO/AIA data the differential emission measure has been calculated. It is shown that the thermal coronal plasma with the temperature above 0.5 MK cannot be responsible for the observed sub-THz flare emission. The non-thermal gyrosynchrotron mechanism can be responsible for the microwave emission near 10 GHz but the observed millimeter spectral characteristics are likely to be produced by the thermal bremsstrahlung emission from plasma with a temperature of about 0.1 MK.

  10. On the origin of 140 GHz emission from the 4 July 2012 solar flare

    Tsap, Yuriy T; Morgachev, Alexander S; Motorina, Galina G; Kontar, Eduard P; Nagnibeda, Valery G; Strekalova, Polina V

    2016-01-01

    The sub-THz event observed on the 4 July 2012 with the Bauman Moscow State Technical University Radio Telescope RT-7.5 at 93 and 140~GHz as well as Kislovodsk and Mets\\"ahovi radio telescopes, Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), GOES, RHESSI, and SDO orbital stations is analyzed. The spectral flux between 93 and 140 GHz has been observed increasing with frequency. On the basis of the SDO/AIA data the differential emission measure has been calculated. It is shown that the thermal coronal plasma with the temperature above 0.5~MK cannot be responsible for the observed sub-THz flare emission. The non-thermal gyrosynchrotron mechanism can be responsible for the microwave emission near $10$~GHz but the observed millimeter spectral characteristics are likely to be produced by the thermal bremsstrahlung emission from plasma with a temperature of about 0.1~MK.

  11. A 140 GHz pulsed EPR/212 MHz NMR spectrometer for DNP studies

    Smith, Albert A.; Corzilius, Björn; Bryant, Jeffrey A.; DeRocher, Ronald; Woskov, Paul P.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2012-10-01

    We described a versatile spectrometer designed for the study of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at low temperatures and high fields. The instrument functions both as an NMR spectrometer operating at 212 MHz (1H frequency) with DNP capabilities, and as a pulsed-EPR operating at 140 GHz. A coiled TE011 resonator acts as both an NMR coil and microwave resonator, and a double balanced (1H, 13C) radio frequency circuit greatly stabilizes the NMR performance. A new 140 GHz microwave bridge has also been developed, which utilizes a four-phase network and ELDOR channel at 8.75 GHz, that is then multiplied and mixed to obtain 140 GHz microwave pulses with an output power of 120 mW. Nutation frequencies obtained are as follows: 6 MHz on S = 1/2 electron spins, 100 kHz on 1H, and 50 kHz on 13C. We demonstrate basic EPR, ELDOR, ENDOR, and DNP experiments here. Our solid effect DNP results demonstrate an enhancement of 144 and sensitivity gain of 310 using OX063 trityl at 80 K and an enhancement of 157 and maximum sensitivity gain of 234 using Gd-DOTA at 20 K, which is significantly better performance than previously reported at high fields (⩾3 T).

  12. Results of 170 GHz gyrotron tests

    During the last few years the development of 170 GHz gyrotron for ITER have been under way. Sketchy description of experiment and test results of an improved design gyrotron with a depressed collector, are reported. The analysis of the phenomena causing the destruction of the output window is submitted. The projects for the following experiments are presented. The new 170 GHz/1 MW/50%/CW gyrotron with depressed collector and CVD diamond window was developed by GYCOM. This gyrotron was tested with BN window and then with diamond window. The gyrotron testing showed that practically all ITER requirements are satisfied except of pulse duration limited to that time by brick load arcing. Imperfection of arc protection system gave the possibility for arc-plasma to come to the window and destroy it. New loads have been created and tested at 140 GHz, with output gyrotron power Phf = 820 kW and the pulse duration T = 3.5 s. A new version of protection system has been developed and tested in experiment. The next gyrotron with modified electron gun has been manufactured. After first stage test, BN window will be replaced with new CVD diamond unit, which is assembling now. Testing of this gyrotron is planned to carry out in May 2002. (authors)

  13. Demonstration of a 140-GHz 1-kW Confocal Gyro-Traveling-Wave Amplifier

    Joye, Colin D.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    The theory, design, and experimental results of a wideband 140-GHz 1-kW pulsed gyro-traveling-wave amplifier (gyro-TWA) are presented. The gyro-TWA operates in the HE06 mode of an overmoded quasi-optical waveguide using a gyrating electron beam. The electromagnetic theory, interaction theory, design processes, and experimental procedures are described in detail. At 37.7 kV and a 2.7-A beam current, the experiment has produced over 820 W of peak power with a –3-dB bandwidth of 0.8 GHz and a li...

  14. 140 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating experiments at the W7-AS stellarator

    Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) at the W7-AS stellarator is performed with two systems of comparable heating power at 70GHz (0.8MW, 3s) and 140GHz (0.9MW, 0.4s). Experiments with 140GHz open a new parameter window with high density operation up to 1.1x1020m-3. H mode transitions were observed in high density discharges at 2.5T and at lower density at 1.25T. The operational window for the stellarator H mode with emphasis on the density and power threshold and the influence of gas puffing on the H transitions are discussed. Perturbation experiments with modulated ECRH power were performed to determine the heat transport and the power deposition profile. Density control is achieved in combined heating with neutral beam injection (NBI) despite the beam particle fuelling, whereas with NBI alone a steady density rise is observed. The impact of combined heating on the impurity confinement was investigated. Electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) was studied in different magnetic field configurations and the influence of trapped particles on the ECCD efficiency was examined experimentally and compared with theory. ((orig.))

  15. High-power tests of a remote steering launcher mock-up at 140 GHz

    This paper reports the results of the high-power test of a remote steering launcher mock-up at 140 GHz, which were performed at the ECRH installation for the future stellarator W7-X at IPP Greifswald. The mock-up test system consists of a 6.62 m long corrugated square waveguide with a steerable optic at the entrance and various diagnostics at the exit of the waveguide. A straight and a dog-leg version of the launcher were investigated. The high-power tests of the straight setup have been performed with powers up to P0 = 700 kW (typically 500 kW) and pulse lengths of up to 10 seconds. For both polarizations (parallel and perpendicular to the steering plane), no arcing was observed in spite of the fact, that the experiments were performed under ambient atmospheric conditions. After the integration of 2 mitre bends in the setup, arcing limited the usable parameter range. The ohmic loss Px of the waveguide was measured via the temperature increase of the waveguide wall, and was used to calibrate the calculated angular dependence of the total ohmic losses of the waveguide. Short-pulse radiation pattern measurements with thermographic recording show high beam quality and confirm the steering range of -12 deg. < φ < 12deg

  16. Conditioning optics for astigmatic Gaussian beams at 140 GHz, 0.5 MW

    A quasi-optical system has been designed to couple the power coming from a gyrotron with astigmatic gaussian beam output, into an oversized corrugated waveguide (HE11 mode). The fraction of the power injected in the transmission line can be controlled by means of a wire grid beam splitter. Polarization control is provided by two rotating corrugated mirrors of electrical depth λ/4 and λ/8 respectively

  17. Photonic-Band-Gap Resonator Gyrotron

    We report the design and experimental demonstration of a gyrotron oscillator using a photonic-band-gap (PBG) structure to eliminate mode competition in a highly overmoded resonator. The PBG cavity supports a TE041 -like mode at 140GHz and is designed to have no competing modes over a minimum frequency range δω/ω of 30% about the design mode. Experimental operation of a PBG gyrotron at 68kV and 5A produced 25kW of peak power in the design mode. No other modes were observed over the full predicted operating range about the design mode. PBG cavities show great promise for applications in vacuum electron devices in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave bands

  18. Electron cyclotron heating at 140 GHZ on FTU tokamak in steady-state conditions and during current ramp-up

    Localized absorption of EC waves at 140 Ghz, 0.7 MW, in FTU is used to shape the current density profile (qa∼6) in a way to affect sawteeth. If absorption is localized near the inversion radius, temporary stabilization occurs. Sawteeth with a small inversion radius (r/a<0.2) do not affect electron energy confinement. Energy transport appears diffusive, and global confinement is found to be in good agreement with ITER89P L-mode scaling law. (author)

  19. High-power 140 GHz ECRH experiments at the W7-AS stellarator

    ECRH was combined with NBI at moderate and high densities with on- and off-axis heating. Density control was achieved for combined heating in long pulse operation despite the beam fueling in contrast to discharges with pure NBI heating. Particle confinement degradation by profile changes inferred by ECRH is discussed as a possible mechanism. The impurity confinement is strongly affected and is discussed for on- and off-axis combined heating conditions

  20. Theory and Modeling of High-Power Gyrotrons

    Nusinovich, Gregory Semeon [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-04-29

    This report summarized results of the work performed at the Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics of the University of Maryland (College Park, MD) in the framework of the DOE Grant “Theory and Modeling of High-Power Gyrotrons”. The report covers the work performed in 2011-2014. The research work was performed in three directions: - possibilities of stable gyrotron operation in very high-order modes offering the output power exceeding 1 MW level in long-pulse/continuous-wave regimes, - effect of small imperfections in gyrotron fabrication and alignment on the gyrotron efficiency and operation, - some issues in physics of beam-wave interaction in gyrotrons.

  1. Recent result of gyrotron operation in NIFS

    Ito Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last Large Helical Device (LHD experimental campaign, a 154GHz gyrotron which had been conditioned to generate 1 MW/2 s, 0.5 MW/CW was installed for LHD experiments. Four high power gyrotrons (three-77 GHz/1~1.5 MW and one-154 GHz/1 MW and a CW gyrotron (84 GHz/0.2 MW are ready. Our experiment requires high energy and various injection patterns for Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH. Higher individual injection power and various injection patterns, we developed a power enhancement method by stepped anode acceleration voltage control and operated the gyrotron in the hard excitation region. These operations were realized by a remote controlled waveform generator. However the oscillation map of high power or long pulse operation in the hard excitation region were limited because in order to achieve the hard excitation region by the anode voltage control one must pass through the high anode current phase within a time short enough that the anode or the anode power supply is not overloaded. This limitation becomes more critical when the gyrotron beam current is increased in order to increase the output power. In the long pulse operation it was impossible to reach the hard excitation region in a low beam current (<10A.

  2. Development and application of superconducting magnet for gyrotron with 4 mm wave length

    A superconducting magnet for gyrotron with 4 mm wave legnth is developed, its main magnetic field reaches 3 T. The gyrotron combined with the magnet producesfundamental wave long pulse, its power is more than 60 kW, pulse duration 10 ∼ 20 ms, frequency 70 GHz. It is used for plasma preionization experiment on HL-1 Tokamak

  3. Gyrotron Development in the EU for Present Fusion Experiments and for ITER

    The long term strategy of the EU in the field of gyrotrons in fusion plasma applications is based on two approaches: R and D in laboratories to develop advanced concepts and industrial development of state-of-the-art tubes for use in present experiments like TCV, Tore Supra (118 GHz, 0.5 MW, CW) and W7-X (140 GHz, 1 MW, CW). The results from these two approaches are then applied to the development of a coaxial cavity gyrotron operating at 170 GHz and delivering 2 MW-CW for the electron cyclotron wave system of ITER. This paper will recall the main achievements of this program and will outline the present status of the 170 GHz coaxial cavity gyrotron development

  4. Optimization of oversized corrugated waveguide bends for higher-order TE0n-modes at 140 GHz

    Oversized corrugated 900 waveguide bends with a waveguide diameter of 27.79 mm were optimized for TE0n (n = 3...6) transmission lines to transmit power of about 200 kW for Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance-Heating of plasmas in thermonuclear fusion research at a frequency of 140 GHz. The corrugation removes the degeneracy of the mode pairs TE0n/TM1n. The bends were optimized by numerical integration of the coupled-mode differential equations for six coupled modes: TE0n, HE1n, EH1n, EH1,n+1, HE2n and EH2n. During the optimization procedure three parameters were varied: curvature distribution, corrugation depth and arc length. Following curvature distributions were studied: sine-sine-squared, triangular and specific Fourier series. The last one was found to be the best. The optimum corrugation depth increases with increasing mode number n, whereas the arc length decreases. It was found, that a small elliptical deformation of less than 0.04 mm has a negligible influence on TE03- and TE04-bends. In the case of TE05- and TE06-bends the arc length must be increased in order to maintain a pure output mode. (orig.)

  5. Investigation of a 140 GHz gryo-backward wave oscillator and a 95 GHz gyro-traveling wave

    There is current interest in developing a high-power source of continuously tunable millimeter wave radiation as a RF driver for high-power gyrotron, CARM, or FEL amplifiers. The gyrotron backward wave oscillator is a voltage-tunable fast-wave device that can satisfy these requirements. This thesis reports on the design and experimental investigation of a 130--145 GHz gyrotron backward wave oscillator Novel operating features of this design include the use of a 80-kV, 6.2-A Pierce-wiggler electron beam source, a broadband motheye window and an overmoded TE1,2 cylindrical interaction waveguide. Although this device has demonstrated voltage-tunable operation over the design range in the TE1,2 mode, the frequency tuning is not continuous, output powers were low and full-beam transmission through the interaction region was not possible. Simulations indicate that the beam has very high velocity spread induced by space charge forces in the compression region. After increasing the diameter of the beam tunnel to achieve full transmission, the TE1,2 was not found. It is felt that the scraping off of the beam edge in the initial experiments allowed a better quality beam to enter the interaction region and inhibited coupling into competing forward wave modes. The need for radar systems with greater resolution has led to renewed interest in the development of efficient high-power amplifiers at 95 GHz. Current sources are limited to 6--8 kW of output power due to ohmic loading on the slow-wave circuit. A gyrotron traveling wave tube amplifier is capable of efficient operation over a wide bandwidth with the added attraction of low ohmic loading on the smooth fast-wave circuit. This thesis reports of the design a 95-GHz gyrotron traveling wave tube amplifier that is capable of high power (125 kW), high gain (38 dB), large bandwidth > 5 GHz and high efficiencies (> 30%)

  6. Development of high power gyrotron with energy recovery system

    A gyrotron with an energy recovery system was developed and its stable operation was performed. The efficiency was improved from 30% to 50% at 610kW, 50msec, and the long pulse, high efficiency operation, 350kW, 5sec, 48% was demonstrated. These results should bring a large cost reduction of ECH system. (orig.)

  7. Design considerations in achieving 1 MW CW operation with a whispering-gallery-mode gyrotron

    Varian is developing high-power, CW gyrotrons at frequencies in the range 100 GHz to 150 GHz, for use in electron cyclotron heating applications. Early test vehicles have utilized a TE15,2,1 interaction cavity, have achieved short-pulse power levels of 820 kW and average power levels of 80 kW at 140 GHz. Present tests are aimed at reaching 400 kW under CW operating conditions and up to 1 MW for short pulse durations. Work is also underway on modifications to the present design that will enable power levels of up to 1 MW CW to be achieved. 7 refs., 2 figs

  8. Development of 100 GHz band high power gyrotron for fusion experimental reactor

    In JAERI, 1MW gyrotrons of 170GHz and 110GHz are under development for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and JT-60U, respectively. Both gyrotrons have a depressed collector for an efficiency improvement and a low loss synthetic diamond window that enables Gaussian beam output over 1MW. Three 110GHz gyrotrons are used on an electron cyclotron heating and current drive(ECH/ECCD) system on JT-60U, in which the output power of ∼0.8MW/3sec was generated from each gyrotron. As for 170GHz, output power of 1.2MW with electron beam of 85kV/49A was obtained on a short pulse gyrotron. The efficiency of ∼57% was attained at 1.1MW with the depressed collector. Based on these results, the 1MW 170GHz gyrotron for long pulse operation was fabricated. (author)

  9. Active heater control and regulation for the Varian VGT-8011 gyrotron

    The Varian VGT-8011 gyrotron is currently being used in the new 110 GHz 2 MW ECH system installed on D3-D. This new ECH system augments the 60 GHz system which uses Varian VA-8060 gyrotrons. The new 110 GHz system will be used for ECH experiments on D3-D with a pulse width capability of 10 sec. In order to maintain a constant RF outpower level during long pulse operation, active filament-heater control and regulation is required to maintain a constant cathode current. On past D3-D experiments involving the use of Varian VA-8060 gyrotrons for ECH power, significant gyrotron heater-emission depletion was experienced for pulse widths > 300 msec. This decline in heater-emission directly results in gyrotron-cathode current droop. Since RF power from gyrotrons decreases as cathode current decreases, it is necessary to maintain a constant cathode current level during gyrotron pulses for efficient gyrotron operation. Therefore, it was determined that a filament-heater control system should be developed for the Varian VGT-8011 gyrotron which will include cathode-current feed-back. This paper discusses the mechanisms used to regulate gyrotron filament-heater voltage by using cathode-current feed-back. 1 fig

  10. Technical developments at the KIT gyrotron test facility

    Parasitic beam tunnel oscillations have been discovered on some of the series production gyrotrons for W7-X and also on the coaxial pre-prototype gyrotron for ITER. Solutions to remedy these problems have resulted in a modified beam tunnel design, technologically close to the existing beam tunnel. The new design has successfully been tested on both the coaxial and also the f-step-tunable gyrotrons and has subsequently been implemented on one of the W7-X series-production-tubes presently undergoing factory acceptance tests in Karlsruhe. The ECRH test loads at KIT are operated under normal atmospheric conditions. Several loads have eventually failed in 1 MW long pulse experiments and KIT has therefore started to design its own loads. The first KIT-load is based on a fixed conical mirror and an aluminum cylinder coated with a lossy material for increased absorption. The new load has so far successfully been used during the acceptance tests of two 1-MW CW gyrotrons. Nevertheless a new load based on pure (uncoated) stainless steel absorbers is being developed as a backup solution for the ongoing high priority gyrotron testing. A superconducting magnet capable of rapid field changes between 4.15 and 5.67 T for frequency step-tunable gyrotrons has been procured, has demonstrated a (static) field of 7.2 T and its capability of rapid field-changes.

  11. Technical developments at the KIT gyrotron test facility

    Schmid, Martin, E-mail: martin.schmid@kit.edu [Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Erckmann, Volker [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysics, Association EURATOM-IPP, Greifswald (Germany); Gantenbein, Gerd; Illy, Stefan; Kern, Stefan [Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Lievin, Christophe [Thales Electron Devices, Velicy (France); Samartsev, Andrey [Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Schlaich, Andreas [Institute of High Frequency Techniques and Electronics (IHE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Rzesnicki, Thomaz [Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Thumm, Manfred [Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of High Frequency Techniques and Electronics (IHE), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Parasitic beam tunnel oscillations have been discovered on some of the series production gyrotrons for W7-X and also on the coaxial pre-prototype gyrotron for ITER. Solutions to remedy these problems have resulted in a modified beam tunnel design, technologically close to the existing beam tunnel. The new design has successfully been tested on both the coaxial and also the f-step-tunable gyrotrons and has subsequently been implemented on one of the W7-X series-production-tubes presently undergoing factory acceptance tests in Karlsruhe. The ECRH test loads at KIT are operated under normal atmospheric conditions. Several loads have eventually failed in 1 MW long pulse experiments and KIT has therefore started to design its own loads. The first KIT-load is based on a fixed conical mirror and an aluminum cylinder coated with a lossy material for increased absorption. The new load has so far successfully been used during the acceptance tests of two 1-MW CW gyrotrons. Nevertheless a new load based on pure (uncoated) stainless steel absorbers is being developed as a backup solution for the ongoing high priority gyrotron testing. A superconducting magnet capable of rapid field changes between 4.15 and 5.67 T for frequency step-tunable gyrotrons has been procured, has demonstrated a (static) field of 7.2 T and its capability of rapid field-changes.

  12. Long pulse operation on Tore Supra

    Monier-Garbet, P

    2004-07-01

    This document gathers a series of transparencies dedicated to the long pulse operation on Tore-Supra. The structure of the document is described as follows: the first part is an introduction recalling fusion basis and presenting the different physical and technological phenomenon time scales. The second part is dedicated to the production of long pulses through non-inductive drive and some experimental scenarios illustrate it. The final part is devoted to physics issues like particle retention.

  13. Long pulse operation on Tore Supra

    This document gathers a series of transparencies dedicated to the long pulse operation on Tore-Supra. The structure of the document is described as follows: the first part is an introduction recalling fusion basis and presenting the different physical and technological phenomenon time scales. The second part is dedicated to the production of long pulses through non-inductive drive and some experimental scenarios illustrate it. The final part is devoted to physics issues like particle retention

  14. Development of dual frequency gyrotron and high power test of EC components

    Sakamoto K.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In JAEA, development of high-power long-pulse gyrotrons is underway. The output power of the gyrotron was applied for high-power long-pulse tests of the transmission line (TL and the equatorial launcher (EL mock up for ITER. The feature of design in the dual frequency gyrotron is the simultaneously satisfying the matching of both frequencies at a window and the same radiation angle at an internal mode convertor for both frequencies. The dual frequency gyrotron was developed and high power operations at 170 GHz and 137 GHz were carried out. The 170 GHz high power experiment of 40 m length ITER relevant TL was carried out and transmission efficiency and mode purity change caused by long pulse operation were measured. The mock-up model of EL was also tested using 170 GHz gyrotron. The power transmission through the quasi-optical beam line in EL was demonstrated using the full scale mock up model. Furthermore, the high power test results of the transmission components will be summarized.

  15. Development program for a 200 kW, cw gyrotron. Final report

    Development of a millimeter-wave device to produce 200 kW of continuous wave power at 60 GHz is described. The device, a gyrotron oscillator, is intended for electron-cyclotron heating of fusion plasmas. The design philosophy is herein discussed and experimental results, both diagnostic and long pulse, are given

  16. From reactors to long pulse sources

    We will show, that by using an adapted instrumentation concept, the performance of a continuous source can be emulated by one switch on in long pulses for only about 10% of the total time. This 10 fold gain in neutron economy opens up the way for building reactor like sources with an order of magnitude higher flux than the present technological limits. Linac accelerator driven spallation lends itself favorably for the realization of this kind of long pulse sources, which will be complementary to short pulse spallation sources, the same way continuous reactor sources are

  17. State-of-the-art and recent developments of high-power gyrotron oscillators

    Thumm, Manfred

    1999-05-01

    Gyrotron oscillators (gyromonotrons) are mainly used as high-power millimeter wave sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and diagnostics of magnetically confined plasmas for generation of energy by controlled thermonuclear fusion. High unit power and high efficiency single-mode CW gyrotrons with conventional cylindrical (1 MW) and advanced coaxial (2 MW) cavities are worldwide under development. 118 GHz, 140 GHz and 170 GHz conventional cavity gyrotrons with output power Pout≈0.5 MW, pulse length τ≈5.0 s and efficiency η≈35% are commercially available. Advanced internal quasi-optical mode converters generate linearly polarized output wave beams from the high-order cavity modes (e.g., TE22,6) with efficiencies of 90-95% and separate the millimeter-wave beam from the electron beam, thus allowing the use of large CW-relevant depressed collectors for energy recovery. Overall efficiencies between 50 and 60% have been already achieved at JAERI, FZK, and GYCOM employing single-stage depressed collectors (SDC). First successful experiments at FZK employing a broadband Brewster window gave up to 1.5 MW output power at around 50% efficiency (SDC) for all operating mode series in the frequency range from 114 to 166 GHz (frequency tuning in 3.7 GHz steps by variation of the magnetic field strength in the cavity). Gyrotrons with advanced coaxial cavities designed for operation in the TE28,16 and TE31,17 modes at 140 and 165 GHz, respectively, are under development and test at IAP Nizhny Novgorod and FZK Karlsruhe. A maximum output power of 1.7 MW has been measured at 165 GHz with an efficiency of 35.2% (SDC, FZK). Cryogenically edge-cooled single-disk sapphire (T=77 K) and Au-doped silicon (T=230 K) windows as well as CVD-diamond windows with water edge-cooling at room temperature are under investigation in order to solve the window problem. Commercial CVD-diamond disks will easily allow the transmission of 2 MW power level at 170 GHz, CW. Bonding and

  18. State-of-the-art and recent developments of high-power gyrotron oscillators

    Gyrotron oscillators (gyromonotrons) are mainly used as high-power millimeter wave sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and diagnostics of magnetically confined plasmas for generation of energy by controlled thermonuclear fusion. High unit power and high efficiency single-mode CW gyrotrons with conventional cylindrical (1 MW) and advanced coaxial (2 MW) cavities are worldwide under development. 118 GHz, 140 GHz and 170 GHz conventional cavity gyrotrons with output power Pout≅0.5 MW, pulse length τ≅5.0 s and efficiency η≅35% are commercially available. Advanced internal quasi-optical mode converters generate linearly polarized output wave beams from the high-order cavity modes (e.g., TE22,6) with efficiencies of 90-95% and separate the millimeter-wave beam from the electron beam, thus allowing the use of large CW-relevant depressed collectors for energy recovery. Overall efficiencies between 50 and 60% have been already achieved at JAERI, FZK, and GYCOM employing single-stage depressed collectors (SDC). First successful experiments at FZK employing a broadband Brewster window gave up to 1.5 MW output power at around 50% efficiency (SDC) for all operating mode series in the frequency range from 114 to 166 GHz (frequency tuning in 3.7 GHz steps by variation of the magnetic field strength in the cavity). Gyrotrons with advanced coaxial cavities designed for operation in the TE28,16 and TE31,17 modes at 140 and 165 GHz, respectively, are under development and test at IAP Nizhny Novgorod and FZK Karlsruhe. A maximum output power of 1.7 MW has been measured at 165 GHz with an efficiency of 35.2% (SDC, FZK). Cryogenically edge-cooled single-disk sapphire (T=77 K) and Au-doped silicon (T=230 K) windows as well as CVD-diamond windows with water edge-cooling at room temperature are under investigation in order to solve the window problem. Commercial CVD-diamond disks will easily allow the transmission of 2 MW power level at 170 GHz, CW. Bonding and

  19. Long pulse operation with actively cooled limiters

    We present here the major results obtained with actively cooled plasma facing components during long pulse operation (plasma duration >3 x surface temperature time constant=steady-state). Shots up to 120 s have been achieved in Tore Supra when the plasma was leaning on the large inner toroidal actively cooled limiter with a moderate deposited power density heat flux (up to 0.3 MW/m2). For larger power density heat flux up to 4.5 MW/m2 (design value), modular limiters have been used. A prerequisite for any actively cooled limiter is the absence of any cooling defect (crack parallel to the surface in the tile or non-correct bonding). If a defect is present it leads to a super-brilliance event (with its corresponding local power heat flux increase) which propagates. This deleterious effect is unfortunately a runaway effect. (orig.)

