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Sample records for 14-mer cuucgg tetraloop

  1. Membrane topology of a 14-mer model amphipathic peptide: a solid-state NMR spectroscopy study.

    Ouellet, Marise; Doucet, Jean-Daniel; Voyer, Normand; Auger, Michèle

    2007-06-01

    We have investigated the interaction between a synthetic amphipathic 14-mer peptide and model membranes by solid-state NMR. The 14-mer peptide is composed of leucines and phenylalanines modified by the addition of crown ethers and forms a helical amphipathic structure in solution and bound to lipid membranes. To shed light on its membrane topology, 31P, 2H, 15N solid-state NMR experiments have been performed on the 14-mer peptide in interaction with mechanically oriented bilayers of dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC), dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). The 31P, 2H, and 15N NMR results indicate that the 14-mer peptide remains at the surface of the DLPC, DMPC, and DPPC bilayers stacked between glass plates and perturbs the lipid orientation relative to the magnetic field direction. Its membrane topology is similar in DLPC and DMPC bilayers, whereas the peptide seems to be more deeply inserted in DPPC bilayers, as revealed by the greater orientational and motional disorder of the DPPC lipid headgroup and acyl chains. 15N{31P} rotational echo double resonance experiments have also been used to measure the intermolecular dipole-dipole interaction between the 14-mer peptide and the phospholipid headgroup of DMPC multilamellar vesicles, and the results indicate that the 14-mer peptide is in contact with the polar region of the DMPC lipids. On the basis of these studies, the mechanism of membrane perturbation of the 14-mer peptide is associated to the induction of a positive curvature strain induced by the peptide lying on the bilayer surface and seems to be independent of the bilayer hydrophobic thickness. PMID:17487978

  2. Equilibrium conformational dynamics in an RNA tetraloop from massively parallel molecular dynamics.

    DePaul, Allison J; Thompson, Erik J; Patel, Sarav S; Haldeman, Kristin; Sorin, Eric J

    2010-08-01

    Conformational equilibrium within the ubiquitous GNRA tetraloop motif was simulated at the ensemble level, including 10 000 independent all-atom molecular dynamics trajectories totaling over 110 micros of simulation time. This robust sampling reveals a highly dynamic structure comprised of 15 conformational microstates. We assemble a Markov model that includes transitions ranging from the nanosecond to microsecond timescales and is dominated by six key loop conformations that contribute to fluctuations around the native state. Mining of the Protein Data Bank provides an abundance of structures in which GNRA tetraloops participate in tertiary contact formation. Most predominantly observed in the experimental data are interactions of the native loop structure within the minor groove of adjacent helical regions. Additionally, a second trend is observed in which the tetraloop assumes non-native conformations while participating in multiple tertiary contacts, in some cases involving multiple possible loop conformations. This tetraloop flexibility can act to counterbalance the energetic penalty associated with assuming non-native loop structures in forming tertiary contacts. The GNRA motif has thus evolved not only to readily participate in simple tertiary interactions involving native loop structure, but also to easily adapt tetraloop secondary conformation in order to participate in larger, more complex tertiary interactions. PMID:20223768

  3. Tumor imaging and targeting potential of an Hsp70-derived 14-mer peptide.

    Mathias Gehrmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously used a unique mouse monoclonal antibody cmHsp70.1 to demonstrate the selective presence of a membrane-bound form of Hsp70 (memHsp70 on a variety of leukemia cells and on single cell suspensions derived from solid tumors of different entities, but not on non-transformed cells or cells from corresponding 'healthy' tissue. This antibody can be used to image tumors in vivo and target them for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Tumor-specific expression of memHsp70 therefore has the potential to be exploited for theranostic purposes. Given the advantages of peptides as imaging and targeting agents, this study assessed whether a 14-mer tumor penetrating peptide (TPP; TKDNNLLGRFELSG, the sequence of which is derived from the oligomerization domain of Hsp70 which is expressed on the cell surface of tumor cells, can also be used for targeting membrane Hsp70 positive (memHsp70+ tumor cells, in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The specificity of carboxy-fluorescein (CF- labeled TPP (TPP to Hsp70 was proven in an Hsp70 knockout mammary tumor cell system. TPP specifically binds to different memHsp70+ mouse and human tumor cell lines and is rapidly taken up via endosomes. Two to four-fold higher levels of CF-labeled TPP were detected in MCF7 (82% memHsp70+ and MDA-MB-231 (75% memHsp70+ cells compared to T47D cells (29% memHsp70+ that exhibit a lower Hsp70 membrane positivity. After 90 min incubation, TPP co-localized with mitochondrial membranes in memHsp70+ tumors. Although there was no evidence that any given vesicle population was specifically localized, fluorophore-labeled cmHsp70.1 antibody and TPP preferentially accumulated in the proximity of the adherent surface of cultured cells. These findings suggest a potential association between membrane Hsp70 expression and cytoskeletal elements that are involved in adherence, the establishment of intercellular synapses and/or membrane reorganization. CONCLUSIONS

  4. Structural variation and uniformity among tetraloop-receptor interactions and other loop-helix interactions in RNA crystal structures.

    Li Wu

    Full Text Available Tetraloop-receptor interactions are prevalent structural units in RNAs, and include the GAAA/11-nt and GNRA-minor groove interactions. In this study, we have compiled a set of 78 nonredundant loop-helix interactions from X-ray crystal structures, and examined them for the extent of their sequence and structural variation. Of the 78 interactions in the set, only four were classical GAAA/11-nt motifs, while over half (48 were GNRA-minor groove interactions. The GNRA-minor groove interactions were not a homogeneous set, but were divided into five subclasses. The most predominant subclass is characterized by two triple base pair interactions in the minor groove, flanked by two ribose zipper contacts. This geometry may be considered the "standard" GNRA-minor groove interaction, while the other four subclasses are alternative ways to form interfaces between a minor groove and tetraloop. The remaining 26 structures in the set of 78 have loops interacting with mostly idiosyncratic receptors. Among the entire set, a number of sequence-structure correlations can be identified, which may be used as initial hypotheses in predicting three-dimensional structures from primary sequences. Conversely, other sequence patterns are not predictive; for example, GAAA loop sequences and GG/CC receptors bind to each other with three distinct geometries. Finally, we observe an example of structural evolution in group II introns, in which loop-receptor motifs are substituted for each other while maintaining the larger three-dimensional geometry. Overall, the study gives a more complete view of RNA loop-helix interactions that exist in nature.

