WorldWideScience

Sample records for 14-mev incident neutrons

  1. FEASIBILITY OF MEASURING IRON IN VIVO USING FAST 14 MEV NEUTRONS.

    WIELOPOLSKI, L.

    2005-05-01

    In this short report, I reassess the feasibility of measuring iron in vivo in the liver and heart of thalassemia patients undergoing chelation therapy. Despite the multiplicity of analytical methods for analyzing iron, only two, magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic susceptibility, are suitable for in vivo applications, and these are limited to the liver because of the heart's beat. Previously, a nuclear method, gamma-resonance scattering, offered a quantitative measure of iron in these organs; however, it was abandoned because it necessitated a nuclear reactor to produce the radioactive source. I reviewed and reassessed the status of two alternative nuclear methods, based on iron spectroscopy of gamma rays induced by fast neutron inelastic scattering and delayed activation in iron. Both are quantitative methods with high specificity for iron and adequate penetrating power to measure it in organs sited deep within the human body. My experiments demonstrated that both modalities met the stated qualitative objectives to measure iron. However, neutron dosimetry revealed that the intensity of the neutron radiation field was too weak to reliably assess the minimum detection limits, and to allow quantitative extrapolations to measurements in people. A review of the literature, included in this report, showed that these findings agree qualitatively with the published results, although the doses reported were about three orders-of-magnitude higher than those I used. Reviewing the limitations of the present work, steps were outlined for overcoming some of the shortcomings. Due to a dearth of valid quantitative alternatives for determining iron in vivo, I conclude that nuclear methods remain the only viable option. However, from the lessons learned, further systematic work is required before embarking on clinical studies.

  2. Neutron activitation analysis of an air-dust sample using a high-flux 14 Mev neutron generator

    The 14 MeV neutron activation analysis technique is illustrated for multielement analysis of a Milanese air-dust sample. The neutron generator and electronic system, the efficiency and flux calibration, the γ-ray background, the sample preparation and the peak analysis used are described. After careful corrections of all possible interferences and error calculations, the results of 24 elemental concentrations are compared with those of other analytical techniques in the scope of an interlaboratory test. (orig.)

  3. Linking laboratory and in situ activation analysis of rock-forming elements using a 14 Mev neutron source. Doctoral thesis

    Truax, J.

    1995-10-06

    This work examines the ability of a borehole-conveyed delayed neutron activation system to perform elemental analysis of earth formations with the combination of a neutron generator and a large germanium spectrometer. High purity germanium spectrometers are now made large enough that detection efficiency rivals that of borehole-compatible scintillators. Elemental concentrations of silicon, aluminum, magnesium, and sodium are important quantities used in the characterization of rocks. A series of activation spectrometry experiments was performed on chemically pure compounds of these elements in a neutron moderating environment similar to what would pertain in a borehole measurement. Then, the geometry of the experimental setup was entered into a radiation transport modeling code based on a Monte Carlo process. The purpose of this exercise was to compare the measured responses with those predicted by the reaction cross sections in the library of the model, which are often ill-defined for high energy neutron interactions.

  4. Grazing Incidence Neutron Optics

    Gubarev, Mikhail V. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor); Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Neutron optics based on the two-reflection geometries are capable of controlling beams of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence. The preferred mirror fabrication technique is a replication process with electroform nickel replication process being preferable. In the preliminary demonstration test an electroform nickel optics gave the neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20.ANG.. The replication techniques can be also be used to fabricate neutron beam controlling guides.

  5. Fast Neutron Induced Fission neutron Spectra Below the Incident Energy

    Woodring, Mitchell L.; Egan, James J.; Kegel, Gunter H.; DeSimone, David J.

    2008-06-15

    Fission neutron spectra from neutron induced fission in 235U and 239Pu for energies below that of the neutron inducing fission have been measured. The spectra were obtained for 1.5 MeV and 2.5 MeV incident neutrons. Previous accelerator-based fission neutron spectra measurements have been seriously complicated by time-correlated gamma rays and scattered neutrons from the fission sample. Three barium fluoride detectors were placed near the sample undergoing induced fission and used to identify fission gamma rays. A coincidence of fission gamma rays was used to gate a liquid scintillator neutron detector to distinguish fission events from other events. The fission neutron spectral shape and average energy measured in this experiment compare well to both previous measurements and prior theory and also suggest a dependence on incident neutron energy and mass of the fissioning nucleus. An overview of the experiment, a discussion of the results, and the importance of this work to homeland security are given.

  6. Fast-neutrons incident on holmium

    Differential neutron-scattering cross-sections of 165Ho are measured at 40 or more scattering angles and at ∼0.5 MeV incident-energy intervals from ∼4.5-10.0 MeV. These results are combined with previously-reported neutron total and scattering cross-sections to construct a comprehensive experimental data base which is interpreted in the context of a coupled-channels model, with attention to the collective excitation of the K=7/2- ground-state rotational band. Physical aspects are discussed and comparisons made with previous models reported in the literature and with the relevant portions of the ENDF/B-6 evaluated nuclear data file

  7. Grazing-Incidence Neutron Optics based on Wolter Geometries

    Gubarev, M. V.; Ramsey, B. D.; Mildner, D. F. R.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of grazing-incidence neutron imaging optics based on the Wolter geometries have been successfully demonstrated. Biological microscopy, neutron radiography, medical imaging, neutron crystallography and boron neutron capture therapy would benefit from high resolution focusing neutron optics. Two bounce optics can also be used to focus neutrons in SANS experiments. Here, the use of the optics would result in lower values of obtainable scattering angles. The high efficiency of the optics permits a decrease in the minimum scattering vector without lowering the neutron intensity on sample. In this application, a significant advantage of the reflective optics over refractive optics is that the focus is independent of wavelength, so that the technique can be applied to polychromatic beams at pulsed neutron sources.

  8. Development of Grazing Incidence Optics for Neutron Imaging and Scattering

    Gubarev, M. V.; Khaykovich, B.; Liu, D.; Ramsey, B. D.; Zavlin, V. E.; Kilaru, K.; Romaine, S.; Rosati, R. E.; Bruni, R.; Moncton, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Because of their wave nature, thermal and cold neutrons can be reflected from smooth surfaces at grazing incidence angles, be reflected by multilayer coatings or be refracted at boundaries of different materials. The optical properties of materials are characterized by their refractive indices which are slightly less than unity for most elements and their isotopes in the case of cold and thermal neutrons as well as for x-rays. The motivation for the optics use for neutrons as well as for x-rays is to increase the signal rate and, by virtue of the optic's angular resolution, to improve the signal-to-noise level by reducing the background so the efficiency of the existing neutron sources use can be significantly enhanced. Both refractive and reflective optical techniques developed for x-ray applications can be applied to focus neutron beams. Typically neutron sources have lower brilliance compared to conventional x-ray sources so in order to increase the beam throughput the neutron optics has to be capable of capturing large solid angles. Because of this, the replicated optics techniques developed for x-ray astronomy applications would be a perfect match for neutron applications, so the electroformed nickel optics under development at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) can be applied to focus neutron beams. In this technique, nickel mirror shells are electroformed onto a figured and superpolished nickel-plated aluminum cylindrical mandrel from which they are later released by differential thermal contraction. Cylindrical mirrors with different diameters, but the same focal length, can be nested together to increase the system throughput. The throughput can be increased further with the use of the multilayer coatings deposited on the reflectivr surface of the mirror shells. While the electroformed nickel replication technique needs to be adopted for neutron focusing, the technology to coat the inside of cylindrical mirrors with neutron multilayers has to be

  9. Few-MeV neutrons incident on yttrium

    Neutron total and scattering cross sections of elemental yttrium are measured in the few-MeV region with broad resolutions. The total-cross section measurements extend from approx. = 0.5 to 4.2 MeV in steps of less than or equal to 0.1 MeV. Neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured from approx. = 1.5 to 4.0 MeV, at incident-neutron energy intervals of less than or equal to 50 keV and at ten or more scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160 deg. Inelastically-scattered neutron groups are observed corresponding to the excitation of levels at 909 +- 23, 1504 +- 20, 1747 +- 16, 2224 +- 16, 2567 +- 26, 2889 +- 12 and 3104 +- 10 keV. The experimental results are discussed in terms of the spherical optical-statistical, coupled-channels and core-coupling models and compared with corresponding quantities given in the evaluated nuclear data file ENDF/B-V

  10. Contamination from the next higher incident energy in inelastic neutron scattering measurements with multiple incident energies on chopper spectrometers

    A highly efficient measurement technique utilizing multiple incident energies (Eis) simultaneously on a neutron chopper spectrometer has recently become popular in inelastic neutron scattering studies of condensed matter. However, the inelastic scattering spectrum of a target incident energy can be contaminated by the scattering process of other Eis. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the extent to which the spectrum of a target Ei in this type of measurement can be contaminated by the scattering process of the next higher Ei. We estimated the relative intensity of the scattering from the next higher Ei for the neutron chopper spectrometers 4SEASONS and AMATERAS at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC)

  11. Neutron-induced fission: properties of prompt neutron and γ rays as a function of incident energy

    Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.

    2016-06-01

    We have applied the Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory, in a Monte-Carlo implementation, to the de-excitation of fission fragments, obtaining a reasonable description of the characteristics of neutrons and gamma rays emitted before beta decays toward stability. Originally implemented for the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the neutroninduced fission of 235U and 239Pu at thermal neutron energy, in this contribution we discuss the extension of the formalism to incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV. For the emission of pre-fission neutrons, at incident energies beyond second-chance fission, we take into account both the pre-equilibrium and statistical pre-fission components. Phenomenological parameterizations of mass, charge and TKE yields are used to obtain the initial conditions for the fission fragments that subsequently decay via neutron and emissions. We illustrate this approach for 239Pu(n,f).

  12. Proposed algorithm to angular radiation incidence correction of fast neutron track dosimeter

    Aiming to improve the dosimetry of workers potentially exposed to neutron radiation in Brazil, the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN, a governmental Research Center, in association with PRO-RAD, a private Monitoring Service, designed and developed an individual dosimeter for gamma-neutron mixed field monitoring using the techniques of Thermoluminescent Albedo Dosimetry (TLAD) and Solid State Nuclear Track Dosimetry (SSNTD). Neutron doses are preferably estimated according to albedo neutrons dosimeter response. Track detectors are used just to high fast neutron doses confirmation. Thermoluminescent detectors Harshaw TLD-600 and TLD-700 were used to evaluate gamma and intermediate (albedo) neutrons doses. A commercial polycarbonate produced in Brazil, named SS-1, was used as track detector to measure fast neutrons doses. Previous study shown that SS-1 directional (angular) response presents a cosine behavior. Knowing the incidence angle, a correction factor, equal to the inverse of this angle's cosine, must be applied in the dose calculation algorithm. The ratio of fast and albedo neutrons responses could be considered constant as a function of dose, but decreases proportionally with increasing radiation incidence angle. This variation allows estimating the incidence angle and, then, correcting the fast neutrons dose response. An algorithm to directional incidence correction applied to Americium-Beryllium neutron sources and dose range of radiation protection interest (up to 20 mSv) was proposed based on these premises and considering that correction factor will be applied only if the ratio of fast and albedo neutron responses is below its average to normal incidence less 30% (∼ 200 tracks/cm2.nC). (author)

  13. Analysis of incident-energy dependence of delayed neutron yields in actinides

    Nasir, Mohamad Nasrun bin Mohd, E-mail: monasr211@gmail.com; Metorima, Kouhei, E-mail: kohei.m2420@hotmail.co.jp; Ohsawa, Takaaki, E-mail: ohsawa@mvg.biglobe.ne.jp; Hashimoto, Kengo, E-mail: kengoh@pp.iij4u.or.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kindai University, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka, 577-8502 (Japan)

    2015-04-29

    The changes of delayed neutron yields (ν{sub d}) of Actinides have been analyzed for incident energy up to 20MeV using realized data of precursor after prompt neutron emission, from semi-empirical model, and delayed neutron emission probability data (P{sub n}) to carry out a summation method. The evaluated nuclear data of the delayed neutron yields of actinide nuclides are still uncertain at the present and the cause of the energy dependence has not been fully understood. In this study, the fission yields of precursor were calculated considering the change of the fission fragment mass yield based on the superposition of fives Gaussian distribution; and the change of the prompt neutrons number associated with the incident energy dependence. Thus, the incident energy dependent behavior of delayed neutron was analyzed.The total number of delayed neutron is expressed as ν{sub d}=∑Y{sub i} • P{sub ni} in the summation method, where Y{sub i} is the mass yields of precursor i and P{sub ni} is the delayed neutron emission probability of precursor i. The value of Y{sub i} is derived from calculation of post neutron emission mass distribution using 5 Gaussian equations with the consideration of large distribution of the fission fragments. The prompt neutron emission ν{sub p} increases at higher incident-energy but there are two different models; one model says that the fission fragment mass dependence that prompt neutron emission increases uniformly regardless of the fission fragments mass; and the other says that the major increases occur at heavy fission fragments area. In this study, the changes of delayed neutron yields by the two models have been investigated.

  14. Prompt neutron multiplicity distribution for 235U(n,f) at incident energies up to 20 MeV

    CHEN Yong-Jing; LIU Ting-Jin

    2011-01-01

    For the n+U fission reaction, the total excitation energy partition of the fission fragments, the average neutron kinetic energy (A) and the total average energies E(A) removed by γ rays as a function of fission fragment mass are given at incident energies up to 20 MeV. The prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of the fragment mass, ν(A), for neutron-induced fission of U at different incident neutron energies is calculated. The calculated results are checked with the total average prompt neutron multiplicities ν and compared with the experimental and evaluated data. Some prompt neutron and γ emission mechanisms are discussed.

  15. Theoretical model application to the evaluation of fission neutron data up to 20 MeV incidence energy

    A complex statistical theory of fission neutron emission combined with a phenomenological fission model has been used to calculate fission neutron data for 238U. Obtained neutron multiplicities and energy spectra as well as average fragment energies for incidence energies from threshold to 20 MeV (including multiple-chance fission) are compared with traditional data representations. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  16. Measurement of neutron-production double-differential cross sections for continuous neutron-incidence reaction up to 100 MeV

    The inclusive measurements of neutron-incident neutron-production double-differential cross sections in intermediate energy range is now being carried out. Spallation neutrons are used as incident particles. As a part of this, the experiment was performed by using of NE213 liquid organic scintillators to detect outgoing-neutrons. Incident-neutron energy was determined by time-of-flight technique, and outgoing-neutron energy spectrum was derived by unfolding light-output spectrum of NE213 with response functions calculated by SCINFUL-R. Preliminary cross sections were obtained up to about 100 MeV, and were compared with calculations by the GNASH code. It is hoped to get pure measurements by using measured response functions for our detectors used in this study. (author)

  17. Simulation of Radiation Dose and Neutron Incidence rate for various neutron shielding materials

    Choi, Yeon-Gyeong; Kim, Yu-Seok [Dongguk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    A beam line for PIXE analysis is composed of diffuser foil that scatters proton beam, collimator for selecting a uniform portion of the scattered beam or a nozzle system. A beam extracted from the accelerator generates many neutrons and gamma rays due to this collision between the collimator and diffuser foil. Therefore, since generated neutrons and gamma rays can cause radioactivation on surrounding substances, it must be shielded using appropriate shielding materials. This paper has performed an analysis on the radiation dose absorbed by the carbon plate used as the energy degrader in the PIXE analysis beam line using the 13-MeV cyclotron and a shielding study on the neutrons generated in the nozzle system. Using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) program, a shielding effect comparison was conducted on the polyethylene, borated polyethylene and paraffin which is representing substances used as shielding materials of neutrons and shielding evaluation was conducted through thickness calculation in order to shield the neutrons being generated. In this paper, in order to obtain the radiation dose absorbed by the energy degrader and to shield the neutrons generated in the PIXE nozzle system composed of energy degrader and proton beam nozzle, a comparative analysis on the three types of most commonly used shielding materials, such as polyethylene, borated polyethylene and paraffin blocks was conducted for its shielding effects. In addition, after comparing the shielding effects on the three types of shielding materials, borated polyethylene have shown the most absorption rate of neutrons and seemed to be the most appropriate shielding material.

  18. Measurement of secondary neutrons and gamma rays produced by neutron bombardment of water over the incident energy range 1 to 20 MeV

    The spectra of secondary neutrons and gamma rays produced by neutron bombardment of a thick (approx. 1 mean free path) sample of water have been measured as a function of the incident neutron energy over the range 1 to 20 MeV. Data were taken for angles of 900 and 1400. A linac (ORELA) was used as a neutron source with a 47-m flight path. Incident energy was determined by time-of-flight, while secondary spectra were determined by pulse-height unfolding techniques. The results of the measurements are presented in forms suitable for comparison to calculations based on the evaluated data files. (6 figures, 9 tables) (auth)

  19. New opportunities for quasielastic and inelastic neutron scattering at steady-state sources using mechanical selection of the incident and final neutron energy

    We propose a modification of the neutron wide-angle velocity selector (WAVES) device that enables inelastic (in particular, quasielastic) scattering measurements not relying on the neutron time-of-flight. The proposed device is highly suitable for a steady-state neutron source, somewhat similar to a triple-axis spectrometer, but with simultaneous selection of the incident and final neutron energy over a broad range of scattering momentum transfer. Both the incident and final neutron velocities are defined by the WAVES geometry and rotation frequency. The variable energy transfer is achieved through the natural variation of the velocity of the transmitted neutrons as a function of the scattering angle component out of the equatorial plane

  20. The dependence of cumulative 238U(n,f) fission yield on incident-neutron energy

    ZHENG Na; ZHONG Chunlai; MA Liyong; CHEN Zhongjing; LI Xiangqing; LIU Tingjin; CHEN Jinxiang; FAN Tieshuan

    2009-01-01

    This work is aim at studying the dependence of fission yields on incident neutron energy,so as to produce evaluated yield sets of the energy dependence.Experimental data at different neutron energies for gas fission products 85m,87,88Kr and 138Xe resulting from the 238U(n,f) reaction are processed using codes AVERAGE for weighed average and ZOTT for simultaneous evaluation.Energy dependence of the cumulative fission product yields on the incident neutron is presented.The evaluated curve of product yield is compared with the results calculated by the TALYS-0.64 code.The present evaluation is consistent with other main libraries in error permission.The fit curve of 87,88Kr can be recommended to predict the unmeasured fission yields.Comparisons of the evaluated energy dependence curves with theoretical calculated results show that the predictions using purely theoretical model for the fission process are not sufficiently accurate and reliable for the calculations of the cumulative fission yields for the 238U(n,f).

  1. Longevity and tumour incidence in mice exposed to fast neutrons at different ages

    Experiments are under way in the authors' laboratory to observe both neoplastic and non-neoplastic late effects in mice irradiated with fission neutrons and X-rays at three different ages. Analysis of data from over 2800 animals is in progress and a preliminary evaluation can be made on the survival and the pathology at spontaneous death of mice irradiated in utero and at 3 months of age. Single doses of 250kV X-rays or of attenuated fission neutrons obtained in the biological channel of the experimental fast reactor RSV TAPIRO of the Casaccia Centre were given to male BC3F1 mice of 3 months of age and to pregnant females on day 17.5 post coitum. Both male and female offspring of the latter group were followed to spontaneous death, along with appropriate untreated controls. As for the 3 month old irradiated animals their mean survival time was decreased by X-rays, the dose-effect relationship being compatible with a linear fitting. Fission neutrons proved to be more efficient than X-rays in the induction of life shortening, but the shape of the dose-effect relationship did not fit a linear model because efficiency is higher at low than at high neutron doses. Reticulum cell sarcoma (RCS) was decreased by increasing X-ray and neutron doses, the latter being more efficient. The final incidences of all other neoplasms, regardless of tumour type and site, indicate that neutrons are more efficient than X-rays in tumour induction at low and intermediate doses. As for prenatally irradiated mice, no detectable effect on mean lifespan was observed for either type of radiation. A low final frequency of RCS was seen after irradiation at all dose levels of both types of radiation. The incidence of all other tumours was practically unchanged in male mice irradiated as foetuses with X-rays, but a significant excess was found after neutron irradiation, showing a frequency peak in the range of 0.27-0.45Gy. Similar results were obtained after irradiation of foetal females. (author)

  2. MCNP simulation of the incident and Albedo neutron response of the IRD Albedo Neutron Dosemeter for 241Am-Be moderated sources

    The IRD TLD Albedo dosemeter measures both incident and albedo neutron component. The incident to Albedo ratio is used to take into account the energy dependence of its response. In this paper, the behavior of the IRD Albedo dosemeter response as a function of the incident to Albedo ratio for 241Am-Be sources was simulated to improve its algorithm. The simulation was performed in MCNPX transport code and presents a good agreement with experimental measurements. The results obtained in this work are very useful to improve the accuracy of the IRD Albedo dosemeter at real neutron workplace. (author)

  3. Investigation of 234U(n,f) as a Function of Incident Neutron Energy

    Al-Adili, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Pomp, S.

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the reaction 234U(n,f) have been performed at incident neutron energies from 0.2 MeV to 5 MeV at the 7 MV Van De Graaf accelerator at IRMM. A twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber was used for fission-fragment detection. Parallel digital and analogue data acquisitions were applied in order to compare the two techniques. First results on the angular anisotropy and preliminary mass distributions are presented along with a first comparison between the two techniques.

  4. The calculation program for activity correction by neutron incident on the edges of the foil in the foil activation method

    Computer program with FORTRAN has been made for calculating activity correction by neutron incident on the edge of the foil. The calculation based on single on collision theory with the assumption of monoenergetic neutron and isotopic distributed. the combination of simpson rule 1/3 and gauss quadrature were chosen to solve the problems and discrete summation was used as approximation of integration to the whole of energy groups (640 groups). the inputs are dimension and mass of the foil and activation cross-section and spectrum neutron. the output are foil activity and activation correction by neutron incident on the edge of the foil. the calculation results of activity correction by neutron incident on the edges of the gold foils of 0.05383 mm and 1.27 mm thick are about 0.2% and 7.8% and for cobalt foils of 0.1128 mm and 1.128 mm thick are about 0.58% and 6.7% respectively. the discrepancy of foil activation between experiment and calculation are about 1.6% for gold foil of 0.05383 mm thick and 1% for cobalt foil of 0.1128 mm thick. from that results can be concluded that the calculation result quit close to the experiment one and the thicker foil give bigger activation correction by neutrons incident on the edges of the foil

  5. Update of neutron dose yields as a function of energy for protons and deuterons incident on beryllium targets

    Neutron absorbed dose yields (absorbed dose rates per unit incident current on targets at a given SAD or SSD) increase with incident charged particle energy for both protons and deuterons. Analyses of neutron dose yield versus incident particle energy have been performed for both deuterons and protons. It is the purpose of this report to update those analyses by pooling all of the more recent published results and to reanalyze the trend of yield, Y, versus incident energy, E, which in the past has been described by an expression of the form Y = aE/sup b/, where a and b are empirical constants. From the reanalyzed trend it is concluded that for a given size cyclotron (E/sub p/ = 2E/sub d/), the dose yields using protons are higher than those using deuterons up to a proton energy E/sub p/ of 64 MeV

  6. Incidence of leukemia among atomic bomb survivors in relation to neutron and gamma dose, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-71

    The incidence of leukemia during 1950-71 in the fixed mortality sample of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has been analyzed as a function of individual gamma and neutron kerma and marrow dose. Two dose response models were tested for each of acute leukemia, chronic granulocytic leukemia, and all types of leukemia, respectively. Each model postulates that leukemia incidence depends upon the sum of the separate risks imposed by the gamma ray and neutron doses; in Model I both are assumed to be directly proportional to the respective doses, while Model II assumes that while the risk from neutrons is directly proportional to the dose, the risk from gamma rays is proportional to dose-squared. Weighted regression analyses were performed for each model. When the two models were fitted to the data for all types of leukemia, the estimated regression coefficients corresponding to the neutron and gamma ray doses both differed significantly from zero, for each model. However, when analysis was restricted to acute leukemia, both the neutron and gamma ray coefficients were significant only for Model II, and with respect to chronic granulocytic leukemia, only the coefficient of the neutron dose was significant, using either Model I or Model II. It appeared that the responses of the two leukemia types differed by type of radiation. If the chronic granulocytic and acute leukemias are considered together, the Model II appears to fit the data slightly better than Model I, but neither models is rejected by the data. (author)

  7. Axisymmetric Grazing-Incidence Focusing Optics for Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    Liu, Dazhi; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Resta, Giacomo; Ramsey, Brian D.; Moncton, David E.; Khaykovich, Boris

    2012-01-01

    We propose and design novel axisymmetric focusing mirrors, known as Wolter optics, for small-angle neutron scattering instruments. Ray-tracing simulations show that using the mirrors can result in more than an order-of-magnitude increase in the neutron flux reaching detectors, while decreasing the minimum wave vector transfer. Such mirrors are made of Ni using a mature technology. They can be coated with neutron supermirror multilayers, and multiple mirrors can be nested to improve their flux...