  20. Feasibility of ion temperature measurement with a gyrotron scattering alpha particle diagnostic

    Collective Thomson scattering can be used to diagnose localized ion temperature as well as alpha particle velocity distribution and density in a D-T burning tokamak. With one diagnostic beam a simultaneous, but independent, measure of the bulk ion temperature and alpha particle parameters can be made. Use of a long pulse, millimeter-wave gyrotron offers a significant margin in signal to noise ratio capability (√Δftau > 1000) not previously possible with lasers. 9 refs., 2 figs

  1. Development of high power gyrotron and transmission line for ECH/ECCD system

    170 GHz, high power and long pulse gyrotron with CVD diamond output window (tanδ ≤ 1.4 x 10-4, σ = 1800 W/m/K) has successfully been developed. The operation of 0.45 MW-8.0 sec and of 0.52 MW-6.2 sec were performed. Temperature increase of the window center was 150 deg. C at the operation of 0.52 MW-6.2 sec, moreover, the increment saturated, which well agreed with the simulation result. No damage on the gyrotron window and the gyrotron itself was observed through the experiment. We have constructed the 40 m run transmission line to demonstrate the efficient transmission of high power and long pulse millimeter wave. The total transmission loss has been estimated as less than 18%, which includes the loss in mirror optical unit, assumed as 10%. The transmission efficiency, the mode purity and the polarization are mainly investigated in the high power transmission experiment. The diamond window assembly as tritium or vacuum barrier in a transmission line was fabricated for high pressure test. The disk was failed at pressure of 0.465 MPa, which is consistent with the material strength. (author)

  2. Gyrotron: an ECH system component

    The gyrotron, or electron-cyclotron maser, in the form of a gyromonotron, is being developed as a source of millimeter wave energy for fusion plasma heating. The characteristics of this high power, high efficiency electron tube are described in terms of the requirements for the beam power supply system, the mechanical support system, the cooling system, the focusing and tuning magnets, and the waveguide system. Requirements of power level and transmission efficiency dictate the use of oversize waveguide. The implications, both to the user and to the interaction mechanisms in the gyrotron, of the use of oversize waveguide are treated. The effects of variations of various operating parameters upon the gyrotron's power output and stability are also discussed. Data from gyrotron development and system operation are used where appropriate

  3. Design of an ultra-broadband single-disk output window for a frequency step-tunable 1 MW gyrotron

    Output window design is one of the key issues to realize broadband output of a multi-frequency gyrotron. Corresponding to the recent development of a frequency step-tunable 1 MW gyrotron at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), this paper reports about a newly designed ultra-broadband CVD-diamond disk Brewster window. The thickness of the disk and the geometry of the window unit have been optimized to get low power reflection over a broadband incident angle range around the Brewster angle at different operating frequencies. Detailed calculations of mm-wave transmission characteristics for this Brewster window have been performed for all the considered operation modes from TE17,6 at 105 GHz up to TE23,8 at 143 GHz, and for thickness of the disk from 1.5 to 2.0 mm. Calculations show if one prefers to place the low reflection area in the middle of the discussed frequency range (120-130 GHz), the thickness of 1.6 mm is near optimum and its -20 dB bandwidth angle is more than 30o. For operation near 105 and 140 GHz, a 1.9 mm disk is preferable and its -20 dB bandwidth angle is around 30o

  4. Gyrotron oscillators for fusion heating

    Recent experiments have been performed to determine the ultimate power capability of a 28 GHz 200 kW CW gyrotron design. A power output of 342 kW CW was measured in these tests with an efficiency of 37%. Progress in the development of 60 GHz 200 kW pulsed and CW gyrotrons is discussed. An output of 200 kW with 100 msec pulse length has been achieved with the pulsed design

  5. Frequency-Based Investigation of Charge Neutralization Processes and Thermal Cavity Expansion in Gyrotrons

    Schlaich, Andreas; Wu, Chuanren; Pagonakis, Ioannis; Avramidis, Konstantinos; Illy, Stefan; Gantenbein, Gerd; Jelonnek, John; Thumm, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    During the first hundred milliseconds, the frequency and RF output power of long pulse operating gyrotrons undergo deterministic variation. This well-known behavior is caused by the thermal expansion of the cavity and internal electrostatic processes related to the ionization of residual gas. A macroscopic analytical investigation of the gas conditions in modern gyrotrons indicates that ionization processes are unlikely to influence the overall internal gas pressure. In combination with electrostatic potential considerations, it was found that the beam depression voltage is not fully neutralized; in the case of W7-X gyrotrons, a maximum value of about 60 % neutralization is expected, in conflict with the common assumption of full neutralization in steady state. Using experimentally measured frequency shifts and the Evridiki gyrotron interaction simulation code, a fitting process was employed to further investigate these effects. The results are in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions and allow a separation of the time constants of the two processes causing the frequency tuning.

  6. Advances in high power calorimetric matched loads for short pulses and CW gyrotrons

    ) and the CW version at 2 MW, 170 GHz, are described in the paper. High power tests on short-pulse loads have been done using a double frequency gyrotron, 105 GHz/600 kW for 0.5 s and 140 GHz/800 kW for 1 s. Also a method for emulating 2 MW conditions while using 1 MW gyrotron has been applied to test the load to be used for the European 2 MW coaxial cavity gyrotron development programme

  7. Advances in High Power Calorimetric Matched Loads for Short Pulses and CW Gyrotrons

    the CW version at 2 MW, 170 GHz, are described in the paper. High power tests on short-pulse loads have been done using a double frequency gyrotron, 105 GHz/600 kW for 0.5 s and 140 GHz/800 kW for 1 s. Also a method for emulating 2 MW conditions while using 1 MW gyrotron has been applied for testing the load to be used for the European 2 MW coaxial cavity gyrotron development programme. (author)

  8. Long-pulse-width narrow-bandwidth solid state laser

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd A.

    1997-01-01

    A long pulse laser system emits 500-1000 ns quasi-rectangular pulses at 527 nm with near diffraction-limited divergence and near transform-limited bandwidth. The system consists of one or more flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass zig-zag amplifiers, a very low threshold stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phase conjugator system, and a free-running single frequency Nd:YLF master oscillator. Completely passive polarization switching provides eight amplifier gain passes. Multiple frequency output can be generated by using SBS cells having different pressures of a gaseous SBS medium or different SBS materials. This long pulse, low divergence, narrow-bandwidth, multi-frequency output laser system is ideally suited for use as an illuminator for long range speckle imaging applications. Because of its high average power and high beam quality, this system has application in any process which would benefit from a long pulse format, including material processing and medical applications.

  9. The Los Alamos Long-Pulse-Spallation-Source driver

    A Los Alamos study has investigated the possibility of adapting the LANSCE facility to a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS) delivering H+ beam to a new spallation target in 1-ms long pulses at a repetition rate of 60 Hz, while maintaining the present short-pulse capabilities. The study noted limitations of the LANSCE linac and has specified a scheme for high-reliability operation with low beam loss. Such an upgrade would provide a very inexpensive spallation source equivalent to a large reactor. Novel aspects of the scheme are stressed. (author) 5 figs

  10. Systematic Observation of Time-Dependent Phenomena in the RF Output Spectrum of High Power Gyrotrons

    Kern Stefan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available At IHM/KIT, high power gyrotrons with conventional cavity (e.g. 1 MW CW at 140 GHz for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X and coaxial cavity (2 MW shortpulse at 170 GHz for ITER for fusion applications are being developed and verified experimentally. Especially with respect to the problem of parasitic RF oscillations in the beam tunnel of some W7-X tubes, investigations of the gyrotron RF output spectrum have proved to be a valuable source of diagnostic information. Signs of transient effects in millisecond pulses, like frequency switching or intermittent low-frequency modulation, have indicated that truly time-dependent measurements with high frequency resolution and dynamic range could give deeper insight into these phenomena. In this paper, an improved measurement system is presented, which employs a fast oscilloscope as receiver. Shorttime Fourier transform (STFT is applied to the time-domain signal, yielding time-variant spectra with frequency resolutions only limited by acquisition length and STFT segmentation choice. Typical reasonable resolutions are in the range of 100 kHz to 10 MHz with a currently memory-limited maximum acquisition length of 4 ms. A key feature of the system consists in the unambiguity of frequency measurement: The system receives through two parallel channels, each using a harmonic mixer (h = 9 – 12 to convert the signal from RF millimeter wave frequencies (full D-Band, 110 – 170 GHz to IF (0 – 3 GHz. For each IF output signal of each individual mixer, injection side and receiving harmonic are initially not known. Using accordingly determined LO frequencies, this information is retrieved from the redundancy of the channels, yielding unambiguously reconstructed RF spectra with a total span of twice the usable receiver IF bandwidth, up to ≈ 6 GHz in our case. Using the system, which is still being improved continuously, various transient effects like cavity mode switching, parasitic oscillation frequency variation

  11. Systematic Observation of Time-Dependent Phenomena in the RF Output Spectrum of High Power Gyrotrons

    Schlaich, Andreas; Gantenbein, Gerd; Kern, Stefan; Thumm, Manfred

    2012-09-01

    At IHM/KIT, high power gyrotrons with conventional cavity (e.g. 1 MW CW at 140 GHz for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X) and coaxial cavity (2 MW shortpulse at 170 GHz for ITER) for fusion applications are being developed and verified experimentally. Especially with respect to the problem of parasitic RF oscillations in the beam tunnel of some W7-X tubes, investigations of the gyrotron RF output spectrum have proved to be a valuable source of diagnostic information. Signs of transient effects in millisecond pulses, like frequency switching or intermittent low-frequency modulation, have indicated that truly time-dependent measurements with high frequency resolution and dynamic range could give deeper insight into these phenomena. In this paper, an improved measurement system is presented, which employs a fast oscilloscope as receiver. Shorttime Fourier transform (STFT) is applied to the time-domain signal, yielding time-variant spectra with frequency resolutions only limited by acquisition length and STFT segmentation choice. Typical reasonable resolutions are in the range of 100 kHz to 10 MHz with a currently memory-limited maximum acquisition length of 4 ms. A key feature of the system consists in the unambiguity of frequency measurement: The system receives through two parallel channels, each using a harmonic mixer (h = 9 - 12) to convert the signal from RF millimeter wave frequencies (full D-Band, 110 - 170 GHz) to IF (0 - 3 GHz). For each IF output signal of each individual mixer, injection side and receiving harmonic are initially not known. Using accordingly determined LO frequencies, this information is retrieved from the redundancy of the channels, yielding unambiguously reconstructed RF spectra with a total span of twice the usable receiver IF bandwidth, up to ≈ 6 GHz in our case. Using the system, which is still being improved continuously, various transient effects like cavity mode switching, parasitic oscillation frequency variation, and lowfrequency

  12. ECRH experiments and developments for long pulses in Tore Supra

    The ECRH system presently under construction at CEA/Cadarache for the Tore Supra tokamak is described. The system will be equipped by 6 gyrotrons (118 GHz, 400 kW, cw), manufactured by Thomson Tubes Electroniques. The results of the tests of the prototype and of the first series gyrotron are reported and discussed. The best performance obtained was a pulse of 102 s at 310 kW average power on dummy load, which corresponds to the new record energy of 32 MJ. Results of first ECRH experiments on Tore Supra with the prototype gyrotron are also reported. 350 kW have been coupled in O-mode both to Ohmic and to LHCD plasmas in continuous or modulated pulses lasting up to 2 s. During non-inductive discharges, fully sustained by LHCD, a significant response of the hard X-ray signals to the ECRH power has been observed, despite the low power ratio between the two waves (0.35 MW EC/4.5 MW LH waves). (author)

  13. Long Pulse Integrator of Variable Integral Time Constant

    A kind of new long pulse integrator was designed based on the method of variable integral time constant and deducting integral drift by drift slope. The integral time constant can be changed by choosing different integral resistors, in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, and avoid output saturation; the slope of integral drift of a certain period of time can be calculated by digital signal processing, which can be used to deduct the drift of original integral signal in real time to reduce the integral drift. The tests show that this kind of long pulse integrator is good at reducing integral drift, which also can eliminate the effects of changing integral time constant. According to experiments, the integral time constant can be changed by remote control and manual adjustment of integral drift is avoided, which can improve the experiment efficiency greatly and can be used for electromagnetic measurement in Tokamak experiment. (authors)

  14. EAST ion cyclotron resonance heating system for long pulse operation

    Zhao, Y.P. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhang, X.J., E-mail: xjzhang@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Mao, Y.Z.; Yuan, S.; Xue, D.Y.; Deng, X.; Wang, L.; Ju, S.Q.; Cheng, Y.; Qin, C.M.; Chen, G. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Lin, Y. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Li, J.G.; Wan, B.N.; Song, Y.T. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Braun, F. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kumazawa, R. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Wukitch, S. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Radio frequency (RF) power in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is one of the primary auxiliary heating techniques for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The ICRF system for EAST has been developed to support long-pulse high-β advanced tokamak fusion physics experiments. The ICRF system is capable of delivering 12 MW 1000-s RF power to the plasma through two antennas. The phasing between current straps of the antennas can be adjusted to optimize the RF power spectrum. The main technical features of the ICRF system are described. Each of the 8 ICRF transmitters has been successfully tested to 1.5 MW for a wide range of frequency (25–70 MHz) on a dummy load. Part of the ICRF system was in operation during the EAST 2012 spring experimental campaign and a maximum power of 800 kW (at 27 MHz) lasting for 30 s has been coupled for long pulse H mode operation.

  15. Long-pulse induction acceleration of heavy ions

    A long-pulse induction acceleration unit has been installed in the high-current Cs+ beam line at LBL and has accelerated heavy ions. A maximum energy gain of 250 keV for 1.5 μs is possible. The unit comprises 12 independent modules which may be used to synthesize a variety of waveforms by varying the triggering times of the low voltage trigger generators

  16. A digital long pulse integrator for EAST Tokamak

    Highlights: • This digital integrator is done in real time integration and data transmission. • Chopper technology and linear compensation is used for drift correction. • This integrator has achieved results of 411 s long pulse plasma discharge in 2012 EAST campaign. - Abstract: A digital integrator has been developed to be compatible with the long pulse plasma discharges on the Experimental Advanced Superconductor Tokamak (EAST), in which the induced signal is modulated by a chopper, and a field programmable gate array (FPGA) in the 16-bit digitizer is used to realize the digital integration in real time. After rectification and integration, the drift is almost linear and stable in controlled temperature, so a period of 50 s is used to determine the linear drift rate for drift compensation. The integration data can be directly transferred to the reflective memory (RFM) card, which is installed in the same PCI eXtensions for Instrumentation (PXI) chassis, so the data transmission can be also done in real time. The test results show that the real time data transmission rate is up to 10 kHz, the integration drift is typically less than 0.4 uVs/s and drift performance is a little worse in real long pulse discharge, which can be reduced further by using more precise data acquisition

  17. Aspects of long pulse commercial tokamak reactor design

    Possibilities of very long burn pulse operation in commercial tokamak reactors are analyzed. Long pulse operation could reduce or eliminate lifetime limits due to fatigue in the first wall, blanket and structural material and make the reactor more attractive from the standpoint of the electric utility. Very long pulse lengths can be achieved with tokamaks using inductive current drive if the major radius is increased to accomodate a large ohmic transformer. Illustrative design parameters have been developed for an Ultra-Long Pulse Tokamak Reactor (ULTR) with a pulse length of 24 hours. The principles developed for the 24 hour pulse length ULTR design have also been used in a scoping study for machines with shorter pulses. Parameters for a machine with a 4 hour pulse length are given. The ULTR design has an ohmic transformer which is optimized to satisfy the conflicting requirements of maximized OH drive and for reaction of the inward forces of the TF coil. The toroidal field magnet is completely modularized, with each coil in its own cryostat and shearing panels at room temperature. Analysis of effects of thermal fatigue on a representative first wall design has been performed. Windows of allowed operation have been found, limited by primary stress, swelling and fatigue. The analysis has been carried out for first walls made of stainless steel or vanadium

  18. Hysteresis and Frequency Tunability of Gyrotrons

    Dumbrajs, O.; Khutoryan, E. M.; Idehara, T.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first devoted theoretical and experimental study of the hysteresis phenomenon in relation to frequency tunability of gyrotrons. In addition, we generalize the theory describing electron tuning of frequency in gyrotrons developed earlier to arbitrary harmonics. It is found that theoretical magnetic and voltage hysteresis loops are about two times larger than experimental loops. In gyrotrons whose cavities have high quality factors, hysteresis allows one only little to broaden the frequency tunability range.

  19. Beta limits in long-pulse tokamak discharges

    Sauter, O.; La Haye, R.J.; Chang, Z.; Gates, D.A.; Kamada, Y.; Zohm, H.; Bondeson, A.; Boucher, D.; Callen, J.D.; Chu, M.S.; Gianakon, T.A.; Gruber, O.; Harvey, R.W.; Hegna, C.C.; Lao, L.L.; Monticello, D.A.; Perkins, F.; Pletzer, A.; Reiman, A.H.; Rosenbluth, M.; Strait, E.J.; Taylor, T.S.; Turnbull, A.D.; Waelbroeck, F.; Wesley, J.C.; Wilson, H.R.; Yoshino, R. [CRPP, Assoc. Euratom-Switzerland, PPB-Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)]|[ITER-JCT, 11025 N Torrey Pines Rd., La Jolla, California 92037 (United States)]|[General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)]|[Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)]|[UKAEA Fusion, Culham, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)]|[JAERI, Naka-machi, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 311-01 (Japan)]|[MIP fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany)]|[Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)]|[University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-16787 (United States)]|[CompX, 12839 Via Grimaldi, Del Mar, California 92014 (United States)]|[IFS, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The maximum normalized beta achieved in long-pulse tokamak discharges at low collisionality falls significantly below both that observed in short pulse discharges and that predicted by the ideal MHD theory. Recent long-pulse experiments, in particular those simulating the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [M. Rosenbluth {ital et al.}, {ital Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion} (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1995), Vol. 2, p. 517] scenarios with low collisionality {nu}{sub e{sup {asterisk}}}, are often limited by low-m/n nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. The effect of saturated MHD modes is a reduction of the confinement time by 10{percent}{endash}20{percent}, depending on the island size and location, and can lead to a disruption. Recent theories on neoclassical destabilization of tearing modes, including the effects of a perturbed helical bootstrap current, are successful in explaining the qualitative behavior of the resistive modes and recent results are consistent with the size of the saturated islands. Also, a strong correlation is observed between the onset of these low-m/n modes with sawteeth, edge localized modes (ELM), or fishbone events, consistent with the seed island required by the theory. We will focus on a quantitative comparison between both the conventional resistive and neoclassical theories, and the experimental results of several machines, which have all observed these low-m/n nonideal modes. This enables us to single out the key issues in projecting the long-pulse beta limits of ITER-size tokamaks and also to discuss possible plasma control methods that can increase the soft {beta} limit, decrease the seed perturbations, and/or diminish the effects on confinement. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. High-resolution processing of long-pulse-lidar data

    Gurdev, L. L.; Dreischuh, T. N.; Stoyanov, D. V.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the performance of the Fourier-deconvolution technique developed to improve the resolution of the long-pulse coherent lidar power profile, and to take into account the multiplicative fluctuations. The behavior of the error due to the power fluctuations and a method to reduce it are analyzed theoretically and simulated numerically. A processing of real data obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ground-based Doppler lidar is also presented. Similar problems were investigated using a different approach based on introducing a correction function to the lidar equation.

  1. Long-pulse microwave radiation from large plane diode victor

    The structure and the measuring arrangements of vircator with a large plane velvet cathode diode to induce long pulsed microwave radiation are given. The cathode-anode plasma closed velocity, the maximum pulse width of the microwave radiation, the microwave peak power and frequency are measured. It is shown that there exists physically restriction in this kind of flat diode vircator between radiation pulse width, radiation frequency and radiation power. It is pointed out that coaxial vircator will be a new way to get rid of such a restriction

  2. Free-electron masers vs. gyrotrons prospects for high-power sources at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    Thumm, M K

    2002-01-01

    The possible applications of high-power millimeter (mm) and sub-mm waves from free-electron masers (FEMs) and gyro-devices span a wide range of technologies. The plasma physics community has already taken advantage of recent advances in applying high-power mm waves generated by long pulse or continuous wave (CW) gyrotron oscillators and short pulse very high-power FEMs in the areas of RF-plasma production, heating, non-inductive current drive, plasma stabilization and active plasma diagnostics for magnetic confinement thermonuclear fusion research, such as electron cyclotron resonance heating (28-170 GHz), electron cyclotron current drive , collective Thomson scattering , microwave transmission and heat-wave propagation experiments. Continuously frequency tunable FEMs could widen these fields of applications. Another important application of CW gyrotrons is industrial materials processing, e.g. sintering of high-performance functional and structural nanostructured ceramics. Sub-mm wave sources are employed in...

  3. State-of-the-art of high power gyro-devices and free electron masers 1994

    At present, gyrotron oscillators are mainly used as high power millimeter wave sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and diagnostics of magnetically confined plasmas for generation of energy by controlled thermonuclear fusion. 140 GHz gyrotrons with output power Pout=0.54 MW, pulse length τ=3.0 s and efficiency η=42% are commercially available. Total efficiencies around 50% have been achieved using single-stage depressed collectors. Diagnostic gyrotrons deliver Pout=40 kW with τ=40 μs at frequencies up to 650 GHz (η≥4%). Recently, gyrotron oscillators have also been successfully used in material processing and plasma chemistry. Such technological applications require gyrotrons with the following parameters: f≥24 GHz, Pout=10-50 kW, CW, η≥30%. This paper reports on achievements and problems related to the development of very high power mm-wave gyrotrons for long pulse or CW operation and describes the microwave technological pecularities of the different development steps. In addition, this work gives a short overview of the present development of gyrotrons for technological applications, relativistic gyrotrons, quasi-optical gyrotrons, cyclotron autoresonance masers (CARMs), gyro klystrons, gyro-TWT amplifiers, gyrotwystron amplifiers, gyro-BWO's, peniotrons and free electron masers (FEMs). The most impressive FEM output parameters are: Pout=2 GW, τ=20 ns, η=13% at 140 GHz (LLNL) and Pout=15 kW, τ=20 μs, η=5% in the range from 120 to 900 GHz (UCSB). (orig.)

  4. Treatment of rosacea with long-pulsed Nd: YAG laser

    Ekin Meşe Say

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the face. There is no curative treatment for the disease. Facial flushing and vascular lesions due to rosacea may significantly affect a patient’s quality of life. Topical and oral antibiotics are not effective for treating rosacea. Currently, laser treatment of vascular lesions has been reported in the literature. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of long-pulse 1064-nm neodymium: YAG (Nd: YAG laser in the treatment of vascular lesions (erythema and telangiectasia in rosacea patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine patients (29 women, 10 men with erythematotelangiectatic rosacea (ETR were recruited into the study. Severity of the disease (ETR-score: 0-3 was assessed for all patients. We used long-pulsed Nd: YAG laser for vascular lesions at 3-4 weeks intervals. The face was divided into seven anatomic regions for evaluation. Assessment was made by comparing pretreatment and posttreatment photographs by using ETR-scores. For evaluating patient satisfaction, a scale of 0 to 3 was used. Results: The patients were divided into three groups according to the ETR scores [ETR-1 (n=12, ETR-2 (n=9, ETR-3 (n=18]. Following an average of 3.95 (2-8 sessions laser treatments, the clinical improvement was statistically significant in all groups (p<0.05. The mean reduction of ETR-score was 91.70% in patients with ETR-1 and. the clinical improvement was to be decreased in severe forms of ETR. The most common sites for the lesions were the malar region, ala nasi and the nasal dorsum, respectively. The lesions on the ala nasi were more recalcitrant to the treatment than those on the other areas. Regarding to physician assessment of treatment’s success, 97% of the patients was associated with moderate and excellent improvement. According to physicians’ assessment, excellent improvement was noticed in 43.58% and, 61.5% of patients reported a high degree of satisfaction with this

  5. Long-pulse FELs as sources of monochromatic radiation

    A strong competition among modes in a long-pulse FEL is shown to exist. Through that strong competition the dominant mode is able to suppress other modes which would otherwise be present. The theoretical analysis is based on a perturbation expansion of the transverse current driving the FEL, expanded in powers of the radiation field. The perturbation analysis was carried on in a way similar to the interaction representation treatment of quantum mechanics. To third order in the expansion the crossed saturation between modes is twice as strong as the self-saturation. Thus the intensity of the dominant mode decreases the gain of competing modes at a much faster rate than it decreases its own gain. The result is single mode operation. Besides discussing the self-saturation in a single mode situation, the mode stability problem is treated analytically for the case of the two competing neighboring modes. (orig.)