  5. Influence of In Vitro IL-2 or IL-15 Alone or in Combination with Hsp 70 Derived 14-Mer Peptide (TKD on the Expression of NK Cell Activatory and Inhibitory Receptors on Peripheral Blood T Cells, B Cells and NKT Cells.

    Ilona Hromadnikova

    Full Text Available Previous studies from Multhoff and colleagues reported that plasma membrane Hsp70 acts as a tumour-specific recognition structure for activated NK cells, and that the incubation of NK cells with Hsp70 and/or a 14-mer peptide derived from the N-terminal sequence of Hsp70 (TKDNNLLGRFELSG, TKD, aa 450-463 plus a low dose of IL-2 triggers NK cell proliferation and migration, and their capacity to kill cancer cells expressing membrane Hsp70. Herein, we have used flow cytometry to determine the influence of in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals with IL-2 or IL-15, either alone or in combination with TKD peptide on the cell surface expression of CD94, NK cell activatory receptors (CD16, NK2D, NKG2C, NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, NKp80, KIR2DL4, DNAM-1 and LAMP1 and NK cell inhibitory receptors (NKG2A, KIR2DL2/L3, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKR-P1A by CD3+CD56+ (NKT, CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+ and CD19+ populations. NKG2D, DNAM-1, LAMP1 and NKR-P1A expression was upregulated after the stimulation with IL-2 or IL-15 alone or in combination with TKD in NKT, CD8+ T cells and B cells. CD94 was upregulated in NKT and CD8+ T cells. Concurrently, an increase in a number of CD8+ T cells expressing LIR1/ILT-2 and CD4+ T cells positive for NKR-P1A was observed. The proportion of CD8+ T cells that expressed NKG2D was higher after IL-2/TKD treatment, when compared with IL-2 treatment alone. In comparison with IL-15 alone, IL-15/TKD treatment increased the proportion of NKT cells that were positive for CD94, LAMP1 and NKRP-1A. The more potent effect of IL-15/TKD on cell surface expression of NKG2D, LIR1/ILT-2 and NKRP-1A was observed in B cells compared with IL-15 alone. However, this increase was not of statistical significance. IL-2/TKD induced significant upregulation of LAMP1 in CD8+ T cells compared with IL-2 alone. Besides NK cells, other immunocompetent cells present within the fraction of peripheral blood mononuclear cells were influenced by

  6. Free Energy Profile of RNA Hairpins: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    Deng, Nan-Jie; Cieplak, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    RNA hairpin loops are one of the most abundant secondary structure elements and participate in RNA folding and protein-RNA recognition. To characterize the free energy surface of RNA hairpin folding at an atomic level, we calculated the potential of mean force (PMF) as a function of the end-to-end distance, by using umbrella sampling simulations in explicit solvent. Two RNA hairpins containing tetraloop cUUCGg and cUUUUg are studied with AMBER ff99 and CHARMM27 force fields. Experimentally, t...

  7. High resolution 4D HPCH experiment for sequential assignment of 13C-labeled RNAs via phosphodiester backbone

    The three-dimensional structure determination of RNAs by NMR spectroscopy requires sequential resonance assignment, often hampered by assignment ambiguities and limited dispersion of 1H and 13C chemical shifts, especially of C4′/H4′. Here we present a novel through-bond 4D HPCH NMR experiment involving phosphate backbone where C4′–H4′ correlations are resolved along the 1H3′–31P spectral planes. The experiment provides high peak resolution and effectively removes ambiguities encountered during assignments. Enhanced peak dispersion is provided by the inclusion of additional 31P and 1H3′ dimensions and constant-time evolution of chemical shifts. High spectral resolution is obtained by using non-uniform sampling in three indirect dimensions. The experiment fully utilizes the isotopic 13C-labeling with evolution of C4′ carbons. Band selective 13C inversion pulses are used to achieve selectivity and prevent signal dephasing due to the C4′–C3′ and C4′–C5′ homonuclear couplings. Multiple quantum line narrowing is employed to minimize sensitivity loses. The 4D HPCH experiment is verified and successfully applied to a non-coding 34-nt RNA consisting typical structure elements and a 14-nt RNA hairpin capped by cUUCGg tetraloop

  8. High resolution 4D HPCH experiment for sequential assignment of {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs via phosphodiester backbone

    Saxena, Saurabh; Stanek, Jan [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre (Poland); Cevec, Mirko; Plavec, Janez [National Institute of Chemistry, Slovenian NMR Centre (Slovenia); Koźmiński, Wiktor, E-mail: kozmin@chem.uw.edu.pl [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre (Poland)

    2015-11-15

    The three-dimensional structure determination of RNAs by NMR spectroscopy requires sequential resonance assignment, often hampered by assignment ambiguities and limited dispersion of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shifts, especially of C4′/H4′. Here we present a novel through-bond 4D HPCH NMR experiment involving phosphate backbone where C4′–H4′ correlations are resolved along the {sup 1}H3′–{sup 31}P spectral planes. The experiment provides high peak resolution and effectively removes ambiguities encountered during assignments. Enhanced peak dispersion is provided by the inclusion of additional {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H3′ dimensions and constant-time evolution of chemical shifts. High spectral resolution is obtained by using non-uniform sampling in three indirect dimensions. The experiment fully utilizes the isotopic {sup 13}C-labeling with evolution of C4′ carbons. Band selective {sup 13}C inversion pulses are used to achieve selectivity and prevent signal dephasing due to the C4′–C3′ and C4′–C5′ homonuclear couplings. Multiple quantum line narrowing is employed to minimize sensitivity loses. The 4D HPCH experiment is verified and successfully applied to a non-coding 34-nt RNA consisting typical structure elements and a 14-nt RNA hairpin capped by cUUCGg tetraloop.