  8. Measurement and analysis of leakage neutron spectrum from a spherical pile of silicon with incident 14 MeV neutrons

    Absolute leakage neutron spectrum in the energy range between 0.1 and 15 MeV from a silicon spherical pile of 60-cm diameter was measured using an intense 14 MeV pulsed neutron source. OKTAVIAN, for the purpose of the benchmark validation of the nuclear data of silicon in JENDL-3.2, JENDL-3.3, ENDF/B-VI (release 2), ENDF/B-VI (release 5) and EFF-2.4. The neutron spectrum was compared with the calculated results using MCNP with different nuclear data. For estimating sensitivity of the individual cross section, the calculations were also performed using modified JENDL-3.2 based data libraries. It was found that the all nuclear data could predict the measured spectrum with the measurement fairly well. ENDF/B-VI (release 2) gave considerably large discrepancy over the whole energy region presumably caused by the inadequate inelastic scattering cross section values. The discrepancy found in the JENDL-3.2, JENDL-3.3 and EFF-2.4 between 5 and 10 MeV could be attributed to the too low values of the discrete inelastic scattering cross section values. The prediction with ENDF/B-VI (release 5) was almost satisfactory over whole energy region. (author)

  9. Nuclear Poincaré cycle synchronizes with the incident de Broglie wave to predict regularity in neutron resonance energies

    Ohkubo, Makio

    2016-06-01

    In observed neutron resonances, long believed to be a form of quantum chaos, regular family structures are found in the s-wave resonances of many even-even nuclei in the tens keV to MeV region [M.Ohkubo, Phys. Rev. C 87, 014608(2013)]. Resonance reactions take place when the incident de Broglie wave synchronizes with the Poincaré cycle of the compound nucleus, which is composed of several normal modes with periods that are time quantized by inverse Fermi energy. Based on the breathing model of the compound nucleus, neutron resonance energies in family structures are written by simple arithmetic expressions using Sn and small integers. Family structures in observed resonances of 40Ca+n and 37Cl+n are described as simple cases. A model for time quantization is discussed.

  10. Predicted risks of second malignant neoplasm incidence and mortality due to secondary neutrons in a girl and boy receiving proton craniospinal irradiation

    The purpose of this study was to compare the predicted risks of second malignant neoplasm (SMN) incidence and mortality from secondary neutrons for a 9-year-old girl and a 10-year-old boy who received proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI). SMN incidence and mortality from neutrons were predicted from equivalent doses to radiosensitive organs for cranial, spinal and intracranial boost fields. Therapeutic proton absorbed dose and equivalent dose from neutrons were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. Risks of SMN incidence and mortality in most organs and tissues were predicted by applying risks models from the National Research Council of the National Academies to the equivalent dose from neutrons; for non-melanoma skin cancer, risk models from the International Commission on Radiological Protection were applied. The lifetime absolute risks of SMN incidence due to neutrons were 14.8% and 8.5%, for the girl and boy, respectively. The risks of a fatal SMN were 5.3% and 3.4% for the girl and boy, respectively. The girl had a greater risk for any SMN except colon and liver cancers, indicating that the girl's higher risks were not attributable solely to greater susceptibility to breast cancer. Lung cancer predominated the risk of SMN mortality for both patients. This study suggests that the risks of SMN incidence and mortality from neutrons may be greater for girls than for boys treated with proton CSI.

  11. Grazing incidence polarized neutron scattering in reflection geometry from nanolayered spintronic systems

    Amitesh Paul

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes recent experimental investigations using neutron scattering on layered nanomagnetic systems (accentuating my contribution), which have applications in spintronics also. Polarized neutron investigations of such artificially structured materials are basically done to understand the interplay between structure and magnetism confined within the nanometer scale that can be additionally depth-resolved. Details of the identification of buried domains and their nature of lateral and vertical correlations within the systems are important. A particularly interesting aspect that has emerged over the years is the capability to measure polarized neutron scattering in directions parallel and perpendicular to the applied field direction (which is also the quantization axis for neutron polarizations). This was added with the capability of measuring in specular as well as in off-specular geometry. Distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) theory for neutrons has proved to be a remarkable development in the quantitative analysis of the scattering data measured simultaneously for specular and off-specular modes within the same framework. In particular, the depth and lateral distribution of the ferromagnetic spins relative to the interface within interlayercoupled or exchange-coupled system has been extensive. For example, twisted magnetization state at interlayer coupled interfaces or intricacies of symmetric and asymmetric magnetization reversals along with suppression of training effect in exchange coupled system was microscopically identified using neutron scattering only. The investigation on the distribution of magnetic species within dilute ferromagnetic semiconductor superlattices, with low angle neutron scattering, has played a crucial role both from practical and fundamental research points of view.

  12. Neutron induced fission of 238U at incident neutron energies from 1.2 to 5.8 MeV

    Vivès, F.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Barreau, G.; Bax, H.

    1998-10-01

    The reaction 238U(n,f) has been studied at IRMM at different incident neutron energies ranging from En=1.2 to 5.8 MeV. The existence of vibrational resonances in the region of the threshold of the fission cross-section and the proton pairing effect should induce variations in the fission fragment properties. The fission fragment mass, mean total kinetic energy (TKE¯) and angular distributions have been investigated with a double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber. For each incident neutron energy, more than 105 events have been accumulated. The TKE¯ shows an increasing trend up to En=3.5 MeV with a sudden drop at roughly En=3.8 MeV which might be related to the onset of pair breaking. Above En=3.8 MeV TKE¯ is again continually increasing. The two-dimensional mass-TKE distributions have been compared by means of a fit with theoretical calculations performed recently in the frame of the multi-modal random neck-rupture model. Actually, two solutions are possible with assuming either two or three Gaussians for the asymmetric part of the mass distribution. However, both solutions lead to the same physical interpretation. The solution with three Gaussians is more in line with the theoretical predictions. In any case the super-long symmetric mode has to be included, in order to explain the dip in TKE¯ close to symmetry.

  13. O(n,x. gamma. ) reaction cross section for incident neutron energies between 6. 5 and 20. 0 MeV. [Yield

    Morgan, G.L.; Chapman, G.T.

    1979-09-01

    Differential cross sections for the neutron-induced gamma-ray production from oxygen were measured for incident neutron energies between 6.5 and 20.0 MeV. The Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) was used to provide the neutrons and a NaI spectrometer to detect the gamma rays at 125/sup 0/. The data presented are the double differential cross section, d/sup 2/sigma/d..cap omega..dE, for gamma-ray energies between 1.6 and 10.6 MeV for coarse intervals in incident neutron energy. The integrated yield for gamma rays of energies greater than 1.6 MeV with higher resolution in the neutron energy is also presented. The experimental results are compared with the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF). 34 references.

  14. Th(n,xγ) reaction cross section for incident neutron energies between 0.3 and 20.0 MeV

    Differential cross sections for the neutron-induced gamma-ray production from thorium were measured for incident neutron energies between 0.3 and 20.0 MeV. The Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) was used to provide the neutrons, and a NaI spectrometer, to detect the gamma rays at 1250. The data presented are the double differential cross section, d2sigma/dΩdE, for gamma-ray energies between 0.3 and 10.6 MeV for coarse intervals in incident neutron energy. The integrated yield of gamma rays of energies greater than 300 keV with higher resolution in the neutron energy is also presented. 23 figures, 21 tables

  15. O(n,xγ) reaction cross section for incident neutron energies between 6.5 and 20.0 MeV

    Differential cross sections for the neutron-induced gamma-ray production from oxygen were measured for incident neutron energies between 6.5 and 20.0 MeV. The Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) was used to provide the neutrons and a NaI spectrometer to detect the gamma rays at 1250. The data presented are the double differential cross section, d2sigma/dΩdE, for gamma-ray energies between 1.6 and 10.6 MeV for coarse intervals in incident neutron energy. The integrated yield for gamma rays of energies greater than 1.6 MeV with higher resolution in the neutron energy is also presented. The experimental results are compared with the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF). 34 references

  16. Ti(n,xγ) reaction cross section for incident neutron energies between 0.3 and 20.0 MeV

    Differential cross sections for the neutron-induced gamma-ray production from natural titanium were measured for incident neutron energies between 0.3 and 20.0 MeV. The Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) was used to provide the neutrons, and a NaI spectrometer, to detect the gamma rays at 1250. The data presented are the double differential cross section, d2sigma/dΩdE, for gamma-ray energies between 0.3 and 10.6 MeV for coarse intervals in incident neutron energy. The integrated yield of gamma rays of energies greater than 300 keV with higher resolution in the neutron energy is also presented. The experimental results are compared with the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files (ENDF). 22 figures, 20 tables

  17. Evaluation of 242Pu data for the incident neutron energy range 0.1 - 6 MeV

    This report presents the models and the procedures used for the calculation of the quantities required by Files 3, 4 and 5 of ENDF-6 for 242Pu. These quantities are the integrated cross sections for the total, fission, scattering and gamma-capture reactions and the angular and energy distributions of the scattered neutrons for the incident neutron energies 0.01/6 MeV. The direct mechanism was treated with the coupled-channel method using a deformed optical potential defined by a set of actinide region parameters established by the authors. For the compound nucleus calculations, a new HRTW version of the statistical model extended to describe the fission at subbarrier energies was used. To describe the continuous part of the transition states spectrum, analytical expressions have been established. The energy distributions of the scattered neutrons have been calculated with an author's version of the Los Alamos model. The agreement of the calculations with the existing experimental data is good. (author)

  18. Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections of Nuclei in the Vicinity of 208Pb at Incident Energies below 60 MeV

    Ryzhov, Igor V.; Tutin, Gennady A.; Eismont, Vilen P.; Mitryukhin, Andrey G.; Oplavin, Valery S.; Soloviev, Sergey M.; Meulders, Jean-Pierre; El Masri, Youssef; Keutgen, Thomas; Prieels, René; Nolte, Ralf

    2005-05-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections of 205Tl, 204, 206, 207, 208Pb, and 209Bi have been measured at incident energies of 32.8, 45.3, and 59.9 MeV. The measurements were performed at the Louvain-la-Neuve neutron beam facility using the 7Li (p, n) reaction as neutron source. Fission fragments were detected with a multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber (MFGIC). Neutron fluence measurements were based on the 238U(n, f) reaction. The neutron fluence monitoring procedure was asserted by crosscheck measurement, in which the 59.9-MeV neutron beam fluence was simultaneously determined with the MFGIC and with a fission chamber monitor calibrated relative to a proton-recoil telescope.

  19. Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Sections of Nuclei in the Vicinity of 208Pb at Incident Energies below 60 MeV

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections of 205Tl, 204, 206, 207, 208Pb, and 209Bi have been measured at incident energies of 32.8, 45.3, and 59.9 MeV. The measurements were performed at the Louvain-la-Neuve neutron beam facility using the 7Li (p, n) reaction as neutron source. Fission fragments were detected with a multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber (MFGIC). Neutron fluence measurements were based on the 238U(n, f) reaction. The neutron fluence monitoring procedure was asserted by crosscheck measurement, in which the 59.9-MeV neutron beam fluence was simultaneously determined with the MFGIC and with a fission chamber monitor calibrated relative to a proton-recoil telescope

  20. High resolution measurement of the 238U neutron capture yield for incident neutron energies between 1 and 100 keV

    Measurements of the capture gamma-ray spectrum of three U-238 metallic samples of areal densities, N = 0.0124, 0.0031, and 0.00057 at/b, were performed by placing a sample at the center of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator liquid scintillator tank. Five measurements of the time of flight spectrum were performed for each sample thickness. Measurements were done with and without aluminum filters in the beam, at both 800 and 400 pulses per second to determine the energy-dependent background which arises from pulse overlap and room return. The fifth measurement had a polyethylene plug in the beam to determine the constant background due to cosmic rays and long-lived radioactivities in the sample and surrounding materials. The shape of the incident neutron spectrum was determined by the count rate of a 1-mm-thick Li-6 glass scintillation monitor placed upstream of the liquid scintillator

  1. Study of the in-plane magnetic structure of a layered system using polarized neutron scattering under grazing incidence geometry

    Maruyama, R.; Bigault, T.; Wildes, A. R.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Soyama, K.; Courtois, P.

    2016-05-01

    The in-plane magnetic structure of a layered system with a polycrystalline grain size less than the ferromagnetic exchange length was investigated using polarized neutron off-specular scattering and grazing incidence small angle scattering measurements to gain insight into the mechanism that controls the magnetic properties which are different from the bulk. These complementary measurements with different length scales and the data analysis based on the distorted wave Born approximation revealed the lateral correlation on a length scale of sub- μm due to the fluctuating orientation of the magnetization in the layer. The obtained in-plane magnetic structure is consistent with the random anisotropy model, i.e. competition between the exchange interactions between neighboring spins and the local magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  2. Conclusion Empirical Equations of Asymmetry Parameter for Magic Nuclei in N for (n, α) Reaction of Incident Neutron Energy

    In this study, the magic nuclei is divided into groups, one of them is light group and the other is middle group, it was calculated shell corrections for all nuclei, and also it was concluded the relationship between cross sections for nuclear reactions (n, α) and the mass number (A) for all nuclei to incident neutrons (14.5MeV).We found empirical equations to asymmetry parameter (N-Z)/A as function of mass number and for that two groups: for A=38 to A=40 light nuclei.(N-Z)/A=-0.0263A+1.0534 for A=50 to A=89 middle nuclei.(N-Z)/A=0.0001A2+0.0151A-0.408 for A=90 to A=144 middle nuclei.(N-Z)/A=-9e-5A2+0.0221A-1.0711

  3. Neutron relative biological effectiveness for solid cancer incidence in the Japanese A-bomb survivors: an analysis considering the degree of independent effects from γ-ray and neutron absorbed doses with hierarchical partitioning.

    Walsh, Linda

    2013-03-01

    It has generally been assumed that the neutron and γ-ray absorbed doses in the data from the life span study (LSS) of the Japanese A-bomb survivors are too highly correlated for an independent separation of the all solid cancer risks due to neutrons and due to γ-rays. However, with the release of the most recent data for all solid cancer incidence and the increased statistical power over previous datasets, it is instructive to consider alternatives to the usual approaches. Simple excess relative risk (ERR) models for radiation-induced solid cancer incidence fitted to the LSS epidemiological data have been applied with neutron and γ-ray absorbed doses as separate explanatory covariables. A simple evaluation of the degree of independent effects from γ-ray and neutron absorbed doses on the all solid cancer risk with the hierarchical partitioning (HP) technique is presented here. The degree of multi-collinearity between the γ-ray and neutron absorbed doses has also been considered. The results show that, whereas the partial correlation between the neutron and γ-ray colon absorbed doses may be considered to be high at 0.74, this value is just below the level beyond which remedial action, such as adding the doses together, is usually recommended. The resulting variance inflation factor is 2.2. Applying HP indicates that just under half of the drop in deviance resulting from adding the γ-ray and neutron absorbed doses to the baseline risk model comes from the joint effects of the neutrons and γ-rays-leaving a substantial proportion of this deviance drop accounted for by individual effects of the neutrons and γ-rays. The average ERR/Gy γ-ray absorbed dose and the ERR/Gy neutron absorbed dose that have been obtained here directly for the first time, agree well with previous indirect estimates. The average relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons relative to γ-rays, calculated directly from fit parameters to the all solid cancer ERR model with both

  4. Fission fragment mass and energy distributions as a function of incident neutron energy measured in a lead slowing-down spectrometer

    A new method of measuring fission fragment mass and energy distributions as a function of incident neutron energy in the range from below 0.1 eV to 1 keV has been developed. The method involves placing a double-sided Frisch-gridded fission chamber in Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS). The high neutron flux of the LSDS allows for the measurement of the energy-dependent, neutron-induced fission cross sections simultaneously with the mass and kinetic energy of the fission fragments of various small samples. The samples may be isotopes that are not available in large quantities (submicrograms) or with small fission cross sections (microbarns). The fission chamber consists of two anodes shielded by Frisch grids on either side of a single cathode. The sample is located in the center of the cathode and is made by depositing small amounts of actinides on very thin films. The chamber was successfully tested and calibrated using 0.41±0.04 ng of 252Cf and the resulting mass distributions were compared to those of previous work. As a proof of concept, the chamber was placed in the LSDS to measure the neutron-induced fission cross section and fragment mass and energy distributions of 25.3±0.5 μg of 235U. Changes in the mass distributions as a function of incident neutron energy are evident and are examined using the multimodal fission mode model.

  5. Fission fragment mass and energy distributions as a function of incident neutron energy measured in a lead slowing-down spectrometer

    Romano, C.; Danon, Y.; Block, R.; Thompson, J.; Blain, E.; Bond, E.

    2010-01-01

    A new method of measuring fission fragment mass and energy distributions as a function of incident neutron energy in the range from below 0.1 eV to 1 keV has been developed. The method involves placing a double-sided Frisch-gridded fission chamber in Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS). The high neutron flux of the LSDS allows for the measurement of the energy-dependent, neutron-induced fission cross sections simultaneously with the mass and kinetic energy of the fission fragments of various small samples. The samples may be isotopes that are not available in large quantities (submicrograms) or with small fission cross sections (microbarns). The fission chamber consists of two anodes shielded by Frisch grids on either side of a single cathode. The sample is located in the center of the cathode and is made by depositing small amounts of actinides on very thin films. The chamber was successfully tested and calibrated using 0.41±0.04 ng of Cf252 and the resulting mass distributions were compared to those of previous work. As a proof of concept, the chamber was placed in the LSDS to measure the neutron-induced fission cross section and fragment mass and energy distributions of 25.3±0.5μg of U235. Changes in the mass distributions as a function of incident neutron energy are evident and are examined using the multimodal fission mode model.

  6. Dose-response relationship of neutrons and γ rays to leukemia incidence among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki by type of leukemia, 1950--1971

    The incidence of leukemia during 1950 to 1971 in a fixed mortality sample of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was analyzed as a function of neutron and γ kerma and marrow doses. Two dose-response models were tested for acute leukemia, chronic granulocytic leukemia, and all types of leukemia, respectively. Each model postulates that the leukemia incidence depends upon the sum of separate risks imposed by γ and neutron doses. In Model I the risk from both types of radiation is assumed to be directly proportional to the respective doses, while Model II assumes that whereas the risk from neutrons is directly proportional to the dose, the risk from γ rays is proportional to dose-squared. The analysis demonstrated that the dose-response of the two types of leukemia differed by type of radiation. The data suggested that the response of acute leukemia was best explained by Model II, while the response of chronic granulocytic leukemia depended almost linearly upon neutron dose alone, because the regression coefficients associated with γ radiation for both Models I and II were not significant. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons in relation to γ rays for incidence of acute leukemia was estimated to be approximately 30/(Dn)/sup 1/2/ [95% confidence limits; 17/(Dn)/sup 1/2/ approx. 54/(Dn)/sup 1/2/] for kerma and 32/(Dn)/sup 1/2/ [95% confidence limits; 18/(Dn)/sup 1/2/ approx. 58/(Dn)/sup 1/2/] for marrow dose (Dn = neutron dose). If acute and chronic granulocytic leukemias are considered together as all types of leukemia, Model II appears to fit the data slightly better than Model I, but neither model is statistically rejected by the data

  7. Evaluation of 242Pu data for the incident neutron energy range 5-20 MeV

    Models, procedures and parameters are presented for the calculation of neutron cross sections, the neutron angular distributions and the neutron energy distributions of 242Pu in the energy range 5-20 MeV. The interaction takes place through direct interaction and compound nucleus mechanism. For heavy deformed nucleus the direct interaction was treated with the coupled channel process, using the ECIS code. For the compound nucleus mechanism, a statistical treatment was used for fission, neutron elastic and inelastic scattering, radiative capture, (n,2n), (n,3n), (n,4n) cross section calculations, using the GNASH code. (R.P.)