  6. High current precision long pulse electron beam position monitor

    Nelson, S D; Fessenden, T J; Holmes, C

    2000-01-01

    Precision high current long pulse electron beam position monitoring has typically experienced problems with high Q sensors, sensors damped to the point of lack of precision, or sensors that interact substantially with any beam halo thus obscuring the desired signal. As part of the effort to develop a multi-axis electron beam transport system using transverse electromagnetic stripline kicker technology, it is necessary to precisely determine the position and extent of long high energy beams for accurate beam position control (6 - 40 MeV, 1 - 4 kA, 2 μs beam pulse, sub millimeter beam position accuracy.) The kicker positioning system utilizes shot-to-shot adjustments for reduction of relatively slow (< 20 MHz) motion of the beam centroid. The electron beams passing through the diagnostic systems have the potential for large halo effects that tend to corrupt position measurements.

  7. Aspects of long pulse commercial tokamak reactor design

    Illustrative design parameters have been developed for an Ultra-Long Pulse Tokamak Reactor (ULTR) with a pulse length of 24 hours. The principles developed for the 24 hour pulse length ULTR design have also been used in a scoping study for machines with shorter pulses. Parameters for a machine with a 4 hour pulse length are given. The ULTR design has an ohmic transformer which is optimized to satisfy the conflicting requirements of maximized OH drive and for reaction of the inward forces of the TF coil. The toroidal field magnet is completely modularized, with each coil in its own cryostat and shearing panels at room temperature. Analysis of effects of thermal fatigue on a representative first wall design has been performed. Windows of allowed operation have been found, limited by primary stress, swelling and fatigue. The analysis has been carried out for first walls made of stainless steel or vanadium

  8. Options for neutron scattering instruments on long pulse neutron sources

    Instrumenttion on long pulse sources can be approached either by instruments from short pulse sources and hence using mainly inverted time of flight techniques or by adopting reactor type instruments and making use of the time dependence of the source flux to enhance their performance substantially. While the first approach requires more or less single use of a beam line by one instrument, the second one allows multiple use of neutron guides, as customary on reactors and hence can make much better use of the source with gains up to 100 for time of flight spectrometers. To a certain extent, the design parameters of the source depend on which of the two approaches is chosen. (author) 8 figs., 1 tab., 16 refs

  9. Web Based System Architecture for Long Pulse Remote Experimentation

    INDRA is the first Information Technology company in Spain and it presents here, through a series of transparencies, its own approach for the remote experimentation architecture for long pulses (REAL). All the architecture is based on Java-2 platform standards and REAL is a totally open architecture. By itself REAL offers significant advantages: -) access authentication and authorization under multiple security implementations, -) local or remote network access: LAN, WAN, VPN..., -) on-line access to acquisition systems for monitoring and configuration, -) scalability, flexibility, robustness, platform independence,.... The BeansNet implementation of REAL gives additional good things such as: -) easy implementation, -) graphical tool for service composition and configuration, -) availability and hot-swap (no need of stopping or restarting services after update or remodeling, and -) INDRA support. The implementation of BeansNet at the TJ-2 stellarator at Ciemat is presented. This document is made of the presentation transparencies. (A.C.)

  10. Physics design of an ultra-long pulsed tokamak reactor

    A pulsed tokamak reactor driven only by inductive current drive has recently revived, because the non-inductive current drive efficiency seems to be too low to realize a steady-state tokamak reactor with sufficiently high energy gain Q. Essential problems in pulsed operation mode is considered to be material fatigue due to cyclic operation and expensive energy storage system to keep continuous electric output during a dwell time. To overcome these problems, we have proposed an ultra-long pulsed tokamak reactor called IDLT (abbr. Inductively operated Day-Long Tokamak), which has the major and minor radii of 10 m and 1.87 m, respectively, sufficiently to ensure the burning period of about ten hours. Here we discuss physical features of inductively operated tokamak plasmas, employing the similar constraints with ITER CDA design for engineering issues. (author) 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Instrumentation system for long-pulse MFTF neutral beams

    The instrumentation system for long pulse neutral beams for MFTFS consists of monitoring and protective circuitry. Global synchronization of high speed monitoring data across twenty-four neutral beams is achieved via an experiment wide fiber optic timing system. Fiber optics are also used as a means of isolating signals at elevated voltages. An excess current monitor, interrupt monitor, sparkdown detector, spot detector and gradient grid ratio detector form the primary protection for the neutral beam source. A unique hierarchical interlocking scheme allows other protective devices to be factored into the shutdown circuitry of the power supply so that the initiating cause of a shutdown can be isolated and even allows some non-critical devices to be safely ignored for a period of time

  12. Commissioning a Megawatt-class Gyrotron with Collector Potential Depression

    Lohr, J.; Cengher, M.; Gorelov, Y. A.; Ponce, D.; Prater, R.

    2013-10-01

    A 110 GHz depressed collector gyrotron has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. The commissioning process rapidly achieved operation at full parameters, 45 A and 94 kV total voltage, with 29 kV depression. Although short pulse, 2 ms, factory testing demonstrated 1.2 MW at 41% electrical efficiency, long pulse testing at DIII-D achieved only 33% efficiency at full power parameters, for pulse lengths up to 10 s. Maximum generated power was ~950 kW, considerably below the 1.2 MW target. During attempts to increase the power at 5 s pulse length, it was noted that the collector cooling water was boiling. This led to the discovery that 14 of the 160 cooling channels in the collector had been blocked by braze material during manufacture of the tube. The locations of blocked channels were identified using infrared imaging of the outside of the collector during rapid changes in the cooling water temperature. Despite these difficulties, the rf beam itself was of very high quality and the stray rf found calorimetrically in the Matching Optics Unit, which couples the Gaussian rf beam to the waveguide, was only 2% of the generated power, about half that of our previous best quality high power beam. Details of the power measurements and collector observations will be presented. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  13. State-of-the-art of high power gyro-devices and free electron masers

    At present, gyrotron oscillators are mainly used as high power millimeter wave sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and diagnostics of magnetically confined plasmas for generation of energy by controlled thermonuclear fusion. 140 GHz gyrotrons with output power Pout = 0.58 MW, pulse length τ = 2.0 s and efficiency η = 34% are commercially available. Diagnostic gyrotrons deliver Pout = 40 kW with τ = 40 μs at frequencies up to 650 GHz (η ≥ 4%). Recently, gyrotron oscillators have also been successfully used in material processing and plasma chemistry. Such technological applications require gyrotrons with the following parameters: f ≥ 28 GHz, Pout = 10-30 kW, CW, η ≥ 30%. This paper reports on achievements and problems related to the development of very high power mm-wave gyrotrons for long pulse or CW operation and describes the microwave technological pecularities of the different development steps. In addition, this work gives a short overview of the present development of gyrotrons for technological applications, quasi-optical gyrotrons, cyclotron autoresonance masers (CARMs), gyro-klystrons, gyro-TWT amplifiers, gyro-BWO's and free electron masers (FEMs). The most impressive FEM output parameters are: Pout = 2 GW, τ = 20 ns, η = 13% at 140 GHz (LLNL) and Pout = 15 kW, τ = 20 μs, η = 5% in the range from 120 to 900 GHz (UCSB). (orig.)

  14. Analytic theory of the gyrotron

    An analytic theory is derived for a gyrotron operating in the linear gain regime. The gyrotron is a coherent source of microwave and millimeter wave radiation based on an electron beam emitting at cyclotron resonance Ω in a strong, uniform magnetic field. Relativistic equations of motion and first order perturbation theory are used. Results are obtained in both laboratory and normalized variables. An expression for cavity threshold gain is derived in the linear regime. An analytic expression for the electron phase angle in momentum space shows that the effect of the RF field is to form bunches that are equal to the unperturbed transit phase plus a correction term which varies as the sine of the input phase angle. The expression for the phase angle is plotted and bunching effects in and out of phase (0 and -π) with respect to the RF field are evident for detunings leading to gain and absorption, respectively. For exact resonance, field frequency ω = Ω, a bunch also forms at a phase of -π/2. This beam yields the same energy exchange with the RF field as an unbunched, (nonrelativistic) beam. 6 refs., 10 figs

  15. Recent Advances in the long pulse heating and current drive system for KSTAR

    The heating and current-drive systems of KSTAR tokamak have been developed to support long pulse, high β, advanced tokamak physics experiments. Key technologies relevant for high power and long-pulse operation are under development. Substantial progresses have been made in areas such as ion source, RF launchers, tuning components and high power supplies and they will make the advanced tokamak operation of the KSTAR be obtainable and maintained for long-pulse operating condition. (author)

  16. Gyrotrons for fusion. Status and prospects

    Gyrotrons are the most advanced high-power sources of millimeter wavelength radiation. They have been used for many years in electron-cyclotron-wave (ECW) systems of many existing fusion installations. Typically modern gyrotrons produce power of 0.5...0.8 MW in pulses of 2-3 seconds, or lower power in longer pulses (e.g. 300-400 kW in pulses up to 10-15 seconds). For the next generation of fusion installations, such as ITER or W7-X the ECW systems based on gyrotrons capable to produce 1MW/CW radiation are considered. Definitely, such gyrotrons with enhanced performance are very interesting also for the use also at existing installations

  17. 1 GJ long pulse control on Tore Supra

    Full text: With the goal of addressing the critical issue of long pulse steady-state operation of next fusion devices, the experimental programme of the Tore Supra has been devoted in 2003 to study simultaneously current profile control, heat removal capability and particle exhaust. This required both advanced technology integration and steady-state real time plasma control, obtained on Tore Supra with a complete set of measurements and actuators built around a shared memory network. Plasma position control was improved within a few millimetres range, taking in account small changes in the pick up coils temperature. Fully non inductive current drive, in a MHD stable regime, was maintained during more than 6 minutes, with the capability to recover from transient failures of the RF power (arcs in the wave-guides). Infrared imaging of the first wall, analysed in real time, shows a stable surface temperature, as more than 98% of the injected power was recovered in the cooling water loop. A world record of injected-extracted energy, exceeding 1 GJ, was obtained in this new powerful regime. (author)

  18. Complementarity of long pulse and short pulse spallation sources

    The complementarity of short pulse spallation sources (SPSS) and steady state (CW) reactors is a widely accepted concept. SPSS and long pulse spallation sources (LPSS) are complementary in two ways: a) in their performance in neutron scattering experiments LPSS closely emulate CW reactors. In this respect two facets of the time-of-flight (TOF) monochromator method adequate for LPSS will be discussed: the superiority of the TOF approach to the crystal monochromator method in high resolution powder diffraction, and the novel technique of repetition rate multiplication in TOF spectroscopy, b) LPSS combined with adequate chopper systems can also emulate SPSS in a number of applications. It will be shown that the LPSS method of producing short neutron pulses is more efficient for cold and thermal neutrons (below an energy of about 100 MeV), while SPSS is the more favourable approach for hot, epithermal neutrons, i.e. in the slowing down regime in contrast to the moderated regime. These two aspects of complementarity of LPSS and SPSS lead to the conclusions that for about 75% of the spectrum of neutron scattering experiments as known of today the LPSS approach is the most advantageous one with a feasible neutron intensity exceeding that available at ILL by a factor of about 30, while for the remaining 25% of applications the SPSS technique is superior with a well-known potential of a similar gain over present day performances. (author) 7 figs., 6 refs

  19. A new long-pulse data system for EAST experiments

    Highlights: • Slice storage mechanism on MDSplus has been adopted for the effective solutions to the continuous and quasi real-time data storage. • Using circular linked list method solves the speed mismatch between the network transmission and the MDSplus writing. • Using LVS (Linux Virtual server) load balance technology, the new system provides a safe, highly scalable and highly available network service for user to access data. - Abstract: A long pulse discharge requires high throughput data acquisition. As more physics diagnostics with high sampling rate are applied and the pulse length becomes longer, the original EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) data system no longer satisfies the requirements of real-time data storage and quick data access. A new system was established to integrate various data acquisition hardware and software for easy expansion and management of the system. Slice storage mechanism in MDSplus is now being used for the continuous and quasi real-time data storage. For every data acquisition thread and process, sufficient network bandwidth is ensured. Moreover, temporal digitized data is cached in computer memory in doubly linked circular lists to avoid the possible data loss by the occasional temporal storage or transfer jam. These data are in turn archived in MDSplus format by using slice storage mechanism called “segments”. For the quick access of the archived data to the users, multiple data servers are used. These data servers are linked using LVS (Linux Virtual server) load balance technology to provide a safe, highly scalable and available data service

  20. Long-pulse, high-power vircator experiments

    Coleman, P.D.; Aurand, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    An experiment designed to achieve long pulse virtual cathode oscillator (VCO) operation at approx. 700 MHz is described. Low frequency operation allowed operating at large A-K gaps and low current densities which facilitated the 800 ns pulsewidth operation. The VCO was configured in a 91 cm diameter drift tube and consisted of a 76 cm diameter planar cathode separated from an anode screen by an A-K gap that was varied from 5 to 10 cm. The diode was directly driven by a Marx generator with a resultant A-K voltage of 350 kV. Power was extracted axially from the cylindrical waveguide through a Lexan window. Application of a transverse magnetic field downstream of the virtual cathode swept the beam into the wall. This method of dumping the beam avoided plasma formation at the window and a resultant shortening of the radiated pulse. The frequency was observed to chirp from 600 to 800 MHz. The radiation pattern was measured by a seven element B-dot array located 2.4 m from the exit window. Comparison of these patterns to computer code predictions indicated a mix of TM/sub 0/exclamation and TM/sub 02/ modes.

  1. Web based system architecture for long pulse remote experimentation

    Remote experimentation (RE) methods will be essential in next generation fusion devices. Requirements for long pulse RE will be: on-line data visualization, on-line data acquisition processes monitoring and on-line data acquisition systems interactions (start, stop or set-up modifications). Note that these methods are not oriented to real-time control of fusion plant devices. INDRA Sistemas S.A., CIEMAT (Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas) and UPM (Universidad Politecnica de Madrid) have designed a specific software architecture for these purposes. The architecture can be supported on the BeansNet platform, whose integration with an application server provides an adequate solution to the requirements. BeansNet is a JINI based framework developed by INDRA, which makes easy the implementation of a remote experimentation model based on a Service Oriented Architecture. The new software architecture has been designed on the basis of the experience acquired in the development of an upgrade of the TJ-II remote experimentation system.

  2. Web Based System Architecture for Long Pulse Remote Experimentation

    Remote experimentation methods will be essential in next generation fusion devices. Requirements for long pulse operation will be the real-time visualization of data, the real-time monitoring of data acquisition processes and the real-time interaction with data acquisition systems (start, stop or set-up modifications). INDRA Sistemas S.A., CIEMAT and UPM (polytechnic university of Madrid) have designed a specific software architecture for these purposes. The architecture is based on the BeansNet platform, whose integration with an application server provides a proper solution to the requirements. BeansNet is a JINI based framework developed by INDRA, which makes easy the implementation of a remote participation model based on a Service Oriented Architecture. BeansNet and its interaction with the Messaging Services provides the users with the information acquired by real time acquisition systems, with no further delay than the derived from the information transmission over the network, depending on its bandwidth. The new software architecture has been designed based on the existing experience with the TJ-II remote experimentation system. In that case, different aspects of remote participation in experiments from distributed environments were addressed, as remote configuration of data acquisition systems or user authentication. The new design allows the required real-time interactions within a secure environment and with an easy system administration. (authors)

  3. A review on the sub-THz/THz gyrotrons

    Kumar, Nitin; Singh, Udaybir; Bera, Anirban; Sinha, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    A review on the sub-THz/THz gyrotrons is performed in this manuscript. The present development status of gyrotrons can be divided into three streams for the sake of better understanding: 1. low frequency (200 GHz) gyrotrons for various innovative applications. In this manuscript, the third stream of gyrotron development is reviewed. In last few decades several innovative applications are searched in sub-THz/THz band where the gyrotrons could be used as an efficient source of RF radiation. The applications of sub-THz/THz gyrotrons including the futuristic scope of the device are also discussed in this article. Further, several criticalities arise in the design and development when the gyrotron operation shifts toward the high frequency band. Various such design and technological challenges are also discussed here. Finally the development status of sub-THz/THz gyrotrons as per the use in various scientific and technological applications is also discussed.

  4. Development of 1 MW gyrotron and progress of ECH system for the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror in Tsukuba

    High power gyrotrons with TE4,2 cavity at 28 GHz and with TE18,6 cavity and a diamond window at 77 GHz have been developed for GAMMA 10 and LHD in the joint program of NIFS and University of Tsukuba. The maximum outputs of 570 kW at 28 GHz and 1.1 MW at 77 GHz were obtained corresponding to each design. The operations of more than 750 kW for 5 sec. and 810 kW for 3.5 sec. were achieved in the developing tubes at 77 GHz, which is the first high power-long pulse result of the 77 GHz tube. The experimental simulation of the effect of the stray RF in the 28 GHz tube indicates the stray RF is the one of the major causes limiting gyrotron performance. The output of more than 1 MW with 40% oscillation efficiency is expected from the design of the next 28 GHz gyrotron for GAMMA 10. Installation of the polarizer in the transmission line enhanced the performance of the ECH system in GAMMA 10, that is the first result which clearly showed ∼100% X mode excitation is a key to design the efficient fundamental ECH system of strong field side injection in mirror devices. (author)

  5. Theory and Practice in ICRF Antennas for Long Pulse Operation

    Long plasma discharges on the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak were extended in 2004 towards higher powers and plasma densities by combined Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) waves. RF pulses of 20 s x 8 MW and 60 s x 4 MW were produced. TS is equipped with 3 ICRF antennas, whose front faces are ready for CW operation. This paper reports on their behaviour over high power long pulses, as observed with infrared (IR) thermography and calorimetric measurements. Edge parasitic losses, although modest, are concentrated on a small surface and can raise surface temperatures close to operational limits. A complex hot spot pattern was revealed with at least 3 physical processes involved: convected power, electron acceleration in the LH near field, and a RF-specific phenomenon compatible with RF sheaths. LH coupling was also perturbed in the antenna shadow. This was attributed to RF-induced DC ExB0 convection. This motivated sheath modelling in two directions. First, the 2D topology of RF potentials was investigated in relation with the RF current distribution over the antenna, via a Green's function formalism and full-wave calculation using the ICANT code. In front of phased arrays of straps, convective cells were interpreted using the RF current profiles of strip line theory. Another class of convective cells, specific to antenna box corners, was evidenced for the first time. Within 1D sheath models assuming independent flux tubes, RF and rectified DC potentials are proportional. 2D fluid models couple nearby flux tubes via transverse polarisation currents. Unexpectedly this does not necessarily smooth RF potential maps. Peak DC potentials can even be enhanced. The experience gained on TS and the numerical tools are valuable for designing steady state high power antennas for next step devices. General rules to reduce RF potentials as well as concrete design options are discussed. (authors)

  6. Upgrade Of The TH1506B 118 GHz Gyrotron Using Modeing Tools

    The first TH1506B prototype showing problems of overheating and spurious oscillations, a new modified gyrotron was built. During the tests, the extwo peaks, which was never predicted by simulations. Various low evel tests were performed on the mode converter with different shapes for the launcher but without real improvement. Besides measurements, the use of a new software Surf3D[l] showed that the problem mainly comes from the 3rd mirror whose curvature is too high and not well taken nto account by the calculation. This analysis software is based on ntegral equations and the complete 3D modelling alowed to determine a new profile for the 3rd mirror. An aluminium model of a new mirror was manufactured and thorough low level tests made at FZK showed that there was no double peak.The next step would consist in building a gyrotron based on this new design, to confirm the simulation and to valdate it for long pulses

  7. Effect of ion compensation of the beam space charge on gyrotron operation

    In gyrotrons, the coherent radiation of electromagnetic waves takes place when the cyclotron resonance condition between the wave frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency or its harmonic holds. The voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field changes the relativistic cyclotron frequency and, hence, can play an important role in the beam-wave interaction process. In long pulse and continuous-wave regimes, the beam space charge field can be partially compensated by the ions, which appear due to the beam impact ionization of neutral molecules of residual gases in the interaction space. In the present paper, the role of this ion compensation of the beam space charge on the interaction efficiency is analyzed. We also analyze the effect of the electron velocity spread on the limiting currents and discuss some effects restricting the ion-to-beam electron density ratio in the saturation stage. It is shown that the effect of the ion compensation on the voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field can cause significant changes in the efficiency of gyrotron operation and, in some cases, even result in the break of oscillations

  8. Effect of ion compensation of the beam space charge on gyrotron operation

    Fokin, A. P.; Glyavin, M. Yu. [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Nusinovich, G. S. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-3511 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    In gyrotrons, the coherent radiation of electromagnetic waves takes place when the cyclotron resonance condition between the wave frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency or its harmonic holds. The voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field changes the relativistic cyclotron frequency and, hence, can play an important role in the beam-wave interaction process. In long pulse and continuous-wave regimes, the beam space charge field can be partially compensated by the ions, which appear due to the beam impact ionization of neutral molecules of residual gases in the interaction space. In the present paper, the role of this ion compensation of the beam space charge on the interaction efficiency is analyzed. We also analyze the effect of the electron velocity spread on the limiting currents and discuss some effects restricting the ion-to-beam electron density ratio in the saturation stage. It is shown that the effect of the ion compensation on the voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field can cause significant changes in the efficiency of gyrotron operation and, in some cases, even result in the break of oscillations.

  9. Effect of ion compensation of the beam space charge on gyrotron operation

    Fokin, A. P.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2015-04-01

    In gyrotrons, the coherent radiation of electromagnetic waves takes place when the cyclotron resonance condition between the wave frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency or its harmonic holds. The voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field changes the relativistic cyclotron frequency and, hence, can play an important role in the beam-wave interaction process. In long pulse and continuous-wave regimes, the beam space charge field can be partially compensated by the ions, which appear due to the beam impact ionization of neutral molecules of residual gases in the interaction space. In the present paper, the role of this ion compensation of the beam space charge on the interaction efficiency is analyzed. We also analyze the effect of the electron velocity spread on the limiting currents and discuss some effects restricting the ion-to-beam electron density ratio in the saturation stage. It is shown that the effect of the ion compensation on the voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field can cause significant changes in the efficiency of gyrotron operation and, in some cases, even result in the break of oscillations.

  10. The 110 GHz Gyrotron System on DIII-D: Gyrotron Tests and Physics Results

    The DIII-D tokamak has installed a system with three gyrotrons at the 1 MW level operating at 110 GHz. Physics experiments on electron cyclotron current drive, heating, and transport have been performed. Good efficiency has been achieved both for on-axis and off-axis current drive with relevance for control of the current density profile leading to advanced regimes of tokamak operation, although there is a difference between off-axis ECCD efficiency inside and outside the magnetic axis. Heating efficiency is excellent and electron temperatures up to 10 keV have been achieved. The gyrotron system is versatile, with poloidal scan and control of the polarization of the injected rf beam. Phase correcting mirrors form a Gaussian beam and focus it into the waveguide. Both perpendicular and oblique launch into the tokamak have been used. Three different gyrotron designs are installed and therefore unique problems specific to each have been encountered, including parasitic oscillations, mode hops during modulation and polarization control problems. Two of the gyrotrons suffered damage during operations, one due to filament failure and one due to a vacuum leak. The repairs and subsequent testing will be described. The transmission system uses evacuated, windowless waveguide and the three gyrotrons have output windows of three different materials. One gyrotron uses a diamond window and generates a Gaussian beam directly. The development of the system and specific tests and results from each of the gyrotrons will be presented. The DIII-D project has committed to an upgrade of the system, which will add three gyrotrons in the 1 MW class, all using diamond output windows, to permit operation at up to ten seconds per pulse at one megawatt output for each gyrotron

  11. Linear theory of frequency pulling in gyrotrons

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Luo, Li; Liu, Pu-kun

    2016-05-01

    The effect of the electron beam on the gyrotron operating frequency (the frequency pulling) is studied analytically in the framework of the linear (or small-signal) theory. The theory is applicable for gyrotrons operating at any cyclotron harmonics and in modes with arbitrary axial structures. The present consideration is limited to cases of operation at the fundamental cyclotron resonance and the second harmonic; also two specific axial profiles of the resonator modes are analyzed: the constant and the sinusoidal distributions. In the case of the sinusoidal distribution, we considered the operation in modes with one, two, and three axial variations. It is shown how to use the theory developed for analyzing the frequency tunability due to the frequency pulling effect in a gyrotron with specified parameters of the electron beam.

  12. Compact, harmonic multiplying gyrotron amplifiers

    Guo, H.Z.; Granatstein, V.L.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Levush, B.; Tate, J.; Chen, S.H. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Inst. for Plasma Research

    1995-12-31

    A compact, harmonic multiplying gyrotron traveling wave amplifier is being developed. The device is a three-stage tube with the output section running as a fourth harmonic gyro-TWT, the input section running as a fundamental gyro-TWT, and the middle operating at the second harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. Radiation is suppressed by servers between the sections. The operating beam of the tube is produced by a magnetron injection gun (MIG). A TE{sub 0n} mode selective interaction circuit consisting of mode converters and a filter waveguide is employed for both input and output sections to solve the mode competition problem, which is pervasive in gyro-TWT operation. The input section has an input coupler designed as a TE{sub 0n} mode launcher. It excites a signal at the fundamental cyclotron frequency (17.5 GHz), which is amplified in the first TWT interaction region. So far the device is similar to a two-stage harmonic gyro-TWT. The distinction is that in the three-stage device the second section will be optimized not for output power but for fourth harmonic bunching of the beam. A gyroklystron amplifier has also been designed. The configuration is similar to the gyro-TWT but with the traveling wave interaction structures replaced by mode selective special complex cavities. Cold test results of the wideband input coupler and the TE{sub 0n} mode selective interaction circuit have been obtained.