  9. Free energy profile of RNA hairpins: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Deng, Nan-Jie; Cieplak, Piotr

    2010-02-17

    RNA hairpin loops are one of the most abundant secondary structure elements and participate in RNA folding and protein-RNA recognition. To characterize the free energy surface of RNA hairpin folding at an atomic level, we calculated the potential of mean force (PMF) as a function of the end-to-end distance, by using umbrella sampling simulations in explicit solvent. Two RNA hairpins containing tetraloop cUUCGg and cUUUUg are studied with AMBER ff99 and CHARMM27 force fields. Experimentally, the UUCG hairpin is known to be significantly more stable than UUUU. In this study, the calculations using AMBER force field give a qualitatively correct description for the folding of two RNA hairpins, as the calculated PMF confirms the global stability of the folded structures and the resulting relative folding free energy is in quantitative agreement with the experimental result. The hairpin stabilities are also correctly differentiated by the more rapid molecular mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann-surface area approach, but the relative free energy estimated from this method is overestimated. The free energy profile shows that the native state basin and the unfolded state plateau are separated by a wide shoulder region, which samples a variety of native-like structures with frayed terminal basepair. The calculated PMF lacks major barriers that are expected near the transition regions, and this is attributed to the limitation of the 1-D reaction coordinate. The PMF results are compared with other studies of small RNA hairpins using kinetics method and coarse grained models. The two RNA hairpins described by CHARMM27 are significantly more deformable than those represented by AMBER. Compared with the AMBER results, the CHARMM27 calculated DeltaG(fold) for the UUUU tetraloop is in better agreement with the experimental results. However, the CHARMM27 calculation does not confirm the global stability of the experimental UUCG structure; instead, the extended conformations are predicted

  10. Bioinformatics and Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of L1 Stalk Non-Canonical rRNA Elements: Kink-Turns, Loops, and Tetraloops

    Krepl, Miroslav; Réblová, K.; Koča, J.; Šponer, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 18 (2013), s. 5540-5555. ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP305/12/G034 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : PARTICLE MESH EWALD * ION-BINDING SITES * A-MINOR MOTIF Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.377, year: 2013

  11. The stability of triplex DNA is affected by the stability of the underlying duplex

    Rusling, David A.; Rachwal, Phillip A.; Brown, Tom; Fox, Keith R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We have studied the formation of DNA triple helices in different sequence contexts and show that, for the most stable triplexes, their apparent stability is affected by the stability of the underlying duplex. For a 14-mer parallel triplex-forming oligonucleotide (generating C+.GC and T.AT triplets) at pH 5.0 the Tm is more than 10?C lower with an intermolecular 14-mer duplex target, than it is with an intramolecular duplex, or one which is flanked by 6 GC base pairs at eit...

  12. Structural differences within the loop E motif imply alternative mechanisms of viroid processing

    Viroids replicate via a rolling circle mechanism, and cleavage/ligation requires extensive rearrangement of the highly base-paired native structure. For Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), the switch from cleavage to ligation is driven by the change from a multi-branched tetraloop structure to a l...

  13. Detecting Ricin: A Sensitive Luminescent Assay for Ricin A-chain Ribosome Depurination Kinetics+

    Sturm, Matthew B.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2009-01-01

    Ricin is a family member of the lethal ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP) found in plants. Ricin toxin A-chain (RTA) from castor beans catalyzes the hydrolytic depurination of a single base from a GAGA tetraloop of eukaryotic ribosomal RNA to release a single adenine from the sarcin-ricin loop (SRL). Protein synthesis is inhibited by loss of elongation factor binding resulting in cell death. We report a sensitive coupled assay for the measurement of adenine released from ribosomes or small ...

  14. Evaluation of The Interaction between Netropsin and Double Stranded DNA by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    2003-01-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was applied to study the interaction between netropsin and a 14mer double stranded DNA (dsDNA). The binding constant of this interaction calculated from Scatchard plot was (1.07±0.10)×105 (mol/L)-1. The binding stoichiometry was 1:1. The use of polyacrylamide coated capillary showed better effect in the analysis of DNA than noncoated capillary.

  15. Enhancement of TFO Triplex Formation by Conjugation with Pyrene via Click Chemistry.

    Taniguchi, Yosuke; Tomizaki, Akira; Matsueda, Nozomu; Okamura, Hidenori; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the preparation of 14-mer triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) containing a 2-O-methyl-1-β-phenyl-α-propargyl-ribose unit, which was conjugated with azide-modified molecules via a click reaction. Modification of these TFOs with pyrene assisted triplex formation, improving the stability of the triplex DNA and the anti-proliferative effects against A549 cells. PMID:26521856

  16. Characterization of minisatellites in Arabidopsis thaliana with sequence similarity to the human minisatellite core sequence.

    Tourmente, S; Deragon, J M; Lafleuriel, J; Tutois, S; Pélissier, T; Cuvillier, C.; Espagnol, M C; G. Picard

    1994-01-01

    A strategy based on random PCR amplification was used to isolate new repetitive elements of Arabidopsis thaliana. One of the random PCR product analyzed by this approach contained a tandem repetitive minisatellite sequence composed of 33 bp repeated units. The genomic locus corresponding to this PCR product was isolated by screening a lambda genomic library. New related loci were also isolated from the genomic library by screening with a 14 mer oligonucleotide representing a region conserved ...