  8. Measurement of the (n,2n) cross sections for 89Y, 93Nb, 103Rh, 107Ag, 169Tm, 175Lu and 197Au at 14.1 and 14.8 MeV incident neutron energies

    The (n,2n) cross sections for 89Y, 93Nb, 103Rh, 107Ag, 169Tm, 175Lu and 197Au have been measured at 14.1 and 14.8 MeV incident neutron energies. The samples were irradiated at the 14 MeV neutron generator of C.E. VALDUC. 27Al(n,α)24Na cross section was used for standard. The cross sections were obtained with an accuracy of about 5%

  9. Methods used to produce nuclear data files for 0--10 GeV incident neutrons and protons

    Nuclear models for calculating medium energy data are in need of a unified theory. For energies above 100 MeV the incident nucleon wavelength is smaller than its collision mean-free-path within the target nucleus so that an intra-nuclear-cascade model, for example, is appropriate. For energies below 100 MeV the incident nucleon wavelength is larger than the dimensions of the target nucleus so that a partial wave nuclear model, for example, is appropriate. Comparisons between calculations and experiments show discrepancies even when using appropriate models. Experimental data alone is rarely convergent or sufficient to define an evaluation over the complete range of interest. The evaluator is therefore left to selectively choose from a diverse arsenal of experimental data, nuclear models and nuclear systematics those tools that may best help him to complete an evaluation. These points are illustrated by the use of calculation and experiment in the evaluation of nucleon data for 12C

  10. Experiments Relating to Whole-Body Activation Analysis in Man In Vivo Using 14-MeV Incident Neutrons

    Chromium eczema is a well-known phenomenon in dermatological practice. Different explanations may be given for it. According to one of these the specific texture of the skin of patients is assumed to allow more chromium to pass through the upper layers. As a result, the chromium accumulates faster in the dermis of patients so that a critical value is reached sooner. Another explanation might be that die sensitivity threshold for chromium in patients is lower than in normal persons and can more easily be exceeded. To distinguish between these possibilities and to obtain more information, an investigation was started in which the chromium content in the skin was compared for eczema patients and normal people. The sample weight (10 mg) and the chromium content (0.2 - 0.4 ppm) involved require a sensitive technique. Neutron activation analysis is well suited to this purpose. Under our operation conditions (irradiation time 10 days, neutron flux 1014n/cm2s) it is possible to determine quantities as low as 5 x 1011 g of chromium. Preliminary experiments show relatively large variations in chromium content of comparable samples, even in skin samples taken from the back of a single person. It is further suggested by the results of these experiments that the chromium content in the skin of eczema patients is lower than in that of normal patients. The results of the analysis may be seriously affected by chromium contamination during sample preparation. Therefore chromium-free instruments must be used. To avoid chromium migration in the skin due to degeneration processes, samples must be taken from persons alive or shortly after their death. (author)

  11. High-resolution measurement of the 238U neutron capture yield for incident neutron energies between 1 and 100 keV

    The capture cross section of 238U in the energy range up to 100 keV is one of the important nuclear parameters in reactor design. Nevertheless, the uncertainties in this parameter are still above reactor design requirements. These uncertainties, which were discussed at the Antwerp Conference on Nuclear Data (Sept. 1982), led to the formation of the 238U task force of the Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Data Committee (NEANDC). Among the most relevant conclusions arrived at by the NEANDC task force were that, since most of the capture cross-section measurements were old and disagreed among themselves by more than expected from their respective error assignment, a new high-resolution measurement was needed and the resolved resonance energy region should be extended above its present 4-keV limit. In response to these requests, a measurement of the 238U capture yield was performed at the 150-m flight-path station of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) facility. The energy resolution achieved in this measurement frequently resulted in spectacular doublet and triplet splittings of what appeared to be single resonances in previous measurements. The present 238U capture yield measurements has provided a wealth of data that, when combined with recent transmission results, will have a significant impact in both reactor design and neutron spectroscopy studies

  12. E1 and E2 cross sections of the 12C(α,γ)16O reaction at Ecm∼1.4 Mev using pulsed α beams

    We have installed a new system to measure the γ-ray angular distribution of the 12C(α,γ)16O reaction at the 3.2 MV Pelletron accelerator laboratory at Tokyo Institute of Technology to accurately determine the E1 and E2 cross sections. In this experiment, we used high efficiency anti-Compton NaI(T1) spectrometers to detect a γ-ray from the reaction with a large S/N ratio, intense pulsed α beams to discriminate true events from neutron induced background with a time-of-flight (TOF) method, and the monitoring system of target thickness. We succeeded in removing a background due to neutrons and could clearly detect the γ-ray from the 12C(α,γ)l6O reaction with high statistics

  13. Investigation of the fission fragment properties of the reaction 238U(n,f) at incident neutron energies up to 5.8 MeV

    The fission fragment properties of the reaction 238U(n,f) have been studied, at different incident neutron energies ranging from En=1.2 to 5.8 MeV. The pre-neutron emission mass, kinetic energy and fission fragment angular distributions have been investigated with a double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber. The influence of the subthreshold vibrational resonances and of the proton pairing effect on the fission fragment properties is clearly visible. The total kinetic energy averaged over all fission fragment masses TKEbar shows an increasing trend up to En=3.5 MeV with a sudden drop at roughly En=3.8 MeV which has been attributed to the onset of pair breaking at the barrier. Above En=3.8 MeV, the TKEbar is again continuously increasing. The changes in the mass yield and TKEbar(A) distributions have been studied as a function of the compound nuclear excitation energy and their contribution to the observed variations in the TKEbar have been determined. The two-dimensional mass-TKE distributions have been described in terms of fission modes and compared with theoretical calculations performed recently in the frame of the multi-modal random neck-rupture model. Although theoretically six asymmetric fission modes are predicted which all surpass individual outer barriers, an interpretation in terms of only two asymmetric modes has physical meaning. This points to an influence of shell structure effects to the observed distributions. In any case, the super-long symmetric mode has to be included, in order to explain the dip in TKEbar(A) distribution close to symmetry

  14. Investigation of the fission fragment properties of the reaction 238U(n,f) at incident neutron energies up to 5.8 MeV

    Vivès, F.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Bax, H.; Oberstedt, S.

    2000-01-01

    The fission fragment properties of the reaction 238U(n,f) have been studied, at different incident neutron energies ranging from En=1.2 to 5.8 MeV. The pre-neutron emission mass, kinetic energy and fission fragment angular distributions have been investigated with a double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber. The influence of the subthreshold vibrational resonances and of the proton pairing effect on the fission fragment properties is clearly visible. The total kinetic energy averaged over all fission fragment masses ( overlineTKE) shows an increasing trend up to En=3.5 MeV with a sudden drop at roughly En=3.8 MeV which has been attributed to the onset of pair breaking at the barrier. Above En=3.8 MeV, the overlineTKE is again continuously increasing. The changes in the mass yield and overlineTKE( A) distributions have been studied as a function of the compound nuclear excitation energy and their contribution to the observed variations in the overlineTKE have been determined. The two-dimensional mass-TKE distributions have been described in terms of fission modes and compared with theoretical calculations performed recently in the frame of the multi-modal random neck-rupture model. Although theoretically six asymmetric fission modes are predicted which all surpass individual outer barriers, an interpretation in terms of only two asymmetric modes has physical meaning. This points to an influence of shell structure effects to the observed distributions. In any case, the super-long symmetric mode has to be included, in order to explain the dip in overlineTKE( A) distribution close to symmetry.

  15. Fragment-mass, kinetic energy, and angular distributions for 234U(n ,f ) at incident neutron energies from En=0.2 MeV to 5.0 MeV

    Al-Adili, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Pomp, S.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the neutron-induced fission of 234U and the fission-fragment properties for neutron energies between En=0.2 and 5.0 MeV with a special highlight on the prominent vibrational resonance at En=0.77 MeV. Angular, energy, and mass distributions were determined based on the double-energy technique by means of a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber. The experimental data are parametrized in terms of fission modes based on the multimodal random neck-rupture model. The main results are a verified strong angular anisotropy and fluctuations in the energy release as a function of incident-neutron energy.

  16. Neutron tubes

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  17. Neutron and gamma-ray emission double differential cross sections for the nuclear reaction by 1.5 GeV {pi}{sup +} incidence

    Iga, Kiminori; Ishibashi, Kenji; Shigyo, Nobuhiro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)] [and others

    1998-03-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray production double differential cross sections were measured for iron by the use of 1.5 GeV {pi}{sup +} mesons. The measured cross sections were compared with the calculated values by HETC-KFA2. For the neutrons, the calculated results deviate from the experimental data in the neutron energy region below 30 MeV. The calculated values of gamma-ray production agree with the experimental data at gamma-ray energies from 1 to 7 MeV within a factor of three. (author)

  18. Nuclear data evaluations of neutron and proton incidence on Zr, Nb, and W for energy up to 200 MeV

    Neutron and proton nuclear data were evaluated on Zr, Nb, and W for energy up to 200 MeV. To execute optical model calculations, spherical optical potentials were developed to reproduce experimental data for many elements. The GNASH nuclear model code was used to evaluate light-particle production cross sections. For neutron emission, giant resonance correction came to be performed in the code system. (author)

  19. Analysis of the Nb(n,xn) and Bi(n,xn) reaction in the 5-27 MeV incident neutron energy range

    Results of a detailed study of the generation of neutron emission spectra, taking into account the contribution of the pre-equilibrium decay and direct reaction mechanisms to the formation of the compound nucleus are presented. Main consideration is given to the determination of the nuclear level density in the neutron inelastic scattering channel which is the primary contributor to the shape of the soft part of neutron emission spectra. A good description of the experimentally observed spectra over the whole energy range was obtained. The level density parameters which were determined are in good agreement with those taken from well known systematics in the case of Nb, but not in the case of Bi. (author). 29 refs, 12 figs, 2 tab

  20. Neutron-emission measurements at a white neutron source

    Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Data on the spectrum of neutrons emittcd from neutron-induced reactions are important in basic nuclear physics and in applications. Our program studies neutron emission from inelastic scattering as well as fission neutron spectra. A ''white'' neutron source (continuous in energy) allows measurements over a wide range of neutron energies all in one experiment. We use the tast neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for incident neutron energies from 0.5 MeV to 200 MeV These experiments are based on double time-of-flight techniques to determine the energies of the incident and emitted neutrons. For the fission neutron measurements, parallel-plate ionization or avalanche detectors identify fission in actinide samples and give the required fast timing pulse. For inelastic scattering, gamma-ray detectors provide the timing and energy spectroscopy. A large neutron-detector array detects the emitted neutrons. Time-of-flight techniques are used to measure the energies of both the incident and emitted neutrons. Design considerations for the array include neutron-gamma discrimination, neutron energy resolution, angular coverage, segmentation, detector efficiency calibration and data acquisition. We have made preliminary measurements of the fission neutron spectra from {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. Neutron emission spectra from inelastic scattering on iron and nickel have also been investigated. The results obtained will be compared with evaluated data.

  1. Measurement of neutron-production double-differential cross sections for 8 and 15 GeV proton incidence in the most-forward directions

    Shigyo, N; Iwamoto, Y; Ishimoto, S; Kawasaki, Y; Takayama, Y; Tenzou, H; Ishibashi, K; Nakamoto, T; Numajiri, M; Meigo, S

    2002-01-01

    Neutron-production double-differential cross sections in the most- forward directions were measured for proton-induced reactions on Fe and Pb targets at 0.8 and 1.5 GeV. The experiment was performed at the pi 2 beam line of the 12 GeV proton synchrotron in High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). Neutrons were measured by time-of-flight technique with two different flight path lengths, i.e. 3.5 and 5.0 in at 0.8 and 1.5 GeV, respectively. NE213 liquid organic scintillators 12.7 cm in diameter and 12.7 cm in thickness were set at 0 degrees and 5 degrees as neutron detectors. For the improvement of the energy resolution, the scintillator at 0 degrees was connected with three Hamamatsu H2431 photomultipliers 5.1 cm in diameter. The neutron detection efficiencies were obtained by the SCINFUL-QMD code. The experimental data were compared with the calculation results of the intranuclear-cascade-evaporation and QMD models. (15 refs).

  2. Fission products yield in the neutron-induced fission of 232Th using neutrons source from 7Li( p, n)7Be reaction at incident proton energy of 20 MeV

    This paper presents the measurement of fission product yields from the neutron induced fission of 232Th. These measurements were carried out using the neutron source from 7Li (p,n) reaction at TIFR-BARC Pelletron facility. The yields were obtained using activation and off-line gamma ray spectroscopic technique. The fission yields values are reported for twelve fission products. Activated targets were counted in highly shielded HPGe detectors over a period of several weeks to identify decaying fission products. The results obtained from the present work were compared with the similar data of mono-energetic neutrons of comparable energy from literature and are found to be in good agreement

  3. Life-span shortening and disease incidence in male BALB/c and C57BL mice after single, fractionated d(50)-Be neutron or gamma exposure

    Life-span shortening and causes of death, ascertained by autopsy and histological examination at the time of spontaneous death, after single or fractionated x-ray, gamma, or d(50)-Be neutron irradiation, are being studied for two mouse strains (BALB/c and C57BL) with different disease characteristics. Fractionation schedules that have been implemented are x rays, four weekly exposures (C57BL); gamma rays, 10 daily exposures (BALB/c; and neutrons, eight exposures at 3-h intervals (C57BL). The data are incomplete but suggest that the dependency of life shortening on dose is related to the types of effects induced by radiation and results in different functions, linear or sigmoid, for the two mouse strains. Fractionated gamma irradiation causes more tumors than single exposure, but, generally, this is a result of multiple tumors occurring in animals. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for life shortening for d(50)-Be neutrons as compared to gamma rays is on the order of 1 to 2 and is slightly greater for the C57BL than for the BALB/c strain. 18 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Energy Dependence of Fission Product Yields from 235U, 238U and 239Pu for Incident Neutron Energies Between 0.5 and 14.8 MeV

    Gooden, M. E.; Arnold, C. W.; Becker, J. A.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fallin, B.; Fowler, M. M.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Krishichayan; Macri, R.; Rusev, G.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    -ray counted using shielded HPGe detectors for a period of 1-2 months to determine the yield of various fission products. To the extent possible all irradiation and counting procedures were kept the same to minimize sources of systematic errors. FPY have been determined at incident neutron energies of 0.6, 1.4, 2.4, 3.5, 4.6, 5.5, 8.9 and 14.8 MeV.

  5. Investigation of the fission fragment properties of the reaction sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U(n,f) at incident neutron energies up to 5.8 MeV

    Vivès, F; Bax, H; Oberstedt, S

    2000-01-01

    The fission fragment properties of the reaction sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U(n,f) have been studied, at different incident neutron energies ranging from E sub n =1.2 to 5.8 MeV. The pre-neutron emission mass, kinetic energy and fission fragment angular distributions have been investigated with a double Frisch-gridded ionization chamber. The influence of the subthreshold vibrational resonances and of the proton pairing effect on the fission fragment properties is clearly visible. The total kinetic energy averaged over all fission fragment masses TKEbar shows an increasing trend up to E sub n =3.5 MeV with a sudden drop at roughly E sub n =3.8 MeV which has been attributed to the onset of pair breaking at the barrier. Above E sub n =3.8 MeV, the TKEbar is again continuously increasing. The changes in the mass yield and TKEbar(A) distributions have been studied as a function of the compound nuclear excitation energy and their contribution to the observed variations in the TKEbar have been determined. The two-dimensional ...

  6. Diffractive dissociation reaction np→Λ0K0p for incident neutron momenta between 30 and 70 GeV/c

    Results are presented of a study of the exclusive diffractive reaction np→Λ0K0p at 0.080.53 GeV22/c2 and momenta between 30-70 GeV/c at the Serpukhov neutron beam. The t-dependence is exp (Bt) with B=11.4±2.3 (GeV/c)-2 and it exhibits the diffractive minimum at |t|∼0.28 GeV2/c2 for Λ0K0 masses M2. B decreases with increasing M. Correlation with the beam direction is observed in the rest frame of the Λ0K0 system: the cross section increases for the forward-going Λ0. The increase is more pronounced for higher M. The cross section of reaction np→Λ0K0p for 02/c2 is 10.3 ±2.5±2.8 μb. (author). 8 figs., 2 tabs., 20 refs

  7. Incidents analysis

    We undertook a study programme at the end of 1991. To start with, we performed some exploratory studies aimed at learning some preliminary lessons on this type of analysis: Assessment of the interest of probabilistic incident analysis; possibility of using PSA scenarios; skills and resources required. At the same time, EPN created a working group whose assignment was to define a new approach for analysis of incidents on NPPs. This working group gave thought to both aspects of Operating Feedback that EPN wished to improve: Analysis of significant incidents; analysis of potential consequences. We took part in the work of this group, and for the second aspects, we proposed a method based on an adaptation of the event-tree method in order to establish a link between existing PSA models and actual incidents. Since PSA provides an exhaustive database of accident scenarios applicable to the two most common types of units in France, they are obviously of interest for this sort of analysis. With this method we performed some incident analyses, and at the same time explores some methods employed abroad, particularly ASP (Accident Sequence Precursor, a method used by the NRC). Early in 1994 EDF began a systematic analysis programme. The first, transient phase will set up methods and an organizational structure. 7 figs

  8. Neutron response study

    Neutron response of the albedo type dosimeter is strongly dependent on the energy of the incident neutrons as well as the moderating material on the backside of the dosimeter. This study characterizes the response of the Hanford dosimeter for a variety of neutron energies for both a water and Rando phantom (a simulated human body consisting of an actual human skeleton with plastic for body muscles and certain organs). The Hanford dosimeter response to neutrons of different energies is typical of albedo type dosimeters. An approximate two orders of magnitude difference in response is observed between neutron energies of 100 keV and 10 MeV. Methods were described to compensate for the difference in dosimeter response between a laboratory neutron spectrum and the different spectra encountered at various facilities in the field. Generally, substantial field support is necessary for accurate neutron dosimetry

  9. Pulsed neutron sources for epithermal neutrons

    It is shown how accelerator based neutron sources, giving a fast neutron pulse of short duration compared to the neutron moderation time, promise to open up a new field of epithermal neutron scattering. The three principal methods of fast neutron production: electrons, protons and fission boosters will be compared. Pulsed reactors are less suitable for epithermal neutrons and will only be briefly mentioned. The design principle of the target producing fast neutrons, the moderator and reflector to slow them down to epithermal energies, and the cell with its beam tubes and shielding will all be described with examples taken from the new Harwell electron linac to be commissioned in 1978. A general comparison of pulsed neutron performance with reactors is fraught with difficulties but has been attempted. Calculation of the new pulsed source fluxes and pulse widths is now being performed but we have taken the practical course of basing all comparisons on extrapolations from measurements on the old 1958 Harwell electron linac. Comparisons for time-of-flight and crystal monochromator experiments show reactors to be at their best at long wavelengths, at coarse resolution, and for experiments needing a specific incident wavelength. Even existing pulsed sources are shown to compete with the high flux reactors in experiments where the hot neutron flux and the time-of-flight methods can be best exploited. The sources under construction can open a new field of inelastic neutron scattering based on energy transfer up to an electron volt and beyond

  10. Fast neutrons dosimetry

    A proton recoil technique has been developed for inducing thermoluminescence with incident fast neutrons. CaF2 was used as the TL phosphor, and cane sugar and polyethylene were used as proton radiators. The phosphor and the hydrogeneous material powders were well mixed, encapsulated in glass tubes and exposed to Am-Be sources, resulting in recoils from incident fast neutrons of energy between 0,25 and 11,25 MeV. The intrinsic response of pure CaF2 to fast neutrons without a hydrogeneous radiator was checked by using LiF (TLD-700). Glow curves were recorded from room temperature up to 3500C after different doses of neutrons and gamma rays of 60Co. First collision dose due to fast neutrons in tissue like materials such as cane sugar and polyethylene was also calculated

  11. Phenomenological dirac optical potential for neutron cross sections

    Maruyama, Shin-ichi; Kitsuki, Hirohiko; Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Ishibashi, Kenji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    Because of limitation on neutron-incident data, it is difficult to obtain global optical model potential for neutrons. In contrast, there are some global optical model potentials for proton in detail. It is interesting to convert the proton-incident global optical potentials into neutron-incident ones. In this study we introduce (N-Z)/A dependent symmetry potential terms into the global proton-incident optical potentials, and then obtain neutron-incident ones. The neutron potentials reproduce total cross sections in an acceptable degree. However, a comparison with potentials proposed by other authors brings about a confused situation in the sign of the symmetry terms. (author)

  12. Basic neutronics. Neutrons migration

    This article presents the basic neutronics necessary for the understanding of the operation of the different types of nuclear reactors: 1 - introduction to neutronics: principle of fission chain reactions, fast neutron reactors and thermal neutron reactors, capture, neutron status, variations with the reactor lattices; 2 - Boltzmann equation: neutrons population, neutrons migration, characterization of neutrons population and reactions, integral form of the Boltzmann equation, integral-differential form, equivalence between the two forms; 3 - reactor kinetics: fast neutrons and delayed neutrons, kinetic equations in punctual model, Nordheim equation, reactivity jumps, reactivity ramp; 4 - diffusion equation: local neutron status, Fick's law, diffusion equation, initial, boundary and interface conditions, nuclei in infinite and homogenous medium, some examples of solutions, developments in Eigenmodes; 5 - one-group theory: equation of the 'one-group - diffusion' theory, critical condition of the naked and homogenous reactor, critical condition of a reactor with reflectors, generalizations; 6 - neutrons moderation: different moderation mechanisms, elastic shock laws, moderation equation, some examples of solutions; 7 - resonance absorption of neutrons: advantage of the discontinuous moderation character, advantage of an heterogenous disposition, classical formula of the anti-trap factor in homogenous and heterogenous situation; 8 - neutrons thermalization: notions of thermalization mechanisms, thermalization equation, Maxwell spectrum, real spectrum, classical formula of the thermal utilisation factor, classical formula of the reproduction factor, moderation optimum. (J.S.)

  13. Fast neutrons incident on rotors : - tantalum.

    Smith, A. B.

    2005-03-21

    Reports in the Argonne National Laboratory Nuclear Data and Measurement Series present results of studies in the field of microscopic nuclear data. The primary objective of the series is the dissemination of information in the comprehensive form required for nuclear technology applications. This series is devoted to: (a) measured microscopic nuclear parameters, (b) experimental techniques and facilities employed in measurements, (c) the analysis, correlation and interpretation of nuclear data, and (d) the compilation and evaluation of nuclear data.

  14. Apparatus for measuring a flux of neutrons

    Stringer, James L.

    1977-01-01

    A flux of neutrons is measured by disposing a detector in the flux and applying electronic correlation techniques to discriminate between the electrical signals generated by the neutron detector and the unwanted interfering electrical signals generated by the incidence of a neutron flux upon the cables connecting the detector to the electronic measuring equipment at a remote location.

  15. Integral Fission Cross Section Ratios of Th232, U236 and U238 Relative to U235 in the Neutron Spectrum Produced by 23.2 MeV Deuterons Incident on a Thick Be Metal Target

    Integral neutron fission cross section ratios have been measured for Th232 /U238 , U23S/U235 and U236/U235 in the neutron field produced by bombardment of a thick Be metal target with 23.2 MeV deuterons. Validation of Th232, U236, U23S fission cross sections in a high energy neutron continuum spectrum is the object of this work. The neutron spectrum in the irradiation site has been obtained by unfolding of the neutron induced activity of eleven selected reactions. The average standard deviation between calculated activities with SAND-II unfolding code and the experimental input activities was 2.5%. Calculated values of the fission cross section ratios were obtained from, the ENDF/B-y evaluated library of cross sections and the measured spectrum. These ratios were not sensitive (<0.7%) to quite different SAND-II input spectra assumed in the low energy spectrum range (0.5 to 2. MeV). Analysis of error sources, errors propagation and their correlations was made and the correlation matrix of the experimental results was calculated. The experimental and calculated values obtained are consistent within the errors. Examination of the fissile ratios measured in other continuum neutron spectra shows a similar consistency in the spectrum produced by 7 MeV deuterons on Be. However in Cf252 and thermal U235 fission neutron spectra, a large discrepancy is found for Th232. (author)

  16. Prompt Neutrons from Fission

    A survey is given of the present state of knowledge of the spectrum, angular distribution and number of prompt fission neutrons, as functions of incident neutron energy and individual fragment mass, for low-energy fission. The energy spectrum of prompt neutrons has been found to be of the same form (nearly Maxwellian) for many different types of fission. It has been shown that this type of spectrum is to be expected on the basis of evaporation from moving fragments, and theoretical predictions of the spectrum agree very accurately with experimental data. Some data are now available on the variation of the neutron spectrum with fragment mass and angle of emission. Only recently has it become possible to take accurate data on the angular distribution of the neutrons. It appears that the neutrons have the angular distribution to be expected if emitted almost isotropically from the moving fragments, with a possibility that some small fraction are not emitted in this way, but directly from the fissioning nuclide. Much work has been done on the variation of fission neutron number v with incident neutron energy for neutron-induced fission. The neutron number increases roughly linearly with energy, with a slope of about 0.15 n/MeV. There is now evidence that this slope changes somewhat with energy. This change must be associated with other changes in the-fission process. The most interesting recent discovery concerning fission neutrons is the strong dependence of neutron number on individual fragment mass. The data are being rapidly improved by means of the newer techniques of determining fragment mass yields from velocity and pulse-height data, and of determining neutron yields from cumulative mass yields. There is evidence of similar dependence of neutron yield on fragment mass in a number of cases. It has been suggested that this property is directly connected with the deformability of the fragments, and in particular with the near-spherical shapes of magic

  17. Neutron stress measurement using neutron image plate. 4

    A fundamental study on the neutron stress measurement using an image plate neutron detector was described. First, a method for determining internal mean stress over the area where incident beams pass through was explained. The method is based on the α angle method by which the stress analysis is conducted using information along a diffraction ring. Second, a neutron diffraction experiment was shown. This was conducted using the research reactor, JRR-3M, at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The 211 diffraction rings from steel sample were obtained using the image plate neutron detector. It was found that the mean stress obtained by the image plate agreed with stress applied. (author)

  18. Quality incidents in projects

    Eren, Serkan

    2010-01-01

    A quality incident is an occurrence that has a negative consequence on time, cost and quality.These incidents are important for quality management in the projects. Similar to Health,Safety and Environment Incidents (HSE incidents) which are widely used in organizations allaround the world and in their projects, quality incidents should also be reported. For thepurpose of this, quality incident reporting systems can be used.The main purpose of this project is to define and explain the current ...