  13. Long pulse discharges on the HT-7 tokamak

    =120-180 kA, Bt=1.5-2.0 T, Te(0)=2-4 keV, and e>=1.0-2.5 x 1019 m-3) had been achieved with a duration of more than 10 s. For lower performance operation (Ip=55 kA, Te(0)=0.5 - 1.0 keV, and a central density ne0=0.5-1.0 x 1019 m-3), a reproducible long pulse discharge with the operational pulse length up to 240 seconds was sustained by the LHCD (<200 kW) on the HT-7. (author)

  14. Reliability of High Power Laser Diode Arrays Operating in Long Pulse Mode

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Baker, Nathaniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Reliability and lifetime of quasi-CW laser diode arrays are greatly influenced by their thermal characteristics. This paper examines the thermal properties of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse duration regime.

  15. Investigation of long pulse laser induced flame on Al in air using optical interferometry

    Zhang, Hongchao; Lu, Jian; Shen, Zhonghua; Ni, Xiaowu

    2013-05-01

    The process of long pulse laser(1ms) interaction with the aluminum plate was analyzed using Mach-Zehnder interferometer in this paper. A continuous semiconductor laser with about 50mW power and 532nm wavelength was used to detect the flame which induced by long pulse laser interaction with the aluminum plate. A high speed camera was used to capture the interferograms. The exposure time of the high speed camera is about 2 microseconds. And the frame rate is 2130fps. The high-speed camera and the long pulse laser pulse was synchronously controlled by the four-channel digital delay (Stanford Research Systems DG535).The FFT(Fast Fourier transform ) analysis is applied to extract the phase of the interferograms. The results provide an understanding of the process of long pulse laser drilling of the Al target.

  16. Simulation calculation of 24kV long pulse TESLA modulator

    TAO Xiao-Ping; Stefan CHOROBA

    2004-01-01

    A 24 kV long pulse modulator is designed for DESY's TESLA Test Facility (TIF). This modulator,with a 120 kV, 1.7 ms width pulse output, is used to drive a Thomson TH1801 multibeam klystron. In order to make waveform flatness of the klystron voltage less than ±0.5%, it is necessary to use a bouncer circuit. This paper gives the Pspice simulation results of the 24 kV long pulse TESLA modulator.

  17. Long-pulsed dye laser versus long-pulsed dye laser-assisted photodynamic therapy for acne vulgaris: A randomized controlled trial

    Haedersdal, M.; Togsverd, K.; Wiegell, S.R.;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Long-pulsed dye laser (LPDL)-assisted photodynamic therapy has been suggested to be superior to laser alone for acne vulgaris but no evidence is available. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of LPDL alone versus LPDL in photodynamic therapy with methylaminolevulinic acid...

  18. Electron beam instabilities in gyrotron beam tunnels

    Electron beam instabilities occurring in a gyrotron electron beam can induce an energy spread which might significantly deteriorate the gyrotron efficiency. Three types of instabilities are considered to explain the important discrepancy found between the theoretical and experimental efficiency in the case of quasi-optical gyrotrons (QOG): the electron cyclotron maser instability, the Bernstein instability and the Langmuir instability. The low magnetic field gradient in drift tubes of QOG makes that the electron cyclotron maser instability can develop in the drift tube at very low electron beam currents. Experimental measurements show that with a proper choice of absorbing structures in the beam tunnel, this instability can be suppressed. At high beam currents, the electrostatic Bernstein instability can induce a significant energy spread at the entrance of the interaction region. The induced energy spread scales approximately linearly with the electron beam density and for QOG one observes that the beam density is significantly higher than the beam density of an equivalent cylindrical cavity gyrotron. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  19. Recent achievements on tests of series gyrotrons for W7-X and planned extension at the KIT gyrotron test facility

    Schmid, M., E-mail: martin.schmid@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM) (Germany); Choudhury, A. Roy; Dammertz, G. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM) (Germany); Erckmann, V. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysics, Association EURATOM-IPP, Greifswald (Germany); Gantenbein, G.; Illy, S. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM) (Germany); Jelonnek, J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM) (Germany); Institute of High Frequency Techniques and Electronics (IHE) (Germany); Kern, S. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM) (Germany); Legrand, F. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Thales Electron Devices, Vélicy (France); Rzesnicki, T.; Samartsev, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM) (Germany); Schlaich, A.; Thumm, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM) (Germany); Institute of High Frequency Techniques and Electronics (IHE) (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Solution found to suppress parasitic beam tunnel oscillations on high power gyrotrons. ► Electron beam sweeping technique to avoid plastic deformation on collector of high power gyrotrons. ► Ongoing investigations on limitations of gyrotron efficiency. ► Upgrade of 10 MW CW modulator for gyrotrons with multistage depressed collectors. -- Abstract: Parasitic beam tunnel oscillations have been hampering the series production of gyrotrons for W7-X. This problem has now been overcome thanks to the introduction of a specially corrugated beam tunnel. Two gyrotrons equipped with the new beam tunnel have fully passed the acceptance tests. Despite excellent power capability, the expected efficiency has not yet been achieved, possibly due to the presence of parasitic oscillations suspected to be dynamic after-cavity-oscillations (ACI's) or due to insufficient electron beam quality. Both theoretical and experimental investigations on these topics are ongoing. On previous W7-X gyrotrons collector fatigue has been observed, not (yet) leading to any failures so far. The plastic deformation occurring on the collector has now been eliminated due to the strict use (on all gyrotrons) of a sweeping method which combines the conventional 7 Hz solenoid sweeping technique with a 50 Hz transverse-field sweep system. Starting in 2013, the gyrotron test facility at KIT will be enhanced, chiefly with a new 10 MW DC modulator, capable of testing gyrotrons up to 4 MW CW output power with multi-stage-depressed collectors.

  20. Recent achievements on tests of series gyrotrons for W7-X and planned extension at the KIT gyrotron test facility

    Highlights: ► Solution found to suppress parasitic beam tunnel oscillations on high power gyrotrons. ► Electron beam sweeping technique to avoid plastic deformation on collector of high power gyrotrons. ► Ongoing investigations on limitations of gyrotron efficiency. ► Upgrade of 10 MW CW modulator for gyrotrons with multistage depressed collectors. -- Abstract: Parasitic beam tunnel oscillations have been hampering the series production of gyrotrons for W7-X. This problem has now been overcome thanks to the introduction of a specially corrugated beam tunnel. Two gyrotrons equipped with the new beam tunnel have fully passed the acceptance tests. Despite excellent power capability, the expected efficiency has not yet been achieved, possibly due to the presence of parasitic oscillations suspected to be dynamic after-cavity-oscillations (ACI's) or due to insufficient electron beam quality. Both theoretical and experimental investigations on these topics are ongoing. On previous W7-X gyrotrons collector fatigue has been observed, not (yet) leading to any failures so far. The plastic deformation occurring on the collector has now been eliminated due to the strict use (on all gyrotrons) of a sweeping method which combines the conventional 7 Hz solenoid sweeping technique with a 50 Hz transverse-field sweep system. Starting in 2013, the gyrotron test facility at KIT will be enhanced, chiefly with a new 10 MW DC modulator, capable of testing gyrotrons up to 4 MW CW output power with multi-stage-depressed collectors

  1. 100 GHz, 1 MW, CW gyrotron study program. Final report

    The results of a study program to investigate the feasibility of various approaches in designing a 100 GHz, 1 MW CW gyrotron are presented. A summary is given of the possible configurations for a high average power, high frequency gyrotron, including an historical survey of experimental results which are relevant to the various approaches. A set of basic scaling considerations which enable qualitative comparisons between particular gyrotron interaction circuits is presented. These calculations are important in understanding the role of various electron beam and circuit parameters in achieving a viable gyrotron design. Following these scaling exercises, a series of design calculations is presented for a possible approach in achieving 100 GHz, 1 MW CW. These calculations include analyses of the electron gun and interaction circuit parts of the gyrotron, and a general analysis of other aspects of a high average power, high frequency gyrotron. Scalability of important aspects of the design to other frequencies is also discussed, as well as key technology issues

  2. Gyrotron electromagnetic wiggler for a compact free electron laser

    We have demonstrated a novel, high power (≥1 MW), short wavelength (2 mm) gyrotron electromagnetic (GEM) wiggler for use in a compact free electron laser (FEL). The gyrotron consisted of an electron gun and resonator section followed by a special high Q cavity for storing the power created in the gyrotron resonator. The electromagnetic field stored in the high Q cavity would then be appropriate for use as a wiggler field in an infrared or visible FEL with a moderate energy (4 to 10 MeV) electron beam. The gyrotron experiment tested the practical limits due to ohmic loss, mode conversion, etc. on the strength of such a stored field. It also tested the effect of strong feedback from the high Q cavity back onto the gyrotron resonator. The proposed research utilized the technology of high power, high frequency gyrotrons developed at M.I.T. as part of the Department of Energy program on development of sources for plasma heating

  3. High harmonic terahertz confocal gyrotron with nonuniform electron beam

    Fu, Wenjie; Guan, Xiaotong; Yan, Yang [THz Research Center, School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The harmonic confocal gyrotron with nonuniform electron beam is proposed in this paper in order to develop compact and high power terahertz radiation source. A 0.56 THz third harmonic confocal gyrotron with a dual arc section nonuniform electron beam has been designed and investigated. The studies show that confocal cavity has extremely low mode density, and has great advantage to operate at high harmonic. Nonuniform electron beam is an approach to improve output power and interaction efficiency of confocal gyrotron. A dual arc beam magnetron injection gun for designed confocal gyrotron has been developed and presented in this paper.

  4. High harmonic terahertz confocal gyrotron with nonuniform electron beam

    The harmonic confocal gyrotron with nonuniform electron beam is proposed in this paper in order to develop compact and high power terahertz radiation source. A 0.56 THz third harmonic confocal gyrotron with a dual arc section nonuniform electron beam has been designed and investigated. The studies show that confocal cavity has extremely low mode density, and has great advantage to operate at high harmonic. Nonuniform electron beam is an approach to improve output power and interaction efficiency of confocal gyrotron. A dual arc beam magnetron injection gun for designed confocal gyrotron has been developed and presented in this paper

  5. 28 GHz Gyrotron ECRH Upgrade for LDX

    Michael, P. C.; Woskov, P. P.; Ellsworth, J. L.; Kesner, J.; Garnier, D. T.; Mauel, M. E.; Ellis, R. F.

    2009-11-01

    A 10 kW, CW, 28 GHz gyrotron is being implemented on LDX to increase the plasma density and to more fully explore the potential of high beta plasma stability in a dipole magnetic configuration. Higher density increases the heating of ions by thermal equilibration and allows for improved wave propagation in planned ICRF experiments. This represents over a 50% increase in the 17 kW ECRH from sources at 2.45, 6.4, and 10.5 GHz. The higher frequency will also make possible access to plasma densities of up to 10^13 cm-3. The 1 Tesla resonances are located above and below the floating coil near the dipole axial region. The gyrotron beam will be transmitted in TE01 mode in 32.5 mm diameter guide using one 90 bend and a short Tesla resonance region. A layout of the planned system will be presented.

  6. Performance of long-pulse source reference target-moderator-reflector configurations

    We have calculated the performance of five similar target-moderator-reflector geometries that are reasonably well optimized for long-pulse source applications. For all cases, the moderators are fully coupled; that is, no poisons, decouplers, or liner are used. For each case, the energy- and time-dependent characteristics of the moderator source brightness have been parameterized using empirical functions. These parameterizations have been made available to users of the Monte Carlo neutron scattering instrument design code MCLIB for use in evaluating the performance of neutron scattering instruments on a long-pulse source. (author) 7 figs., 2 tabs., 5 refs

  7. New Edge Coherent Mode Providing Continuous Transport in Long-Pulse H-mode Plasmas

    Wang, H. Q.; Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Ding, S. Y.; Guo, H. Y.; Shao, L. M.; Liu, S. C.; Xu, X. Q.; Wang, E.; Yan, N.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A. H.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Candy, J.; Bravenec, R.; Sun, Y. W.; Shi, T. H.; Liang, Y. F.; Chen, R.; Zhang, W.; Wang, L.; Chen, L.; Zhao, N.; Li, Y. L.; Liu, Y. L.; Hu, G. H.; Gong, X. Z.

    2014-05-01

    An electrostatic coherent mode near the electron diamagnetic frequency (20-90 kHz) is observed in the steep-gradient pedestal region of long pulse H-mode plasmas in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak, using a newly developed dual gas-puff-imaging system and diamond-coated reciprocating probes. The mode propagates in the electron diamagnetic direction in the plasma frame with poloidal wavelength of ˜8 cm. The mode drives a significant outflow of particles and heat as measured directly with the probes, thus greatly facilitating long pulse H-mode sustainment. This mode shows the nature of dissipative trapped electron mode, as evidenced by gyrokinetic turbulence simulations.

  8. Development of an ion source for long-pulse (30-s) neutral beam injection

    Menon, M.M.; Barber, G.C.; Blue, C.W.; Dagenhart, W.K.; Gardner, W.L.; Haselton, H.H.; Moeller, J.A.; Ponte, N.S.; Ryan, P.M.; Schecter, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a long-pulse positive ion source that has been designed to provide high brightness deuterium beams (divergence approx. = 0.25/sup 0/ rms, current density approx. = 0.15 A cm/sup -2/) of 40 to 45 A, at a beam energy of 80 keV, for pulse lengths up to 30 s. The design and construction of the ion source components are described with particular emphasis placed on the long-pulse cathode assembly and ion accelerator.

  9. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays Operating in Long Pulse Mode

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Baker, Nathaniel R.

    2006-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data of the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  10. The performance of neutron spectrometers AR a long-pulse spallation source

    At a recent workshop at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory members of the international neutron scattering community discussed the performance to be anticipated from neutron scattering instruments installed at a 1 MW long-pulse spallation source (LPSS). Although the report of this workshop is long, its principal conclusions can be easily summarised and almost as easily understood. This article presents such a synthesis for a 60 Hz LPSS with 1 msec proton pulses. We discuss some of the limitations of the workshop conclusions and suggest a simple analysis of the performance differences that might be expected between short- and long-pulse sources both of which exploit coupled moderators

  11. Design of Single disc RF window for High Power Gyrotron

    In this paper investigates the design of water edge cooled single-disc CVD-diamond window for 120 GHz, 1MW gyrotron. The design of RF window for 120 GHz, 1MW gyrotron has been carried out using the CST microwave studio. In 120 GHz gyrotron single disc of diameter 90 mm and thickness 2.0 mm CVD diamond window has been used in the simulation. The return loss (S11) and transmission loss (S21) of the 120 GHz gyrotron window have been found - 40.0 dB and -0.02 dB respectively. Thermal analysis of single disc rf window has also been carried out using ANSYS software for high power 120 GHz gyrotron. The temperature range on the disc surface has been found to be 100 °C - 300 ° C.

  12. The characteristic and application of triggered vacuum gap in long pulse discharging system

    An experiment shows that the triggered vacuum gap is cut off when the current and the rate of current in the gap are less than certain values, and that the cutting off current is about 10 A, with the cutting off rate about 6 x 108 A/s. The application of triggered vacuum gap in long pulse discharging system is also discussed

  13. New Edge Coherent Mode Providing Continuous Transport in Long Pulse H-mode Plasmas

    Wang, H.Q.; Xu, G.S.; Wan, B.N.;

    2014-01-01

    An electrostatic coherent mode near the electron diamagnetic frequency (20–90 kHz) is observed in the steep-gradient pedestal region of long pulse H-mode plasmas in the Experimental Advanced Super-conducting Tokamak, using a newly developed dual gas-puff-imaging system and diamond-coated reciproc...

  14. Design of long pulse heating systems for doublet III-D

    Replacement of the Doublet III vacuum vessel by a large dee-shaped vessel is now in progress. Multisecond auxiliary heating will be needed to reach peak plasma parameters. Plans for modifying the existing neutral beam injection system to a 5 s capability and for a new, high power, long pulse ion cyclotron heating system are described

  15. Design of long pulse heating systems for Doublet III-D

    Replacement of the Doublet III vacuum vessel by a large dee-shaped vessel is now in progress. Multisecond auxiliary heating will be needed to reach peak plasma parameters. Plans for modifying the existing neutral beam injection system to a 5 s capability and for a new, high power, long pulse ion cyclotron heating system are described

  16. ECH system and its application to long pulse discharge in large helical device

    We have developed and constructed an ECH system for the large helical device (LHD). The ECH system consists of 0.5 MW, 84 GHz range and 168 GHz gyrotrons, high voltage power supplies, long distance transmission lines, and in-vessel quasi-optical antennas. It has been improved step by step. At the third campaign of LHD experiments, three 84 GHz range (two 82.6 GHz and one 84 GHz) and three 168 GHz gyrotrons are operated and ECH power can be injected from four antennas vertically and two horizontally. This complicated system is remotely controlled and monitored by fully GUI (Graphical User Interface) control panels realized on PC via TCP (transmission control protocol) communication. Over 10000 shots of gyrotron power have been injected steadily into the LHD during the experimental campaigns on this system. One line of the system (84 GHz line) is specially prepared for the experiments of steady state plasma production. Using this line, plasma sustainment for 2 min was successfully achieved by only ECH power. Injected ECH power was 50 kW with 95% duty factor. The electron density and temperature of the sustained plasma are measured to be 0.3-0.5x1018 m-3 and ∼650 eV. Ion temperature measured by Doppler broadening of the impurity radiation line was kept constant at ∼300 eV during RF injection

  17. A high-order particle-in-cell method for low density plasma flow and the simulation of gyrotron resonator devices

    of its huge computational demand and the thereby resulting long calculation time. Using the presented high-order discontinuous Galerkin Particle-in-Cell scheme on high-performance-computers, this thesis demonstrates for the first time that full-wave and transient research- and design-simulations of gyrotron resonators with high mode-indices can be efficiently performed. For benchmark issues the developed discontinuous Galerkin Particle-in-Cell scheme is verified with a 30 GHz resonant cavity and the results are compared to the SELFT code, which is a state-of-the-art design code for resonators. The discontinuous Galerkin Particle-in-Cell scheme is used to simulate the resonator of the 1 MW, 140 GHz, TE(28,8)-mode gyrotron, used for plasma heating of the Wendelstein 7-X fusion-reactor. Due to the huge number of degrees of freedom and particles, this type of simulation can only be performed on high-performance-computers with enough memory and computational power. Hence, the discontinuous Galerkin Particle-in-Cell code is improved by a new parallelization approach for the high-order shape-function deposition method on unstructured grids, allowing for a high-order coupling between the particles and the electromagnetic field. To further improve the discontinuous Galerkin Particle-in-Cell code, a multi-rate time-stepping method, based on an Adams-Bashforth approach, for the hyperbolic divergence cleaning is developed and verified. This new approach considers the different time scales occurring in the hyperbolic divergence cleaning allowing for a more efficient time-stepping-algorithm then standard time-stepping-schemes. A rule for the construction of arbitrary-order multi-rate time-stepping methods has been derived. The presented simulations provide new physical insights to the complex particle-field-interaction appearing in gyrotrons. The discontinuous Galerkin Particle-in-Cell scheme can be used to analyse transient phenomena, such as beam-miss-alignment, mode competition

  18. Long-pulsed dye laser vs. intense pulsed light for the treatment of facial telangiectasias: a randomized controlled trial

    Nymann, Peter; Hedelund, Lene; Haedersdal, M

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to compare the efficacy and adverse effects of long-pulsed dye laser (LPDL) and intense pulsed light (IPL) in the treatment of facial telangiectasias.......This study aims to compare the efficacy and adverse effects of long-pulsed dye laser (LPDL) and intense pulsed light (IPL) in the treatment of facial telangiectasias....

  19. Feasibility of a dual regime gyrotron

    The design concept of a 42/84 GHz, 500 kW, CW, dual-regime gyrotron for ECRH of plasma in an experimental Tokamak will be presented in this paper. Operation at 42 GHz is fundamental where as that in 84 GHz will be second harmonic so that a similar guidance system will be retained for dual regime operation. In this paper, the mode competition and mode selection procedures are presented for such a dual regime operation. Cold cavity design and self-consistent calculations will be carried out for power and efficiencies. (author)

  20. Development of submillimeter wave source Gyrotron FU Series for plasma diagnostics

    Our gyrotrons developed in Fukui University (FU), Research Center for Development of Far Infrared Region are high frequency, medium power gyrotrons and are used as millimeter to submillimeter wave radiation sources for application to new far-infrared technologies including plasma diagnostics. We have already developed Gyrotron FU Series which consists of 8 gyrotrons. The gyrotron series has achieved frequency tunability in wide range (from 38 GHz to 889 GHz). The highest frequency is corresponding to a wavelength of 337 μm. This is a current record for high frequency operation of gyrotron. Recently, we have developed a high harmonic gyrotron with an axis-encircling electron beam and a THz gyrotron with a pulse magnet. In this presentation, the present status of Gyrotron FU Series is described. (authors)

  1. The Effects of Long Pulse Durations and Radiation Damping in Selective Inversion Recovery Experiments

    Ginn, John S

    2014-01-01

    Long pulse durations necessary in selective inversion recovery (SIR) experiments along with radiation damping (RD) introduce difficulties in quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, such as those that allow for the determination of a sample's characteristics, including the rates that govern magnetization transfer. Because of these influences, the assumption of perfect inversion is invalid. In this work, we present data that demonstrates that long pulse durations as well as RD cause difficulties in SIR experiments performed on simple one-spin systems, indicating that they will be problematic for multiple-spin systems as well. These results emphasize the importance of understanding the evolution of magnetization for all time points throughout an experiment used in quantitative NMR measurements. Furthermore, experimental parameters must be chosen carefully and understood completely.

  2. The performance of neutron spectrometers at a long-pulse spallation source

    At a recent workshop at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, members of the international neutron scattering community discussed the performance to be anticipated from neutron scattering instruments installed at a 1 MW long-pulse spallation source (LPSS). Also the report of this workshop is long, its principal conclusions can be easily summarised and almost as easily understood. This article presents such a synthesis for a 60 Hz LPSS with 1 msec proton pulses. We discuss some of the limitation of the workshop conclusions and suggest a simple analysis of the performance differences that might be expected between short- and long-pulse sources both of which exploit coupled moderators. (author) 5 figs., 1 tab., 5 refs

  3. Initial operation of high power ICRF system for long pulse in EAST

    The ICRF heating system on EAST upgraded by active cooling aims for long pulse operation. In this paper, the main technical features of the ICRF system are described. One of a major challenges for long pulse operation is RF-edge interactions induced impurity production and heat loading. In EAST, ICRF antenna protections and Faraday screen bars damaged due to LH electron beam are found. Preliminary results for the analysis of the interaction between LHCD and ICRF antenna are discussed. Increase of metal impurities in the plasma during RF pulse and in a larger core radiation are also shown. These RF-edge interactions at EAST and some preliminary results for the optimizing RF performance will be presented

  4. Initial operation of high power ICRF system for long pulse in EAST

    Qin, C. M., E-mail: chmq@ipp.ac.cn; Zhao, Y. P.; Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Mao, Y. Z.; Yuan, S.; Chen, G. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2015-12-10

    The ICRF heating system on EAST upgraded by active cooling aims for long pulse operation. In this paper, the main technical features of the ICRF system are described. One of a major challenges for long pulse operation is RF-edge interactions induced impurity production and heat loading. In EAST, ICRF antenna protections and Faraday screen bars damaged due to LH electron beam are found. Preliminary results for the analysis of the interaction between LHCD and ICRF antenna are discussed. Increase of metal impurities in the plasma during RF pulse and in a larger core radiation are also shown. These RF-edge interactions at EAST and some preliminary results for the optimizing RF performance will be presented.

  5. 28 GHz Gyrotron ECRH on LDX

    Woskov, P. P.; Kesner, J.; Michael, P. C.; Garnier, D. T.; Mauel, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    A 10 kW, CW, 28 GHz gyrotron has been implemented on LDX to increase the plasma density and to more fully explore the potential of high beta plasma stability in a dipole magnetic configuration. This added power represents about a 60% increase in ECRH to a new total of 26.9 kW with sources at 2.45, 6.4, and 10.5 GHz. The 1 Tesla resonances in LDX form small rings encompassing the entire plasma cross-section above and below the floating coil (F-coil) near the dipole axial region. A 32.5 mm diameter TE01 waveguide with a partial Vlasov step cut launches a diverging beam from above the F-coil that depends on internal wall reflections for plasma coupling. Initial gyrotron only plasmas exhibit steep natural profiles with fewer hot electrons than with the other sources. The background scattered radiation suggests that only about half the power is being absorbed with the present launcher.