  17. Cationic modified nucleic acids for use in DNA hairpins and parallel triplexes

    Bomholt, Niels; Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard

    2011-01-01

    Non-nucleosidic DNA monomers comprising partially protonated amines at low pH have been designed and synthesized. The modifications were incorporated into DNA oligonucleotides via standard DNA phosphoramidite synthesis. The ability of cationic modifications to stabilize palindromic DNA hairpins and...... parallel triplexes were evaluated using gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism and thermal denaturation measurements. The non-nucleosidic modifications were found to increase the thermal stability of palindromic hairpins at pH 8.0 as compared with a nucleosidic tetraloop (TCTC). Incorporation of...

  18. Performance of molecular mechanics force fields for RNA simulations: Stability of UUCG and GNRA hairpins

    Banáš, P.; Hollas, D.; Zgarbová, M.; Jurečka, P.; Orozco, M.; Cheatham III, T.E.; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 12 (2010), s. 3836-3849. ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06030; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/1476; GA ČR(CZ) GD203/09/H046; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040802 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : molecular dynamics * force fields * RNA * tetraloops Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.138, year: 2010

  19. LNA nucleotides improve cleavage efficiency of singular and binary hammerhead ribozymes

    Christiansen, Janne K; Lobedanz, Sune; Arar, Khalil;

    2007-01-01

    concentrations, it was found that insertion of LNA monomers into the substrate binding arms allowed these to be shortened and results in a very active enzyme under both single and multiple turnover conditions. Incorporation of a mix of LNA and DNA residues further increased the multiple turnover cleavage...... activity. At high Mg(2+) concentrations or high substrate and ribozyme concentrations, the enhancing effect of LNA incorporation was even more prominent. Using LNA in the stem of Helix II diminished cleavage activity, but allowed deletion of the tetra-loop and thus separating the ribozyme into two...

  20. Targeting membrane heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) on tumors by cmHsp70.1 antibody

    Stangl, Stefan; Gehrmann, Mathias; Riegger, Julia; Kuhs, Kristin; Riederer, Isabelle; Sievert, Wolfgang; Hube, Kathrin; Mocikat, Ralph; Dressel, Ralf; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Pockley, Alan G.; Friedrich, Lars; Vigh, Laszlo; Skerra, Arne; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    Immunization of mice with a 14-mer peptide TKDNNLLGRFELSG, termed “TKD,” comprising amino acids 450–461 (aa450–461) in the C terminus of inducible Hsp70, resulted in the generation of an IgG1 mouse mAb cmHsp70.1. The epitope recognized by cmHsp70.1 mAb, which has been confirmed to be located in the TKD sequence by SPOT analysis, is frequently detectable on the cell surface of human and mouse tumors, but not on isogenic cells and normal tissues, and membrane Hsp70 might thus serve as a tumor-s...

  1. Studying metal ion binding properties of a three-way junction RNA by heteronuclear NMR.

    Bartova, Simona; Pechlaner, Maria; Donghi, Daniela; Sigel, Roland K O

    2016-06-01

    Self-splicing group II introns are highly structured RNA molecules, containing a characteristic secondary and catalytically active tertiary structure, which is formed only in the presence of Mg(II). Mg(II) initiates the first folding step governed by the κζ element within domain 1 (D1κζ). We recently solved the NMR structure of D1κζ derived from the mitochondrial group II intron ribozyme Sc.ai5γ and demonstrated that Mg(II) is essential for its stabilization. Here, we performed a detailed multinuclear NMR study of metal ion interactions with D1κζ, using Cd(II) and cobalt(III)hexammine to probe inner- and outer-sphere coordination of Mg(II) and thus to better characterize its binding sites. Accordingly, we mapped (1)H, (15)N, (13)C, and (31)P spectral changes upon addition of different amounts of the metal ions. Our NMR data reveal a Cd(II)-assisted macrochelate formation at the 5'-end triphosphate, a preferential Cd(II) binding to guanines in a helical context, an electrostatic interaction in the ζ tetraloop receptor and various metal ion interactions in the GAAA tetraloop and κ element. These results together with our recently published data on Mg(II) interaction provide a much better understanding of Mg(II) binding to D1κζ, and reveal how intricate and complex metal ion interactions can be. PMID:26880094

  2. Membrane interactions of synthetic peptides with antimicrobial potential: effect of electrostatic interactions and amphiphilicity.

    Fillion, Matthieu; Valois-Paillard, Geneviève; Lorin, Aurélien; Noël, Mathieu; Voyer, Normand; Auger, Michèle

    2015-03-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are considered promising candidates to complement currently used antibiotics, which are less effective against increasingly resistant pathogens. To determine the mechanism of action of these peptides, a better understanding of each molecular determinant involved in their membrane interactions is of great importance. In this study, we have focused on the role of electrostatic interactions and amphiphilicity on the membrane interactions since the large majority of natural antimicrobial peptides are cationic. Therefore, cationic and anionic peptides have been prepared based on a model 14-mer peptide. The latter is a synthetic peptide composed of ten leucines and four phenylalanines, which are modified by the addition of the crown ether. Infrared spectroscopy results indicate that the position of substitution is the main determinant involved in the secondary structure adopted by the peptides, and not the charge of the substituted residues. Fluorescence vesicle leakage assays indicate, however, differences between the ability of cationic and anionic peptides to induce calcein release in zwitterionic and anionic lipid vesicles, suggesting an importance of electrostatic interactions and repulsions. Finally, (31)P NMR results indicate that the vesicle morphologies is not significantly affected by the interactions with both cationic and anionic peptides but that their effect on lipid bilayers is mainly determined by their secondary structure. This study therefore indicates that the membrane interactions of model 14-mer peptides are mainly governed by their secondary structure, which depends on the position of substitution, and not the charge of the residues. PMID:25422123

  3. Characterization of minisatellites in Arabidopsis thaliana with sequence similarity to the human minisatellite core sequence.