  19. Fragment-mass, kinetic energy, and angular distributions for 234U(, ) at incident neutron energies from n = 0.2 MeV to 5.0 MeV

    AL-ADILI ALI; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Pomp, S.; Oberstedt, Stephan; Vidali, Marzio

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the neutron-induced fission of 234U and the fission-fragment properties for neutron energies between n = 0.2 MeV and 5.0 MeV with a special highlight on the prominent vibrational resonance at n = 0.77 MeV. Angular-, energy- and mass distributions were determined based on the double-energy (2E) technique by means of a Twin Frisch-Grid Ionization Chamber. The experimental data are parametrized in terms of fission modes based on the Multi-Modal Random Neck-Rupture model...

  20. Nested Focusing Optics for Compact Neutron Sources

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH) have developed novel neutron grazing incidence optics for use with small-scale portable neutron generators. The technology was developed to enable the use of commercially available neutron generators for applications requiring high flux densities, including high performance imaging and analysis. Nested grazing incidence mirror optics, with high collection efficiency, are used to produce divergent, parallel, or convergent neutron beams. Ray tracing simulations of the system (with source-object separation of 10m for 5 meV neutrons) show nearly an order of magnitude neutron flux increase on a 1-mm diameter object. The technology is a result of joint development efforts between NASA and MIT researchers seeking to maximize neutron flux from diffuse sources for imaging and testing applications.

  1. A new thermal neutron reflectometer at HANARO

    Lee, J. S.; Hong, K. P.; Choi, B. H.; Lee, C. H.; Kim, H. R.; Shin, K.

    2006-11-01

    A new neutron reflectometer has been installed at the HANARO, research reactor in Korea. The scattering geometry is horizontal and, as a result, the sample is placed vertically. The wavelength of the incident neutron beam is 2.45 Å, and monochromated by a pyrolytic graphite crystal with a mosaicity of 0.4°. A detection of the incident and reflected neutron beams is via a helium-3 neutron detector. The neutron reflectivities of deuterated polystyrene and SiO 2 thin films were measured using this instrument. A neutron reflectivity as low as 10 -6 was determined. The maximum neutron momentum transfer, Q, reached 0.4 Å -1 for the solid thin films.

  2. A new thermal neutron reflectometer at HANARO

    A new neutron reflectometer has been installed at the HANARO, research reactor in Korea. The scattering geometry is horizontal and, as a result, the sample is placed vertically. The wavelength of the incident neutron beam is 2.45 A, and monochromated by a pyrolytic graphite crystal with a mosaicity of 0.4o. A detection of the incident and reflected neutron beams is via a helium-3 neutron detector. The neutron reflectivities of deuterated polystyrene and SiO2 thin films were measured using this instrument. A neutron reflectivity as low as 10-6 was determined. The maximum neutron momentum transfer, Q, reached 0.4 A-1 for the solid thin films

  3. Neutron-induced background by an {alpha}-beam incident on a deuterium gas target and its implications for the study of the {sup 2}H({alpha},{gamma}){sup 6}Li reaction at LUNA

    Anders, M.; Bemmerer, D.; Elekes, Z.; Marta, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany); Trezzi, D.; Mazzocchi, C. [INFN, Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bellini, A.; Costantini, H.; Corvisiero, P.; Lemut, A.; Prati, P. [Universita di Genova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Genova, Dipartimento di Fisica, Genova (Italy); Aliotta, M.; Davinson, T.; Scott, D. [University of Edinburgh, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A.; Erhard, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Rossi Alvarez, C. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Formicola, A.; Junker, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, Assergi (Italy); Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, G.; Somorjai, E.; Szuecs, T. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Gervino, G. [Universita di Torino (Italy); INFN, Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Torino (Italy); Guglielmetti, A. [INFN, Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Gustavino, C. [INFN, Sezione di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Roma (Italy); Straniero, O. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy); Collaboration: LUNA Collaboration

    2013-02-15

    The production of the stable isotope {sup 6}Li in standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis has recently attracted much interest. Recent observations in metal-poor stars suggest that a cosmological {sup 6}Li plateau may exist. If true, this plateau would come in addition to the well-known Spite plateau of {sup 7}Li abundances and would point to a predominantly primordial origin of {sup 6}Li, contrary to the results of standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculations. Therefore, the nuclear physics underlying Big Bang {sup 6}Li production must be revisited. The main production channel for {sup 6}Li in the Big Bang is the {sup 2}H({alpha},{gamma}){sup 6}Li reaction. The present work reports on neutron-induced effects in a high-purity germanium detector that were encountered in a new study of this reaction. In the experiment, an {alpha}-beam from the underground accelerator LUNA in Gran Sasso, Italy, and a windowless deuterium gas target are used. A low neutron flux is induced by energetic deuterons from elastic scattering and, subsequently, the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction. Due to the ultra-low laboratory neutron background at LUNA, the effect of this weak flux of 2-3 MeV neutrons on well-shielded high-purity germanium detectors has been studied in detail. Data have been taken at 280 and 400keV {alpha}-beam energy and for comparison also using an americium-beryllium neutron source. (orig.)

  4. Hybrid Superconducting Neutron Detectors

    Merlo, V.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2014-01-01

    A new neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction 10B+n $\\rightarrow$ $\\alpha$+ 7Li , with $\\alpha$ and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection...

  5. Neutron reflectometry

    Neutron research where reflection, refraction, and interference play an essential role is generally referred to as 'neutron optics'. The neutron wavelength, the scattering length density and the magnetic properties of the material determine the critical angle for total reflection. The theoretical background of neutron reflection, experimental methods and the interpretation of reflection data are presented. (K.A.)

  6. Neutron Radiography

    Reddy, A. R.; Rao, M. V. N.

    2012-01-01

    The field of neutron radiography with special reference to isotopic neutron radiography has been reviewed. Different components viz., sources, collimators, imaging systems are described. Various designs of neutron radiography facilities, their relative merits and demerits , the appropriateness of each design depending on the object to be radiographed, and economics of each technique are also dealt. The applications of neutron radiography are also briefly presented.

  7. Calibration of the IRD two-component TLD albedo neutron dosemeter in some moderated neutron fields

    In some stray neutron fields, like those found in practices involving the handling of radionuclide sources, the neutron calibration factor for albedo neutron dosemeter can vary widely compared to the factor for bare sources. This is the case for well logging, which is the area with the largest number of workers exposed to neutrons in Brazil. The companies employ routinely 241Am-Be neutron sources. The albedo response variation is mainly due to the presence of scattered and moderated neutrons. This paper studies the response variation of the two-component TLD albedo neutron dosemeter used in the neutron individual monitoring service of Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, in different radionuclide neutron source beams. The neutron spectra were evaluated applying a Bonner sphere spectrometer with a 6LiI(Eu) detector in the Brazilian National Metrology Neutron Laboratory. Standard neutron sources of 241Am-Be and 252Cf were employed, besides 238Pu-Be. Measurements were also made with scattered and moderated neutron beams, including 252Cf(D2O) reference spectrum, 241Am-Be moderated with paraffin and silicone and a thermal neutron flux facility. New neutron calibration factors, as a function of the incident to albedo neutron ratio, were proposed for use in the albedo algorithm for occupational fields where the primary neutron beam is one of those studied sources. (author)

  8. Calibration of the IRD two-component TLD albedo neutron dosemeter in some moderated neutron fields

    Freitas, Bruno M.; Silva, Ademir X. da, E-mail: bfreitas@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Martins, Marcelo M.; Pereira, Walsan W.; Mauricio, Claudia L.P., E-mail: marcelo@ird.gov.br, E-mail: walsan@ird.gov.br, E-mail: claudia@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In some stray neutron fields, like those found in practices involving the handling of radionuclide sources, the neutron calibration factor for albedo neutron dosemeter can vary widely compared to the factor for bare sources. This is the case for well logging, which is the area with the largest number of workers exposed to neutrons in Brazil. The companies employ routinely {sup 241}Am-Be neutron sources. The albedo response variation is mainly due to the presence of scattered and moderated neutrons. This paper studies the response variation of the two-component TLD albedo neutron dosemeter used in the neutron individual monitoring service of Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, in different radionuclide neutron source beams. The neutron spectra were evaluated applying a Bonner sphere spectrometer with a {sup 6}LiI(Eu) detector in the Brazilian National Metrology Neutron Laboratory. Standard neutron sources of {sup 241}Am-Be and {sup 252}Cf were employed, besides {sup 238}Pu-Be. Measurements were also made with scattered and moderated neutron beams, including {sup 252}Cf(D{sub 2}O) reference spectrum, {sup 241}Am-Be moderated with paraffin and silicone and a thermal neutron flux facility. New neutron calibration factors, as a function of the incident to albedo neutron ratio, were proposed for use in the albedo algorithm for occupational fields where the primary neutron beam is one of those studied sources. (author)

  9. Study on performance test of CR39 personal dosimeter for fast neutron

    Neutron personal dose monitoring is an important part of external monitoring for occupational exposure. According to the principles of neutron detecting of CR39 and its structure, experiments regarding energy response and angle response as well as dose equivalent response of CR39 neutron personal dosimeter against neutron flux emitted by Am-Be were conducted. Results show a strong dependence of neutron flux sensitivity on the energy and incident angle of neutron. The critical angle of 64 degree incident neutron and neutron flux sensitivity of about 2.24 x 10-4 trs/n were obtained. (authors)

  10. Neutron Skins and Neutron Stars

    Piekarewicz, J

    2013-01-01

    The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ("PREX") at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in 208Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron be...

  11. Study of damages by neutron irradiation in lithium aluminates

    Lithium aluminates proposed to the production of tritium in fusion nuclear reactors, due to the thermal stability that they present as well as the behavior of the aluminium to the irradiation. As a neutron flux with profile (≅ 14 Mev) of a fusion reactor is not available. A irradiation experiment was designed in order to know the micro and nano structure damages produced by fast and thermal neutrons in two irradiation positions of the fusion nuclear reactor Triga Mark III: CT (Thermal Column) and SIFCA (System of Irradiation Fixed of Capsules). In this work samples of lithium aluminate were characterized by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). Two samples were prepared by two methods: a) coalition method and b) peroxide method. This characterization comprised original and irradiated samples. The irradiated sample amounted to 4 in total: one for each preparation method and one for each irradiation position. The object of this analysis was to correlate with the received neutron dose the damages suffered by the samples with the neutron irradiation during long periods (440 H), in their micro and nano structure aspects; in order to understand the changes as a function of the irradiation zone (with thermal and fast neutron flux) and the preparation methods of the samples and having as an antecedent the irradiation in SIFCA position by short times (2h). The obtained results are referred to the stability of γ -aluminate phase, under given conditions of irradiation and defined nano structure arrangement. They also refer to the proposals of growth mechanism and nucleation of new phases. The error associated with the measurement of neutron dose is also discussed. (Author)

  12. Neutron polarisers for diffraction experiments

    Full text: Every neutron in a neutron beam has a spin which is either up or down. In an unpolarised beam, half the neutrons are up and half are down. A neutron polariser is a device which creates an imbalance in the number of up and down spin neutrons in the beam, thus giving a net beam polarisation. The three most common techniques for polarising neutron beams are supermirrors, Heusler alloy polarising monochromators and neutron spin filters. Supermirrors use the difference in refractive index for up and down spin neutrons at a magnetic/non-magnetic interface to selectively remove neutrons of one spin state from the beam. Heusler alloy polarisers give polarised beams through spin dependent Bragg reflection, and transmission filters work by preferentially absorbing the neutrons in one spin state. The most promising filter material is polarised gaseous 3He, in which the lone neutron is polarised and then the atom will preferentially absorb a neutron of the opposite spin. All three techniques have different advantages. Here, we compare the three techniques by generating quality factors which relate closely to an instruments performance in an experiment and determining which polariser will give the best quality factor for a given type of experiment. We find that supermirrors give the best results when narrow angular divergence of the neutron beam is desired, while filters are best when short wavelengths and wide angular divergence is required. For a powder diffractometer, this implies that a supermirror would be used to polarise the incident beam, while a large array of supermirrors or a single curved transmission filter could be used to analyse the polarisation of the diffracted intensity. We note that while Heusler alloys have advantages in that they combine polarisation with monochromation, on purely performance based criteria, they are not competitive with supermirrors or well-developed transmission filter technology

  13. Shielding the LANSCE [Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center] 800-MeV spallation neutron source

    Neutrons produced by medium-energy (800-MeV) proton reactions at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center spallation neutron source cause a variety of difficult shield problems. We describe the general shielding questions encountered at such a spallation source, and contrast spallation and reactor source shielding issues using an infinite slab-shield composed of 100 cm of iron and 15 cm of borated polyethylene. The calculations show that (for an incident spallation spectrum characteristic of neutrons leaking at 90 degrees from a tungsten target) high-energy neutrons dominate the dose at the shield surface. Secondary low-energy neutrons (produced by high-energy neutron attenuation) and attendant gamma-rays add significantly to the dose. The primary low-energy neutrons produced directly at the tungsten source contribute negligibly to the dose, and behave similarly to neutrons with a fission spectrum distribution. 8 refs., 10 figs

  14. Incident Information Management Tool

    Pejovic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Flaws of\tcurrent incident information management at CMS and CERN\tare discussed. A new data\tmodel for future incident database is\tproposed and briefly described. Recently developed draft version of GIS-­‐based tool for incident tracking is presented.

  15. Fast-Neutron Surveys Using Indium-Foil Activation

    Stephens, Lloyd D.; Smith, Alan R.

    1958-08-13

    Activation of indium foils by thermal neutrons has been applied to measurement of fast-neutron fluxes. Foils are encased in paraffin spheres placed in cadmium boxes. The high-energy neutrons that penetrate the cadmium become thermal neutrons; the thermal-neutron flux is proportional to the incident fast-neutron flux over a range of about 20 kev to 20 Mev. The foils are removed from the boxes and counted on a methane-flow proportional counter. High instantaneous neutron fluxes are easily detected and counted by use of these foils. Many simultaneous measurements have been made easily by this method.

  16. Neutron-induced background by an alpha-beam incident on a deuterium gas target and its implications for the study of the 2H(alpha,gamma)6Li reaction at LUNA

    Anders, M; Bellini, A; Aliotta, M; Bemmerer, D; Broggini, C; Caciolli, A; Costantini, H; Corvisiero, P; Davinson, T; Elekes, Z; Erhard, M; Formicola, A; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, Gy; Junker, M; Lemut, A; Marta, M; Mazzocchi, C; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Alvarez, C Rossi; Scott, D; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Szücs, T

    2013-01-01

    The production of the stable isotope Li-6 in standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis has recently attracted much interest. Recent observations in metal-poor stars suggest that a cosmological Li-6 plateau may exist. If true, this plateau would come in addition to the well-known Spite plateau of Li-7 abundances and would point to a predominantly primordial origin of Li-6, contrary to the results of standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculations. Therefore, the nuclear physics underlying Big Bang Li-6 production must be revisited. The main production channel for Li-6 in the Big Bang is the 2H(alpha,gamma)6Li reaction. The present work reports on neutron-induced effects in a high-purity germanium detector that were encountered in a new study of this reaction. In the experiment, an {\\alpha}-beam from the underground accelerator LUNA in Gran Sasso, Italy, and a windowless deuterium gas target are used. A low neutron flux is induced by energetic deuterons from elastic scattering and, subsequently, the 2H(d,n)3He reaction....

  17. Neutron forward diffraction by single crystal prisms

    Sohrab Abbas; Apoorva G Wagh; Markus Strobl; Wolfgang Treimer

    2008-11-01

    We have derived analytic expressions for the deflection as well as transmitted fraction of monochromatic neutrons forward diffracted by a single crystal prism. In the vicinity of a Bragg reflection, the neutron deflection deviates sharply from that for an amorphous prism, exhibiting three orders of magnitude greater sensitivity to the incidence angle. We have measured the variation of neutron deflection and transmission across a Bragg reflection, for several single crystal prisms. The results agree well with theory.

  18. Neutron Radiography

    A. R. Reddy

    1982-07-01

    Full Text Available The field of neutron radiography with special reference to isotopic neutron radiography has been reviewed. Different components viz., sources, collimators, imaging systems are described. Various designs of neutron radiography facilities, their relative merits and demerits , the appropriateness of each design depending on the object to be radiographed, and economics of each technique are also dealt. The applications of neutron radiography are also briefly presented.

  19. Albedo method applied to coupled neutron-gamma shielding radiations

    The Albedo Theory was applied in order to develop an one-group algorithm for coupled neutron-gamma shielding calculations. The configuration analyzed consists of multilayered plane systems, where a incident neutron current generates gamma radiation through neutron-gamma reactions. The results obtained by Albedo Method and ANISN code have shown excellent agreement. (author)

  20. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    Merlo, V.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-01

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, 10B + n → α + 7Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  1. Hybrid Superconducting Neutron Detectors

    Merlo, V; Cirillo, M; Lucci, M; Ottaviani, I; Scherillo, A; Celentano, G; Pietropaolo, A

    2014-01-01

    A new neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction 10B+n $\\rightarrow$ $\\alpha$+ 7Li , with $\\alpha$ and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the supercond...

  2. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, I-00133 Roma (Italy); CNR SPIN Salerno, Università di Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, n.132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Scherillo, A. [Science and Technology Facility Council, ISIS Facility Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Celentano, G. [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Pietropaolo, A., E-mail: antonino.pietropaolo@enea.it [ENEA Frascati Research Centre, Via. E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Mediterranean Institute of Fundamental Physics, Via Appia Nuova 31, 00040 Marino, Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  3. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, 10B + n → α + 7Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed

  4. Neutron cross section evaluations of europium isotopes in 1 keV - 30 MeV energy range. Format - validation - comparison; Evaluation de sections efficaces pour des neutrons incidents sur des isotopes d'europium aux energies 1 keV - 30 MeV. Format - validation - comparaison

    Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.; Le Luel, C.; Bauge, E. [CEA Bruyeres le Chatel, 91 (France). Dept. de Physique Theorique et Appliquee

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents neutron cross section evaluations of Europium isotopes. The cross sections are evaluated in 1 keV - 30 MeV energy range for the isotopes {sup 146}Eu, {sup 147}Eu, {sup 148}Eu, {sup 149}Eu, {sup 150}Eu, {sup 151}Eu, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 153}Eu, {sup 154}Eu in their ground state. This evaluation includes cross section productions of the long life isomeric states. Special attention is put on the options used for the description of the files written in ENDF-6 format. The final issue is a proposal of a new breed of ENDF-6 formatted neutron activation file. (authors)

  5. Neutron Capture and Neutron Halos

    A.Mengoni; Otsuka, T; Nakamura, T.(International Center for Elementary Particle Physics and Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan); Ishihara, M.

    1996-01-01

    The connection between the neutron halo observed in light neutron rich nuclei and the neutron radiative capture process is outlined. We show how nuclear structure information such as spectroscopic factors and external components of the radial wave function of loosely bound states can be derived from the neutron capture cross section. The link between the direct radiative capture and the Coulomb dissociation process is elucidated.

  6. Measuring the neutron lifetime using magnetically trapped neutrons

    The neutron beta-decay lifetime plays an important role both in understanding weak interactions within the framework of the Standard Model and in theoretical predictions of the primordial abundance of 4He in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. In previous work, we successfully demonstrated the trapping of ultracold neutrons in a conservative potential magnetic trap. A major upgrade of the apparatus is nearing completion at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). In our approach, a beam of 0.89 nm neutrons is incident on a superfluid 4He target within the minimum field region of an Ioffe-type magnetic trap. A fraction of the neutrons is downscattered in the helium to energies <200neV, and those in the appropriate spin state become trapped. The inverse process is suppressed by the low phonon density of helium at temperatures less than 200 mK, allowing the neutron to travel undisturbed. When the neutron decays the energetic electron ionizes the helium, producing scintillation light that is detected using photomultiplier tubes. Statistical limitations of the previous apparatus will be alleviated by significant increases in field strength and trap volume resulting in twenty times more trapped neutrons.

  7. Analysis of ancient coins by activation with rapid neutrons and by PIXE method

    The quantitative analysis of valuable objects in archaelogical research calls for the use of strictly non-destructive methods, even on very small surfaces of the object to investigate. The analytical method used by L.A.R.N. for the determination of principal elements Cu, Sn and Pb and of trace elements As and Ag in coins have been: 1. the rapid neutron activation (14 Mev) for the analysis of Sn; 2. the PIXE (Proton-Induced X-ray Emission) technique for the surface and core measures in samples which have been sawn as Sn, Pb, Ag and As. These methods have been used to analyse the blanks of Argos supplied by the Institut d'Archeologie of the University of Louvain. (A.F.)

  8. DPZ-1M rhodium neutron detector performance

    The characteristics of the DPZ-1M rhodium self-powered neutron detector based on the calculational technique using corrected experimental data are given. These detectors are used for power distribution monitoring in the WWER reactors. For calculating neutron absorption in an emitter incident neutron flux is specified, while the probability of β-particles escape is determined on the base of empirical dependence of extrapolated electron path on its energy. In addition correction by the emither radius of the probability distribution of β-particles escape by experimental data is performed. The results obtained permit to conclude that the rhodium detector possesses high sensitivity to epithermal neutrons Which depends on the neutron spectrum form; current relation of burned-up and non burned- up detector seightly depends on the spectrum form, neutron gas temperature and average neutron spectral hardness

  9. Understanding inelastically scattered neutrons from water on a time-of-flight small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument

    Doa, Changwoo; Stanley, Christopher; Gallmeier, Franz X; Doucet, Mathieu; Smith, Gregory S

    2013-01-01

    It is generally assumed by most of the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) user community that a neutrons energy is unchanged during SANS measurements. Here, the scattering from water, specifically light water, was measured on the EQ-SANS instrument, a time-of-flight SANS instrument located at the Spallation Neutron Source of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A significant inelastic process was observed in the TOF spectra of neutrons scattered from water. Analysis of the TOF spectra from the sample showed that the scattered neutrons have energies consistent with room-temperature thermal energies (~20 meV) regardless of the incident neutron energy. With the aid of Monte Carlo particle transport simulations, we conclude that the thermalization process within the sample results in faster neutrons that arrive at the detector earlier than expected based on the incident neutron energies. This thermalization process impacts the measured SANS intensities in a manner that will ultimately be sample- and temperature-depe...