  6. Submillimeter-wave harmonic gyrotron experiment

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of the operation at submillimeter wavelengths of a harmonic gyrotron is reported. Using a waveguide cavity with an iris at the output end of the straight section, 14 different second-harmonic modes were observed with frequencies of 301--503 GHz, output powers of 1-22 kW, and a 12-MHz emission frequency bandwidth. The highest output power was 22 kW, with a total efficiency of 3.5% at 467 GHz, and an output power of 15 kW with a 6% efficiency was obtained at 417 GHz. Research was conducted using a 65--75 kV up to 10-A electron gun with 1--1.5 μs pulse-length and a 4-Hz repetition rate, which produced a helical electron beam in magnetic fields of up to 14 T. These results represent the first operation of a high-power harmonic gyrotron in the submillimeter region

  7. Measurement of soft x-ray image by using CCD camera for long pulse discharge

    A soft x-ray imaging was made a CCD camera installed to a tangential port in LHD. The large number of pixels (1024x512) of with CCD gives a good spatial resolution of 1.8 mm. The tangential soft x-ray image is obtained during long pulse discharge on LHD with a time resolution of 0.5 s. The shift of x-ray emission profile is found for plasmas with different magnetic axes. (J.P.N.)

  8. Laser ion source with long pulse width for RHIC-EBIS

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a new heavy ion-projector for RHIC and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory. Laser Ion Source (LIS) with solenoid can supply many kinds of ion from solid targets and is suitable for long pulse length with low current as ion provider for RHIC-EBIS. In order to understand a plasma behavior for fringe field of solenoid, we measure current, pulse width and total ion charges by a new ion probe. The experimental result indicates that the solenoid confines the laser ablation plasma transversely. Laser ion source needs long pulse length with limited current as primary ion provider for RHIC-EBIS. New ion probe can measure current distribution for the radial positions along z axis. The beam pulse length is not effected by magnetic field strength. However, the currents and charges decay with the distance from the end of solenoid. These results indicate that solenoid field has important role for plasma confinement not longitudinally but transversely and solenoid is able to have long pulse length with sufficient total ion charges. Moreover, the results are useful for a design of the extraction system for RHIC-EBIS.

  9. Long-pulse operation of a cesium-seeded high-current large negative ion source

    A high-power large negative ion source has been operated for a long pulse duration. A three-grid single-stage accelerator is used, where the extraction grid is shaped so that the secondary electrons generated on the extraction grid would be prevented from leaking into the acceleration gap. A stable long-pulse arc discharge with an arc power of 100 kW has been obtained over 15 s by balancing an individual arc current flowing through each filament. The cesium-seeded operation is not influenced by a temperature rise of over 100degC of the plasma grid during the long-pulse arc discharge. As a result, the negative ion beam power of 330 kW (91 keV-3.6 A) was produced stably for 10 s from an area of 25 cm x 26 cm, where the current density was 21 mA/cm2 and the negative ion power density was 1.9 kW/cm2. The neutralization efficiency of accelerated negative ions has been measured including the residual positive and negative ion ratios by the water calorimetry of the beam dumps. The result agrees well with the calculation result. (author)

  10. Progress of long pulse and H-mode experiments in EAST

    Significant progress, on both the technological and physical fronts, towards high-performance, long-pulse plasma discharges has been made in EAST (the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak) since the last IAEA FEC. With enhanced operational capabilities, the following key results have been achieved with lithium wall conditioning: fully steady-state long-pulse diverted plasmas entirely driven by the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) over 400 s and stationary H-mode discharges over 30 s with LHCD and ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRF). H-modes with various types of edge localized modes (ELMs) have been achieved with HIPB98(y,2) ranging from 0.7 to over unity, providing great opportunities for the study of H-mode physics. New and exciting physics with dominant radio-frequency heating has emerged, including new findings of LHCD-induced 3D edge magnetic topology and its effect on ELM dynamics and particle and heat deposition; the role of zonal flows during the L–H transition and I-phase; and a new turbulence-flow cycle state at the H-mode pedestal. Various means for mitigating ELMs have also been demonstrated to facilitate long-pulse operation, including supersonic molecular beam injection, as well as innovative solid Li granule injection. A brief overview of these recent advances is presented. (paper)

  11. Quasi-optical gyrotron: present status and future prospect

    A review of the main experiments on quasi-optical gyrotron is presented. Methods to improve the efficiency (pencil beam electron gun and depressed collector) will be discussed. (author) 5 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs

  12. Development of long pulse radiofrequency heating and current drive systems and scenarios for WEST

    The longstanding expertise of the Tore Supra Team in long pulse radiofrequency (RF) heating and current drive systems will now be exploited in WEST (tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak). WEST will allow an integrated long pulse tokamak programme for testing W-divertor components at ITER-relevant heat flux (10-20 MW/m2), while treating crucial aspects for ITER-operation, such as avoidance of W-accumulation in long discharges, monitoring and control of heat fluxes on the metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) and coupling of RF waves in H-mode plasmas. Scenario modelling using the METIS-code shows that ITER-relevant heat fluxes are compatible with the sustainment of long pulse H-mode discharges, at high power (up to 15 MW/30s at IP = 0.8 MA) or high fluence (up to 10 MW, up to 1000s at IP = 0.6 MA), all based on RF heating and current drive using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). To allow coupling to H-mode plasmas, three ELM-resilient ICRH antennas have been designed for WEST. They will be fabricated and provided as in-kind contribution by ASIPP (Hefei), within the framework of the Associated Laboratory IRFM-ASIPP. Furthermore, the ICRH generator has been upgraded to allow high power operation (9 MW/30s) at high reflected power (VSWR = 2). The WEST ICRH system is thus the first ever ICRH system combining continuous wave (CW) operation at high power and load tolerance capability for coupling on H-modes. The nominal operating frequencies are 53±2 MHz and 55.5± 2 MHz, in order to allow flexibility in the location of the resonance layer around the magnetic axis. The LHCD system, with capability to inject 7 MW/1000s, is an indispensable tool for long pulse scenarios. The LH power deposition and current profiles have been modelled with the recent 'Tail LH' model in C3PO/LUKE, which has proven to reproduce well the experimental LHCD results on Tore Supra, as well as on EAST. The simulations show that the

  13. Pulsed TRIGA reactor as substitute for long pulse spallation neutron source

    TRIGA reactor cores have been used to demonstrate various pulsing applications. The TRIGA reactor fuel (U-ZrHx) is very robust especially in pulsing applications. The features required to produce 50 pulses per second have been successfully demonstrated individually, including pulse tests with small diameter fuel rods. A partially optimized core has been evaluated for pulses at 50 Hz with peak pulsed power up to 100 MW and an average power up to 10 MW. Depending on the design, the full width at half power of the individual pulses can range between 2000 μsec to 3000 μsec. Until recently, the relatively long pulses (2000 μsec to 3000 μsec) from a pulsed thermal reactor or a long pulse spallation source (LPSS) have been considered unsuitable for time-of-flight measurements of neutron scattering. More recently considerable attention has been devoted to evaluating the performance of long pulse (1000 to 4000 μs) spallation sources for the same type of neutron measurements originally performed only with short pulses from spallation sources (SPSS). Adequate information is available to permit meaningful comparisons between CW, SPSS, and LPSS neutron sources. Except where extremely high resolution is required (fraction of a percent), which does require short pulses, it is demonstrated that the LPSS source with a 1000 msec or longer pulse length and a repetition rate of 50 to 60 Hz gives results comparable to those from the 60 MW ILL (CW) source. For many of these applications the shorter pulse is not necessarily a disadvantage, but it is not an advantage over the long pulse system. In one study, the conclusion is that a 5 MW 2000 μsec LPSS source improves the capability for structural biology studies of macromolecules by at least a factor of 5 over that achievable with a high flux reactor. Recent studies have identified the advantages and usefulness of long pulse neutron sources. It is evident that the multiple pulse TRIGA reactor can produce pulses comparable to those

  14. A simple quantum-electronic approach to the Gyrotron and its application to the solid-state gyrotron

    Ho, P.-T.; Granatstein, V. L.

    1986-01-01

    A simple, unifying theory of the gyrotron is presented. It is of the Lamb type. Within its framework, important results from different approaches can be easily obtained. As an application, gyrotron action in InSb is reexamined, and coherent emission at 10 to the 12th Hz appears possible with an output power of about 0.5 mW/sq mm of the device.

  15. Efficiency optimization for quasi-optical gyrotrons

    Optimization studies for resonator cavities of quasi-optical gyrotrons have been carried out. With the constraint that the RF field is limited by peak power load on the mirrors, the electronic efficiency can have a value of up to 10% higher than the confocal results by using spherical mirrors with g=1-d/R close to -1. Optimized nonspherical cavities yield similar results. When output coupling through circular slots is considered, confocal (g=0) as well as more extreme designs near the resonator stability boundary are less favorable and the optimum configurations found are spherical mirrors with g-factors of about -0.3, -0.6, and possibly -0.75. (author) 16 figs., 1 tab., 8 refs

  16. Gyrotrons for magnetic fusion applications at 110 GHz and 170 GHz

    Cahalan P.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two megawatt-class gyrotrons at frequencies of 110 GHz and 170 GHz have recently been fabricated at CPI. The 110 GHz gyrotron is designed to produce 1.2 MW of output power for 10-second pulses, and will be used for electron cyclotron heating and current drive on the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics. This gyrotron has completed factory testing and has been delivered to General Atomics for installation and additional testing. The 170 GHz gyrotron, though specified as a 500 kW CW system, has been designed with the goal of generating up to 1 MW CW. Oak Ridge National Laboratory will use this gyrotron in ITER ECH transmission line testing. This gyrotron has been fabricated and is awaiting factory testing, Design features of each gyrotron are described, and test data for the 110 GHz gyrotron are presented.

  17. State-of-the-art of high power gyro-devices and free electron masers. Update 2005

    Gyrotron oscillators (gyromonotrons) are mainly used as high power millimeter wave sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH), electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), stability control and diagnostics of magnetically confined plasmas for generation of energy by controlled thermonuclear fusion. The maximum pulse length of commercially available 140 GHz, megawatt-class gyrotrons employing synthetic diamond output windows is 30 minutes (CPI and European FZK-CRPP-CEA-TED collaboration). The world record parameters of the European 140 GHz gyrotron are: 0.92 MW output power at 30 min. pulse duration, 97.5% Gaussian mode purity and 43% efficiency, employing a single-stage depressed collector for energy recovery. This results in an energy content of 1.66 GJ. A maximum output power of 1.2 MW in 4.1 s pulses was generated with the JAERI-TOSHIBA 110 GHz gyrotron. The Russian and the Japan 170 GHz ITER gyrotrons achieved 0.5 MW with pulse durations of 80 s and 500 s, respectively. Diagnostic gyrotrons deliver Pout=40 kW with τ=40 μs at frequencies up to 650 GHz (η=4%). Gyrotron oscillators have also been successfully used in materials processing. Such technological applications require gyrotrons with the following parameters: f≥24 GHz, Pout=4-50 kW, CW, η≥30%. This paper gives an update of the experimental achievements related to the development of high power gyrotron oscillators for long pulse or CW operation and pulsed gyrotrons for plasma diagnostics. In addition, this work gives a short overview of the present development status of coaxial-cavity gyrotrons, gyrotrons for technological applications, relativistic gyrotrons, quasi-optical gyrotrons, fast- and slow-wave cyclotron autoresonance masers (CARMs), gyroklystrons, gyro-TWT amplifiers, gyrotwystron amplifiers, gyro-BWO's, gyropeniotrons, magnicons, gyroharmonic converters, free electron masers (FEMs) and of vacuum windows for such high-power mm-wave sources. The highest CW powers produced by

  18. Quasi-optical harmonic gyrotron and gyroklystron

    A method and apparatus for suppressing lower order cyclotron harmonics in order to permit resonance within a quasi-optical gyrotron/gyroklystron configuration of a desired higher order harmonic. In the gyrotron/gyroklystron configuration at least one open resonator defined by at least two mirrors is positioned downstream from an electron beam source for receiving the beam of electrons and for exchanging energy therewith. This method includes the steps of choosing a mirror radius size p for the mirrors forming at least one open resonator which is large enough relative to the spot size of a desired radiation cyclotron harmonic w /sub n/ so that the harmonic w /sub n/ oscillates within the at least one resonator, but small enough so that the spot size for the next lower cyclotron harmonic w /sub m/ is larger than the mirror so that the harmonic w /sub m/ does not oscillate due to diffraction losses. This method further includes the step of generating an electron beam via the electron beam source with a beam current which is greater than or equal to the starting current I /sub n/ for the desired nth cyclotron harmonic, but less than the starting current I /sub m/ for the mth cyclotron harmonic. The method also includes the step of extracting radiation energy at the nth cyclotron harmonic from the at least one open resonator. The desired mirror radius size p for a given cyclotron harmonic frequency w /sub n/, for a desired diffraction loss Y /sub n/ for that harmonic n, a given half length separation L /sub y/ between the mirrors, and a given radius of curvature R /sub M/, can be determined by the equation wherein r /sub on/ is the spot size at the mirror for radiation at the nth cyclotron harmonic

  19. Exploration of the Challenges of Neutron Optics and Instrumentation at Long Pulsed Spallation Sources

    Klenø, Kaspar Hewitt

    In this thesis I have explored the challenges of long guides and instrumentation for the long pulsed European Spallation Source. I have derived the theory needed for quantifying the performance of a guide using brilliance transfer. With this tool it is easier to objectively compare how well...... shown that doing this is feasible, even for advanced guide geometries, such as elliptic and parabolic guides. I have also looked into how guide imperfections affect the brilliance transfer, and shown that long elliptic guide are robust against imperfections at the levels we expect to see. I have also...

  20. 2 MW Active Bouncer Converter Design for Long Pulse Klystron Modulators

    Aguglia, D

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents some design issues of a 2 MW interleaved buck converter which is used as an active bouncer droop compensator for a 5.5MW long pulse klystron modulator. This novel design concept presents many challenges in terms of voltage ripple versus pulse rise-time. Issues related to the voltage ripple specification versus output filter design are discussed in detail. The design study is analyzed analytically, simulated numerically and is validated by experimental results obtained from a full power prototype.

  1. A comparison between short pulse spallation source and long pulse spallation source

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Watanabe, Noboru; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Niimura, Nobuo; Morii, Yukio; Katano, Susumu; Osakabe, Toyotaka; Teshigawara, Makoto [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Mezei, F.

    1997-11-01

    The performance for a 5 MW short pulse spallation source (SPSS) and a 4.5 MW long pulse spallation source (LPSS) in a JAERI program which is based on the availability of a 1.5 GeV superconducting linac with a 30 mA peak current for both proton and H{sup -} beams is discussed. We have examined the superiority of SPSS to LPSS. While a LPSS facility is a second option, we propose an SPSS facility as a first option. (author)

  2. Heat treatment of long pulse operation for the JAERI ERL-FEL

    RF power sources are replaced from all-solid-state amplifiers to IOT amplifiers for the superconducting accelerators (SCAs) and a vacuum tube amplifier for the SHB of the JAERI ERL-FEL. A long pulse operation increased the pressure in the cryostat of the SCA. The single-cell SCA can be operated in 9% duty according to the time constant of the pressure decay in the cryostat. SHB can be operated in 4% duty which is limited by the frequency range of the tuners. The result of the ABAQUS calculation shows the more duty operation. (author)

  3. Long pulse H- beam extraction with a rf driven ion source on a high power level

    IPP Garching is investigating the applicability of rf driven negative ion sources for the neutral beam injection of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The setup of the tested source was improved to enable long pulses up to 100 kW rf power. The efficiency of negative ion production decreases at high power. The extracted H- currents as well as the symmetry of the plasma density close to the plasma grid and of the beam divergence depend on the magnetic filter field. The pulse duration is limited by the increase in coextracted electrons, which depends on the rf power and the caesium conditions on the plasma grid.

  4. A comparison between short pulse spallation source and long pulse spallation source

    The performance for a 5 MW short pulse spallation source (SPSS) and a 4.5 MW long pulse spallation source (LPSS) in a JAERI program which is based on the availability of a 1.5 GeV superconducting linac with a 30 mA peak current for both proton and H- beams is discussed. We have examined the superiority of SPSS to LPSS. While a LPSS facility is a second option, we propose an SPSS facility as a first option. (author)

  5. A high-duty-cycle long-pulse electron gun for electron accelerators

    Ebrahim, N. A.; Thrasher, M. H.

    1990-11-01

    We describe the design and operation of a long-pulse (200-300 μs), high-duty-cycle (5%-6%), 8-mm-diam dispenser cathode, electrically isolated, modulating Wehnelt electron gun for applications in a high-average-power electron linear accelerator. The electron optics design was optimized with computer modeling of the electron trajectories and equipotentials. The gun performance was established in a series of experimental measurements in a test stand. Excellent pulse-to-pulse emission current reproducibility and electron-beam pulse profile stability were obtained.

  6. Advances in long pulse operation at high radio frequency power in Tore Supra

    Goniche, M.; Dumont, R.; Bourdelle, C.; Decker, J.; Delpech, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Guilhem, D.; Guimarães-Filho, Z.; Litaudon, X.; Lotte, Ph.; Maget, P.; Mazon, D.; Saoutic, B. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2014-06-15

    The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system of Tore Supra has been upgraded for long pulse operation at higher power (7–8 MW). The two launchers have coupled on plasma 3.8 MW and 2.7 MW separately. This new power capability allows extending the operational domain of Tore Supra for long pulses at higher current and density. 38 long (20 s –155 s) discharges with very low loop voltage (V{sub L} = 30-60 mV) were performed with combined LHCD (5-5.7 MW) and ICRH (1–3 MW) powers, with up to 1 GJ of injected energy. Higher LHCD efficiency, with respect to the previous long discharges, is reported. MHD stability of these discharges is very sensitive to the LHCD power and parallel wave index, in particular in the preforming phase. For theses evanescent loop voltage plasmas, the ICRH power, in excess of 1 MW, is found to have a beneficial effect on the MHD stability.

  7. Long-pulse Nd:YAG 1064-nm laser treatment for onychomycosis

    ZHANG Rui-na; WANG Dong-kun; ZHUO Feng-lin; DUAN Xiao-han; ZHANG Xiao-yan; ZHAO Jun-ying

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent research shows that lasers can inhibit fungal growth and that Nd:YAG 1064-nm lasers can penetrate as deep as the lower nail plate.The aim of this study was to observe the effect of a long-pulse Nd:YAG 1064-nm laser on 154 nails of 33 patients with clinically and mycologically proven onychomycosis.Methods Thirty-three patients with 154 nails affected by onychomycosis were randomly assigned to two groups,with the 154 nails divided into three sub-groups (Ⅱ degree,Ⅲ degree,and Ⅳ degree) according to the Scoring Clinical Index of Onychomycosis.The 15 patients (78 nails) in group 1 were given eight sessions with a one-week interval,and the 18patients (76 nails) in group 2 were given four sessions with a one-week interval.Results In group 1,the effective rates at 8 weeks,16 weeks,and 24 weeks were 63%,62%,and 51%,respectively,and the effective rates in group 2 were 68%,67%,and 53% respectively.The treatment effect was not significantly different between any sub-group pair (P >0.05).Conclusions Long pulse Nd:YAG 1064-nm laser was effective for onychomycosis.It is a simple and effective method without significant complications or side effects and is expected to become an alternative or replacement therapy for onychomycosis.

  8. Towards high-power long-pulse operation on Tore Supra

    The Tore Supra tokamak was given the main mission to investigate the route towards long pulse plasma discharges. This includes the problem of heat exhaust and particle control (via the development of performant plasma facing components), and in parallel the physics of fully non inductive discharges and its optimisation with respect to the confinement. Tore Supra is thus equipped with a superconducting toroidal magnet (maximum magnetic field on axis 4.5T), a full set of actively cooled plasma facing components (PFC), and a heating and current drive capability based on high power RF systems connected to actively cooled antennas. The encouraging results already obtained, as well as recent progress in PFC, allowed us to envisaged a significant improvement in the heat exhaust capability of Tore Supra. The so-called CIEL-project consists in a complete upgrade of the inner chamber of Tore Supra, planned to be installed during the year 2000. The present paper deals with the experimental and modelling activity linked to the preparation of the long-pulse high-power discharges using the present Tore Supra equipment: heating and current drive scenarios, power coupling, confinement and transport studies, discharge control,... An overview of the results obtained in that field is presented, as well as the progress required in the coming years, and the expected performance, for the CIEL phase, in terms of current drive and confinement. (author)

  9. A repetitive long-pulse power generator based on pulse forming network and linear transformer driver.

    Li, Mingjia; Kang, Qiang; Tan, Jie; Zhang, Faqiang; Luo, Min; Xiang, Fei

    2016-06-01

    A compact module for long-pulse power generator, based on Blumlein pulse forming network (PFN), was designed. Two Blumlein PFNs with L-type configuration and 20 Ω characteristic impedance were connected symmetrically to the primary coil of the linear transformer driver (LTD) and driven by an identical high voltage spark switch to ensure two Blumlein PFNs synchronizing operation. The output pulse of the module connected with 10 Ω water load is about 135 kV in amplitude and 200 ns in duration with a rise time of ∼50 ns and a flat top of ∼100 ns. On this basis, a repetitive long-pulse power generator based on PFN-LTD has been developed, which was composed of four modules. The following technical parameters of the generator were achieved on planar diode: output voltage amplitude of ∼560 kV, output current amplitude of ∼10 kA at a repetition rate of 25 Hz. The generator operates stable and outputs more than 10(4) pulses. Meanwhile, the continuous operating time of the generator is up to 60 s. PMID:27370479

  10. An 8-GW long-pulse generator based on Tesla transformer and pulse forming network

    A long-pulse generator TPG700L based on a Tesla transformer and a series pulse forming network (PFN) is constructed to generate intense electron beams for the purpose of high power microwave (HPM) generation. The TPG700L mainly consists of a 12-stage PFN, a built-in Tesla transformer in a pulse forming line, a three-electrode gas switch, a transmission line with a trigger, and a load. The Tesla transformer and the compact PFN are the key technologies for the development of the TPG700L. This generator can output electrical pulses with a width as long as 200 ns at a level of 8 GW and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. When used to drive a relative backward wave oscillator for HPM generation, the electrical pulse width is about 100 ns on a voltage level of 520 kV. Factors affecting the pulse waveform of the TPG700L are also discussed. At present, the TPG700L performs well for long-pulse HPM generation in our laboratory

  11. Small-angle scattering instruments on a 1 MW long pulse spallation source

    We have designed and optimized two small-angle neutron scattering instruments for installation at a 1 MW long pulse spallation source. The first of these instruments measures a Q-domain from 0.002 to 0.44 A-1, and the second instrument from 0.00069-0.17 A-1, Design characteristics were determined and optimization was done using a Monte Carlo instrument simulation package under development at Los alamos. A performance comparison was made between these instruments with D11 at the ILL by evaluating the scattered intensity and rms resolution for the instrument response function at different Q values for various instrument configurations needed to spn a Q-range of 0.0007-0.44 A-1. We concluded that the first of these instruments outperforms D11 in both intensity and resolution over most of the Q-domain and that the second is comparable to D11. Comparisons were also made of the performance of the optimized long pulse instruments with different reflectors and with a short pulse source, from which we concluded that there is an optimal moderator-reflector combination, and that a short pulse does not substantially improve the instrument performance. (author) 7 figs., 2 tabs., 9 refs

  12. Occlusion Effect of a Long-pulsed 532nm Laser on Veins

    ZHANGLai-ming; YANGGui-long; LIDian-jun; LUQi-peng; GUHua-dong; ZHULin-lin; ZHAOZhen-wu; LIXin; WANGJing-ping; TANGYu-guo; GUOJin

    2005-01-01

    Laser treatment represents an attractive option to other methods of vessel diseases especially varicose veins. A long pulse (30-50ms) 532nm laser was used in our experiments, with the pulse duration matching the thermal relaxation time of the vessels and the green laser matching the absorption spectrum peak of the blood.Laser irradiates nude vein vessels directly or exterior skin to finish operation faster and to acquire the practical data for upper enteron varicose vein treatment in several animal experiments performed in vivo. The 5Jenergy pulse allows us to finely occlude rabbit or dog's vein vessels up to 2 mm in diameter when irradiating them off external skin. Blood vessels are occluded at once, and later biopsy specimens show the immediate and long-term lasting occlusion effect. While vessels are irradiated directly, they are usually irradiated to perforate, detailed causes are still under investigation. Animal experiments showed that the long pulse green laser therapy is a safe and effective solution to the vein's occlusion, which promises such laser with high energy of each pulse and 30-50 ms duration is an ideal candidate for vessel diseases treatment.

  13. Investigation of an X-band gigawatt long pulse multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    To achieve a gigawatt-level long pulse radiation power in X-band, a multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is proposed and studied experimentally. By introducing 18 electron drift tubes and extended interaction cavities, the power capacity of the device is increased. A radiation power of 1.23 GW with efficiency of 41% and amplifier gain of 46 dB is obtained in the particle-in-cell simulation. Under conditions of a 10 Hz repeat frequency and an input RF power of 30 kW, a radiation power of 0.9 GW, frequency of 9.405 GHz, pulse duration of 105 ns, and efficiency of 30% is generated in the experiment, and the amplifier gain is about 45 dB. Both the simulation and the experiment prove that the multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier can generate a long pulse GW-level radiation power in X-band

  14. A repetitive long-pulse power generator based on pulse forming network and linear transformer driver

    Li, Mingjia; Kang, Qiang; Tan, Jie; Zhang, Faqiang; Luo, Min; Xiang, Fei

    2016-06-01

    A compact module for long-pulse power generator, based on Blumlein pulse forming network (PFN), was designed. Two Blumlein PFNs with L-type configuration and 20 Ω characteristic impedance were connected symmetrically to the primary coil of the linear transformer driver (LTD) and driven by an identical high voltage spark switch to ensure two Blumlein PFNs synchronizing operation. The output pulse of the module connected with 10 Ω water load is about 135 kV in amplitude and 200 ns in duration with a rise time of ˜50 ns and a flat top of ˜100 ns. On this basis, a repetitive long-pulse power generator based on PFN-LTD has been developed, which was composed of four modules. The following technical parameters of the generator were achieved on planar diode: output voltage amplitude of ˜560 kV, output current amplitude of ˜10 kA at a repetition rate of 25 Hz. The generator operates stable and outputs more than 104 pulses. Meanwhile, the continuous operating time of the generator is up to 60 s.