    Tourmente, S; Deragon, J M; Lafleuriel, J; Tutois, S; Pélissier, T; Cuvillier, C; Espagnol, M C; Picard, G

    1994-08-25

    A strategy based on random PCR amplification was used to isolate new repetitive elements of Arabidopsis thaliana. One of the random PCR product analyzed by this approach contained a tandem repetitive minisatellite sequence composed of 33 bp repeated units. The genomic locus corresponding to this PCR product was isolated by screening a lambda genomic library. New related loci were also isolated from the genomic library by screening with a 14 mer oligonucleotide representing a region conserved among the different repeated units. Alignment of the consensus sequence for each minisatellite locus allowed the definition of an Arabidopsis thaliana core sequence that shows strong sequence similarities with the human core sequence and with the generalized recombination signal Chi of Escherichia coli. The minisatellites were tested for their ability to detect polymorphism, and their chromosomal position was established. PMID:8078766

  4. Study of Interaction between Red-tide Toxin, Domoic Acid and Double -stranded DNA by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    Da Zhi LI; Xin Ya HE; Hui WANG; Li SUN; Bing Cheng LIN

    2004-01-01

    The interactions between amnesic red-tide toxin, domoic acid (DA) and 14mer double-stranded DNA (dsDNA with three kinds of sequences) were studied by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). For the dsDNA with a sequence of 5'-CCCCCTATACCCGC-3', the amount of free dsDNA decreases with the increase of added DA; and the signal of DA-dsDNA complex was observed. Meanwhile, the other two dsDNAs, 5'-(C)12GC-3' and 5'-(AT)7-3', the existence of DA could not lead to the change of dsDNA signal and indicated that there is no interaction between DA and these two dsDNAs.

  5. Bran data of total flavonoid and total phenolic contents, oxygen radical absorbance capacity, and profiles of proanthocyanidins and whole grain physical traits of 32 red and purple rice varieties.

    Chen, Ming-Hsuan; McClung, Anna M; Bergman, Christine J

    2016-09-01

    Phytochemicals in red and purple bran rice have potential health benefit to humans. We determined the phytochemicals in brans of 32 red and purple global rice varieties. The description of the origin and physical traits of the whole grain (color, length, width, thickness and 100-kernel weight) of this germplasm collection are provided along with data of total flavonoid and total phenolic contents, oxygen radical absorbance capacity and total proanthocyanidin contents. The contents and proportions of individual oligomers, from degree of polymerization of monomers to 14-mers, and polymers in bran of these 32 rice varieties are presented (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.04.004) [1]. PMID:27257615

  6. Biopanning and characterization of peptides with Fe3O4 nanoparticles-binding capability via phage display random peptide library technique.

    You, Fei; Yin, Guangfu; Pu, Ximing; Li, Yucan; Hu, Yang; Huang, Zhongbin; Liao, Xiaoming; Yao, Yadong; Chen, Xianchun

    2016-05-01

    Functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in biomedical applications. A proper functionalization of NPs can improve biocompatibility, avoid a loss of bioactivity, and further endow NPs with unique performances. Modification with vairous specific binding biomolecules from random biological libraries has been explored. In this work, two 7-mer peptides with sequences of HYIDFRW and TVNFKLY were selected from a phage display random peptide library by using ferromagnetic NPs as targets, and were verified to display strong binding affinity to Fe3O4 NPs. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, fluorescence microscopy, thermal analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of peptides on the surface of Fe3O4 NPs. Sequence analyses revealed that the probable binding mechanism between the peptide and Fe3O4 NPs might be driven by Pearson hard acid-hard base specific interaction and hydrogen bonds, accompanied with hydrophilic interactions and non-specific electrostatic attractions. The cell viability assay indicated a good cytocompatibility of peptide-bound Fe3O4 NPs. Furthermore, TVNFKLY peptide and an ovarian tumor cell A2780 specific binding peptide (QQTNWSL) were conjugated to afford a liner 14-mer peptide (QQTNWSLTVNFKLY). The binding and targeting studies showed that 14-mer peptide was able to retain both the strong binding ability to Fe3O4 NPs and the specific binding ability to A2780 cells. The results suggested that the Fe3O4-binding peptides would be of great potential in the functionalization of Fe3O4 NPs for the tumor-targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:26896661

  7. Replication Bypass of the trans-4-Hydroxynonenal-Derived (6S,8R,11S)-1,N[superscript 2]-Deoxyguanosine DNA Adduct by the Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA Polymerase IV

    Banerjee, Surajit; Christov, Plamen P.; Kozekova, Albena; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; Egli, Martin; Stone, Michael P. (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    trans-4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) is the major peroxidation product of {omega}-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in vivo. Michael addition of the N{sub 2}-amino group of dGuo to HNE followed by ring closure of N1 onto the aldehyde results in four diastereomeric 1,N{sub 2}-dGuo (1,N{sub 2}-HNE-dGuo) adducts. The (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo adduct was incorporated into the 18-mer templates 5'-d(TCATXGAATCCTTCCCCC)-3' and d(TCACXGAATCCTTCCCCC)-3', where X = (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo adduct. These differed in the identity of the template 5'-neighbor base, which was either Thy or Cyt, respectively. Each of these templates was annealed with either a 13-mer primer 5'-d(GGGGGAAGGATTC)-3' or a 14-mer primer 5'-d(GGGGGAAGGATTCC)-3'. The addition of dNTPs to the 13-mer primer allowed analysis of dNTP insertion opposite to the (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo adduct, whereas the 14-mer primer allowed analysis of dNTP extension past a primed (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo:dCyd pair. The Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA polymerase IV (Dpo4) belongs to the Y-family of error-prone polymerases. Replication bypass studies in vitro reveal that this polymerase inserted dNTPs opposite the (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo adduct in a sequence-specific manner. If the template 5'-neighbor base was dCyt, the polymerase inserted primarily dGTP, whereas if the template 5'-neighbor base was dThy, the polymerase inserted primarily dATP. The latter event would predict low levels of Gua {yields} Thy mutations during replication bypass when the template 5'-neighbor base is dThy. When presented with a primed (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo:dCyd pair, the polymerase conducted full-length primer extension. Structures for ternary (Dpo4-DNA-dNTP) complexes with all four template-primers were obtained. For the 18-mer:13-mer template-primers in which the polymerase was confronted with the (6S,8R,11S)-HNE-1,N{sub 2}-dGuo adduct, the (6S,8R,11S)-1,N