  10. Methods of Neutron Spectroscopy

    1. Introduction. 2. Methods of spectral distribution measurements. 2.1. General remarks. 2.2. Methods using the wave properties of radiation. 2.2.1. Electromagnetic radiation. 2.2.2. Neutrons. 2.3. Methods using the corpuscular properties of radiation. 2.3.1. Electromagnetic radiation. 2.3.2. Neutrons. 3. Crystal lattice; momentum space; crystal monochromators. 3.1. Crystal lattice in real space. 3.2. Reciprocal lattice.. 3.3. Bragg's equation. 3.4. Ewald's construction. 3.5. Single crystal monochromators. 4. Structure analysis. 4.1. Introductory remarks. 4.2. Structure analysis using single crystals. 4.2.1. Crystal spectrometer method (DAS). 4.2.2. Time-of-flight method (TOF). 4.3. Structure analysis using powdered crystals. 4.3.1. Crystal spectrometer method (DAS). 4.3.2. Time- of-flight method (TOF). 4.4. DAS method VS. TOF method. 5. Lattice dynamics studies. 5.1. Introductory remarks. 5.2. Crystal spectrometer methods. 5.2.1. Triple axes spectrometer (TAS). 5.2.2. The neutron crystal spectrometer with a polycrystalline filter in front of the detector. 5.3. Time-of-methods. 5.3.1. The TOF methods using a monochromatic incident beam. 5. 3.2. The TOF methods using a polychromatic incident beam. 5. 4. Crystal spectrometer methods vs. TOF methods. 6. Outlook for the future. (author)

  11. "Skew" scattering of cold unpolarized neutrons in ferromagnetic crystal

    Udalov, O. G.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of neutron scattering by the single magnetic atom is theoretically considered in the second order perturbation theory. It is demonstrated that elastic scattering of unpolarized neutron by magnetic atom is skewed, i.e. contains the term with the symmetry of mixed product of the atom magnetic moment and wave vectors of incident and scattered neutrons. The problem of dynamical diffraction of unpolarized neutrons by the perfect ferromagnetic crystal is investigated. The case is consid...

  12. Compact neutron imaging system using axisymmetric mirrors

    Khaykovich, Boris; Moncton, David E; Gubarev, Mikhail V; Ramsey, Brian D; Engelhaupt, Darell E

    2014-05-27

    A dispersed release of neutrons is generated from a source. A portion of this dispersed neutron release is reflected by surfaces of a plurality of nested, axisymmetric mirrors in at least an inner mirror layer and an outer mirror layer, wherein the neutrons reflected by the inner mirror layer are incident on at least one mirror surface of the inner mirror layer N times, wherein N is an integer, and wherein neutrons reflected by the outer mirror are incident on a plurality of mirror surfaces of the outer layer N+i times, where i is a positive integer, to redirect the neutrons toward a target. The mirrors can be formed by a periodically reversed pulsed-plating process.

  13. Feasibility study on using imaging plates to estimate thermal neutron fluence in neutron-gamma mixed fields

    In current radiotherapy, neutrons are produced in a photonuclear reaction when incident photon energy is higher than the threshold. In the present study, a method of discriminating the neutron component was investigated using an imaging plate (IP) in the neutron-gamma-ray mixed field. Two types of IP were used: a conventional IP for beta- and gamma rays, and an IP doped with Gd for detecting neutrons. IPs were irradiated in the mixed field, and the photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) intensity of the thermal neutron component was discriminated using an expression proposed herein. The PSL intensity of the thermal neutron component was proportional to thermal neutron fluence. When additional irradiation of photons was added to constant neutron irradiation, the PSL intensity of the thermal neutron component was not affected. The uncertainty of PSL intensities was approximately 11.4 %. This method provides a simple and effective means of discriminating the neutron component in a mixed field. (authors)

  14. Research of accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Background: 7Li (p, n) reaction of high neutron yield and low threshold energy has become one of the most important neutron generating reactions for Accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Purpose Focuses on neutron yield and spectrum characteristics of this kind of neutron generating reaction which serves as an accelerator-based neutron source and moderates the high energy neutron beams to meet BNCT requirements. Methods: The yield and energy spectrum of neutrons generated by accelerator-based 7Li(p, n) reaction with incident proton energy from 1.9 MeV to 3.0 MeV are researched using the Monte Carlo code-MCNPX2.5.0. And the energy and angular distribution of differential neutron yield by 2.5-MeV incident proton are also given in this part. In the following part, the character of epithermal neutron beam generated by 2.5-MeV incident protons is moderated by a new-designed moderator. Results: Energy spectra of neutrons generated by accelerator-based 7Li(p, n) reaction with incident proton energy from 1.9 MeV to 3.0 MeV are got through the simulation and calculation. The best moderator thickness is got through comparison. Conclusions: Neutron beam produced by accelerator-based 7Li(p, n) reaction, with the bombarding beam of 10 mA and the energy of 2.5 MeV, can meet the requirement of BNCT well after being moderated. (authors)

  15. Neutron sources

    As neutron scattering experiments have grown more and more demanding with respect to resolution and quality, it became more and more necessary to include the neutron source itself in the design of an experimental setup. In this sense the generic representation of a neutron scattering arrangement includes the primary neutron source and the associated spectrum shifter (or moderator). In fact, the design of a modern neutron source will start from a set of users requirements and will proceed 'inwards' through a selection of the moderators (spectrum shifters) to the primary source best suited to meet these often conflicting needs. This paper aims at explaining the options source designers have to match the neutron source performance to the users' demands. (author)

  16. Neutron detector

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  17. Moving Crystal Slow-Neutron Wavelength Analyser

    Buras, B.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1973-01-01

    Experimental proof that a moving single crystal can serve as a slow-neutron wavelength analyser of special features is presented. When the crystal moves with a velocity h/(2 md) (h-Planck constant, m-neutron mass, d-interplanar spacing) perpendicular to the diffracting plane and the analysed...... neutron beam is parallel to the diffracting plane, then neutrons of different wave-lengths contained in the incident beam are simultaneously diffracted under different reflection angles and recorded by a position-sensitive detector. Special features of this analysing system are briefly discussed....

  18. Modeling a neutron-rich nuclei source

    The deuteron break-up process in a suitable converter gives rise to intense neutron beams. A source of neutron-rich nuclei based on the neutron-induced fission can be realised using these beams. A theoretical optimization of such a facility as a function of the incident deuteron energy is reported. The model used to determine the fission products takes into account the excitation energy of the target nucleus and the evaporation of prompt neutrons. Results are presented in connection with a converter-target specific geometry. (orig.)

  19. Modeling a neutron rich nuclei source

    The deuteron break-up process in a suitable converter gives rise to intense neutron beams. A source of neutron rich nuclei based on the neutron induced fission can be realised using these beams. A theoretical optimization of such a facility as a function of the incident deuteron energy is reported. The model used to determine the fission products takes into account the excitation energy of the target nucleus and the evaporation of prompt neutrons. Results are presented in connection with a converter-target specific geometry. (authors)

  20. Neutron dosimetry

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq 241 Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s-1 and 0,5 μSv s-1. A calibrated 50 nSv s-1 thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the 241 Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold 241 Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,α) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kVpp cm-1, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46± 0,09) 104 tracks cm-2 mSv-1 for thermal neutrons, (9±3) 102 tracks cm-2 mSV-1 for intermediate neutrons and (26±4) tracks cm-2 mSv-1 for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990's ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is sufficiently sensitive to thermal and intermediate neutrons but fast neutron monitoring ar radiological protection level

  1. Atmospheric neutrons

    Additional calibrations of the University of California double-scatter neutron and additional analysis corrections lead to the slightly changed neutron fluxes reported here. The theoretical angular distributions of Merker (1975) are in general agreement with our experimental fluxes but do not give the peaks for vertical upward and downward moving neutrons. The theoretical neutron escape current J2/sub pi/ (Merker, 1972; Armstrong et al., 1973) is in agreement with the experimental values from 10 to 100 MeV. Our experimental fluxes agree with those of the Kanbach et al. (1974) in the overlap region from 70 to 100 MeV

  2. A NEW SINGLE-CRYSTAL FILTERED THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    John D. Brockman; David W. Nigg; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2008-09-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The calculated and measured thermal neutron flux produced at the irradiation location is on the order of 9.5x108 neutrons/cm2-s, with a measured cadmium ratio (Au foils) of 105, indicating a well-thermalized spectrum.

  3. Neutron Imaging Camera

    Hunter, Stanley D.; DeNolfo, Georgia; Floyd, Sam; Krizmanic, John; Link, Jason; Son, Seunghee; Guardala, Noel; Skopec, Marlene; Stark, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We describe the Neutron Imaging Camera (NIC) being developed for DTRA applications by NASA/GSFC and NSWC/Carderock. The NIC is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics applications. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, approximately 0.4 mm resolution. 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of fast neutrons, E(sub N) > 0.5 MeV. arc reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the proton and triton fragments resulting from 3He(n,p)3H interactions in the 3-DTI volume. We present angular and energy resolution performance of the NIC derived from accelerator tests.

  4. Micromegas neutron beam monitor neutronics.

    Stephan, Andrew C; Miller, Laurence F

    2005-01-01

    The Micromegas is a type of ionising radiation detector that consists of a gas chamber sandwiched between two parallel plate electrodes, with the gas chamber divided by a Frisch grid into drift and amplification gaps. Investigators have applied it to a number of different applications, such as charged particle, X-ray and neutron detection. A Micromegas device has been tested as a neutron beam monitor at CERN and is expected to be used for that purpose at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) under construction in Oak Ridge, TN. For the Micromegas to function effectively as neutron beam monitor, it should cause minimal disruption to the neutron beam in question. Specifically, it should scatter as few neutrons as possible and avoid neutron absorption when it does not contribute to generating useful information concerning the neutron beam. Here, we present the results of Monte Carlo calculations of the effect of different types of wall materials and detector gases on neutron beams and suggest methods for minimising disruption to the beam. PMID:16381746

  5. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Fratin, Luciano

    1993-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  6. Neutron gun

    The neutron gun combines a new core ion source of the cold type based on X-ray ionization and new cold type of neutron source working with core ion generation. The neutrons are formed from the impact of core ions on the negatively charged anode. Based on a new conversion function, the function of the positive anode becomes analogous to the beta-unstable decomposition of a neutron. A core ion and neutron amplifier in the sense of amplifying the number is derived from the beta-unstable neutron decomposition, in order to raise the output of a gun in pulsed operation by using the number amplification in the intervals between the pulses. The method of construction is simple and cheap, the equipment has purely linear acceleration or operation with circular acceleration with linear pre-acceleration as an alternative. Purely linear operation should be sufficient for medical applications, e.g. for neutron photography to replay X-ray photography and particularly for neutron scalpels in the surgical treatment of tumours. (orig./HP)

  7. Large whale incident database

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Large whale stranding, death, ship strike and entanglement incidents are all recorded to monitor the health of each population and track anthropogenic factors that...

  8. Incident Report - Legacy

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Incident Report is a mandatory post trip legal document observers fill out to report any enforcement related situations they have encountered on an observed...

  9. NRC Incident Response Plan

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates civilian nuclear activities to protect the public health and safety and to preserve environmental quality. An Incident Response Plan had been developed and has now been revised to reflect current Commission policy. NUREG-0728, Rev. 2 assigns responsibilities for responding to any potentially threatening incident involving NRC licensed activities and for assuring that the NRC will fulfill it statutory mission. This report has also been reproduced for staff use as NRC Manual Chapter 0502

  10. Neutron transport

    This bibliographical note presents a reference book which addresses the study of neutron transport in matter, the study of conditions for a chain reaction and the study of modifications of matter composition due to nuclear reactions. This book presents the main nuclear data, their measurement, assessment and processing, and the spallation. It proposes an overview of methods applied for the study of neutron transport: basic equations and their derived forms, deterministic methods and Monte Carlo method of resolution of the Boltzmann equation, methods of resolution of generalized Bateman equations, methods of time resolution of space kinetics coupled equations. It presents the main calculation codes, discusses the qualification and experimental aspects, and gives an overview of neutron transport applications: neutron transport calculation of reactors, neutron transport coupled with other disciplines, physics of fuel cycle, criticality

  11. Neutron scattering from -Ce at epithermal neutron energies

    A P Murani

    2008-10-01

    Neutron scattering data, using neutrons of incident energies as high as 2 eV, on -Ce and -Ce-like systems such as CeRh2, CeNi2, CeFe24, CeRu2, and many others that point clearly to the substantially localized 4f electronic state in these systems are reviewed. The present interpretation is contrary to the widely held view that the 4f electrons in these systems form a narrow itinerant electron 4f band.

  12. Neutron radiography

    This introduction is addressed to an audience active in diverse forms of neutron source applications but not directly familiar with neutron radiography. Neutron radiography is, of course, similar to, and complementary to, radiography using x-rays. However, neutrons, being sensitive to the nuclear properties of materials, provide information fundamentally different from x-rays. For example, neutrons can penetrate many dense metals such as uranium, lead, bismuth or steel, and can reveal details of internal hydrogenous components: explosives, lubricants and gaskets. For nuclear fuel inspection neutron radiography offers the ability to penetrate dense uranium-238 and contrast the isotopes U-235 or Pu-239 and also offers the ability to discriminate against unwanted interference from gamma radiation. In addition to advantages in industrial applications, there are special situations in fields such as medical diagnostics, dentistry, agriculture and forensic science. Comprehensive accounts of applications in the field can be found in the proceedings of the world conferences on neutron radiography: USA (1981), FRANCE (1986). A third conference in this series is scheduled for May 1989 in Japan

  13. Neutron radiography

    The digital processing of the neutron radiography images gives the possibility for data quantification. In this case an exact relation between the measured neutron attenuation and the real macroscopic attenuation coefficient for every point of the sample is required. The assumption that the attenuation of the neutron beam through the sample is exponential is valid only in an ideal case where a monochromatic beam, non scattering sample and non background contribution are assumed. In the real case these conditions are not fulfilled and in dependence on the sample material we have more or less deviation from the exponential attenuation law. Because of the high scattering cross-sections of hydrogen (σs=80.26 barn) for thermal neutrons, the problem with the scattered neutrons at quantitative radiography investigations of hydrogenous materials (as PE, Oil, H2O, etc) is not trivial. For these strong scattering materials the neutron beam attenuation is no longer exponential and a dependence of the macroscopic attenuation coefficient on the material thickness and on the distance between the sample and the detector appears. When quantitative radiography (2 D) or tomography investigations (3 D) are performed, some image correction procedures for a description of the scattering effect are required. This thesis presents a method that can be used to enhance the neutron radiography image for objects with high scattering materials like hydrogen, carbon and other light materials. This method uses the Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, to simulate the neutron radiography process and get the flux distribution for each pixel of the image and determine the scattered neutrons distribution that causes the image blur and then subtract it from the initial image to improve its quality.

  14. Neutron tomography

    In this paper a survey is given of recent developments in selected areas of neutron tomography, within the context of several applications Argonne is involved in, including high penetration of reactor-fuel bundles in thick containers (involving TREAT and NRAD facilities), dual-energy hydrogen imaging (performed at IPNS), dynamic coarse-resolution emission tomography of rector fuel under test (a proposed modification to the TREAT hodoscope), and an associated-particle system that uses neutron flight-time to electronically collimate transmitted neutrons and to tomographically image nuclides identified by reaction gamma-rays

  15. Personnel neutron monitoring based on albedo technique

    This work deals with the study, design and test of a personal neutron monitor based on the detection of albedo neutrons from the body and its further relation to the incident flux. By this method, neutrons of energies below about 100 KeV can be efficiently detected, providing good information in the region where the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation starts to rise. The system consists of a pair of Thermoluminescent Detectors (6 LiF - 7 LiF) ∼ inside a polyethylene moderating body, in order to increase the sensitivity. The surface of the dosimeter facing away from the body is covered by a layer of a borated resin to assure appropriate shielding of incident low energy neutrons. The response of the dosimeter to monoenergetic neutrons from a 3 MeV Van de Graaff, to Am Be neutrons and to neutrons from a thermal column was investigated. The directional sensitivity, the effect of beam divergence was well as the effect of changes in dosimeter-to-body distances were also studied. (author)

  16. Neutron capture cross sections of 151,153Eu

    The neutron capture cross section of 151,153Eu nuclei was measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Neutrons were produced at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center and their energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The relative yield versus neutron incident energy from 0.1 eV to 2.0 keV for both 151Eu(n,) and 153Eu(n,) reactions was derived from events gated on the total energy and multiplicity measured by the DANCE array. The absolute cross section was determined by scaling the relative yield to the measured cross sections of well-known resonances. The shape of the yield curve agrees well with previous measurements in the resonance region for both 151Eu and 153Eu capture cross sections. New data are reported for neutron incident energies between 100 eV and 2.0 keV. The trend of data in the 0.3 keV to 2.0 keV region of neutron incident energy is consistent with the ENDF/BVI and the measurements of Macklin and Young. Crucial skills, acquired from these measurements in the early implementation of DANCE, are important to plan future experiments, which will yield results up to a few hundred keV neutron incident energy

  17. Neutron emission time measurements for ICF targets

    The neutron emission time for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion targets is determined from data recorded with fast neutron and optical detector systems. Two types of neutron detectors are used. Radiation-induced conductivity devices have a 130-ps FWHM response and are sensitive to targets with yields greater than 5 x 10/sup 10/ DT neutrons. They measure the average neutron emission time with a precision of +- 50 ps and are fast enough to measure the neutron production rate within a target core as a function of time. Plastic scintillators coupled to microchannel-plate photomultiplier tubes have a 1.2-ns FWHM response and measure the average neutron emission time with a precision of +- 75 ps for targets with yields greater than 106 neutrons. Streak cameras record the incident laser power. Optical fiducial signals that are injected into each detector are used to cross time between the detector systems. Measurements made on 1-mm-diam spherical targets irradiated with 23 kJ of 0.35-μm light delivered in a temporally square 1.1-ns pulse and yielding 10/sup 13/ neutrons show a burn duration greater than 300 ps and an average neutron emission time of about 850 ps

  18. Neutron scattering

    This report contains the text of 16 lectures given at the Summer School and the report on a panel discussion entitled ''the relative merits and complementarities of x-rays, synchrotron radiation, steady- and pulsed neutron sources''. figs., tabs., refs

  19. Piezonuclear Neutrons

    Cardone, Fabio; Petrucci, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    We report the results of neutron measurements carried out during the application of ultrasounds to a solution containing only stable elements like Iron and Chlorine, without any other radioactive source of any kind. These measurements, carried out by CR39 detectors and a Boron TriFouride electronic detector, evidenced the emission of neutron pulses. These pulses stand well above the electronic noise and the background of the laboratory where the measurements were carried out.

  20. Neutron Scattering

    The neutron probe is a standard tool for measuring soil water content. This article provides an overview of the underlying theory, describes the methodology for its calibration and use, discusses example applications, and identifies the safety issues. Soil water makes land-based life possible by satisfying plant water requirements, serving as a medium for nutrient movement to plant roots and nutrient cycling, and controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in the soil environment. Therefore, a successful understanding of the dynamics of plant growth, nutrient cycling, and contaminant behavior in the soil requires knowledge of the soil water content as well as its spatial and temporal variability. After more than 50 years, neutron probes remain the most reliable tool available for field monitoring of soil water content. Neutron probes provide integrated measurements over relatively large volumes of soil and, with proper access, allow for repeated sampling of the subsurface at the same locations. The limitations of neutron probes include costly and time-consuming manual operation, lack of data automation, and costly regulatory requirements. As more non-radioactive systems for soil water monitoring are developed to provide automated profiling capabilities, neutron-probe usage will likely decrease. Until then, neutron probes will continue to be a standard for reliable measurements of field water contents in soils around the globe

  1. Neutronic and thermalhydraulic aspects

    Precise computation of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor represents one of the basic aspects of reactor design and operation. Neutron flux is computed by solving Boltzmann's linear equation. Anyway, the direct solution of the equation involves too great a number of operations for practical application, leading up to TeraFlops or even PetaFlops supercomputing capabilities. Physical and mathematical models are then required to handle the extensive variety of configurations encountered. Numerical methods must be adapted to the rapid evolution of computer power, as also computer architecture: sequential, vector or parallel. Physical and mathematical models must allow for very fast estimation for online control and monitoring, adequate quantification for industrial studies and high-precision, best estimate computations. Coupling of neutronics to mechanics and two-phase flow thermohydraulics must be implemented in order to improve the accuracy in best-estimate computation schemes and to take into account the transient behaviour of the plant during normal operation or incidents. In this field of continuous improvement, the new methods applied in Reactor Physics lead obviously to good results and provide the improvements required in the future for the needs of efficiency, safety and advanced fuel cycle. This trend and the ''evolutionary'' implementation in large and modular software systems will be illustrated by the example of the SAPHYR system. (authors). 3 tabs

  2. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) has consultative committees covering various areas of metrology. The Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI) differs from the others in having three sections: Section (I) deals with radiation dosimetry, Section (II) with radionuclide metrology and Section (III) with neutron metrology. In 2003 a proposal was made to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the three Sections. Section (II) was the first to complete their task, and their special issue was published in 2007, volume 44(4). This was followed in 2009 by the special issue on radiation dosimetry, volume 46(2). The present issue, volume 48(6), completes the trilogy and attempts to explain neutron metrology, the youngest of the three disciplines, the neutron only having been discovered in 1932, to a wider audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of this field. When originally approached with the idea of this special issue, Section (III) immediately saw the value of a publication specifically on neutron metrology. It is a topic area where papers tend to be scattered throughout the literature in journals covering, for example, nuclear instrumentation, radiation protection or radiation measurements in general. Review articles tend to be few. People new to the field often ask for an introduction to the various topics. There are some excellent older textbooks, but these are now becoming obsolete. More experienced workers in specific areas of neutron metrology can find it difficult to know the latest position in related areas. The papers in this issue attempt, without presenting a purely historical outline, to describe the field in a sufficiently logical way to provide the novice with a clear introduction, while being sufficiently up-to-date to provide the more experienced reader with the latest scientific developments in the different topic areas. Neutron radiation fields obviously occur throughout the nuclear

  3. Advanced Modeling of Prompt Fission Neutrons and Gamma Rays

    Kawano T.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Prompt fission neutrons and gamma rays are computed using a Monte Carlo treatment of the statistical evaporation of the excited primary fission fragments. The assumption of two fragments in thermal equilibrium at the time of neutron emission is addressed by studying the neutron multiplicity as a function of fragment mass. Results for the neutron-induced fission of 235U are discussed, for incident neutron energies from 0.5 to 5.5 MeV. Recent experimental data on the fission fragment yields as a function of mass and total kinetic energy are used as input data.

  4. Advanced Modeling of Prompt Fission Neutrons and Gamma Rays

    Kawano T; Talou P.

    2010-01-01

    Prompt fission neutrons and gamma rays are computed using a Monte Carlo treatment of the statistical evaporation of the excited primary fission fragments. The assumption of two fragments in thermal equilibrium at the time of neutron emission is addressed by studying the neutron multiplicity as a function of fragment mass. Results for the neutron-induced fission of 235U are discussed, for incident neutron energies from 0.5 to 5.5 MeV. Recent experimental data on the fission fragment yield...