  15. Towards high-power long-pulse operation on Tore Supra

    The Tore Supra tokamak was given the main mission to investigate the route towards long pulse plasma discharges. This includes the problem of heat exhaust and particle control (via the development of high-performance plasma facing components), and in parallel the physics of fully non inductive discharges and its optimization with respect to the confinement. Tore Supra is thus equipped with a superconducting toroidal magnet (maximum magnetic field on axis 4.5T), a full set of actively cooled plasma facing components (PFC), and a heating and current drive capability based on high power RIF systems connected to actively cooled antennas. The encouraging results already obtained, as well as recent progress in PFC, allowed us to envisage a significant improvement in the heat exhaust capability of Tore Supra. The so-called CIEL-project consists in a complete upgrade of the inner chamber of Tore Supra, planned to be installed during the year 2000. The present paper deals with the experimental and modeling activity linked to the preparation of the long-pulse high-power discharges using the present Tore Supra equipment: heating and current drive scenarios, power coupling, confinement and transport studies, discharge control... An overview of the results obtained in that field is presented, as well as the progress required in the coming years, and the expected performance, for the CIEL phase, in terms of current drive and confinement. (author)

  16. Experimental studies toward long-pulse steady-state operations in LHD

    Stable discharges longer than one minute have been obtained in LHD with all the heating schemes including electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Plasma is sustained with neutral beam injection (NBI) or with ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) with 0.5-1 MW. Central plasma temperature is higher than 1.5 keV with a density of 1-2x1019m-3 until the end of the pulse. Full installation of the carbon divertor has contributed to this achievement. This gives a sufficient base for physics and technology studies from the next campaign. The long pulse operation indicates new possibilities in diagnostics and in physics studies. Higher accuracy and reliability is obtained with diagnostics parameter scan, longer integration of signals or two-dimensional measurement. The mechanism of a slow oscillation called breathing is discussed. Hydrogen recycling analysis has been carried out and preliminary results are obtained. Based on these results, the future program is divided into two categories, that is, i) physics and technology experiments utilizing long-pulse discharges up to 5 minutes, and ii) extension of the pulse-length toward one hour. (author)

  17. Dynamics of high power and long pulse laser propagation and its control in underdense plasmas

    Nakatsutsumi, M.; Fuchs, J.; Antici, P.; Audebert, P.; Bourgeois, N.; Grech, M.; Kodama, R.; Lin, T.; Marqués, J. R.; Riazuelo, G.; Romagnani, L.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2006-10-01

    The study of intense laser pulse propagation through long underdense plasmas is of crucial importance for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). We have performed a systematic study of long pulse beams (τL=400ps,I=10^10˜10^12Wcm-2) propagating through the underdense plasmas (ne=10^19˜10^20cm-3), by controlling two filaments created from the pulses with variable delay and intensity ratio. These experiments have been performed at the LULI laser facility. The results show that the earlier pulse affects the propagation characteristics of the later pulse. The 2D time-resolved sampling camera provides the ability to examine the possibility of enhanced propagation, collimation, and guiding of a trailing pulse induced by an earlier pulse. These facts are of interest for ICF and other applications. In particular, this study opens perspectives, through shaping the pulses temporally, for the control of propagation of long pulses in the low density plasmas that are present within ICF hohlraums.

  18. The performance of neutron scattering spectrometers at a long-pulse spallation source

    The first conclusion the author wants to draw is that comparison of the performance of neutron scattering spectrometers at CW and pulsed sources is simpler for long-pulsed sources than it is for the short-pulse variety. Even though detailed instrument design and assessment will require Monte Carlo simulations (which have already been performed at Los Alamos for SANS and reflectometry), simple arguments are sufficient to assess the approximate performance of spectrometers at an LPSS and to support the contention that a 1 MW long-pulse source can provide attractive performance, especially for instrumentation designed for soft-condensed-matter science. Because coupled moderators can be exploited at such a source, its time average cold flux is equivalent to that of a research reactor with a power of about 15 MW, so only a factor of 4 gain from source pulsing is necessary to obtain performance that is comparable with the ILL. In favorable cases, the gain from pulsing can be even more than this, approaching the limit set by the peak flux, giving about 4 times the performance of the ILL. Because of its low duty factor, an LPSS provides the greatest performance gains for relatively low resolution experiments with cold neutrons. It should thus be considered complementary to short pulse sources which are most effective for high resolution experiments using thermal or epithermal neutrons

  19. Gyrotron source system for ITER plasma start up

    Full text: For a reliable plasma current start-up with a limited toroidal electric field of ∼0.3V/m, ITER would require Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) assistance during this phase. An ECH Start-up system with an installed capacity of 3MW RF power, at a frequency of ∼127 GHz with a maximum pulse length of 10 s, is being envisaged for ITER Plasma Start-up system. The Indian Participating Team (IN PT) is currently working on the details of the gyrotron source including auxiliary power supplies, High voltage power supplies, protections and controls for the ECH Start-up system. The specified gyrotron sources are expected to be commercially available involving certain development on the part of supplier to re adopt the proven technologies to a new design suitable for the specified frequency. Diode type tube configuration would be preferred, as this would allow a simpler High voltage power supply configuration. The required HVPS would be based on PSM technology and one HVPS would be driving all the three start up gyrotrons in parallel. The required auxiliary power supplies like the Ion pump power supplies, Magnet power supplies, filament power supplies and the gyrotron tanks would be procured as per the basic designs and /or tube specifications. A VME based Data Acquisition and Control system would be built with various fast (critical) and slow interlocks for the safe operation of the tubes. For the critical faults, the HVPS would be removed within a time scale of 10 μs. Various parameters like rf, vacuum, cooling and DC parameters would be monitored and/or set remotely. Integrated testing of the gyrotron source system into a calorimetric water load is planned at IN-PT site. The paper highlights the details of the integrated gyrotron system as planned by the Indian participating team. (author)

  20. Oscillating virtual cathode, large-orbit gyrotron and driver

    VanHaaften, F.W.; Hoeberling, R.F.; Fazio, M.V.

    1986-01-01

    Studies using an oscillating virtual cathode (vircator) and a large-orbit gyrotron to generate microwave levels of several hundred megawatts are being conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A pulse level of approx.1 MV, with length approaching 1 ..mu..s at a repetition rate of a few hertz, is anticipated for extension of these studies from the present single-shot mode with 100-ns pulse width. The increased pulse width is needed to test longer pulse length microwave sources. Pulse forming network (PFN), transformer-coupled drivers have been studied and are part of the subject of this paper. The large-orbit gyrotron is discussed here.

  1. Inelastic scattering research at a 1 MW long pulse spallation neutron source

    The brief was, with respect to the LPSS bench mark design supplied (60 Hz, 1 MW, Imsec proton pulse, with a split, non-fissile target and 4 moderators in a flux trap geometry design), to identify a set of instruments, and to assess their performance with respect to existing spectrometers on other sources. Any modifications to the existing instruments which would make them more effective on the bench-mark source, or conversely, any modifications to the source bench-mark required by the proposed instruments were to be identified, as were any uncertainties in the estimated performances, or any R ampersand D needed to make the proposed instruments viable. Any new instrument concepts specifically matched to the long pulse itself were to be identified and assessed. This process was to result in an indicative list of instruments for the source. A figure of around 10 spectrometers was to be aimed for

  2. Counter-facing plasma focus system as an efficient and long-pulse EUV light source

    Kuwabara, H.; Hayashi, K.; Kuroda, Y.; Nose, H.; Hotozuka, K.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.

    2011-04-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and efficient EUV light source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrode. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time duration in at least ten microseconds for Xe plasma. Also, we confirmed operations of our system for Li plasma. We estimated the highest EUV energy in Li plasma operation at 93mJ/4π sr per 2% bandwidth per pulse.

  3. High power density and long pulse operation with Tore Supra ICRF facility

    Bremond, S. E-mail: sbremond@cea.fr; Agarici, G.; Beaumont, B.; Lombard, G.; Millon, L.; Mollard, P.; Volpe, D.; Vulliez, K.; Becoulet, A.; Colas, L.; Saoutic, B

    2003-09-01

    Ten years after the first ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heated Tore Supra (TS) plasma shot, and as TS facility, now equipped with the new 'CIEL' high power handing in-vessel components (This SOFT), is progressing towards long pulse performances, the main results and experience gained from the ICRF system are reviewed. An overview of the present status of TS ICRF facility is given, with highlights on the main modifications made to the initial plant and associated results. TS ICRF system achievements are then reported from a large ICRF heated pulses database covering ten experimental campaigns (1991-2001). The main technological issues encountered, especially those relevant to next step ICRF system design, are also discussed. Finally, in view of extended pulse length performances on TS, the present limitations of the ICRF facility and future plans are outlined.

  4. A Long-Pulse Modulator for the TESLA Test Facility (TTF)

    Kaesler, W

    2004-01-01

    The long-pulse (1.6 ms) klystron modulator for TTF is a hardtube pulser using a Bouncer-circuit for droop compensation. It is built up with new advanced components representing industrial standards. The on-/off switch is a rugged 12 kV IGCT-stack with a fast 4kA turn-off capability. The 100 kJ storage capacitor bank contains only three capacitors with self-healing, segmented PP-foil technology. A new 100 kA solid-state switch based on light triggered thyristors (LTT) replaced the standard ignitrons as crowbar switches. The 300 kW high voltage power supply is based on modern switched mode technology.

  5. Magnet Design and Analysis of a 40 Tesla Long Pulse System Energized by a Battery Bank

    Lv, Y. L.; Peng, T.; Wang, G. B.; Ding, T. H.; Han, X. T.; Pan, Y.; Li, L.

    2013-03-01

    A 40 tesla long pulse magnet and a battery bank as the power supply have been designed. This is now under construction at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. The 22 mm bore magnet will generate smooth pulses with duration 1 s and rise time 0.5 s. The battery bank consists of 945 12V/200 Ah lead-acid battery cells. The magnet and battery bank were optimized by codes developed in-house and by ANSYS. The coil was made from soft copper with internal reinforcement by fiber-epoxy composite; it is divided into two sections connected in series. The inner section consists of helix coils with each layer reinforced by Zylon composite. The outer section will be wound from copper sheet and externally reinforced by carbon fiber composite.

  6. Effects of magnetic configuration on divertor power and particle deposition for long pulse operation in EAST

    The magnetic configuration exhibits a strong influence on the dynamics of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs), as demonstrated in the EAST superconducting tokamak. We find that poloidal drifts play an important role in particle deposition during the ELMs, leading to a strong up/down asymmetry in the double null divertor configuration, favoring the upper divertor for normal toroidal field, Bt, i.e., with the ion ∇B drift towards the bottom, while the heat flux distribution appears to be rather uniform during ELMs. These observations are well reproduced by the boundary plasma turbulence code, BOUT++. As divertor pumping was only available at the bottom, the preferential particle flow towards the bottom divertor associated with reverse Bt led to a preferred scenario for long pulse operation in EAST

  7. Methods of first wall structural analysis with applications to the long pulse commercial tokamak reactor design

    Methods of analysis for fusion first wall design are developed. Several design limits have been evaluated and combined to present trade-offs in the form of design windows. These considerations include limits related to thermal fatigue, primary membrane strength, displacement under loading, ratcheting, radiation damage, and plasma-wall interactions. Special emphasis is placed on the investigation of thermal fatigue using a two dimensional treatment of a tubular first wall configuration. The work is motivated by the proposal of the Ultra Long Pulse Commercial Reactor (ULTR), a machine capable of delivering plasma burn pulses of up to 24 hours in length. The present work looks in detail at the impact of pertinent characteristics of the ULTR design such as pulse length, coolant pressure, first wall thickness and first wall lifetime on the structural effects considered. Computer programs are developed and consider several major structural effects on a cylindrical first wall element for both 316 stainless steel and vanadium alloy

  8. ICPP: Physics and Design Interplay Phenomena in a Long Pulse Tokamak: Tore Supra

    Chatelier, Michel

    2000-10-01

    The Tore Supra Tokamak has been built with the aim of running steady state powerful long pulse discharges. It has been equipped with relevant technology such as a superconducting magnet, high frequency additional heating systems with long pulse capability, to heat up the plasma and drive the current, and actively cooled plasma facing components to remove steadily the large power flow at the plasma boundary. Due to this configuration, a number of physics processes differ from the conventional situation with inertially cooled plasma facing components that have to be carefully analysed, since they can have consequences on the design and the availability of future devices. Three examples are listed below. - Intense beams of well confined multi-MeV runaway electrons are formed when plasma discharge recovers after a current disruption, which eventually penetrate deep inside the wall and can drill holes in the water pipes. - Suprathermal electrons are generated by lower hybrid frequency waves, used for non inductive current drive in the plasma bulk. These electrons can be transported to the edge without having been slowed down. They impact on very localised areas where the heat deposition is so large that the metal layer between CFC and water can be melted. - Carbon blooms are generally not observed in Tore Supra, because the wall is maintained at low temperature in normal operating conditions. When local destruction of CFC-copper bond occurs, the surface temperature rises, but on a too small area for any significant impurity source to be generated. Bond destruction protects the water circuit from being melted. The excursion in surface temperature to very high values triggers a new heat flow equilibrium to the wall which depends also on the local electron temperature.

  9. Electron beam emission and interaction of double-beam gyrotron

    Highlights: ► The complete electrical design of electron gun and interaction structure of double-beam gyrotron. ► EGUN code is used for the simulation of electron gun of double-beam gyrotron. ► MAGIC code is used for the simulation of interaction structure of double-beam gyrotron. ► Design validations with other codes. - Abstract: This paper presents the numerical simulation of a double-beam magnetron injection gun (DB-MIG) and beam-wave interaction for 60 GHz, 500 kW gyrotron. The beam-wave interaction calculations, power and frequency growth estimation are performed by using PIC code MAGIC. The maximum output power of 510 kW at 41.5% efficiency, beam currents of 6 A and 12 A, electron beam velocity ratios of 1.41 and 1.25 and beam voltage of 69 kV are estimated. To obtain the design parameters, the DB-MIG with maximum transverse velocity spread less than 5% is designed. The computer simulations are performed by using the commercially available code EGUN and the in-house developed code MIGANS. The simulated results of DB-MIG design obtained by using the EGUN code are also validated with another trajectory code TRAK, which are in good agreement.

  10. New results and applications for the quasioptical gyrotron. Interim report

    Fliflet, A.W.; Fischer, R.P.; Manheimer, W.M.

    1993-02-26

    The quasioptical gyrotron (QOG), which features an open resonator formed by a pair of spherical mirrors instead of the conventional gyrotron waveguide cavity, has been under development at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory as a tunable high power millimeterwave source for tokamak plasma heating, advanced radars, and power beaming. In the free running oscillator configuration, the QOG has produced a peak power of 6OOkW at a frequency of 120GHZ, and a peak efficiency of 12% at 200kW. Results have recently been obtained for a quasioptical gyroklystron (QOGK) realized by the addition of an open-mirror prebunching resonator driven by an 85GHz, 1.5kW Extended Interaction Oscillator. Efficiency enhancement by mode priming has been investigated, and efficiencies up to 19% have been obtained by increasing the detuning of the operating mode. An overall efficiency of 30% was obtained by the addition of a simple depressed collector. The high circulating power in the QOG resonator is currently being considered for use as an electromagnetic wiggler for compact IR free-electron lasers. The QOG is also promising as a source for an active sensor of upper atmosphere trace impurities.... Gyrotrons, Gyroklystron, Atmospheric sensing, Quasioptical gyrotron, Electromagnetic wiggler, Free-electron laser.

  11. Research on advanced high power gyrotrons at FZK

    The experimental 170 GHz coaxial cavity gyrotron for ITER has been assembled and installed in the SC magnet. The operation started in May 2004 with performing the alignment and conditioning of the tube. The main goal of the experiments is to verify the design of components for a 2 MW, CW industrial prototype

  12. The DIII-D ECH multiple gyrotron control system

    DIII-D's ECH upgrade with 1 MW, 110 GHz gyrotrons is ongoing, and with it, an upgrade of the control system. The ECH Multiple Gyrotron Control System uses software distributed among networked computers, interfaced to a programmable logic controller (PLC), the timing and pulse system, power supplies, vacuum and wave guide controls, and instrumentation. During DIII-D operations, the system will allow a chief and a co-operator to control and monitor a number of gyrotrons from different manufacturers. The software, written using LabVIEW, allows for remote and multiple operator control. Thus any supported computer can become a control station and multiple projects can be simultaneously accommodated. Each operator can be given access to the controls of all gyrotrons or to a subset of controls. Status information is also remotely available. The use of a PLC simplifies the hardware and software design. It reduces interlock and control circuitry, includes monitoring for slow analog signals, and allows one software driver to efficiently interface to a number of systems. In addition, the interlock logic can be easily changed and control points can be forced as needed. The pulse system is designed around arbitrary function generators. Various modulation schemes can be accommodated, including real-time control of the modulation. This discussion will include the hardware and software design of the control system and its current implementation

  13. Design study of a test stand for ITER gyrotron

    In the frame of development of the ITER electron cyclotron wave (ECW) system, a two MW CW coaxial cavity gyrotron will be developed during the Sixth Framework Program (2003-2006). Such development relies on the availability of a test stand capable of providing the electrical energy and cooling capacity. This test stand will possibly be used, in a later stage, for the component test of the ITER ECW system. This paper will first present the main parameters of this new coaxial gyrotron. Then we describe the test stand itself, including the general requirements for testing and evaluating the behaviour of the RF source and then a description of the electrical system design. Compared to the ITER reference design, the test stand emphasises the requirement of flexibility, which is necessary during the development of the gyrotron. The additional electrical equipment is included in the overview of the electrical system. The cooling system will be an important part of the design study. Indeed, the design efficiency of such a depressed collector gyrotron is ∼50%, implying >4 MW of continuous heat dissipation and evacuation by the cooling equipment. The specifications of the cooling system must also comply with ITER reference design values

  14. A high efficiency, high power 100 GHz gyrotron

    Gyrotrons, operating at 28 GHz, 35 GHz and 60 GHz are currently producing 100-200 KW, pulsed and CW, for electron cyclotron heating experiments in magnetically-confined gaseous fusion machines. Recently, considerable interest has been expressed towards the development of a 100 GHz, 1.0 MW CW gyrotron for increasing the electron temperature above that achieved with the lower frequency, lower power devices listed above. Toward this goal, Hughes Aircraft Company has developed a 100 GHz, 0.5 MW gyrotron operating at low duty at 30 msec pulse widths. This device employs a single anode magnetron injection gun operating at a cathode voltage of 90 kV at 14A cathode current. Control of the electron beam is by cathode pulsing or CW. RF control is accomplished by low-level cathode magnetic field modulation. Computations show that velocity spread, both perpendicular and parallel, is considerable lower, rotational energy is higher and voltage gradients are significantly lower than for a comparable double anode magnetron injection gun, typically employed on lower frequency gyrotrons

  15. Long-pulse neutral beam power supply system for LBL 20 kV, 10 A sources

    Honey, V.J.; Baker, W.R.; Fitzgerald, M.L.

    1976-05-01

    A description is given of the power supplies and control system for the LBL 20 kV, 10 A, 10 sec long-pulse neutral beam source test facility, now in operation. Such sources are used in a number of existing and planned fusion power experiments.

  16. A high power CW or long pulse klystron: 500 kW at 3.7 GHz

    The design, technology, and preliminary test results for a new klystron for LHRH is described. The tube will deliver 500 kW in long pulse (min.) or CW operation at 3.7 GHz, with 45% efficiency into a high, fluctuating SWR

  17. Recent Long-Pulse Test Results of KSTAR ICRF Antenna with Active Cooling

    KSTAR ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency) system is being developed for the high-power and longpulse operation. For a 300 s operation at a high power of 6 MW, the antenna has many cooling channels inside the current strap, Faraday shield, cavity wall, and vacuum transmission line (VTL) to remove the dissipated RF loss power and incoming plasma heat loads. In the previous test campaign, the standoff capability was increased to 31.2 kVp, 300 s from 24.3 kVp, 300 s by applying water cooling on the ICRF antenna, but it was limited by an overheating of the vacuum feedthrough (VF) and the transmission line of the unmatched section which did not have cooling channels. During the recent RF test campaign (campaign-8), the cooling system for the VF and the transmission line of the unmatched section was developed to enhance the cooling capability. The cooling channels for inner conductors of VF and the transmission line were carefully designed and installed inside their inner conductors, which were connected in series. Outer conductors near the current maximum were also watercooled by using Al cooling blocks which have a cooling channel inside them. The high power and long pulse capabilities of the antenna were experimentally estimated with active cooling on both of the antenna and the unmatched transmission line

  18. Recent Long-Pulse Test Results of KSTAR ICRF Antenna with Active Cooling

    Bae, Y. D.; Kwak, J. G.; Yoon, J. S.; Wang, S. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    KSTAR ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency) system is being developed for the high-power and longpulse operation. For a 300 s operation at a high power of 6 MW, the antenna has many cooling channels inside the current strap, Faraday shield, cavity wall, and vacuum transmission line (VTL) to remove the dissipated RF loss power and incoming plasma heat loads. In the previous test campaign, the standoff capability was increased to 31.2 kVp, 300 s from 24.3 kVp, 300 s by applying water cooling on the ICRF antenna, but it was limited by an overheating of the vacuum feedthrough (VF) and the transmission line of the unmatched section which did not have cooling channels. During the recent RF test campaign (campaign-8), the cooling system for the VF and the transmission line of the unmatched section was developed to enhance the cooling capability. The cooling channels for inner conductors of VF and the transmission line were carefully designed and installed inside their inner conductors, which were connected in series. Outer conductors near the current maximum were also watercooled by using Al cooling blocks which have a cooling channel inside them. The high power and long pulse capabilities of the antenna were experimentally estimated with active cooling on both of the antenna and the unmatched transmission line.

  19. Particle fuelling for long pulse with standard gas puff and supersonic pulsed gas injection

    In addition to the standard gas puff and to the technically complex pellet injection, a novel intermediate method, based on the injection of a supersonic high density cloud of neutrals, has been recently implemented on the Tore Supra tokamak. Fuelling efficiency, in the 30-50% range are found while it lies in the 10-20% range for the gas puff. It is not sensitive to the plasma density and to the additional heating. According to modelling, the increased efficiency is attributed to the very short injection duration compared to the particle confinement time and to the strong cooling of the plasma edge resulting from the massive injection of matter. A feedback loop on the frequency of the injector has been successfully implemented to control the plasma density. In long pulse experiments (>200s), wall saturation has not been reached. Gas puffing rate was typically around 1 Pa.m3s-1 while dynamic wall retention around 0.6 Pa.m3s-1. Co-deposited carbon layer could trap such large amounts of gas. A discharge fuelled by supersonic pulsed gas injections exhibits lower wall retention than a gas puff fuelled discharge. (author)

  20. Beam extractions of a prototype long pulse ion source for the KSTAR NBI system

    Chang, Doo Hee; Seo, Chang Seok; Jun, Yong Woo; Oh, Byung Hoon; Jeong, Seung Ho; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang Ryul; Kim, Jin Choon [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    Preliminary beam extraction experiments of a prototype long pulse (300 s) ion source were carried out on the NBI Test Stand for the KSTAR. The prototype ion source consists of a magnet bucket plasma generator with multi-pole cusp fields, similar to the US LPIS, and a set of tetrode accelerator with circular apertures. Arc discharges of the plasma generator have been controlled precisely by both a space-charge-limited mode and an emission-limited mode. The emission-limited operation, well controlled by the applied heating voltage of cathode filaments, of plasma generator resulted in more efficient and stable discharges than the space-charge- limited mode. An optimum arc efficiency of 0.33 A/kW and maximum ion density of 8310{sup 11} cm{sup -3} were obtained by using a Langmuir probe. Optimum beam perveance of the prototype ion source, which was deduced from the ratio of gradient grid current to the beam current, was 0.52. The preliminary beam extraction results obtained at {<=} 41 kV appear less than the expected.