  8. An RNA-aptamer-based two-color CRISPR labeling system

    Wang, Siyuan; Su, Jun-Han; Zhang, Feng; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The spatial organization and dynamics of chromatin play important roles in essential biological functions. However, direct visualization of endogenous genomic loci in living cells has proven to be laborious until the recent development of CRISPR-Cas9-based chromatin labeling methods. These methods rely on the recognition of specific DNA sequences by CRISPR single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) and fluorescent–protein-fused catalytically inactive Cas9 to label specific chromatin loci in cells. Previously, multicolor chromatin labeling has been achieved using orthogonal Cas9 proteins from different bacterial species fused to different fluorescent proteins. Here we report the development of an alternative two-color CRISPR labeling method using only the well-characterized Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9, by incorporating MS2 or PP7 RNA aptamers into the sgRNA. The MS2 or PP7 aptamers then recruit the corresponding MS2 or PP7 coat proteins fused with different fluorescent proteins to the target genomic loci. Here we demonstrate specific and orthogonal two-color labeling of repetitive sequences in living human cells using this method. By attaching the MS2 or PP7 aptamers to different locations on the sgRNA, we found that extending the tetraloop and stem loop 2 of the sgRNA with MS2 or PP7 aptamers enhances the signal-to-background ratio of chromatin imaging. PMID:27229896

  9. Prediction of hydrogen and carbon chemical shifts from RNA using database mining and support vector regression

    The Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB) contains NMR chemical shift depositions for over 200 RNAs and RNA-containing complexes. We have analyzed the 1H NMR and 13C chemical shifts reported for non-exchangeable protons of 187 of these RNAs. Software was developed that downloads BMRB datasets and corresponding PDB structure files, and then generates residue-specific attributes based on the calculated secondary structure. Attributes represent properties present in each sequential stretch of five adjacent residues and include variables such as nucleotide type, base-pair presence and type, and tetraloop types. Attributes and 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the central nucleotide are then used as input to train a predictive model using support vector regression. These models can then be used to predict shifts for new sequences. The new software tools, available as stand-alone scripts or integrated into the NMR visualization and analysis program NMRViewJ, should facilitate NMR assignment and/or validation of RNA 1H and 13C chemical shifts. In addition, our findings enabled the re-calibration a ring-current shift model using published NMR chemical shifts and high-resolution X-ray structural data as guides

  10. Prediction of hydrogen and carbon chemical shifts from RNA using database mining and support vector regression.

    Brown, Joshua D; Summers, Michael F; Johnson, Bruce A

    2015-09-01

    The Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB) contains NMR chemical shift depositions for over 200 RNAs and RNA-containing complexes. We have analyzed the (1)H NMR and (13)C chemical shifts reported for non-exchangeable protons of 187 of these RNAs. Software was developed that downloads BMRB datasets and corresponding PDB structure files, and then generates residue-specific attributes based on the calculated secondary structure. Attributes represent properties present in each sequential stretch of five adjacent residues and include variables such as nucleotide type, base-pair presence and type, and tetraloop types. Attributes and (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts of the central nucleotide are then used as input to train a predictive model using support vector regression. These models can then be used to predict shifts for new sequences. The new software tools, available as stand-alone scripts or integrated into the NMR visualization and analysis program NMRViewJ, should facilitate NMR assignment and/or validation of RNA (1)H and (13)C chemical shifts. In addition, our findings enabled the re-calibration a ring-current shift model using published NMR chemical shifts and high-resolution X-ray structural data as guides. PMID:26141454

  11. Prediction of hydrogen and carbon chemical shifts from RNA using database mining and support vector regression

    Brown, Joshua D.; Summers, Michael F. [University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Johnson, Bruce A., E-mail: bruce.johnson@asrc.cuny.edu [University of Maryland Baltimore County, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB) contains NMR chemical shift depositions for over 200 RNAs and RNA-containing complexes. We have analyzed the {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 13}C chemical shifts reported for non-exchangeable protons of 187 of these RNAs. Software was developed that downloads BMRB datasets and corresponding PDB structure files, and then generates residue-specific attributes based on the calculated secondary structure. Attributes represent properties present in each sequential stretch of five adjacent residues and include variables such as nucleotide type, base-pair presence and type, and tetraloop types. Attributes and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts of the central nucleotide are then used as input to train a predictive model using support vector regression. These models can then be used to predict shifts for new sequences. The new software tools, available as stand-alone scripts or integrated into the NMR visualization and analysis program NMRViewJ, should facilitate NMR assignment and/or validation of RNA {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shifts. In addition, our findings enabled the re-calibration a ring-current shift model using published NMR chemical shifts and high-resolution X-ray structural data as guides.