  5. UCN Source at an External Beam of Thermal Neutrons

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new method for production of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in superfluid helium. The principal idea consists in installing a helium UCN source into an external beam of thermal or cold neutrons and in surrounding this source with a solid methane moderator/reflector cooled down to ~4 K. The moderator plays the role of an external source of cold neutrons needed to produce UCNs. The flux of accumulated neutrons could exceed the flux of incident neutrons due to their numerous reflections ...

  6. Neutron scattering and models: Titanium

    Smith, A.B.

    1997-07-01

    Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental titanium were measured from 4.5 {r_arrow} 10.0 MeV in incident energy increments of {approx} 0.5 MeV. At each energy the measurements were made at forty or more scattering angles distributed between {approx} 17 and 160{degree}. Concurrently, differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured for observed excitations of 0.975 {+-} 0.034, 1.497 {+-} 0.033, 2.322 {+-} 0.058, 3.252 {+-} 0.043, 3.700 {+-} 0.093, 4.317 {+-} 0.075 and 4.795 {+-} 0.100 MeV. All of the observed inelastically-scattered neutron groups were composites of contributions from several isotopes and/or levels. The experimental results were used to develop energy-average optical, statistical and coupled-channels models.

  7. Detecting energy dependent neutron capture distributions in a liquid scintillator

    Balmer, Matthew J.I., E-mail: m.balmer@lancaster.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Gamage, Kelum A.A. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Taylor, Graeme C. [Neutron Metrology Group, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-11

    A novel technique is being developed to estimate the effective dose of a neutron field based on the distribution of neutron captures in a scintillator. Using Monte Carlo techniques, a number of monoenergetic neutron source energies and locations were modelled and their neutron capture response was recorded. Using back propagation Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) the energy and incident direction of the neutron field was predicted from the distribution of neutron captures within a {sup 6}Li-loaded liquid scintillator. Using this proposed technique, the effective dose of {sup 252}Cf, {sup 241}AmBe and {sup 241}AmLi neutron fields was estimated to within 30% for four perpendicular angles in the horizontal plane. Initial theoretical investigations show that this technique holds some promise for real-time estimation of the effective dose of a neutron field.

  8. Diagnosis of mucoviscidosis by neutron activation analysis. Part 1

    Symptoms pathology, incidence, and gravity of the inherent syndrome called mucoviscidosis, or cystic fibrosis are described in this Part I. The analytical methods used for its diagnosis, both the conventional chemical ones and by neutron activation analysis are also summarised. Finally, an analytical method to study the incidence of mucoviscidosis in Brazil is presented. This , essentially, consists in bromine determination, in fingernails, by resonance neutron activation analysis. (author)

  9. Reflection of slow neutrons from powder of nanorods

    Two phenomena were recently observed: efficient diffuse reflection of very cold neutrons (VCN) from nanostructured matter for any angle of neutron incidence to the matter surface, and also quasispecular reflection of cold neutrons (CN) from nanostructured matter for small angles of neutron incidence to the matter surface. In both cases, powder of diamond nanoparticles was used as nanostructured matter, and the measured reflection probabilities by far exceeded the values known for alternative reflectors. Both these phenomena are already used in neutron experiments and for building neutron sources. In the present theoretical work, we consider an option of further increasing the efficiency of nanostructured reflectors due to replacing spherical nanoparticles by nanorods. We showed that VCN albedo from powder of randomly oriented nanorods is lower than their albedo from powder of nanospheres of equal diameter. However, albedo of VCN and quasispecular reflection of CN from powder of long nanorods oriented parallel to the powder surface exceed those for powder of nanospheres of equal diameter

  10. Scintillator fiber optic long counter for neutron detection

    A fiber optic long counter for neutron detection has been developed which uses 30 cm long, 6Li-loaded Tb3+-doped scintillator fiber optics as the detection element. The element is surrounded by polyethylene moderator and configured to allow neutrons to enter from one direction. The penetration depth of thermalization into the moderator is related to incident neutron energy. By determining the absorption position of the thermalized neutron along the fiber, the incident energy of the neutron can be estimated. The absorption position is measured by determining the differential signal collected by photomultiplier tubes at each end of the fiber element. The system is capable of low resolution neutron spectroscopy while retaining the flat response of conventional long counters. (orig.)

  11. Fast-neutron scattering from elemental cadmium

    Neutron differential-elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental cadmium are measured from approx. = 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at incident-neutron energy intervals of 50 to 200 keV and at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between approx. = 20 and 160 degrees. Concurrently, lumped-level neutron inelastic-excitation cross sections are measured. The experimental results are used to deduce parameters of an optical-statistical model that is descriptive of the observables and are compared with corresponding quantities given in ENDF/B-V

  12. Diffuse neutron scattering signatures of rough films

    Patterns of diffuse neutron scattering from thin films are calculated from a perturbation expansion based on the distorted-wave Born approximation. Diffuse fringes can be categorised into three types: those that occur at constant values of the incident or scattered neutron wavevectors, and those for which the neutron wavevector transfer perpendicular to the film is constant. The variation of intensity along these fringes can be used to deduce the spectrum of surface roughness for the film and the degree of correlation between the film's rough surfaces

  13. Neutron Repulsion

    Manuel, Oliver K

    2011-01-01

    Earth is connected gravitationally, magnetically and electrically to its heat source - a neutron star that is obscured from view by waste products in the photosphere. Neutron repulsion is like the hot filament in an incandescent light bulb. Excited neutrons are emitted from the solar core and decay into hydrogen that glows in the photosphere like a frosted light bulb. Neutron repulsion was recognized in nuclear rest mass data in 2000 as the overlooked source of energy, the keystone of an arch that locked together these puzzling space-age observations: 1.) Excess 136Xe accompanied primordial helium in the stellar debris that formed the solar system (Fig. 1); 2.) The Sun formed on the supernova core (Fig. 2); 3.) Waste products from the core pass through an iron-rich mantle, selectively carrying lighter elements and lighter isotopes of each element into the photosphere (Figs. 3-4); and 4.) Neutron repulsion powers the Sun and sustains life (Figs. 5-7). Together these findings offer a framework for understanding...

  14. Punchthrough calculations for neutrons using CALOR89

    Punchthrough calculations for blocks of iron, copper, depleted uranium and lead of thicknesses of 10 and 12 interaction lengths have been completed for incident negative pions of 10 GeV and 100 GeV using the CALOR89 simulation code. The most numerous particles escaping out the back of the blocks are neutrons. The simulations show that there are significantly more neutrons escaping out the back of the lead block than any of the other absorbers, despite neutron production by fission in the depleted uranium. Two effects are held to be primarily responsible for this. First, the proton and neutron shells in lead nuclei are filled, giving lead a low neutron absorption cross section relative to the other absorbers, particularly uranium. Second, the number density of lead is lower than the other absorbers, particularly copper and iron

  15. Diagnosis of mucoviscidosis by neutron activation analysis. Part 1; Diagnostico da mucoviscidose utilizando analise por ativacao com neutrons. Parte 1

    Bellido, Luis F.; Bellido, Alfredo V

    1997-02-01

    Symptoms pathology, incidence, and gravity of the inherent syndrome called mucoviscidosis, or cystic fibrosis are described in this Part I. The analytical methods used for its diagnosis, both the conventional chemical ones and by neutron activation analysis are also summarised. Finally, an analytical method to study the incidence of mucoviscidosis in Brazil is presented. This , essentially, consists in bromine determination, in fingernails, by resonance neutron activation analysis. (author) 33 refs., 13 figs.

  16. Measurement of Neutron Transmission Through Iron Spheres

    We have measured the transmission of neutrons through iron spheres with several different neutron sources. The D(d,n) reaction and the 15N(n,p) reaction were found to be the best candidates for nearly monoenergetic sources at energies below 11 MeV. We have used a quasi monoenergetic source with 3.0-, 5.0-, and 7.0-MeV deuterons incident on a deuteron gas cell and 5.1-MeV protons incident on a 15N gas cell. The Ohio University Beam Swinger Facility was used in these measurements. This allowed a single fixed detector in a well-shielded time-of-flight (TOF) tunnel to be used for measurements at all angles. This allows a great reduction in the background from room scattered neutrons. The detector, either NE-213 or lithium glass, was calibrated relative to the neutron spectrum from the B(d,n) or the Al(d,n) source reaction. These spectra have been measured relative to the primary neutron standard, 235U(n, f). The transmitted neutrons have been measured for all source reactions at several angles. The data will be reported as the number of neutrons versus time-of-flight since multiple scattering does not allow the energy to be determined accurately by time-of-flight. We have also measured the source reaction at several angles to enhance the modeling of the source spectrum

  17. X-ray and neutron reflectivity

    The intensity of X-rays and neutrons reflected from an interface at near-grazing incidence depends sensitively on the refractive index profile normal to the interface. As the refractive index depends on the density, the measured reflectivity vs. incidence angle can be used to determine the Interfacial density profile with sub angstrom resolution. The density sampled is, however, different for the two probes. As neutrons interact with the atomic nuclei, they probe the scattering amplitude density profile of the nuclei. This amounts effectively to probing the average mass density profile, where the contribution of each atomic species is weighted by its nucleus-neutron interaction strength, which varies irregularly throughout the periodic table. X-rays, however, interact with the electronic charge and thus probe the total electronic density profile of the interface. The two probes provide, therefore, slightly different, though related, information on the interface structure. Since modern synchrotron X-ray sources are 5-6 orders of magnitude brighter than the best neutron sources, X-ray reflectivity measurements routinely achieve much higher resolutions and accuracies than their neutron counterparts. However, the magnetic interaction and the large variation of the neutron scattering length upon isotopic substitution renders neutron reflectivity a method-of-choice in special cases such as studies of surface magnetism and the adsorption of polymers at liquid and solid surfaces

  18. Method and apparatus for detecting neutrons

    Perkins, Richard W.; Reeder, Paul L.; Wogman, Ned A.; Warner, Ray A.; Brite, Daniel W.; Richey, Wayne C.; Goldman, Don S.

    1997-01-01

    The instant invention is a method for making and using an apparatus for detecting neutrons. Scintillating optical fibers are fabricated by melting SiO.sub.2 with a thermal neutron capturing substance and a scintillating material in a reducing atmosphere. The melt is then drawn into fibers in an anoxic atmosphere. The fibers may then be coated and used directly in a neutron detection apparatus, or assembled into a geometrical array in a second, hydrogen-rich, scintillating material such as a polymer. Photons generated by interaction with thermal neutrons are trapped within the coated fibers and are directed to photoelectric converters. A measurable electronic signal is generated for each thermal neutron interaction within the fiber. These electronic signals are then manipulated, stored, and interpreted by normal methods to infer the quality and quantity of incident radiation. When the fibers are arranged in an array within a second scintillating material, photons generated by kinetic neutrons interacting with the second scintillating material and photons generated by thermal neutron capture within the fiber can both be directed to photoelectric converters. These electronic signals are then manipulated, stored, and interpreted by normal methods to infer the quality and quantity of incident radiation.

  19. Evaluation of neutron nuclear data for 240Pu

    Based on the experimental data evaluation and theoretical calculation, a complete set of neutron nuclear data for 240Pu has been recommended in the incident neutron energy range from 10-5 eV to 20 MeV for CENDL-2. The comparison of present evaluation with ENDF/B-6 and JENDL-3 has been carried out

  20. Incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy

    Abelmann, Walter H.

    1985-01-01

    Full reliable data on the incidence and prevalence of dilated cardiomyopathy are not available. In the United States, at least 0.7% of cardiac deaths are attributable to cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy probably contributes the great majority of these cases. The mortality rate for cardiomyopathy in males is twice that of females, and for blacks it is 2.4 times that of whites. Cardiomyopathy was diagnosed in 0.67% of patients discharged from hospitals in 1979 with diagnoses of disease of...

  1. Delayed neutron yield of 238U and 241Pu

    The total delayed neutron yield for 238U and 241Pu were observed as a function of the incident neutron energy. The measurements extend from 2.5 to 5 MeV for 238U and from 0.15 to 5 MeV for 241Pu. The average ratio of the 241Pu delayed neutron yield to that of 238U is 0.292 +- 0.022

  2. Improvements in neutron time-of-flight spectra processing

    At this conference Egan et. al. have reported on neutron scattering experiments on actinide nuclei with incident neutron energies in the 2 to 3 MeV range. These measurements present unique challenges because cross sections are small and excited levels are closely spaced. In this paper we review aspects of experiment design and of data reduction which assist in overcoming these difficulties (neutron scattering, actinides, elastic and inelastic cross sections, data reduction). (author)

  3. Impact of nuclear data on fast neutron therapy

    By combining a new, all-particle Monte Carlo radiation transport code, PEREGRINE, with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) nuclear data base, we have studied the importance of various neutron reactions on dose distributions in biological materials. Monte Carlo calculations have been performed for 5--20 MeV neutron pencil beams incident on biologically relevant materials arranged in several simple geometries. Results highlight the importance of nuclear data used for calculating dose distributions resulting from fast neutron therapy

  4. Contaminated Mexican steel incident

    This report documents the circumstances contributing to the inadvertent melting of cobalt 60 (Co-60) contaminated scrap metal in two Mexican steel foundries and the subsequent distribution of contaminated steel products into the United States. The report addresses mainly those actions taken by US Federal and state agencies to protect the US population from radiation risks associated with the incident. Mexico had much more serious radiation exposure and contamination problems to manage. The United States Government maintained a standing offer to provide technical and medical assistance to the Mexican Government. The report covers the tracing of the source to its origin, response actions to recover radioactive steel in the United States, and return of the contaminated materials to Mexico. The incident resulted in significant radiation exposures within Mexico, but no known significant exposure within the United States. Response to the incident required the combined efforts of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Department of Energy, Department of Transportation, Department of State, and US Customs Service (Department of Treasury) personnel at the Federal level and representatives of all 50 State Radiation Control Programs and, in some instances, local and county government personnel. The response also required a diplomatic interface with the Mexican Government and cooperation of numerous commercial establishments and members of the general public. The report describes the factual information associated with the event and may serve as information for subsequent recommendations and actions by the NRC. 8 figures

  5. Cancer incidence among waiters

    Reijula, Jere; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Lynge, Elsebeth;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To study cancer risk patterns among waiters in the Nordic countries. METHODS: We identified a cohort of 16,134 male and 81,838 female waiters from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. During the follow-up period from 1961 to 2005, we found that 19,388 incident cancer cases were...... diagnosed. Standardised incidence ratio (SIR) was defined as the observed number of cancer cases divided by the expected number, based on national age, time period and gender-specific cancer incidence rates in the general population. RESULTS: The SIR of all cancers in waiters, in the five countries combined......, was 1.46 (95% CI 1.41-1.51) in men and 1.09 (1.07-1.11) in women. In male waiters, the SIR decreased from 1.79 (1.63-1.96) in 1961-1975, to 1.33 (1.26-1.40) in 1991-2005, but remained stable among women. The SIR among male waiters was highest for cancers in the pharynx (6.11; 95% CI 5.02-7.37), oral...

  6. neutron radiography

    Neutron radiography (or radiology) is a diverse filed that uses neutrons of various energies, subthermal, thermal, epithermal or fast in either steady state or pulsed mode to examine objects for industrial, medical, or other purposes, both microscopic and macroscopic. The applications include engineering design, biological studies, nondestructive inspection and materials evaluation. In the past decade, over 100 different centers in some 30 countries have published reports of pioneering activities using reactors, accelerators and isotopic neutron sources. While film transparency and electronic video are most common imaging methods for static or in motion objects respectively, there are other important data gathering techniques, including track etch, digital gauging and computed tomography. A survey of the world-wide progress shows the field to be gaining steadily in its diversity, its sophistication and its importance. (author)

  7. Fast neutron capture with a white neutron source

    A system has been developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure gamma-rays following fast neutron reactions. The neutron beam is produced by bombarding a thick tantalum target with the 800 MeV proton beam from the LAMPF accelerator. Incident neutron energies, from 1 to over 200 MeV, are determined by their times of flight over a 7.6-m flight path. The gamma-rays are detected in five 7.6 x 7.6-cm cylindrical bismuth germanate (BGO) detectors which span an angular range from 450 to 1450 in the reaction plane. With this system it is possible to simultaneously measure the cross section and angular distribution of gamma-rays as a function of neutron energy. The results for the cross section of the 12C(n,n'γ=4.44 MeV) reaction at 900 and 1250 show good agreement with previous measurements while the complete angular distributions show the need for a large a4 coefficient which was not previously observed. Preliminary results for the 12C(n,n'γ=15.1 MeV) reaction have also been obtained. The data obtained for the 40Ca(n,γ0) reaction in the region of the giant dipole resonance demonstrate the unique capabilities of this system. Future developments to the neutron source which will enhance the capabilities of the system are presented. 14 references

  8. Neutron diffraction

    Heger, G. [Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule Aachen, Inst. fuer Kristallographie, Aachen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    X-ray diffraction using conventional laboratory equipment and/or synchrotron installations is the most important method for structure analyses. The purpose of this paper is to discuss special cases, for which, in addition to this indispensable part, neutrons are required to solve structural problems. Even though the huge intensity of modern synchrotron sources allows in principle the study of magnetic X-ray scattering the investigation of magnetic structures is still one of the most important applications of neutron diffraction. (author) 15 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs.

  9. The neutron-deuteron elastic scattering angular distribution at 95 MeV

    Mermod, Philippe

    2004-04-01

    The neutron-deuteron elastic scattering differential cross section has been measured at 95 MeV incident neutron energy, with the Medley setup at TSL in Uppsala. The neutron-proton differential cross section has also been measured for normalization purposes. The data are compared with theoretical calculations to investigate the role of three-nucleon force effects.

  10. The neutron-deuteron elastic scattering angular distribution at 95 MeV

    The neutron-deuteron elastic scattering differential cross section has been measured at 95 MeV incident neutron energy, with the Medley setup at TSL in Uppsala. The neutron-proton differential cross section has also been measured for normalization purposes. The data are compared with theoretical calculations to investigate the role of three-nucleon force effects

  11. Neutron Scattering Simulations at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory

    Nguyen, Thienan; Jackson, Daniel; Hicks, S. F.; Rice, Ben; Vanhoy, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    The Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport code (MCNP) has many applications ranging from radiography to reactor design. It has particle interaction capabilities, making it useful for simulating neutron collisions on surfaces of varying compositions. The neutron flux within the accelerator complex at the University of Kentucky was simulated using MCNP. With it, the complex's capabilities to contain and thermalize 7 MeV neutrons produced via 2H(d,n)3He source reaction to an acceptable level inside the neutron hall and adjoining rooms were analyzed. This will aid in confirming the safety of researchers who are working in the adjacent control room. Additionally, the neutron transport simulation was used to analyze the impact of the collimator copper shielding on various detectors located around the neutron scattering hall. The purpose of this was to attempt to explain any background neutrons that are observed at these detectors. The simulation shows that the complex performs very well with regards to neutron containment and thermalization. Also, the tracking information for the paths taken by the neutrons show that most of the neutrons' lives are spent inside the neutron hall. Finally, the neutron counts were analyzed at the positions of the neutron monitor detectors located at 90 and 45 degrees relative to the incident beam direction. This project was supported in part by the DOE NEUP Grant NU-12-KY-UK-0201-05 and the Donald A. Cowan Physics Institute at the University of Dallas.

  12. Radiation incident in oil well logging

    On June 4th 1997 equipment failure and violation of approved procedures by a crew of workers initiated a series of events that resulted in the unnecessary exposure to neutron and gamma radiation, from a 666 GBq Am241Be source, of forty two workers from a well logging company in Venezuela. Due to the presence of dry mud or drilling fluids inside the logging tool, the nosepiece was screwed off the rest of the source holder; this piece was mistaken for the entire source holder thus leaving the source inside the tool. The tool was labelled for maintenance and electronic laboratory personal worked near the source for seven hours before they identify its presence. As soon as the incident was detected a contingency plan was implemented and the source could be retrieved from the tool and placed in its shipping container. The TLD badges indicate doses well below the annual limit of 20 mSv, and none of the workers involved in the incident seem to show serious health consequences from it. After the incident, in order to avoid the occurrence of similar situations, a better source and tool maintenance program was implemented, all the workers were re-trained, and area monitors were installed in all operations bases. (author)

  13. Neutron reflectometer

    The neutron reflectometer is the most powerful and nondestructive tool to analyze the surface and buried interfaces in the layered films. Such films often have a close relation to the functional devices. Structural information in the vicinity of the interfaces is a key parameter in the field of the nanoscale science. (author)

  14. Neutron radiography

    Principles of the method, complementarity with X or gamma rays, neutron energy, detection and applications on irradiated materials and for the industrial quality control are exposed. Examples of applications in pyrotechnics, plastics, fuels, lubricants, metallurgy are given. Techniques developed by the CEA for its own needs or for industry and description of facilities in the nuclear centers are reviewed

  15. Medication incidents reported to an online incident reporting system.

    Alrwisan, Adel

    2011-01-15

    AIMS: Approximately 20% of deaths from adverse events are related to medication incidents, costing the NHS an additional £500 million annually. Less than 5% of adverse events are reported. This study aims to assess the reporting rate of medication incidents in NHS facilities in the north east of Scotland, and to describe the types and outcomes of reported incidents among different services. Furthermore, we wished to quantify the proportion of reported incidents according to the reporters\\' profession. METHODS: A retrospective description was made of medication incidents reported to an online reporting system (DATIX) over a 46-month-period (July 2005 to April 2009). Reports originated from acute and community hospitals, mental health, and primary care facilities. RESULTS: Over the study period there were 2,666 incidents reported with a mean monthly reporting rate of 78.2\\/month (SD±16.9). 6.1% of all incidents resulted in harm, with insulin being the most commonly implicated medication. Nearly three-quarters (74.2%, n=1,978) of total incidents originated from acute hospitals. Administration incidents were implicated in the majority of the reported medication incidents (59%), followed by prescribing (10.8%) and dispensing (9.9%), while the nondescript "other medication incidents" accounted for 20.3% of total incidents. The majority of reports were made by nursing and midwifery staff (80%), with medical and dental professionals reporting the lowest number of incidents (n=56, 2%). CONCLUSIONS: The majority of medication incidents in this study were reported by nursing and midwifery staff, and were due to administration incidents. There is a clear need to elucidate the reasons for the limited contribution of the medical and dental professionals to reporting medication incidents.

  16. Incident users of antipsychotics

    Baandrup, Lone; Kruse, Marie

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: In Denmark, as well as in many other countries, consumption of antipsychotics is on the rise, partly due to increasing off-label use. The aim of this study was to analyze and quantify the extent of off-label use and polypharmacy in incident users of antipsychotic medication, and to examine...... polypharmacy (HR 1.38; 95 % CI 1.32-1.45), whereas antipsychotic discontinuation was associated with decreased hospitalization risk in most off-label conditions. CONCLUSIONS: The brief duration of most antipsychotic prescriptions suggests that antipsychotics are prescribed more liberally than recommended. As a...