  1. Advances in lower hybrid current drive for tokamak long pulse operation. Technology and physics

    The paper gives a picture of the present status and understanding of technology and physics of Lower Hybrid Current Drive for long pulse operation in tokamaks, including the development of continuous wave (CW) high power klystrons, and its evolutions towards ITER. 3.7 GH / 700 kW CW klystrons produced in series by Thales Electron Devices are now in operation on Tore Supra. First series of eight klystrons delivered more than 4 MW to sustain non-inductive plasmas during 50 s. Moreover, a prototype of 500 kW CW klystron operating at 5 GHz developed for KSTAR by Toshiba Electron Tubes and Devices, and foreseen for ITER, is able to produce RF output powers of 300 kW / 800 s and 450 kW / 20 s on matched load. The situation on wave coupling and antennas is reported, with the latest Tore Supra results of the new CW Passive-Active Multi-junction (PAM) launcher: the antenna concept foreseen for ITER. First experiments with the PAM antenna in Tore Supra have provided extremely encouraging results in terms of power handling and coupling. Relevant ITER power density of ∼25 MW/m2 (2.7 MW of power injected into the plasma) has been maintained over ∼80 s. In addition, LH power of 2.7 MW has been coupled at a plasma-antenna distance of 10 cm. (author)

  2. Angiokeratoma of Fordyce response to long pulsed Nd:YAG laser treatment.

    Zeng, Ying; Zhan, Kui; Xie, Wen-Lian; Lin, Qiong-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Angiokeratoma of Fordyce can be easily diagnosed by their typical erythra and cured by varied therapeutic methods including surgery, electrocoagulation, cryotherapy, or various laser systems. Which are the optimal therapeutic methods? There are no consentaneous opinions in the reported articles. We present our characteristic treatment with the application of long pulsed neodymium-dopedyttrium-aluminum-garne (lpNd:YAG) laser in the treatment of angiokeratoma of Fordyce. A 1064 nm lpNd:YAG laser (spot size: 5 mm/7 mm, energy:90-130 J/cm(2) , and pulse duration: 10-20 ms.) was used to treat the patient's lesions. The desirable clinical endpoint of the treatment was lesions shrunk and turned pallor immediately after the irradiation. The treatment interval was at least 8 weeks. Of the 11 patients, 9 of them were cured and 2 of them were improved. The mean treatment sessions were 2.2 times. None of them had a scar formation and any other side effects. All of them were satisfied with the treatment results. We conclude that angiokeratoma of Fordyce responded well to lpNd:YAG laser treatment. It provided a simple, rapid, and no bleeding treatment in treating Angiokeratoma of Fordyce. PMID:26531316

  3. ECH control system for new 1 MW 110 GHz gyrotrons at DIII-D

    Two new Varian 1 MW 110 GHz gyrotrons are currently being developed and are due to be tested at General Atomics next year. A new cost-effective gyrotron control system to operate multiple gyrotrons simultaneously is being developed. Different systems and combinations that were considered include CAMAC, PLC, VXIbus, and a local computer. This paper will explain the decision making processes used in choosing and implementing the new control system architecture

  4. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of beam instabilities in gyrotrons

    Extensive simulations are performed to investigate effects of electron cyclotron instabilities on the gyrotron beam quality, using two-dimensional axisymmetric particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. Both electrostatic and electromagnetic models, as well as realistic geometries of the gyrotron are considered. It is found that a large beam density can lead to an electrostatic-instability-induced energy spread which substantially degrades the gyrotron efficiency. (author) 11 figs., 14 refs

  5. Two-gigawatt burst-mode operation of the intense microwave prototype (IMP) free-electron laser (FEL) for the microwave tokamak experiment (MTX)

    The MTX explored the plasma heating effects of 140 GHz microwaves from both Gyrotrons and from the IMP FEL wiggler. The Gyrotron was long pulse length (0.5 seconds maximum) and the FEL produced short-pulse length, high-peak power, single and burst modes of 140 GHZ microwaves. Full-power operations of the IMP FEL wiggler were commenced in April of 1992 and continued into October of 1992. The Experimental Test Accelerator H (ETA-II) provided a 50-nanosecond, 6-MeV, 2--3 kAmp electron beam that was introduced co-linear into the IMP FEL with a 140 GHz Gyrotron master oscillator (MO). The FEL was able to amplify the MO signal from approximately 7 kW to peaks consistently in the range of 1--2 GW. This microwave pulse was transmitted into the MTX and allowed the exploration of the linear and non-linear effects of short pulse, intense power in the MTX plasma. Single pulses were used to explore and gain operating experience in the parameter space of the IMP FEL, and finally evaluate transmission and absorption in the MTX. Single-pulse operations were repeatable. After the MTX was shut down burst-mode operations were successful at 2 kHz. This paper will describe the IMP FEL, Microwave Transmission System to MTX, the diagnostics used for calorimetric measurements, and the operations of the entire Microwave system. A discussion of correlated and uncorrelated errors that affect FEL performance will be made Linear and non-linear absorption data of the microwaves in the MTX plasma will be presented

  6. A generic mode selection strategy for high-order mode gyrotrons operating at multiple frequencies

    Franck, Joachim; Avramidis, Konstantinos; Gantenbein, Gerd; Illy, Stefan; Jin, Jianbo; Thumm, Manfred; Jelonnek, John

    2015-01-01

    High-power, high-frequency gyrotrons for electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive, such as proposed for the demonstration thermonuclear fusion reactor DEMO, require operating modes of very high order. As it is shown, the selection of the operating modes for such gyrotrons can be based on multi-frequency operability. A general selection strategy is derived, suitable for multi-purpose multi-frequency gyrotrons with quasi-optical mode converter and single-disc output window. Two examples, one of them relevant for future DEMO gyrotron designs, are discussed.

  7. Recent Tests on 117.5 GHz and 170 GHz Gyrotrons

    Felch K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two megawatt-class gyrotrons at frequencies of 117.5 GHz and 170 GHz have recently been fabricated and tested at CPI. The 117.5 GHz gyrotron was designed to produce up to 1.8 MW for 10-second pulses, and will be used for electron cyclotron heating and current drive on the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics. The 170 GHz gyrotron is specified as a 500 kW CW system, but has been designed with the goal of generating up to 1 MW CW. Oak Ridge National Laboratory will use the gyrotron in ITER ECH transmission line testing.

  8. A long-pulse repetitive operation magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    The improved magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) is a gigawatt-class L-band high power microwave tube. It has allowed us to generate 3.1 GW pulse of 40 ns duration in the single-pulse operation and 500 MW pulse of 25 ns duration in the repetition rate operation. However, because of the severe impedance mismatch, the power conversion efficiency is only about 4% in the repetition rate operation. In order to eliminate the impedance mismatch and obtain repetitive long-pulse high-power microwave (HPM), a series of experiments are carried out and the recent progress is presented in this paper. In the single-pulse operation, when the diode voltage is 466 kV and current is 41.6 kA, the radiated microwave power is above 2.2 GW, the pulse duration is above 102 ns, the microwave frequency is about 1.74 GHz, and the power conversion efficiency is about 11.5%. In the repetition rate operation, under the condition of the diode voltage about 400 kV, beam current about 38 kA, the radiated microwave power is about 1.0 GW, the pulse duration is about 85 ns. Moreover, the radiated microwave power and the pulse duration decline little by little when the shot numbers increase gradually. The experimental results show that the impedance matching is a vital factor for HPM systems and one of the major technical challenges is to improve the cathode for the repetition rate operation MILO

  9. Simultaneous measurement of coarse and unscheduled rapidly changing plasma parameters during long pulse discharges

    In a long pulse discharge plasma parameters changes rapidly because of unpredictable unknown events. These unpredictable rapid changes in plasma parameters should be examined in detail in order to understand the properties of plasma. Normally the unknown events causes a fast changes in plasma parameters and to capture these rapid changes one need to change the sampling rate from the normal sampling rate. This requires to digitize the plasma parameters at two different sampling rate, one at slow sampling rate during the low activity period and another at fast sampling rate to capture the changes occurring at the time of unknown events. This demands for simultaneous coarse and unscheduled rapid change measurement of plasma parameters at different sampling rates. To fulfill above requirement a CAMAC digitizer module has been designed to acquire the data for the whole shot at one sampling rate and to capture the unscheduled rapid changes at higher sampling rate simultaneously. The module is capable of detecting unknown event and changes the sampling rate by ten times for rapid changes measurements. It can store 16 K samples for fast events and 32 K samples for whole shot duration. Besides, the module has some other important features, different modes of operation, a monitoring mode, a single shot mode (Pre/Post trigger acquisition) with selectable sampling rate upto 1 MHz and a loss less continuous acquisition mode. The module was tested for 1 kHz nominal sampling rate for 3.2 seconds data and 10 kHz at the time of event occurrence for 160 msec. data. with 8 K pre trigger samples. (author)

  10. Simultaneous measurement of coarse and unscheduled rapidly changing plasma parameters during long pulse discharges

    Pujara, Harshad Dayaram; Kumar, Amit Srivastava [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2000-07-01

    In a long pulse discharge plasma parameters changes rapidly because of unpredictable unknown events. These unpredictable rapid changes in plasma parameters should be examined in detail in order to understand the properties of plasma. Normally the unknown events causes a fast changes in plasma parameters and to capture these rapid changes one need to change the sampling rate from the normal sampling rate. This requires to digitize the plasma parameters at two different sampling rate, one at slow sampling rate during the low activity period and another at fast sampling rate to capture the changes occurring at the time of unknown events. This demands for simultaneous coarse and unscheduled rapid change measurement of plasma parameters at different sampling rates. To fulfill above requirement a CAMAC digitizer module has been designed to acquire the data for the whole shot at one sampling rate and to capture the unscheduled rapid changes at higher sampling rate simultaneously. The module is capable of detecting unknown event and changes the sampling rate by ten times for rapid changes measurements. It can store 16 K samples for fast events and 32 K samples for whole shot duration. Besides, the module has some other important features, different modes of operation, a monitoring mode, a single shot mode (Pre/Post trigger acquisition) with selectable sampling rate upto 1 MHz and a loss less continuous acquisition mode. The module was tested for 1 kHz nominal sampling rate for 3.2 seconds data and 10 kHz at the time of event occurrence for 160 msec. data. with 8 K pre trigger samples. (author)

  11. A long-pulse repetitive operation magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator.

    Fan, Yu-Wei; Zhong, Hui-Huang; Zhang, Jian-De; Shu, Ting; Liu, Jin Liang

    2014-05-01

    The improved magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) is a gigawatt-class L-band high power microwave tube. It has allowed us to generate 3.1 GW pulse of 40 ns duration in the single-pulse operation and 500 MW pulse of 25 ns duration in the repetition rate operation. However, because of the severe impedance mismatch, the power conversion efficiency is only about 4% in the repetition rate operation. In order to eliminate the impedance mismatch and obtain repetitive long-pulse high-power microwave (HPM), a series of experiments are carried out and the recent progress is presented in this paper. In the single-pulse operation, when the diode voltage is 466 kV and current is 41.6 kA, the radiated microwave power is above 2.2 GW, the pulse duration is above 102 ns, the microwave frequency is about 1.74 GHz, and the power conversion efficiency is about 11.5%. In the repetition rate operation, under the condition of the diode voltage about 400 kV, beam current about 38 kA, the radiated microwave power is about 1.0 GW, the pulse duration is about 85 ns. Moreover, the radiated microwave power and the pulse duration decline little by little when the shot numbers increase gradually. The experimental results show that the impedance matching is a vital factor for HPM systems and one of the major technical challenges is to improve the cathode for the repetition rate operation MILO. PMID:24880374

  12. Proceedings of the workshop on neutron instrumentation for a long-pulse spallation source

    This workshop was carried out under the auspices of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Pulsed Spallation Source activity and its Pulsed Spallation Source Committee (PSSC). One of our activities has been the sponsorship of workshops related to neutron production by pulsed sources. At the Crystal City PSSC meeting a decision was made to hold a workshop on the instrumentation opportunities at a long-pulse spallation source (LPSS). The enclosed material represents the results of deliberations of the three working groups into which the participants were divided, covering elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and fundamental physics, as well as contributions from individual participants. We hope that the material in this report will be useful to the neutron scattering community as it develops a road-map for future neutron sources. The workshop was held at LBNL in mid-April with about sixty very dedicated participants from the US and abroad. This report presents the charge for the workshop: Based on the bench mark source parameters provided by Gary Russell, determine how a suite of spectrometers in each of the three working group's area of expertise would perform at an LPSS and compare this performance with that of similar spectrometers at a continuous source or a short-pulse source. Identify and discuss modifications to these spectrometers that would enhance their performance at an LPSS. Identify any uncertainties in the analysis of spectrometer performance that require further research. Describe what R ampersand D is needed to resolve these issues. Discuss how the performance of instruments would be affected by changes in source parameters such as repetition rate, proton pulse length, and the characteristic time of pulse tails. Identify beneficial changes that could become goals for target/moderator designers. Identify novel methods that might be applied at an LPSS. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology

  13. Study of the parasitic oscillations in a gyrotron

    This work is dedicated to the study of parasitic instabilities in a gyrotron, and to the influence of such instabilities on the interaction efficiency. The gyrotron is a high-power millimeter wave radiation source, based on the resonant interaction between a weakly relativistic electron beam immersed in a guiding magnetic field, and an electromagnetic wave. The gyrotron investigated here operates at a frequency close to 100 GHz: its main feature is that it is quasi optical. In this configuration, the electron beam interacts with a high order TEM eigenmode of a Fabry-Perot resonator, the axis of which is perpendicular to the electron beam path. During the development of this source, the highest efficiency that was achieved is approximately 30% lower than the theoretical predictions. At the same time, parasitic oscillations at frequencies close to the maximum relativistic cyclotronic frequency are detected. The power associated with these oscillations ranges from a few watts to a few kilowatts, with threshold currents of the order of 100 mA. It is suspected that the excitation of parasitic oscillations in the beam duct section before the interaction region might have a dramatic effect on the electron beam distribution function inducing, in particular, an energy spread. The cyclotron maser instability responsible for the energy exchange between particles and fields in a gyrotron, is very sensitive to energy spreads. It is thus necessary to identify the origin of the parasitic radiation. A few physical mechanisms suspected to lead to a degradation of the electron beam properties were investigated: the cyclotron maser process itself, the Bernstein electrostatic instability and the Langmuir instability. The experimental work concentrated on the study of the beam ducts between the electron gun and the resonant cavity. (author) figs., tabs., 90 refs

  14. Characterization of a gyrotron cavity at 10 GHz

    Experiments have been conducted to characterize a gyrotron cavity designed to operate in the Te 021 mode at 10 GHz. Small holes were introduced into the cavity to couple in and detect the probing power. Evaluation of the loaded Q factor is based on bandwidth measurements whereas standing-wave electric field profile is determined by using perturbation techniques. Good agreement between measured and predicted values of resonant frequencies and Q factors for several fundamental TE modes is found. (author)

  15. Investigations and advanced concepts on gyrotron interaction modeling and simulations

    Avramidis, K. A., E-mail: konstantinos.avramidis@kit.edu [Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe 76131 (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    In gyrotron theory, the interaction between the electron beam and the high frequency electromagnetic field is commonly modeled using the slow variables approach. The slow variables are quantities that vary slowly in time in comparison to the electron cyclotron frequency. They represent the electron momentum and the high frequency field of the resonant TE modes in the gyrotron cavity. For their definition, some reference frequencies need to be introduced. These include the so-called averaging frequency, used to define the slow variable corresponding to the electron momentum, and the carrier frequencies, used to define the slow variables corresponding to the field envelopes of the modes. From the mathematical point of view, the choice of the reference frequencies is, to some extent, arbitrary. However, from the numerical point of view, there are arguments that point toward specific choices, in the sense that these choices are advantageous in terms of simulation speed and accuracy. In this paper, the typical monochromatic gyrotron operation is considered, and the numerical integration of the interaction equations is performed by the trajectory approach, since it is the fastest, and therefore it is the one that is most commonly used. The influence of the choice of the reference frequencies on the interaction simulations is studied using theoretical arguments, as well as numerical simulations. From these investigations, appropriate choices for the values of the reference frequencies are identified. In addition, novel, advanced concepts for the definitions of these frequencies are addressed, and their benefits are demonstrated numerically.

  16. Modeling of mode purity in high power gyrotrons

    Cai, S.Y.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Saraph, G.P. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)] [and others

    1993-04-01

    Spurious mode generation at the same frequency of the operational mode in a high power gyrotron can significantly reduce the power handling capability and the stability of a gyrotron oscillator because these modes are usually not matched at the output window and thus have high absorption and reflection rates. To study the generation of this kind of mode, the authors developed a numerical model based on an existing multimode self-consistent time-dependent computer code. This model includes both TE and TM modes and accounts for mode transformations due to the waveguide inhomogeneity. With this new tool, they study the mode transformation in the gyrotron and the possibility of excitation of parasitic TE and TM modes in the up taper section due to the gyroklystron mechanism. Their preliminary results show moderate excitation of both TE and TM modes at the same frequency as the main operating mode at locations near their cutoff. Details of the model and further simulation results will be presented.

  17. Solid-state gyrotron body power supply, test results

    Santinelli, M. [Association Euratom-ENEA, ENEA CR Frascati, 00044 Frascati (Italy)], E-mail: santinelli@frascati.enea.it; Claesen, R.; Coletti, A. [Association Euratom-ENEA, ENEA CR Frascati, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Bonicelli, T.; Mondino, P.L. [EFDA, EFDA CSU Garching, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pretelli, M.; Rinaldi, L.; Sita, L.; Taddia, G. [OCEM SpA, Via 2 Agosto 1980 no. 11, 40016 San Giorgio di Piano (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    A 170 GHz, 2 MW, steady-state gyrotron is being developed in collaboration between European research associations and industries to be used for the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system of ITER, the gyrotron is presently in the prototype state. EFDA entrusted ENEA with the design of a new power supply for the gyrotron's body; in which, the traditional power vacuum tubes are replaced with solid-state components (IGBT); furthermore ENEA had the task of developing the new body power supply (BPS), following the initial conceptual design. The BPS is formed by 50 identical bidirectional (in current) modules, connected in series; the BPS's control system regulates the output voltage by changing the modulation index. OCEM Spa, under ENEA's supervision, has manufactured the BPS. Tests, done at the start of this year, showed the substantial agreement between the initial technical specifications and the values achieved. Particularly the ramp-up/down-emergency time (50-10 {mu}s), the accuracy ({+-}0.5%), the sine wave modulation (45-20 kV at 5 kHz) and the maximum phase shift (<10 deg.) have been tested. In the article, the new stair-way modulation (SWM) scheme will be sketched and the test results will be described in detail.

  18. Deflection of carbon dioxide laser and helium-neon laser beams in a long-pulse relativistic electron beam diode

    Deflection of carbon dioxide and helium-neon laser beams has been used to measure plasma and neutral density gradients during the operating mode and after the shorting time of a long-pulse field-emission electron beam diode. Plasma density gradients of (1014--1015) cm-4 were observed throughout the diode during the final microsecond of the 2--3 μs electron beam pulse. The neutral density gradient was less than 1x1018 cm-4 during the electron beam pulse. Upon diode shorting, neutral density gradients increased to (1018--1019) cm-4 over ∼1 μs, and decayed over many microseconds. Plasma density gradients of ∼1015 cm-4 were also observed after shorting. These experiments demonstrate the value of carbon-dioxide laser and helium-neon laser deflection for diagnosing plasma and neutral particles in long-pulse electron beam diodes

  19. Configuration and supervision of advanced distribuited data adquisition and processing systems for long pulse experiments using JINI technology.

    Gonzalez, Joaquin; Ruiz González, Mariano; Barrera Lopez de Turiso, Eduardo; López Navarro, Juan Manuel; Arcas Castro, Guillermo de; Vega, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    The development of tools for managing the capabilities and functionalities of distributed data acquisition systems is essential in long pulse fusion experiments. The intelligent test and measurement system (ITMS) developed by UPM and CIEMAT is a technology that permits implementation of a scalable data acquisition and processing system based on PXI or CompactPCI hardware. Several applications based on JINI technology have been developed to enable use of this platform for extensive implementat...

  20. Development of long pulse RF heating and current drive for H-mode scenarios with metallic walls in WEST

    Ekedahl, Annika, E-mail: annika.ekedahl@cea.fr; Bourdelle, Clarisse; Artaud, Jean-François; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Bufferand, Hugo; Colas, Laurent; Decker, Joan; Delpech, Léna; Dumont, Rémi; Goniche, Marc; Helou, Walid; Hillairet, Julien; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Mollard, Patrick; Nardon, Eric; Peysson, Yves; Tsitrone, Emmanuelle [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-12-10

    The longstanding expertise of the Tore Supra team in long pulse heating and current drive with radiofrequency (RF) systems will now be exploited in the WEST device (tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) [1]. WEST will allow an integrated long pulse tokamak programme for testing W-divertor components at ITER-relevant heat flux (10-20 MW/m{sup 2}), while treating crucial aspects for ITER-operation, such as avoidance of W-accumulation in long discharges, monitoring and control of heat fluxes on the metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) and coupling of RF waves in H-mode plasmas. Scenario modelling using the METIS-code shows that ITER-relevant heat fluxes are compatible with the sustainment of long pulse H-mode discharges, at high power (up to 15 MW / 30 s at I{sub P} = 0.8 MA) or high fluence (up to 10 MW / 1000 s at I{sub P} = 0.6 MA) [2], all based on RF heating and current drive using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). This paper gives a description of the ICRH and LHCD systems in WEST, together with the modelling of the power deposition of the RF waves in the WEST-scenarios.

  1. User's manual for LINEAR, a computer program that calculates the linear characteristics of a gyrotron

    This program calculates the linear characteristics of a gyrotron. This program is capable of: (1) calculating the starting current or frequency detuning for each gyrotron mode, (2) generating mode spectra, (3) plotting these linear characteristics as a function of device parameters (e.g., beam voltage), and (4) doing the above for any axial rf field profile

  2. Particle control in high power, high density long pulse operation on Tore Supra

    Bucalossi, J.; Brosset, C.; Dufour, E.; Loarer, T.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Pegourie, B.; Tsitrone, E.; Basiuk, V.; Bremond, S.; Chantant, M.; Colas, L.; Commaux, N.; Geraud, A.; Guirlet, R.; Gunn, J.; Hertout, P.; Hoang, G. T.; Kazarian, F.; Mazon, D.; Maget, P.; Mitteau, R.; Moreau, P.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Schunke, B.; Vallet, J. C.

    2005-07-01

    Long pulse operation, and the related issues such as non inductive current drive, particle control and power exhaust, is a crucial point to investigate for next step machines. In the Tore Supra tokamak, equipped with superconducting magnets and actively cooled plasma facing components discharge up to 6 minutes, coupling 1 GJ of energy to the plasma, have already been obtained with 3 MW of LHCD at low density (%50 n{sub C}W). A new scenario has been recently developed combining ICRH and LHCD up to a total power of 8.5 MW at high density (90% n{sub G}W), limited in time to 60 s by the capability of the ICRH heating systems (500 MJ of injected/extracted energy). This paper describes the new operating conditions and compares the results obtained in both scenarios with a special focus on particle control. The density is still maintained by a feedback loop on the gas injection system and do not exhibit any uncontrolled excursions. The radiated power fraction is stable and remains below 30% all along the discharges. In comparison with the previous low density long duration discharges, the gas injection rate necessary to maintain the stationary plasma density is increased by a factor up to 3. The edge electron temperature and density measured by a reciprocating probes are also significantly different, signifying as expected a higher recycling flux. On the other hand, particle balance analyses based on pressure measurements show that the absolute in vessel retention rate is roughly equivalent in both scenarios. This indicates that the retention mechanisms could be dominated by wall processes such as diffusion in carbon porosities rather than plasma processes, dependent on edge conditions, such as codeposition. Moreover, analysis of carbon deposits originating from different locations inside the vessel reveal relatively low deuterium content, unable to account for the large deuterium in-vessel retention worked out from particle balance. Finally, particle control with more

  3. Gyrotron and power supply development for upgrading the electron cyclotron heating system on DIII-D

    Highlights: ► Vendor completed design of 1.5 MW, 117.5 GHz gyrotron for DIII-D. ► Fabrication of gyrotron by vendor underway. ► Finalizing design of solid-state high voltage modulator for cathode power supply. ► Fabrication of solid-state high voltage modulator has begun. ► Finalizing design of high voltage linear amplifier for gyrotron body power supply. -- Abstract: An upgrade of the electron cyclotron heating system on DIII-D to almost 15 MW is being planned which will expand it from a system with six 1 MW 110 GHz gyrotrons to one with ten gyrotrons. A depressed collector 1.2 MW 110 GHz gyrotron is being commissioned as the seventh gyrotron. A new 117.5 GHz 1.5 MW depressed collector gyrotron has been designed, and the first article will be the eighth gyrotron. Two more are planned, increasing the system to ten total gyrotrons, and the existing 1 MW gyrotrons will subsequently be replaced with 1.5 MW gyrotrons. Communications and Power Industries completed the design of the 117.5 GHz gyrotron, and are now fabricating the first article. The design was optimized for a nominal 1.5 MW at a beam voltage of 105 kV, collector potential depression of 30 kV, and beam current of 50 A, but can achieve 1.8 MW at 60 A. The design of the collector permits modulation above 100 Hz by either the body or the cathode power supply, or both, while modulation below 100 Hz must use only the cathode power supply. General Atomics is developing solid-state power supplies for this upgrade: a solid-state modulator for the cathode power supply and a linear high voltage amplifier for the body power supply. The solid-state modulator has series-connected insulated-gate bipolar transistors that are switched at a fixed frequency by a pulse-width modulation regulator to control the output voltage. The design of the linear high voltage amplifier has series-connected transistors to control the output voltage, which was successfully demonstrated in a proof-of-principle test at 2 kV. The

  4. Gyrotron and power supply development for upgrading the electron cyclotron heating system on DIII-D

    Tooker, Joseph F., E-mail: tooker@fusion.gat.com [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Huynh, Paul [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Felch, Kevin; Blank, Monica; Borchardt, Philipp; Cauffman, Steve [Communications and Power Industries, 811 Hanson Way, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Vendor completed design of 1.5 MW, 117.5 GHz gyrotron for DIII-D. ► Fabrication of gyrotron by vendor underway. ► Finalizing design of solid-state high voltage modulator for cathode power supply. ► Fabrication of solid-state high voltage modulator has begun. ► Finalizing design of high voltage linear amplifier for gyrotron body power supply. -- Abstract: An upgrade of the electron cyclotron heating system on DIII-D to almost 15 MW is being planned which will expand it from a system with six 1 MW 110 GHz gyrotrons to one with ten gyrotrons. A depressed collector 1.2 MW 110 GHz gyrotron is being commissioned as the seventh gyrotron. A new 117.5 GHz 1.5 MW depressed collector gyrotron has been designed, and the first article will be the eighth gyrotron. Two more are planned, increasing the system to ten total gyrotrons, and the existing 1 MW gyrotrons will subsequently be replaced with 1.5 MW gyrotrons. Communications and Power Industries completed the design of the 117.5 GHz gyrotron, and are now fabricating the first article. The design was optimized for a nominal 1.5 MW at a beam voltage of 105 kV, collector potential depression of 30 kV, and beam current of 50 A, but can achieve 1.8 MW at 60 A. The design of the collector permits modulation above 100 Hz by either the body or the cathode power supply, or both, while modulation below 100 Hz must use only the cathode power supply. General Atomics is developing solid-state power supplies for this upgrade: a solid-state modulator for the cathode power supply and a linear high voltage amplifier for the body power supply. The solid-state modulator has series-connected insulated-gate bipolar transistors that are switched at a fixed frequency by a pulse-width modulation regulator to control the output voltage. The design of the linear high voltage amplifier has series-connected transistors to control the output voltage, which was successfully demonstrated in a proof-of-principle test at 2 kV. The

  5. Perspective gyrotron with mode converter for co- and counter-rotation operating modes

    Chirkov, A. V.; Denisov, G. G.; Kuftin, A. N.