  12. Detecting ricin: sensitive luminescent assay for ricin A-chain ribosome depurination kinetics.

    Sturm, Matthew B; Schramm, Vern L

    2009-04-15

    Ricin is a family member of the lethal ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP) found in plants. Ricin toxin A-chain (RTA) from castor beans catalyzes the hydrolytic depurination of a single base from a GAGA tetraloop of eukaryotic rRNA to release a single adenine from the sarcin-ricin loop (SRL). Protein synthesis is inhibited by loss of the elongation factor binding site resulting in cell death. We report a sensitive coupled assay for the measurement of adenine released from ribosomes or small stem-loop RNAs by RTA catalysis. Adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (APRTase) and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) convert adenine to ATP for quantitation by firefly luciferase. The resulting AMP is cycled to ATP to give sustained luminescence proportional to adenine concentration. Subpicomole adenine quantitation permits the action of RTA on eukaryotic ribosomes to be followed in continuous, high-throughput assays. Facile analysis of RIP catalytic activity will have applications in plant toxin detection, inhibitor screens, mechanistic analysis of depurinating agents on oligonucleotides and intact ribosomes, and in cancer immunochemotherapy. Kinetic analysis of the catalytic action of RTA on rabbit reticulocyte 80S ribosomes establishes a catalytic efficiency of 2.6 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), a diffusion limited reaction indicating catalytic perfection even with large reactants. PMID:19364139

  13. An RNA-aptamer-based two-color CRISPR labeling system.

    Wang, Siyuan; Su, Jun-Han; Zhang, Feng; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The spatial organization and dynamics of chromatin play important roles in essential biological functions. However, direct visualization of endogenous genomic loci in living cells has proven to be laborious until the recent development of CRISPR-Cas9-based chromatin labeling methods. These methods rely on the recognition of specific DNA sequences by CRISPR single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) and fluorescent-protein-fused catalytically inactive Cas9 to label specific chromatin loci in cells. Previously, multicolor chromatin labeling has been achieved using orthogonal Cas9 proteins from different bacterial species fused to different fluorescent proteins. Here we report the development of an alternative two-color CRISPR labeling method using only the well-characterized Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9, by incorporating MS2 or PP7 RNA aptamers into the sgRNA. The MS2 or PP7 aptamers then recruit the corresponding MS2 or PP7 coat proteins fused with different fluorescent proteins to the target genomic loci. Here we demonstrate specific and orthogonal two-color labeling of repetitive sequences in living human cells using this method. By attaching the MS2 or PP7 aptamers to different locations on the sgRNA, we found that extending the tetraloop and stem loop 2 of the sgRNA with MS2 or PP7 aptamers enhances the signal-to-background ratio of chromatin imaging. PMID:27229896

  14. Defining functional groups, core structural features and inter-domain tertiary contacts essential for group II intron self-splicing: a NAIM analysis.

    Boudvillain, M; Pyle, A M

    1998-12-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing RNA molecules that are of considerable interest as ribozymes, mobile genetic elements and examples of folded RNA. Although these introns are among the most common ribozymes, little is known about the chemical and structural determinants for their reactivity. By using nucleotide analog interference mapping (NAIM), it has been possible to identify the nucleotide functional groups (Rp phosphoryls, 2'-hydroxyls, guanosine exocyclic amines, adenosine N7 and N6) that are most important for composing the catalytic core of the intron. The majority of interference effects occur in clusters located within the two catalytically essential Domains 1 and 5 (D1 and D5). Collectively, the NAIM results indicate that key tetraloop-receptor interactions display a specific chemical signature, that the epsilon-epsilon' interaction includes an elaborate array of additional features and that one of the most important core structures is an uncharacterized three-way junction in D1. By combining NAIM with site-directed mutagenesis, a new tertiary interaction, kappa-kappa', was identified between this region and the most catalytically important section of D5, adjacent to the AGC triad in stem 1. Together with the known zeta-zeta' interaction, kappa-kappa' anchors D5 firmly into the D1 scaffold, thereby presenting chemically essential D5 functionalities for participation in catalysis. PMID:9843513

  15. A temperature-jump NMR probe setup using rf heating optimized for the analysis of temperature-induced biomacromolecular kinetic processes.

    Rinnenthal, Jörg; Wagner, Dominic; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Krahn, Alexander; Engelke, Frank; Schwalbe, Harald

    2015-02-01

    A novel temperature jump (T-jump) probe operational at B(0) fields of 600 MHz (14.1 Tesla) with an integrated cage radio-frequency (rf) coil for rapid (coil" designed for generating rf-electric fields of 190-220 MHz across a lossy dielectric sample and an outer two coil assembly for (1)H-, (2)H- and (15)N-nuclei. High B(0) field homogeneities (0.7 Hz at 600 MHz) are combined with high heating rates (20-25 K/s) and only small temperature gradients (coil is under control of a high power rf-amplifier within the NMR console and can therefore easily be accessed by the pulse programmer. Furthermore, implementation of a real-time setup including synchronization of the NMR spectrometer's air flow heater with the rf-heater used to maintain the temperature of the sample is described. Finally, the applicability of the real-time T-jump setup for the investigation of biomolecular kinetic processes in the second-to-minute timescale is demonstrated for samples of a model 14mer DNA hairpin and a (15)N-selectively labeled 40nt hsp17-RNA thermometer. PMID:25616187

  16. Liquid crystal ordering of DNA and RNA oligomers with partially overlapping sequences

    We have recently shown that solutions of very short double-stranded B-DNA and A-RNA, down to six base pairs in length, can self-organize into chiral nematic and columnar liquid crystal (LC) phases. These observations were made on fully complementary sequences forming duplexes with blunt ends, where the LC ordering is due to base stacking forces promoting end-to-end aggregation of duplexes into living-polymer-type structures. Here we report LC formation in solutions of DNA and RNA 14mers forming double helices having single-stranded dangling ends that are 'sticky', i.e., mutually complementary with similar ends on other duplexes. This finding widens the conditions for spontaneous long range ordering in oligomeric nucleic acids, thus strengthening the notion that nucleic acids have remarkable self-assembly capability. Quantitative analysis of the phase diagram enables the extraction, within a nearest-neighbor interaction approximation, of the free energy associated with the pairing and stacking of nucleobases.