  17. High-efficiency neutron generator system as a neutron source for NCT

    The new target system as an accelerator-based neutron source was investigated for NCT. This system is composed of multilayer of thin films of several kinds of materials (ex, Ta, Be) to improve the efficiency of neutron production. The LA150 cross-section library for Tantalum and an extrapolation value of experimental data for Beryllium was used to optimize the energy and current of the incident proton beam. The optimized system is a good prospect for cyclotron-based NCT. (author)

  18. Neutron scattering. Lectures of the JCNS laboratory course held at Forschungszentrum Juelich and the research reactor FRM II of TU Munich

    The following topics are dealt with: Fourier transform, basic assumptions of quantum mechanics and the Born approximation, symmtery in crystals, neutron sources, neutron elastic scattering and properties, polarized neutron scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, grazing incidence neutron scattering, neutron diffractometers, small-angle scattewring inelastic crystal spectrometers, time-of-flight spectrometers using NSE, structure determination, inelastic neutron scattering with phonon and magnon excitations, structure of complex fluids and macromolecules, polymer dynamics, magnetism. (HSI)

  19. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    Guillen, Donna P.; Longhurst, Glen R.; Porter, Douglas L.; Parry, James R.

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  20. Leukaemia incidence in Somerset

    Analysis I confirms two previous studies. There is a high rate of leukaemia incidence (all ages) in the MPH catchment area, compared with rates found by the Leukaemia Research Fund (LRF) for a large part of the country. LRF rates are only available for 1984-1986. For 1971-1987, local rates are 24% higher than LRF rates for 1984-1986. Limiting analysis to the three-year period for which LRF rates are available reveals a local rate for 1984-1986 that is 61% higher than the LRF rate. Analysis II thus identifies an unusual pattern of leukaemia and non-Hodgkins Lymphoma incidence in the vicinity of Hinkley Point. A relatively high rate exists for the period 1964-1986 but excess cases are concentrated in the period 1964-1973; after 1973, the rate is unremarkable. There is no ready explanation for this pattern. If radioactive emissions from Hinkley Point are responsible, large unreported releases would need to have occurred in the 1960's. This possibility needs to be explored. There are other possible explanations but current knowledge about causes of leukaemia is insufficient to offer definite answers. (Author)

  1. Therapeutic potential of atmospheric neutrons

    Background: Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive type of primary brain tumour in humans. It has a very poor prognosis despite multi-modality treatments consisting of open craniotomy with surgical resection, followed by chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Recently, a new treatment has been proposed - Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) - which exploits the interaction between Boron-10 atoms (introduced by vector molecules) and low energy neutrons produced by giant accelerators or nuclear reactors. Methods: The objective of the present study is to compute the deposited dose using a natural source of neutrons (atmospheric neutrons). For this purpose, Monte Carlo computer simulations were carried out to estimate the dosimetric effects of a natural source of neutrons in the matter, to establish if atmospheric neutrons interact with vector molecules containing Boron-10. Results: The doses produced (an average of 1 micro Gy in a 1 g tumour) are not sufficient for therapeutic treatment of in situ tumours. However, the non-localised yet specific dosimetric properties of 10B vector molecules could prove interesting for the treatment of micro-metastases or as (neo)adjuvant treatment. On a cellular scale, the deposited dose is approximately 0.5 Gy/neutron impact. Conclusion: It has been shown that BNCT may be used with a natural source of neutrons, and may potentially be useful for the treatment of micro-metastases. The atmospheric neutron flux is much lower than that utilized during standard NBCT. However the purpose of the proposed study is not to replace the ordinary NBCT but to test if naturally occurring atmospheric neutrons, considered to be an ionizing pollution at the Earths surface, can be used in the treatment of a disease such as cancer. To finalize this study, it is necessary to quantify the biological effects of the physically deposited dose, taking into account the characteristics of the incident particles (alpha particle and Lithium

  2. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  3. Development of neutron spectrometer toward deuterium plasma diagnostics in LHD

    Neutron spectrometer based on coincident counting of associated particles has been developed for deuterium plasma diagnostics on Large Helical Device (LHD) at the National Institute for Fusion Science. Efficient detection of 2.5 MeV neutron with high energy resolution would be achievable by coincident detection of a scattered neutron and a recoiled proton associated with an elastic scattering of incident neutron in a plastic scintillator as a radiator. The calculated neutron spectra from deuterium plasma heated by neutral beam injection indicate that the energy resolution of better than 7% is required for the spectrometer to evaluate energetic deuterium confinement. By using a prototype of the proposed spectrometer, the energy resolution of 6.3% and the detection efficiency of 3.3x10-7 count/neutron were experimentally demonstrated for 2.5 MeV monoenergetic neutron, respectively.

  4. Road Congestion and Incident Duration

    Adler, Martin W.; van Ommeren, Jos; Rietveld, Piet

    2013-01-01

    Non-recurrent congestion is frequently caused by accidents and other incidents. We estimate the causal effect of incident duration on drivers’ time losses through changes in non-recurrent road congestion on Dutch highways. We demonstrate that incident duration has a strong positive, but concave, effect on non-recurrent congestion. The duration elasticity of non-recurrent congestion is about 0.40 implying that a one minute duration reduction generates a €60 gain per incident. We also show that...

  5. Effects of neutrons scattered from the body on readings of personal neutron dosimeters

    Accurate estimation of neutron dose requires that the personal dosimeter reading be corrected for the effect of neutrons scattered from the body. Although the effect of albedo neutrons on the response of thermal neutron detectors has been studied extensively (e.g. Alsmiller, R.G. and Barish, J., 1974, Health Physics 26, 13-28), little work has been done on the contribution of intermediate and fast albedo neutrons on readings of threshold detectors. Such knowledge is important, particularly in criticality accident dosimetry where a single detector (e.g. a S pellet or a Np damage tract detector) in a personal badge may be used to determine the dose to an individual by comparing its response to that of an area monitor containing a comprehensive set of threshold detectors. The response of several common threshold detectors to scattered neutrons has been found using Monte Carlo calculations of spectra of neutrons reflected from an H2O slab and a tissue equivalent phantom. Incident neutrons were from fission, Po-Be and 14.5 MeV sources. For fission neutrons incident perpendicularly on a 20 cm thick H2O slab, the scattered neutrons increased the activity of the detector on the surface by 11%, 9%, 7%, 12%, 8% and 8% for Rh, In, S, Np, Th and U detectors respectively whereas the heavy particle dose delivered by scattered neutrons was 14% of the dose without the slab. Reflected neutrons thus caused these detectors to under-estimate the total dose by a few percent. Results obtained for the phantom were essentially identical. For irradiations with 14.5 MeV neutrons, scattered neutrons increased the activities of S, Np, Th and U detectors by 3% to 6% and the dose by 4%. However, Rh and Np activities were enhanced by about 17% because of their low cross sections at 14.5 MeV relative to their values below 10 MeV. For Po-Be neutrons, the activities of all the detectors and the dose were increased by approximately 12%. The calculated enhancements for Rh, In and S activities for

  6. Optimizing Laser-accelerated Ion Beams for a Collimated Neutron Source

    C.L. Ellison and J. Fuchs

    2010-09-23

    High-flux neutrons for imaging and materials analysis applications have typically been provided by accelerator- and reactor-based neutron sources. A novel approach is to use ultraintense (>1018W/cm2) lasers to generate picosecond, collimated neutrons from a dual target configuration. In this article, the production capabilities of present and upcoming laser facilities are estimated while independently maximizing neutron yields and minimizing beam divergence. A Monte-Carlo code calculates angular and energy distributions of neutrons generated by D-D fusion events occurring within a deuterated target for a given incident beam of D+ ions. Tailoring of the incident distribution via laser parameters and microlens focusing modifies the emerging neutrons. Projected neutron yields and distributions are compared to conventional sources, yielding comparable on-target fluxes per discharge, shorter time resolution, larger neutron energies and greater collimation.

  7. Racist Incident-Based Trauma

    Bryant-Davis, Thema; Ocampo, Carlota

    2005-01-01

    Racist incidents are potentially traumatizing forms of victimization that may lead to increased psychiatric and psychophysiological symptoms in targets. The magnitude of the problem of racist incidents in the United States is difficult to estimate; however, data from several sources permit the inference that the prevalence of racist incidents,…

  8. Incident Management: Process into Practice

    Isaac, Gayle; Moore, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Tornados, shootings, fires--these are emergencies that require fast action by school district personnel, but they are not the only incidents that require risk management. The authors have introduced the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS) and assured that these systems can help educators plan for and…

  9. Neutron rich nuclei and neutron stars

    Horowitz, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    The PREX experiment at Jefferson Laboratory measures the neutron radius of 208Pb with parity violating electron scattering in a way that is free from most strong interaction uncertainties. The 208Pb radius has important implications for neutron rich matter and the structure of neutron stars. We present first PREX results, describe future plans, and discuss a follow on measurement of the neutron radius of 48Ca. We review radio and X-ray observations of neutron star masses and radii. These cons...

  10. Picosecond Neutron Yields from Ultra-Intense Laser-Target Interactions

    Ellison, C. Leland; Fuchs, Julien

    2009-11-01

    High-flux neutron sources for neutron imaging and materials analysis applications have typically been provided by accelerator-based (Spallation Neutron Source) and reactor-based (High Flux Isotope Reactor) neutron sources. A novel approach is to use ultra-intense (> 10^18 W/cm^2) laser-target interactions to generate picosecond, collimated neutrons. Here we examine the feasibility of a source based on current (LULI) and upcoming laser facility capabilities. A Monte-Carlo code calculates angular and energy distributions of neutrons generated by D-D fusion events occurring within a deuterated target for a given incident beam of D+ ions. The parameters of the deuteron beam are well understood from laser-plasma and laser-target studies relevant to fast-ignition fusion. Expected neutron yields are presented in comparison to conventional neutron sources, previous experimental neutron yields, and within the context of neutron shielding safety requirements.

  11. Small angle neutron scattering

    Cousin Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ∼ 1 nm up to ∼ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ∼ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area… through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer, form factor analysis (I(q→0, Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system, structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates, and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast. It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of

  12. Small angle neutron scattering

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from about 1 nm up to a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ∼ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nano-metric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area... ) through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some information that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer), form factor analysis (I(q→0), Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system), structure factor analysis (2. Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates), and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast). It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of spectrometer

  13. Grazing incidence beam expander

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  14. Cancer incidence among firefighters

    Pukkala, Eero; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Weiderpass, Elisabete;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Firefighters are potentially exposed to a wide range of known and suspected carcinogens through their work. The objectives of this study were to examine the patterns of cancer among Nordic firefighters, and to compare them with the results from previous studies. METHODS: Data for this...... study were drawn from a linkage between the census data for 15 million people from the five Nordic countries and their cancer registries for the period 1961-2005. SIR analyses were conducted with the cancer incidence rates for the entire national study populations used as reference rates. RESULTS: A...... total of 16 422 male firefighters were included in the final cohort. A moderate excess risk was seen for all cancer sites combined, (SIR=1.06, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.11). There were statistically significant excesses in the age category of 30-49 years in prostate cancer (SIR=2.59, 95% CI 1.34 to 4.52) and...

  15. Statement of nuclear incidents

    Eight incidents were reported. Three mothers (two at BNFL's Sellafield Reprocessing Plant and one at Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories) had been contaminated and received more than the annual dose limit. At the Winfrith Atomic Energy Establishment, Cs124 and Cs137 had been washed off the outside of a flask onto the ground. At the BNFL Springfields works a discharge of a solution of natural uranium had occurred to the site foul drain. At the Drigg storage and disposal site a leak from a storage tank was reported. In the other three cases no radioactive release occurred. There was a loose coupling on a tiebar of a fuel stringer at Heysham-I reactor, water beneath a pipeline discharging from Harwell Laboratory was found not to be contaminated and at Dungeness-B a fuel assembly was dropped to the bottom of the reactor during refuelling. (UK)

  16. Neutron production from 200-500 MeV proton interaction with spacecraft materials

    We report on detailed energy spectra of neutron production >14 MeV from collisions of 200-500 MeV protons with combinations of aluminium, graphite and polyethylene. Comparisons of normalised neutron spectra are made with respect to incident proton energy, angle of neutron production and material. In general, carbon (graphite) or polyethylene (by itself or in combination with aluminium) reduce secondary neutron production >14 MeV relative to the production from interactions in aluminium. (authors)

  17. Titanium-I: fast neutron cross section measurements

    Energy averaged total neutron cross sections are measured from approximately 1.0 to 4.5 MeV with few percent statistical accuracies. Differential elastic neutron scattering angular distributions are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at incident neutron energy intervals of less than or equal to 0.2 MeV. Differential cross sections for the inelastic neutron excitation of ''states'' at 158 +- 26, 891 +- 8, 984 +- 15, 1428 +- 39, 1541 +- 30, 1670 +- 80, 2007 +- 8, 2304 +- 22, 2424 +- 16, and 2615 +- 10 keV are measured for incident neutron energies from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV. Additional ''states'' are observed at approximately 2845 and 3009 keV. An energy-averaged optical-statistical model is deduced from the measured values and the implications of its use in the context of the strong fluctuating structure is discussed

  18. Neutron dosimetry

    It is the object of the present invention to provide a method of measuring neutron radiation which eliminates the use of powders as dosimeter target materials and reduces the requirement for repetitive weighing of dosimeters, for expensive radioisotopes as dosimeter target material, and for dosimeter housings (in many cases). The invention described is a method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor consisting of placing one or more extruded sintered oxide wires comprising a dosimeter target oxide within the reactor and measuring the radioactivity induced in the wires by neutron radiation. These oxide wires consist of a dilution containing at least 0.1% by weight of the dosimeter target oxide in a diluent oxide. The diluent oxide is selected from a group consisting of Al2O3 and BeO. Almost any metal oxide may be used as a target oxide. The wires may be encapsulated within a co-extruded housing. These mixed oxide wires have been found to be sufficiently uniform for quantitative analyses. (JTA)

  19. Neutron scattering

    The annual report on hand gives an overview of the research work carried out in the Laboratory for Neutron Scattering (LNS) of the ETH Zuerich in 1990. Using the method of neutron scattering, it is possible to examine in detail the static and dynamic properties of the condensed material. In accordance with the multidisciplined character of the method, the LNS has for years maintained a system of intensive co-operation with numerous institutes in the areas of biology, chemistry, solid-state physics, crystallography and materials research. In 1990 over 100 scientists from more than 40 research groups both at home and abroad took part in the experiments. It was again a pleasure to see the number of graduate students present, who were studying for a doctorate and who could be introduced into the neutron scattering during their stay at the LNS and thus were in the position to touch on central ways of looking at a problem in their dissertation using this modern experimental method of solid-state research. In addition to the numerous and interesting ways of formulating the questions to explain the structure, nowadays the scientific programme increasingly includes particularly topical studies in connection with high temperature-supraconductors and materials research

  20. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic neutron scattering, strongly correlated electrons, polymer dynamics, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  1. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron scattering in contemporary research, neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  2. Comparison between LYRA and SAND code performance for the extrapolation of data from activation detectors used for determining spectra of acceleration neutrons

    Birattari, C.; Cesana, P.; Salomone, A.

    1980-08-26

    Mathematical descriptions are given of the LYRA and SAND programs which are then used to evaluate typical acceleration neutron spectra or various energy conditions of incident protons, bombardment materials, and angle of neutron emission. 16 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  3. LENS: A New Pulsed Neutron Source for Research and Education

    Leuschner, M.; Baxter, D. V.; Cameron, J. M.; Derenchuk, V.; Lavelle, C.; Lone, A; Nann, H.; Rinckel, T.; Snow, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    A new pulsed neutron source is under construction at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). Neutrons are produced via (p,n) reactions by a low-energy proton beam incident on a thin beryllium target. The source is tightly coupled to a cold methane moderator held at a temperature of 20 K or below. The resulting time-averaged cold neutron flux is expected to be comparable to that of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. The initial experimen...

  4. Eurados trial performance test for neutron personal dosimetry

    Bordy, J.M.; Stadtmann, H.; Ambrosi, P.; Bartlett, D.T.; Christensen, P.; Colgan, T.; Hyvonen, H.

    This paper reports on the results of a neutron trial performance test sponsored by the European Commission and organised by EURADOS. As anticipated, neutron dosimetry results were very dependent on the dosemeter type and the dose calculation algorithm. Fast neutron fields were generally well...... measured, but particular problems were noted in the determination of intermediate energy fields and large incident angles, demonstrating the difficulties of neutron personal dosimetry. Of particular concern from a radiological protection point of view was the large number of results underestimating...... personal dose equivalent. A considerable over-response was noted in a few cases....

  5. EURADOS trial performance test for neutron personal dosimetry

    This paper reports on the results of a neutron trial performance test sponsored by the European Commission and organised by EURADOS. As anticipated, neutron dosimetry results were very dependent on the dosemeter type and the dose calculation algorithm. Fast neutron fields were generally well measured, but particular problems were noted in the determination of intermediate energy fields and large incident angles, demonstrating the difficulties of neutron personal dosimetry. Of particular concern from a radiological protection point of view was the large number of results underestimating personal dose equivalent. A considerable over-response was noted in a few cases. (author)

  6. Study of damages by neutron irradiation in lithium aluminates; Estudio de danos por irradiacion neutronica en aluminatos de litio

    Palacios G, O

    1999-06-01

    Lithium aluminates proposed to the production of tritium in fusion nuclear reactors, due to the thermal stability that they present as well as the behavior of the aluminium to the irradiation. As a neutron flux with profile ({approx_equal} 14 Mev) of a fusion reactor is not available. A irradiation experiment was designed in order to know the micro and nano structure damages produced by fast and thermal neutrons in two irradiation positions of the fusion nuclear reactor Triga Mark III: CT (Thermal Column) and SIFCA (System of Irradiation Fixed of Capsules). In this work samples of lithium aluminate were characterized by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). Two samples were prepared by two methods: a) coalition method and b) peroxide method. This characterization comprised original and irradiated samples. The irradiated sample amounted to 4 in total: one for each preparation method and one for each irradiation position. The object of this analysis was to correlate with the received neutron dose the damages suffered by the samples with the neutron irradiation during long periods (440 H), in their micro and nano structure aspects; in order to understand the changes as a function of the irradiation zone (with thermal and fast neutron flux) and the preparation methods of the samples and having as an antecedent the irradiation in SIFCA position by short times (2h). The obtained results are referred to the stability of {gamma} -aluminate phase, under given conditions of irradiation and defined nano structure arrangement. They also refer to the proposals of growth mechanism and nucleation of new phases. The error associated with the measurement of neutron dose is also discussed. (Author)

  7. Application of pulsed neutron technique for integral neutron cross-section tests in the MeV range

    The spectra of neutrons scattered by several elements and compounds for an incident beam of 14 MeV neutrons have been studied by the time of flight method at Livermore in the so called 'Livermore Pulsed Sphere Program'. The measurements have been compared with results of Monte Carlo and neutron transport codes to provide checks on the input cross-sections. Similar measurements have been carried out at Oak ridge for incident neutron energies between 1 MeV to 20 MeV with a view to obtain information useful for neutron shielding calculations. The salient features of these measurements and proposals for an experimental program for obtaining data of interest are reviewed. (author)

  8. Scattering of fast neutrons from elemental molybdenum

    Differential broad-resolution neutron-scattering cross sections of elemental molybdenum were measured at 10 to 20 scattering angles distributed between 20 and 160 degrees and at incident-neutron energy intervals of approx. = 50 to 200 keV from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV. Elastically-scattered neutrons were fully resolved from inelastic events. Lumped-level inelastic-neutron-scattering cross sections were determined corresponding to observed excitation energies of; 789 +- 23, 195 +- 23, 1500 +- 34, 1617 +- 12, 1787, 1874, 1991, 2063 +- 24, 2296, 2569 and 2802 keV. An optical-statistical model was deduced from the measured elastic-scattering results. The experimental values were compared with the respective quantities given in ENDF/B-V

  9. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a next-generation spallation neutron source for neutron scattering that is currently the most powerful neutron source in...

  10. Isotope identification capabilities using time resolved prompt gamma emission from epithermal neutrons

    We present a concept of integrated measurements for isotope identification which takes advantage of the time structure of spallation neutron sources for time resolved γ spectroscopy. Time resolved Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (T-PGAA) consists in the measurement of gamma energy spectrum induced by the radioactive capture as a function of incident neutron Time Of Flight (TOF), directly related with the energy of incident neutrons. The potential of the proposed concept was explored on INES (Italian Neutron Experimental Station) at the ISIS spallation neutron source (U.K.). Through this new technique we show an increase in the sensitivity to specific elements of archaeometric relevance, through incident neutron energy selection in prompt γ spectra for multicomponent samples. Results on a standard bronze sample are presented

  11. Design of a transportable high efficiency fast neutron spectrometer

    Roecker, C.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Dazeley, S.; Gerling, M.; Marleau, P.; Sweany, M. D.; Vetter, K.

    2016-08-01

    A transportable fast neutron detection system has been designed and constructed for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The transportability of the spectrometer reduces the detector-related systematic bias between different neutron spectra and flux measurements, which allows for the comparison of measurements above or below ground. The spectrometer will measure neutron fluxes that are of prohibitively low intensity compared to the site-specific background rates targeted by other transportable fast neutron detection systems. To measure low intensity high-energy neutron fluxes, a conventional capture-gating technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 20 MeV and a novel multiplicity technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 100 MeV. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. To calibrate and characterize the position dependent response of the spectrometer, a Monte Carlo model was developed and used in conjunction with experimental data from gamma ray sources. Multiplicity event identification algorithms were developed and used with a Cf-252 neutron multiplicity source to validate the Monte Carlo model Gd concentration and secondary neutron capture efficiency. The validated Monte Carlo model was used to predict an effective area for the multiplicity and capture gating analyses. For incident neutron energies between 100 MeV and 1000 MeV with an isotropic angular distribution, the multiplicity analysis predicted an effective area of 500 cm2 rising to 5000 cm2. For neutron energies above 20 MeV, the capture-gating analysis predicted an effective area between 1800 cm2 and 2500 cm2. The multiplicity mode was found to be sensitive to the incident neutron angular distribution.

  12. Delay Adjusted Incidence Infographic

    This Infographic shows the National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Thyroid: 5.3*,Liver & IBD: 3.6*, Melanoma: 2.3*, Kidney: 2.0*, Myeloma: 1.9*, Pancreas: 1.2*, Leukemia: 0.9*, Oral Cavity: 0.5, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: 0.3*, Esophagus: -0.1, Brain & ONS: -0.2*, Bladder: -0.6*, All Sites: -1.1*, Stomach: -1.7*, Larynx: -1.9*, Prostate: -2.1*, Lung & Bronchus: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -3/0*. For Women, Thyroid: 5.8*, Liver & IBD: 2.9*, Myeloma: 1.8*, Kidney: 1.6*, Melanoma: 1.5, Corpus & Uterus: 1.3*, Pancreas: 1.1*, Leukemia: 0.6*, Brain & ONS: 0, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -0.1, All Sites: -0.1, Breast: -0.3, Stomach: -0.7*, Oral Cavity: -0.7*, Bladder: -0.9*, Ovary: -0.9*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.0*, Cervix: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -2.7*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). Rates were adjusted for reporting delay in the registry. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  13. UCN Source at an External Beam of Thermal Neutrons

    E. V. Lychagin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new method for production of ultracold neutrons (UCNs in superfluid helium. The principal idea consists in installing a helium UCN source into an external beam of thermal or cold neutrons and in surrounding this source with a solid methane moderator/reflector cooled down to ~4 K. The moderator plays the role of an external source of cold neutrons needed to produce UCNs. The flux of accumulated neutrons could exceed the flux of incident neutrons due to their numerous reflections from methane; also the source size could be significantly larger than the incident beam diameter. We provide preliminary calculations of cooling of neutrons. These calculations show that such a source being installed at an intense source of thermal or cold neutrons like the ILL or PIK reactor or the ESS spallation source could provide the UCN density 105 cm−3, the production rate 107 UCN/s−1. Main advantages of such an UCN source include its low radiative and thermal load, relatively low cost, and convenient accessibility for any maintenance. We have carried out an experiment on cooling of thermal neutrons in a methane cavity. The data confirm the results of our calculations of the spectrum and flux of neutrons in the methane cavity.