    2015-06-01

    A gyrotron oscillator operating efficiently at modes of both rotations was developed and tested. The gyrotron operation can be switched between two modes: co- and counter rotating ones with respect to electron rotation in a resonance magnetic field. A synthesized mode converter provides output of both waves in the form of two different paraxial wave beams corresponding to direction of the mode rotation. Measured gyrotron power (up to 2 MW), interaction efficiency (34%), and diffraction losses in the mode converter (≈2%) agree well with the design values. The proposed gyrotron scheme alloys principal enhancement in the device parameters—possibility of electronic switching of output wave beam direction and possibility to arrange an effective scheme to provide frequency/phase locking of a gyrotron-oscillator.

  6. Infrared monitoring of 110 GHz gyrotron windows at DIII-D

    The combination of low millimeter wave losses and excellent thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties make artificial chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamonds a compelling choice for 1 MW 110 GHz gyrotron windows. Five gyrotrons are currently operating at the DIII-D tokamak. Three Gycom gyrotrons have boron nitride (BN) ceramic windows. Due to temperature increases of the windows up to about 930 deg. C, the pulse duration of these tubes is limited to 2 s for output power near 800 kW. Two Communications and Power Industries (CPI) gyrotrons with diamond windows are also installed and operating. The diamond disks of these windows and the construction of their water-cooling assemblies are different. This paper reviews the infrared (IR) measurements of both types of gyrotron windows, with emphasis on the two diamond designs. (authors)

  7. Perspective gyrotron with mode converter for co- and counter-rotation operating modes

    A gyrotron oscillator operating efficiently at modes of both rotations was developed and tested. The gyrotron operation can be switched between two modes: co- and counter rotating ones with respect to electron rotation in a resonance magnetic field. A synthesized mode converter provides output of both waves in the form of two different paraxial wave beams corresponding to direction of the mode rotation. Measured gyrotron power (up to 2 MW), interaction efficiency (34%), and diffraction losses in the mode converter (≈2%) agree well with the design values. The proposed gyrotron scheme alloys principal enhancement in the device parameters—possibility of electronic switching of output wave beam direction and possibility to arrange an effective scheme to provide frequency/phase locking of a gyrotron-oscillator

  8. Performance of 170 GHz high-power gyrotron for CW operation

    A quasi-steady-state oscillation of 100 s with 0.5 MW power level was demonstrated on a 170 GHz ITER gyrotron. The temperature of major components of the gyrotron reached the steady state, which gives a prospect for a 1 MW-CW, 170 GHz ITER gyrotron. For a further pulse extension and power increase, the gyrotron and its control system have been modified; i.e. a built-in radiator has been optimized for improvement of an efficiency of gyrotron output power and reduction of stray radiation, and pre-program controls of a cathode heater power, magnetic field at the cavity and voltage between anode and cathode, have been employed for stabilization of the beam current and the output power. (author)

  9. Research on a 170 GHz, 2 MW coaxial cavity gyrotron with inner-outer corrugation

    Hou, Shenyong, E-mail: houshenyong@sohu.com [Yangtze Normal University, Chongqing, 408001 (China); Yu, Sheng; Li, Hongfu [University of Electronics Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, a coaxial cavity gyrotron with inner-outer corrugation is researched. The electron kineto-equations and the first order transmission line equations of the gyrotron are derived from Lorentz force equation and the transmission line theory, respectively. And then, a 2 MW, 170 GHz coaxial cavity gyrotron with inner-outer corrugation is designed. By means of numerical calculation, the beam-wave interaction of the coaxial cavity gyrotron with inner-outer corrugation is investigated. Results show that the efficient and the outpower of the gyrotron are 42.3% and 2.38 MW, respectively.

  10. Architecture of central control system for the 10 MW ECRH - plant at W7-X

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) is the main heating method for the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator (W7-X). The mission of W7-X is to demonstrate the inherent steady state capability of stellarators at reactor relevant plasma parameters. A modular 10 MW ECRH plant at 140 GHz with 1 MW CW-capability power for each module is presently under construction at IPP-Greifswald as well as the W7-X, to meet the scientific objectives. The commissioning of the ECRH plant is well under way; three gyrotrons are operational at IPP in Greifswald. The strict modular design allows to operate each gyrotron separately and independent from all others. The ECRH plant consists not only of gyrotrons and high voltage power supplies, but also of many other devices such as superconductive magnets, collector sweep coils, gyrotron cooling systems with many water circuits and last but not least the quasi-optical transmission line for microwaves with remote controlled mirrors and further water cooled circuits. All these devices are essential for long pulse operation. A steady state ECRH has specific requirements on the stellarator machine itself, on the microwave sources, transmission elements and in particular on the central control system. The quasi steady state operation (up to 30 min) asks for real time microwave power adjustment during the different segments of one stellarator long pulse. Therefore the ECRH plant must operate with a maximum reliability and availability. A capable central control system is an important condition to achieve this goal. The central control system for the 10 MW ECRH - plant at W7-X comprises three main parts. In detail these are the voltage and current regulation of each gyrotron, the interlock system to prevent the gyrotrons from damages and the remote control system based on a hierarchy set of PLC's and computers. The architecture of this central control system is presented. (author)

  11. Fault-Protected Laser Diode Drivers for Improving the Performance and Lifetime of Multiple-Millisecond, Long-Pulse LDAs for NASA LIDAR Systems Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project will develop and deliver revolutionary driver technology with intelligent fault protection for driving long-pulse (> 2msec), quasi-CW laser...

  12. High power 303 GHz gyrotron for CTS in LHD

    A high-power pulsed gyrotron is under development for 300 GHz-band collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics in the Large Helical Device (LHD). High-density plasmas in the LHD require a probe wave with power exceeding 100 kW in the sub-terahertz region to obtain sufficient signal intensity and large scattering angles. At the same time, the frequency bandwidth should be less than several tens of megahertz to protect the CTS receiver using a notch filter against stray radiations. Moreover, duty cycles of ∼ 10% are desired for the time domain analysis of the CTS spectrum. At present, a 77 GHz gyrotron for electron cyclotron heating is used as a CTS wave source in the LHD. However, the use of such a low-frequency wave suffers from refraction, cutoff and absorption at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. Additionally, the signal detection is severely affected by background noise from electron cyclotron emission. To resolve those problems, high-power gyrotrons in the 300 GHz range have been developed. In this frequency range, avoiding mode competition is critical to realizing high-power and stable oscillation. A moderately over-moded cavity was investigated to isolate a desired mode from neighbouring modes. After successful tests with a prototype tube, the practical one was constructed with a cavity for TE22,2 operation mode, a triode electron gun forming intense laminar electron beams, and an internal mode convertor. We have experimentally confirmed single mode oscillation of the TE22,2 mode at the frequency of 303.3 GHz. The spectrum peak is sufficiently narrow. The output power of 290 kW has been obtained at the moment

  13. High power 303 GHz gyrotron for CTS in LHD

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Kasa, J.; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Kotera, M.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Tanaka, K.; Nishiura, M.

    2015-10-01

    A high-power pulsed gyrotron is under development for 300 GHz-band collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics in the Large Helical Device (LHD). High-density plasmas in the LHD require a probe wave with power exceeding 100 kW in the sub-terahertz region to obtain sufficient signal intensity and large scattering angles. At the same time, the frequency bandwidth should be less than several tens of megahertz to protect the CTS receiver using a notch filter against stray radiations. Moreover, duty cycles of ~ 10% are desired for the time domain analysis of the CTS spectrum. At present, a 77 GHz gyrotron for electron cyclotron heating is used as a CTS wave source in the LHD. However, the use of such a low-frequency wave suffers from refraction, cutoff and absorption at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. Additionally, the signal detection is severely affected by background noise from electron cyclotron emission. To resolve those problems, high-power gyrotrons in the 300 GHz range have been developed. In this frequency range, avoiding mode competition is critical to realizing high-power and stable oscillation. A moderately over-moded cavity was investigated to isolate a desired mode from neighbouring modes. After successful tests with a prototype tube, the practical one was constructed with a cavity for TE22,2 operation mode, a triode electron gun forming intense laminar electron beams, and an internal mode convertor. We have experimentally confirmed single mode oscillation of the TE22,2 mode at the frequency of 303.3 GHz. The spectrum peak is sufficiently narrow. The output power of 290 kW has been obtained at the moment.

  14. The Development of 460 GHz gyrotrons for 700 MHz DNP-NMR spectroscopy

    Idehara, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Khutoryan, E. M.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Ueda, K.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-07-01

    Two demountable gyrotrons with internal mode converters were developded as sub-THz radiation sources for 700 MHz DNP (Dynamic Nuclear Polarization) enhanced NMR spectroscopy. Experimental study on the DNP-NMR spectroscopy will be carried out in Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research, as a collaboration with FIR UF. Both gyrotrons operate near 460 GHz and the output CW power measured at the end of transmission system made by circular waveguides is typically 20 to 30 watts. One of them named Gyrotron FU CW GVI (we are using "Gyrotron FU CW GO-1" as an official name in Osaka University) is designed to have a special function of high speed frequency modulation δ f within 100 MHz band. This will expand excitable band width of ESR and increase the number of electron spins contributing to DNP. The other gyrotron, Gyrotron FU CW GVIA ("Gyrotron FU CW GO-II") has a function of frequency tunability Δ f in the range of wider than 1.5 GHz, which is achieved in steady state by changing magnetic field intensity. This function should be used for adjusting the output frequency at the optimal value to achieve the highest enhancement factor of DNP.

  15. Temperature and thermal stress fields during the pulse train of long-pulse laser irradiating aluminium alloy plate

    Zhang, Wei; Jin, Guangyong; Gu, Xiu-ying

    2014-12-01

    Based on Von Mises yield criterion and elasto-plastic constitutive equations, an axisymmetric finite element model of a Gaussian laser beam irradiating a metal substrate was established. In the model of finite element, the finite difference hybrid algorithm is used to solve the problem of transient temperature field and stress field. Taking nonlinear thermal and mechanical properties into account, transient distributions of temperature field and stress fields generated by the pulse train of long-pulse laser in a piece of aluminium alloy plate were computed by the model. Moreover,distributions as well as histories of temperature and stress fields were obtained. Finite element analysis software COMSOL is used to simulate the Temperature and thermal stress fields during the pulse train of long-pulse laser irradiating 7A04 aluminium alloy plate. By the analysis of the results, it is found that Mises equivalent stress on the target surface distribute within the scope of the center of a certain radius. However, the stress is becoming smaller where far away from the center. Futhermore, the Mises equivalent stress almost does not effect on stress damage while the Mises equivalent stress is far less than the yield strength of aluminum alloy targets. Because of the good thermal conductivity of 7A04 aluminum alloy, thermal diffusion is extremely quick after laser irradiate. As a result, for the multi-pulsed laser, 7A04 aluminum alloy will not produce obvious temperature accumulation when the laser frequency is less than or equal to 10 Hz. The result of this paper provides theoretical foundation not only for research of theories of 7A04 aluminium alloy and its numerical simulation under laser radiation but also for long-pulse laser technology and widening its application scope.

  16. Application of HDF5 in long-pulse quasi-steady state data acquisition at high sampling rate

    Highlights: • The new data-acquisition system supports long-pulse EAST data acquisition. • The new data-acquisition system is capable for most of the high frequency signals of EAST experiments. • The system's total throughput is about 500 MB/s. • The system uses HDF5 to store data. - Abstract: A new high sampling rate quasi-steady state data-acquisition system has been designed for the microwave reflectometry diagnostic of EAST experiments. In order to meet the requirements of long-pulse discharge and high sampling rate, it is designed based on PXI Express technology. A high-performance digitizer National Instruments PXIe-5122 with two synchronous analog input channels in which the maximum sampling rate is 100 MHz has been adopted. Two PXIe-5122 boards at 60 MSPS and one PXIe-6368 board at 2 MSPS are used in the system and the total throughput is about 500 MB/s. To guarantee the large amounts of data being saved continuously in the long-pulse discharge, an external hard-disk data stream enclosure NI HDD-8265 in which the capacity of sustained speed of reading and writing is 700 MB/s. And in RAID-5 mode its storage capacity is 80% of the total. The obtained raw data firstly stream continuously into NI HDD-8265 during the discharge. Then it will be transferred to the data server automatically and converted into HDF5 file format. HDF5 is an open source file format for data storage and management which has been widely used in various fields, and suitable for long term case. The details of the system are described in the paper

  17. Thermal Stress Analysis of 1 MW Gyrotron Collector

    At the DIII-D tokamak, up to 6 gyrotrons supply ECH power to the plasma. Each gyrotron injects 800 kW for 5 s at the tokamak during normal operation and are designed to generate 1 MW for 10 s pulse lengths. A power of ∼ 2000 kW is absorbed by the collector of each gyrotron from the electron beam. The gyrotrons are manufactured by Communications and Power Industries (CPI). The collectors are 0.6 m diameter cylinders, 60 cm in height. The collector walls are 20.7 mm thick and have 196 coolant holes of 5.3 mm diameter. Each pair of adjacent coolant holes is connected in series to provide 98 cooling paths. The collector material is oxygen free high conductivity copper (OFHC) and the collectors are cooled by water at a design flow rate of 300 gpm. In order to reduce the peak thermal load on the collector walls, the beam is swept over the collector wall at 4 Hz and an amplitude of about 15 cm using an external coil. Sweeping reduces the effective peak heat flux from 1400 W/cm2 to 600 W/cm2. During 2004 and 2005, some of the collectors failed due to stress cracks. In order to investigate reasons for these failures, a nonlinear elastic plastic thermal stress analysis of the collector was undertaken. The thermal stress analysis results indicated that the effective strain for OFHC material under the operating conditions limited the cycle life of the collector due to fatigue, resulting in failures. The desired service life of more than 105 thermal cycles can be obtained by 1) operational changes, such as: increasing the frequency and amplitude of sweeping to reduce the average heat flux, 2) design changes, such as: increasing the height and/or diameter of collector, enhancing the heat transfer coefficient by roughening the coolant channel walls or 3) changing the material of the collector to dispersion strengthened copper such as Glidcop. The analysis and conclusions will be presented. (author)

  18. Influence of construction concepts on training behavior of gyrotron magnets

    A series of 60 NbTi gyrotron magnets intended mainly for high frequency plasma heating complexes at Tokamak T-10 and Tokamak T-15, and prototypes and later improved versions for the same applications within ITER project, were developed and tested. A variety of constructional and technological concepts was applied. As a result of empirical experience in parallel with the application of established theoretical models to the magnet development, a remarkable improvement in winding mechanical stability was reached. The differences in magnet winding construction are related to operational as well as training and quench behaviour. (Author)

  19. Development of long-pulse, high-flatness pulse power supply for an S-band klystron

    FELI(Free Electron Laser Research Institute, Inc.) is constructing a free electron laser facility covering from 20 μm (infra-red region) to 0.35 μm (ultra-violet region), using an S-band linac. This linac uses two S-band klystrons capable of supplying long and flat microwave pulse in order to get the high stable and high quality FELs. In this paper, a long-pulse(24μs), high-flatness(0.08%) klystron pulse power supply developed by FELI and Nissin Electric Co. is described. (author)

  20. Counter-facing plasma focus system as a repetitive and/or long-pulse high energy density plasma source

    Aoyama, Yutaka; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-11-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrodes. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time durations in at least ten microseconds.

  1. Treatment of venous lesions of the lips and perioral area with a long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser.

    John, H E; Phen, H S; Mahaffey, P J

    2016-05-01

    The conventional treatments for venous lesions of the lip have been excision, cryotherapy, infrared coagulation, and sclerotherapy. We report the use of a long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser in 31 consecutive patients. At a mean follow up of 12 months (6 weeks to 3 years), 27 (87%) had no evidence of recurrence and one had a small contracted scar. The treatment is effective for both small and large lesions, and operation or other ablative techniques are no longer indicated, or considerably less relevant. PMID:26233280

  2. Progress in long-pulse production of powerful negative ion beams for JT-60SA and ITER

    Kojima, A.; Umeda, N.; Hanada, M.; Yoshida, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Akino, N.; Komata, M.; Mogaki, K.; Sasaki, S.; Seki, N.; Nemoto, S.; Shimizu, T.; Endo, Y.; Ohasa, K.; Dairaku, M.; Yamanaka, H.; Grisham, L. R.

    2015-06-01

    Significant progress in the extension of pulse durations of powerful negative ion beams has been made to realize the neutral beam injectors for JT-60SA and ITER. In order to overcome common issues of the long-pulse production/acceleration of negative ion beams in JT-60SA and ITER, new technologies have been developed in the JT-60SA ion source and the MeV accelerator in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. As for the long-pulse production of high-current negative ions for the JT-60SA ion source, the pulse durations have been successfully increased from 30 s at 13 A on JT-60U to 100 s at 15 A by modifying the JT-60SA ion source, which satisfies the required pulse duration of 100 s and 70% of the rated beam current for JT-60SA. This progress was based on the R&D efforts for the temperature control of the plasma grid and uniform negative ion productions with the modified tent-shaped filter field configuration. Moreover, each parameter of the required beam energy, current and pulse has been achieved individually by these R&D efforts. The developed techniques are useful to design the ITER ion source because the sustainment of the caesium coverage in the large extraction area is one of the common issues between JT-60SA and ITER. As for the long-pulse acceleration of high power density beams in the MeV accelerator for ITER, the pulse duration of MeV-class negative ion beams has been extended by more than 2 orders of magnitude by modifying the extraction grid with a high cooling capability and a high transmission of negative ions. A long-pulse acceleration of 60 s has been achieved at 70 MW m-2 (683 keV, 100 A m-2) which has reached the power density of JT-60SA level of 65 MW m-2. No degradations of the voltage holding capability of the acceleration voltage and the beam optics due to the distortion of the acceleration grids have been observed in this power density level. These results are the longest pulse durations of high-current and high-power-density negative ion beams in the

  3. Recession velocity of ablated surface for LY-12 aluminum targets irradiated by a long-pulse laser beam

    A method used to measure the burnthrough time of LY-12 aluminum targets irradiated by a 1.06 μm free-oscillation long-pulse laser beam is described. Measurement techniques for ablated target parameters Δm and h with electronic balance, metallograph and collector are also presented. The recession velocity and ablation velocity of targets have been experimentally obtained. For laser power I = 105 ∼ 107 W/cm2, the recession velocity ranges from 0.5 m/s to 3.8 m/s, and the ablation velocity between 1 g/s and 8 g/s

  4. Stabilization of Gyrotron Frequency by PID Feedback Control on the Acceleration Voltage

    Khutoryan, E. M.; Idehara, T.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-12-01

    The results of frequency stabilization by proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback control of acceleration voltage in the 460-GHz Gyrotron FU CW GVI (the official name in Osaka University is Gyrotron FU CW GOI) are presented. The experiment was organized on the basis of the frequency modulation by modulation of acceleration voltage of beam electrons. The frequency stabilization during 10 h experiment was better than 10-6, which is compared with the results of the frequency deviation in free-running gyrotron operation.

  5. Development of ITER CODAC compatible gyrotron local control system and its operation

    JAEA has developed a prototype of the gyrotron local control system required in the ITER ECH and CD system. This system is compatible with the ITER plant control design handbook. The code is based on the ITER CODAC Core System and implements functions of the state transition management and monitoring in the gyrotron operating system and the power supply control and data acquisition. We have succeeded in the demonstration test of high power operation of an ITER 170 GHz gyrotron using the present system and the ITER compatible setup and protocol. (J.P.N.)

  6. A 2 MW, 170 GHz coaxial cavity gyrotron - experimental verification of the design of main components

    A 2 MW, CW, 170 GHz coaxial cavity gyrotron is under development in cooperation between European Research Institutions (FZK Karlsruhe, CRPP Lausanne, HUT Helsinki) and the European tube industry (TED, Velizy, France). The design of critical components has recently been examined experimentally at FZK Karlsruhe with a short pulse (∼ few ms) coaxial cavity gyrotron. This gyrotron uses the same cavity and the same quasioptical (q.o.) RF-output system as designed for the industrial prototype and a very similar electron gun

  7. New results and applications for the quasioptical gyrotron

    Fliflet, A.W.; Fischer, R.P.; Manheimer, W.M. (Plasma Physics Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375-5320 (United States))

    1993-07-01

    The quasioptical gyrotron (QOG), which features an open resonator formed by a pair of spherical mirrors instead of the conventional gyrotron waveguide cavity, has been under development at the U. S. Naval Research Laboratory as a tunable high power millimeter-wave source for tokamak plasma heating, advanced radars, and power beaming. Results have recently been obtained for a quasioptical gyroklystron (QOGK) realized by the addition of an open-mirror prebunching resonator driven by an 85 GHz, 1.5 kW extended interaction oscillator. Efficiency enhancement by mode priming has been investigated, and efficiencies up to 19% have been obtained by increasing the frequency detuning of the operating mode. An overall efficiency of 30% was obtained by the addition of a simple depressed collector. Phase-locked operation was demonstrated at a power of 57 kW and efficiency of 16%. The high circulating power in the QOG resonator is currently being considered for use as an electromagnetic wiggler for compact infrared free-electron lasers. The QOG is also promising as a source for an active sensor of upper atmosphere trace impurities.

  8. Application of Fusion Gyrotrons to Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS)

    Woskov, P.; Einstein, H.; Oglesby, K.

    2013-10-01

    The potential size of geothermal energy resources is second only to fusion energy. Advances are needed in drilling technology and heat reservoir formation to realize this potential. Millimeter-wave (MMW) gyrotrons and related technologies developed for fusion energy research could contribute to enabling EGS. Directed MMW energy can be used to advance rock penetration capabilities, borehole casing, and fracking. MMWs are ideally suited because they can penetrate through small particulate extraction plumes, can be efficiently guided long distances in borehole dimensions, and continuous megawatt sources are commercially available. Laboratory experiments with a 10 kW, 28 GHz CPI gyrotron have shown that granite rock can be fractured and melted with power intensities of about 1 kW/cm2 and minute exposure times. Observed melted rock MMW emissivity and estimated thermodynamics suggest that penetrating hot, hard crystalline rock formations may be economic with fusion research developed MMW sources. Supported by USDOE, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Impact Technologies, LLC.

  9. Fast data acquisition system based on digital oscilloscopes for fluctuation measurements in a long pulse JT-60U tokamak plasma

    We have developed a new data acquisition (DAQ) system with fast sampling rate for fluctuation measurements in a long pulse JT-60U tokamak plasma. This system is based on a powerful digital oscilloscope, which has a large acquisition memory up to 50 Mwords/ch, 1 MHz sampling rate and 16 bits high resolution AD convertors. The system is composed of plural digital oscilloscopes and mass storages. On this system, most of data acquisition processes are executed at each digital oscilloscope. This feature of the system leads to an advantage that the processing loads are distributed among the digital oscilloscopes. This system has been successfully employed for measurements of various fluctuations obtained through magnetic probes, beam emission spectroscopy and so on. The size of the acquired data using this system has reached up to 10 GB/shot so far. It has demonstrated that this system is very powerful for data acquisition of multi-channeled signals with high time resolution in a long pulse plasma

  10. Development of a 33 kV, 20 A long pulse converter modulator for high average power klystron

    Research, design, and development of high average power, long pulse modulators for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source are underway at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology. With this objective, a prototype of long pulse modulator capable of delivering 33 kV, 20 A at 5 Hz repetition rate has been designed and developed. Three Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBT) based switching modules driving high frequency, high voltage transformers have been used to generate high voltage output. The IGBT based switching modules are shifted in phase by 120° with respect to each other. The switching frequency is 25 kHz. Pulses of 1.6 ms pulse width, 80 μs rise time, and 70 μs fall time have been achieved at the modulator output. A droop of ±0.6% is achieved using a simple segmented digital droop correction technique. The total fault energy transferred to the load during fault has been measured by conducting wire burn tests and is found to be within 3.5 J