  14. UCN Source at an External Beam of Thermal Neutrons

    We propose a new method for production of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in superfluid helium. The principal idea consists in installing a helium UCN source into an external beam of thermal or cold neutrons and in surrounding this source with a solid methane moderator/reflector cooled down to ~4 K. The moderator plays the role of an external source of cold neutrons needed to produce UCNs. The flux of accumulated neutrons could exceed the flux of incident neutrons due to their numerous reflections from methane; also the source size could be significantly larger than the incident beam diameter. We provide preliminary calculations of cooling of neutrons. These calculations show that such a source being installed at an intense source of thermal or cold neutrons like the ILL or PIK reactor or the ESS spallation source could provide the UCN density 105 cm−3, the production rate 107 UCN/s−1. Main advantages of such an UCN source include its low radiative and thermal load, relatively low cost, and convenient accessibility for any maintenance. We have carried out an experiment on cooling of thermal neutrons in a methane cavity. The data confirm the results of our calculations of the spectrum and flux of neutrons in the methane cavity

  15. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  16. REFRACTIVE NEUTRON LENS

    Petrov, P. V.; Kolchevsky, N.N.

    2013-01-01

    Compound concave refractive lenses are used for focusing neutron beam. Investigations of spectral and focusing properties of a refractive neutron lens are presented. Resolution of the imaging system on the base of refractive neutron lenses depends on material properties and parameters of neutron source. Model of refractive neutron lens are proposed. Results of calculation diffraction resolution and focal depth of refractive neutron lens are discussed.

  17. Neutron Capture Nucleosynthesis

    Kiss, Miklos

    2016-01-01

    Heavy elements (beyond iron) are formed in neutron capture nucleosynthesis processes. We have proposed a simple unified model to investigate the neutron capture nucleosynthesis in arbitrary neutron density environment. We have also investigated what neutron density is required to reproduce the measured abundance of nuclei assuming equilibrium processes. We found both of these that the medium neutron density has a particularly important role at neutron capture nucleosynthesis. About these resu...

  18. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  19. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  20. Precursor incident program at EDF

    The precursor program was started by EDF in 1994, after an investigation of the US NRC's Accident Sequence Precursor Program. Since then, reported operational events identified as Safety Outstanding Events have been analyzed whenever possible using probabilistic methods based on PSAs. Analysis provides an estimate of the remaining protection against core damage at the time the incident occurred. Measuring the incidents' severity enables to detect incidents important regarding safety. Moreover, the most efficient feedback actions can be derived from the main accident sequences identified through the analysis. Therefore, incident probabilistic analysis provides a way to assess priorities in terms of treatment and resource allocation, and so, to implement countermeasures preventing further occurrence and development of the most significant incidents. As some incidents cannot be analyzed using this method, probabilistic analysis can only be one among the methods used to assess the nuclear power plants' safety level. Nevertheless, it provides an interesting complement to classical methods of deterministic studies. (author)

  1. A new polarized neutron interferometry facility at the NCNR

    Shahi, C. B.; Arif, M.; Cory, D. G.; Mineeva, T.; Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D.; Williams, C. J.; Huber, M. G.; Pushin, D. A.

    2016-03-01

    A new monochromatic beamline and facility has been installed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) devoted to neutron interferometry in the research areas of spin control, spin manipulation, quantum mechanics, quantum information science, spintronics, and material science. This facility is possible in part because of advances in decoherence free subspace interferometer designs that have demonstrated consistent contrast in the presence of vibrational noise; a major environmental constraint that has prevented neutron interferometry from being applied at other neutron facilities. Neutron interferometry measures the phase difference between a neutron wave function propagating along two spatially separated paths. It is a practical example of self interference and due to its modest path separation of a few centimeters allows the insertion of samples and macroscopic neutron spin rotators. Phase shifts can be caused by gravitational, magnetic and nuclear interactions as well as purely quantum mechanical effects making interferometer a robust tool in neutron research. This new facility is located in the guide hall of the NCNR upstream of the existing Neutron Interferometry and Optics Facility (NIOF) and has several advantages over the NIOF including higher incident flux, better neutron polarization, and increased accessibility. The long term goal for the new facility is to be a user supported beamline and makes neutron interferometer more generally available to the scientific community. This paper addresses both the capabilities and characteristics of the new facility.

  2. Incident Dispatching, Clearance and Delay

    Hall, Randolph

    2000-01-01

    This report models response times and delays for highway incidents, according for spacing between interchanges and the time penalty for changing directions, enabling a response vehicle to reach an incident on the opposite side of the highway. A fundamental question in dispatching incident crews is whether to send the closest vehicle that is currently available or to wait for another to become available that is even closer. Waiting for a closer one is advantageous because service time is effec...

  3. Incident reporting in general practice

    Zwart, D.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and aim An incident reporting procedure (IRP) is an important part of patient safety management in healthcare. Currently, patient safety efforts are mainly guided by the ‘systems approach’: incidents, defined as ‘unintended or unexpected events which could have led or did lead to harm for patients’, may teach healthcare providers about the risks and possible flaws of their healthcare system. Hence, incidents should not only be detected and recorded, but also profoundly analysed, in...

  4. Problematika incident managementu v podniku

    Vašák, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Diploma thesis is dedicated to network management principles, mainly focused on incident management. It begins with a definition of incident management followed by an explanation in corresponding to ISO standards. Later in this theoretical prologue are introduced all functional elements of incident management including relations between them. Prologue also consists of detailed description of the TMN model and method of alarm correlation. The second, practical part of this thesis describes the...

  5. Goiania incident case study

    The reasons for wanting to document this case study and present the findings are simple. According to USDOE technical risk assessments (and our own initial work on the Hanford socioeconomic study), the likelihood of a major accident involving exposure to radioactive materials in the process of site characterization, construction, operation, and closure of a high-level waste repository is extremely remote. Most would agree, however, that there is a relatively high probability that a minor accident involving radiological contamination will occur sometime during the lifetime of the repository -- for example, during transport, at an MRS site or at the permanent site itself during repacking and deposition. Thus, one of the major concerns of the Yucca Mountain Socioeconomic Study is the potential impact of a relatively minor radiation-related accident. A large number of potential impact of a relatively minor radiation-related accident. A large number of potential accident scenarios have been under consideration (such as a transportation or other surface accident which results in a significant decline in tourism, the number of conventions, or the selection of Nevada as a retirement residence). The results of the work in Goiania make it clear, however, that such a significant shift in established social patterns and trends is not likely to occur as a direct outcome of a single nuclear-related accident (even, perhaps, a relatively major one), but rather, are likely to occur as a result of the enduring social interpretations of such an accident -- that is, as a result of the process of understanding, communicating, and socially sustaining a particular set of associations with respect to the initial incident

  6. Neutron-neutron quasifree scattering in nd breakup at 10 MeV

    Malone, R. C.; Crowe, B.; Crowell, A. S.; Cumberbatch, L. C.; Esterline, J. H.; Fallin, B. A.; Friesen, F. Q. L.; Han, Z.; Howell, C. R.; Markoff, D.; Ticehurst, D.; Tornow, W.; Witała, H.

    2016-03-01

    The neutron-deuteron (nd) breakup reaction provides a rich environment for testing theoretical models of the neutron-neutron (nn) interaction. Current theoretical predictions based on rigorous ab-initio calculations agree well with most experimental data for this system, but there remain a few notable discrepancies. The cross section for nn quasifree (QFS) scattering is one such anomaly. Two recent experiments reported cross sections for this particular nd breakup configuration that exceed theoretical calculations by almost 20% at incident neutron energies of 26 and 25 MeV [1, 2]. The theoretical values can be brought into agreement with these results by increasing the strength of the 1S0 nn potential matrix element by roughly 10%. However, this modification of the nn effective range parameter and/or the 1S0 scattering length causes substantial charge-symmetry breaking in the nucleon-nucleon force and suggests the possibility of a weakly bound di-neutron state [3]. We are conducting new measurements of the cross section for nn QFS in nd breakup. The measurements are performed at incident neutron beam energies below 20 MeV. The neutron beam is produced via the 2H(d, n)3He reaction. The target is a deuterated plastic cylinder. Our measurements utilize time-of-flight techniques with a pulsed neutron beam and detection of the two emitted neutrons in coincidence. A description of our initial measurements at 10 MeV for a single scattering angle will be presented along with preliminary results. Also, plans for measurements at other energies with broad angular coverage will be discussed.

  7. Method for the determination of neutron dose values

    The albedo dosimeter is used for measuring the dose equivalent of fast neutrons without space-dependent correction factors and independently of the neutron energy and the direction of beam incidence. It consists of LiF or TLD 600 and 700 detectors arranged in a cup-shaped shell of baron-containing material and separated by plates of the same material. One of the detectors is only for measuring the thermal and intermediate neutrons emitted by the body, while another detector measures the thermal and intermediate neutrons retained in the body. An additional third detector enables the measurement of a dose value of all neutrons except the thermal neutrons. The dose values are correlated in a calculation and corrected by means of correction factors from calibration diagrams, and the exact dose values are determined from this. (DG)

  8. High-energy neutron spectroscopy with thick silicon detectors

    Kinnison, James D.; Maurer, Richard H.; Roth, David R.; Haight, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    The high-energy neutron component of the space radiation environment in thick structures such as the International Space Station contributes to the total radiation dose received by an astronaut. Detector design constraints such as size and mass have limited the energy range of neutron spectrum measurements in orbit to about 12 MeV in Space Shuttle studies. We present a new method for high-energy neutron spectroscopy using small silicon detectors that can extend these measurements to more than 500 MeV. The methodology is based on measurement of the detector response function for high-energy neutrons and inversion of this response function with measured deposition data to deduce neutron energy spectra. We also present the results of an initial shielding study performed with the thick silicon detector system for high-energy neutrons incident on polyethylene.

  9. Radiative neutron capture cross sections on 176Lu at DANCE

    Roig, O.; Jandel, M.; Méot, V.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    The cross section of the neutron capture reaction 176Lu(n ,γ ) has been measured for a wide incident neutron energy range with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The thermal neutron capture cross section was determined to be (1912 ±132 ) b for one of the Lu natural isotopes, 176Lu. The resonance part was measured and compared to the Mughabghab's atlas using the R -matrix code, sammy. At higher neutron energies the measured cross sections are compared to ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2, and BRC evaluated nuclear data. The Maxwellian averaged cross sections in a stellar plasma for thermal energies between 5 keV and 100 keV were extracted using these data.

  10. Studies of Neutron-Induced Fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu

    Duke, Dana; TKE Team

    2014-09-01

    A Frisch-gridded ionization chamber and the double energy (2E) analysis method were used to study mass yield distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release from neutron-induced fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu. Despite decades of fission research, little or no TKE data exist for high incident neutron energies. Additional average TKE information at incident neutron energies relevant to defense- and energy-related applications will provide a valuable observable for benchmarking simulations. The data can also be used as inputs in theoretical fission models. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center-Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE - WNR) provides a neutron beam from thermal to hundreds of MeV, well-suited for filling in the gaps in existing data and exploring fission behavior in the fast neutron region. The results of the studies on 238U, 235U, and 239Pu will be presented. LA-UR-14-24921.

  11. Two-dimensional neutron imaging method using scintillators with wavelength shifting fibers

    We have developed a two-dimensional neutron imaging method using rectangular scintillators with wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers for neutron scattering experiments using a next-generation high-intense pulsed-neutron source. In the method, rectangular scintillators are arranged at longitudinal direction and transverse direction and WLS fibers are arranged on the four sides of these scintillators. Luminescences generated in the scintillator are absorbed by the four fibers and wavelength-shifted luminescences are detected by multi-anode photomultipliers. The position of incident neutron is decided by coincidence of the four signals. By preliminary experiments using 5 mmx5 mmx2 mmt6Li glass scintillators and 0.5 mm diameter WLS fibers, it was concluded that detection efficiency for thermal neutron was 13%. By scanning experiment using a 4x4 6Li glass scintillator array neutron detection system, we obtained the clear spot of incident neutron beam that the cross talk was <10%

  12. Compact variable-energy neutron generators for fast neutron applications

    Full text: The advent of compact low-energy accelerators capable of delivering intense beams of charged particles has opened up the opportunity of generating fast neutron beams of sufficient intensity for many previously inaccessible applications. A continuing drawback in the intensity or quality of the neutron beam stems from the nature of the beam-target interaction. To generate mono-energetic neutrons the ideal reaction is the d(d,n)3He reaction. For a sufficiently dense target material the deuterium should be a liquid or solid, but this is invariably impractical due to the associated complex cryogenic requirements. The only alternative is a gas target maintained at high pressure. The disadvantage of a gas target is the question of how to contain a high pressure gas cell and introduce an energetic ion beam with minimal incident beam energy degradation. The concept of an advanced differential pumping system has already been demonstrated, with spinning discs to isolate the gas cell during non-delivery of beam from a pulsed accelerator. Such a process is however, ineffective for higher duty cycles. To overcome this, a novel system has been developed utilizing a plasma porthole in conjunction with a differential pumping system. Such a system has been demonstrated to be highly effective in terms of installing a compact fast neutron generator for applications in the materials research industry. During recent years considerable effort has been directed towards the use of fast neutron generators for contraband and explosives detection. The methodology can also be directed to other applications, more specifically in minerals prospecting and materials characterization. Here we discuss two specific applications that can have a direct impact on the South African economy: 1) Assaying of gold ore in rock: The 279 keV gamma-ray emitted during the decay of 197mAu can be readily observed through the irradiation of natural gold using neutrons of energy 1-6 MeV with optimum

  13. Neutron capture cross section and capture gamma-ray spectra of 138Ba in the keV-neutron energy region

    Katabuchi T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The neutron capture cross sections and the capture γ-ray spectra of 138Ba were measured in the astrophysically important energy region. Measurements were made at neutron energies from 15 to 80 keV. The neutron energy was determined by the time-of-flight method. The γ-ray spectra showed that the primary transition pattern strongly depended on the incident neutron energy. The neutron capture cross sections were derived by the pulse height weighting technique. The present cross section values were compared with evaluated cross section data and previous measurements.

  14. Latest developments of neutron scattering instrumentation at the Juelich Centre for Neutron Science

    Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS) is operating a number of world-class neutron scattering instruments situated at the most powerful and advanced neutron sources (FRM II, ILL and SNS) and is continuously undertaking significant efforts in the development and upgrades to keep this instrumentation in line with the continuously changing scientific request. These developments are mostly based upon the latest progress in neutron optics and polarized neutron techniques. For example, the low-Q limit of the suite of small angle-scattering instruments has been extended to 4·10-5 Å-1 by the successful use of focusing optics. A new generation of correction elements for the neutron spin-echo spectrometer has allowed for the use of the full field integral available, thus pushing further the instrument resolution. A significant progress has been achieved in the developments of 3He neutron spin filters for purposes of the wide-angle polarization analysis for off-specular reflectometry and (grazing incidence) small-angle neutron scattering, e.g. the on-beam polarization of 3He in large cells is allowing to achieve a high neutron beam polarization without any degradation in time. The wide Q-range polarization analysis using 3He neutron spin filters has been implemented for small-angle neutron scattering that lead to the reduction up to 100 times of the intrinsic incoherent background from non-deuterated biological molecules. Also the work on wide-angle XYZ magnetic cavities (Magic PASTIS) will be presented. (author)

  15. Study on spatial resolution of micromegas as a neutron detector under condition of high neutron flux and γ ray background

    WANG Wen-Xin; ZHANG Yi; WANG Ji-Jin; HU Bi-Tao

    2009-01-01

    In this paper Micromegas has been designed to detect neutrons. The simulation of the spatial reso-lution of Micromegas as neutron detector is carried out by GEANT4 toolkit. The neutron track reconstruction method based on the time coincidence technology is employed in the present work. The influence of the flux of incident 14 MeV neutron and high gamma background on the spatial resolution is carefully studied. Our results show that the spatial resolution of the detector is sensitive to the neutron flux, but insensitive to the intensity of γ background if the neutron track reconstruction method proposed by our group is used. The γ insensitivity makes it possible for us to use the Micromegas detector under condition which has high γ-rays background.

  16. Neutron induced fission of 234U

    Pomp S.; Al-Adili A.; Oberstedt S.; Hambsch F.-J.

    2012-01-01

    The fission fragment properties of 234U(n,f) were investigated as a function of incident neutron energy from 0.2 MeV up to 5 MeV. The fission fragment mass, angular distribution and kinetic energy were measured with a double Frisch-grid ionization chamber using both analogue and digital data acquisition techniques. The reaction 234U(n,f) is relevant, since it involves the same compound nucleus as formed after neutron evaporation from highly excited 236U*, the so-called second-chance fission o...

  17. True incidence of vestibular schwannoma?

    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Tos, Mirko; Thomsen, Jens;

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of diagnosed sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) has increased, due primarily to more widespread access to magnetic resonance imaging.......The incidence of diagnosed sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS) has increased, due primarily to more widespread access to magnetic resonance imaging....

  18. Neutron source for Neutron Capture Synovectomy

    Monte Carlo calculations were performed to obtain a thermal neutron field from a 239PuBe neutron source inside a cylindrical heterogeneous moderators for Neutron Capture Synovectomy. Studied moderators were light water and heavy water, graphite and heavy water, lucite and polyethylene and heavy water. The neutron spectrum of polyethylene and heavy water moderator was used to determine neutron spectra inside a knee model. In this model the elemental composition of synovium and synovial liquid was assumed like blood. Kerma factors for synovium and synovial liquid were calculated to compare with water Kerma factors, in this calculations the synovium was loaded with two different concentrations of Boron

  19. Obliquely incident ion beam figuring

    Zhou, Lin; Dai, Yifan; Xie, Xuhui; Li, Shengyi

    2015-10-01

    A new ion beam figuring (IBF) technique, obliquely incident IBF (OI-IBF), is proposed. In OI-IBF, the ion beam bombards the optical surface obliquely with an invariable incident angle instead of perpendicularly as in the normal IBF. Due to the higher removal rate in oblique incidence, the process time in OI-IBF can be significantly shortened. The removal rates at different incident angles were first tested, and then a test mirror was processed by OI-IBF. Comparison shows that in the OI-IBF technique with a 30 deg incident angle, the process time was reduced by 56.8%, while keeping the same figure correcting ability. The experimental results indicate that the OI-IBF technique is feasible and effective to improve the surface correction process efficiency.

  20. Neutron standard data

    The neutron standards are reviewed with emphasis on the evaluation for ENDFB-VI. Also discussed are the neutron spectrum of 252Cf spontaneous fission, activation cross sections for neutron flux measurement, and standards for neutron energies greater than 20 MeV. Recommendations are made for future work. 21 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Neutron dosimetry - A review

    This review summarizes information on the following subjects: (1) physical processes of importance in neutron dosimetry; (2) biological effects of neutrons; (3) neutron sources; and (4) instruments and methods used in neutron dosimetry. Also, possible improvements in dosimetry instrumentation are outlined and discussed. (author)

  2. Borner Ball Neutron Detector

    2002-01-01

    The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector measures neutron radiation. Neutrons are uncharged atomic particles that have the ability to penetrate living tissues, harming human beings in space. The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector is one of three radiation experiments during Expedition Two. The others are the Phantom Torso and Dosimetric Mapping.

  3. Superfluid neutron stars

    Langlois, David

    2001-01-01

    Neutron stars are believed to contain (neutron and proton) superfluids. I will give a summary of a macroscopic description of the interior of neutron stars, in a formulation which is general relativistic. I will also present recent results on the oscillations of neutron stars, with superfluidity explicitly taken into account, which leads in particular to the existence of a new class of modes.

  4. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  5. Neutrostriction in Neutron stars

    Ignatovich, V. K.

    2003-01-01

    It is demonstrated that not only gravity, but also neutrostriction forces due to optical potential created by coherent elastic neutron-neutron scattering can hold a neutron star together. The latter forces can be stronger than gravitational ones. The effect of these forces on mass, radius and structure of the neutron star is estimated.

  6. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  7. Spin distribution in neutron induced preequilibrium reactions

    Dashdorj, D; Kawano, T; Chadwick, M; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R O; Mitchell, G E; Garrett, P E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Macri, R; Younes, W

    2005-10-04

    The preequilibrium reaction mechanism makes an important contribution to neutron-induced reactions above E{sub n} {approx} 10 MeV. The preequilibrium process has been studied exclusively via the characteristic high energy neutrons produced at bombarding energies greater than 10 MeV. They are expanding the study of the preequilibrium reaction mechanism through {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Cross-section measurements were made of prompt {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 250 MeV) on a {sup 48}Ti sample. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The {gamma}-ray excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections taking into account the dead-time correction, target thickness, detector efficiency and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). Residual state population was predicted using the GNASH reaction code, enhanced for preequilibrium. The preequilibrium reaction spin distribution was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshback, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK). The multistep direct part of the FKK theory was calculated for a one-step process. The FKK preequilibrium spin distribution was incorporated into the GNASH calculations and the {gamma}-ray production cross sections were calculated and compared with experimental data. The difference in the partial {gamma}-ray cross sections using spin distributions with and without preequilibrium effects is significant.

  8. Neutron Capture Nucleosynthesis

    Kiss, Miklos

    2016-01-01

    Heavy elements (beyond iron) are formed in neutron capture nucleosynthesis processes. We have proposed a simple unified model to investigate the neutron capture nucleosynthesis in arbitrary neutron density environment. We have also investigated what neutron density is required to reproduce the measured abundance of nuclei assuming equilibrium processes. We found both of these that the medium neutron density has a particularly important role at neutron capture nucleosynthesis. About these results most of the nuclei can formed at medium neutron capture density environment e.g. in some kind of AGB stars. Besides these observations our model is capable to use educational purpose.

  9. Neutrons in cancer therapy

    Allen, Barry J.

    1995-03-01

    The role of neutrons in the management of cancer has a long history. However, it is only in recent years that neutrons are beginning to find an accepted place as an efficacious radiation modality. Fast neutron therapy is already well established for the treatment of certain cancers, and clinical trials are ongoing. Californium neutron sources are being used in brachytherapy. Boron neutron capture therapy has been well tested with thermal neutrons and epithermal neutron dose escalation studies are about to commence in the USA and Europe. Possibilities of neutron induced auger electron therapy are also discussed. With respect to chemotherapy, prompt neutron capture analysis is being used to study the dose optimization of chemotherapy in the management of breast cancer. The rationales behind these applications of neutrons in the management of cancer are examined.

  10. High energy neutron detector

    Wiegand, C.

    1948-04-27

    It is the purpose of this paper to describe a neutron detector suitable for monitoring a flux of neutrons whose energy is greater than about 50 MeV. Detection of the neutrons is accomplished by their ability to induce fission in heavy elements. Kelly and Wiegand studied the neutron fission of Bi, Pb, Ti, Hg, Au, and Pt at various neutron energies and the presently described counter is an application of this work.