  17. A temperature-jump NMR probe setup using rf heating optimized for the analysis of temperature-induced biomacromolecular kinetic processes

    Rinnenthal, Jörg; Wagner, Dominic; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Krahn, Alexander; Engelke, Frank; Schwalbe, Harald

    2015-02-01

    A novel temperature jump (T-jump) probe operational at B0 fields of 600 MHz (14.1 Tesla) with an integrated cage radio-frequency (rf) coil for rapid (coil" designed for generating rf-electric fields of 190-220 MHz across a lossy dielectric sample and an outer two coil assembly for 1H-, 2H- and 15N-nuclei. High B0 field homogeneities (0.7 Hz at 600 MHz) are combined with high heating rates (20-25 K/s) and only small temperature gradients (coil is under control of a high power rf-amplifier within the NMR console and can therefore easily be accessed by the pulse programmer. Furthermore, implementation of a real-time setup including synchronization of the NMR spectrometer's air flow heater with the rf-heater used to maintain the temperature of the sample is described. Finally, the applicability of the real-time T-jump setup for the investigation of biomolecular kinetic processes in the second-to-minute timescale is demonstrated for samples of a model 14mer DNA hairpin and a 15N-selectively labeled 40nt hsp17-RNA thermometer.

  18. Modelling transcriptional interference and DNA looping in gene regulation.

    Dodd, Ian B; Shearwin, Keith E; Sneppen, Kim

    2007-06-22

    We describe a hybrid statistical mechanical and dynamical approach for modelling the formation of closed, open and elongating complexes of RNA polymerase, the interactions of these polymerases to produce transcriptional interference, and the regulation of these processes by a DNA-binding and DNA-looping regulatory protein. As a model system, we have used bacteriophage 186, for which genetic, biochemical and structural studies have suggested that the CI repressor binds as a 14-mer to form alternative DNA-looped complexes, and activates lysogenic transcription indirectly by relieving transcriptional interference caused by the convergent lytic promoter. The modelling showed that the original mechanisms proposed to explain this relief of transcriptional interference are not consistent with the available in vivo reporter data. However, a good fit to the reporter data was given by a revised model that incorporates a novel predicted regulatory mechanism: that RNA polymerase bound at the lysogenic promoter protects itself from transcriptional interference by recruiting CI to the lytic promoter. This mechanism and various estimates of in vivo biochemical parameters for the 186 CI system should be testable. Our results demonstrate the power of mathematical modelling for the extraction of detailed biochemical information from in vivo data. PMID:17498740

  19. Quantitative analysis of the ion-dependent folding stability of DNA triplexes

    Chen, Gengsheng; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2011-12-01

    A DNA triplex is formed through binding of a third strand to the major groove of a duplex. Due to the high charge density of a DNA triplex, metal ions are critical for its stability. We recently developed the tightly bound ion (TBI) model for ion-nucleic acids interactions. The model accounts for the potential correlation and fluctuations of the ion distribution. We now apply the TBI model to analyze the ion dependence of the thermodynamic stability for DNA triplexes. We focus on two experimentally studied systems: a 24-base DNA triplex and a pair of interacting 14-base triplexes. Our theoretical calculations for the number of bound ions indicate that the TBI model provides improved predictions for the number of bound ions than the classical Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. The improvement is more significant for a triplex, which has a higher charge density than a duplex. This is possibly due to the higher ion concentration around the triplex and hence a stronger ion correlation effect for a triplex. In addition, our analysis for the free energy landscape for a pair of 14-mer triplexes immersed in an ionic solution shows that divalent ions could induce an attractive force between the triplexes. Furthermore, we investigate how the protonated cytosines in the triplexes affect the stability of the triplex helices.

  20. Quantitative analysis of the ion-dependent folding stability of DNA triplexes

    A DNA triplex is formed through binding of a third strand to the major groove of a duplex. Due to the high charge density of a DNA triplex, metal ions are critical for its stability. We recently developed the tightly bound ion (TBI) model for ion–nucleic acids interactions. The model accounts for the potential correlation and fluctuations of the ion distribution. We now apply the TBI model to analyze the ion dependence of the thermodynamic stability for DNA triplexes. We focus on two experimentally studied systems: a 24-base DNA triplex and a pair of interacting 14-base triplexes. Our theoretical calculations for the number of bound ions indicate that the TBI model provides improved predictions for the number of bound ions than the classical Poisson–Boltzmann (PB) equation. The improvement is more significant for a triplex, which has a higher charge density than a duplex. This is possibly due to the higher ion concentration around the triplex and hence a stronger ion correlation effect for a triplex. In addition, our analysis for the free energy landscape for a pair of 14-mer triplexes immersed in an ionic solution shows that divalent ions could induce an attractive force between the triplexes. Furthermore, we investigate how the protonated cytosines in the triplexes affect the stability of the triplex helices

  1. Cytosine methylation does not affect binding of transcription factor Sp1

    DNA methylation may be a component of a multilevel control mechanism that regulates eukaryotic gene expression. The authors used synthetic oligonucleotides to investigate the effect of cytosine methylation on the binding of the transcription factor Sp1 to its target sequence (a G+C-rich sequence known as a GC box). Concatemers of double-stranded 14-mers containing a GC box successfully competed with the human metallothionein IIA promoter for binding to Sp1 in DNase I protection experiments. The presence of 5-methylcytosine in the CpG sequence of the GC box did not influence Sp1 binding. The result was confirmed using double-stranded 20-mers containing 16 base pairs of complementary sequence. Electrophoretic gel retardation analysis of annealed 28-mers containing a GC box incubated with an Sp1-containing HeLa cell nuclear extract demonstrated the formation of DNA-protein complexes; formation of these complexes was not inhibited when an oligomer without a GC box was used as a competitor. Once again, the presence of a 5-methylcytosine residue in the GC box did not influence the binding of the protein to DNA. The results therefore preclude a direct effect of cytosine methylation on Sp1-DNA interactions

  2. Determination of site selectivity of different carcinogens for preferential mutational hot spots in oligonucleotide fragments by ion-pair reversed-phase nano liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Sharma, Vaneet K; Xiong, Wennan; Glick, James; Vouros, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Ion-pair reversed-phase nano liquid chromatography coupled with nanospray ion trap mass spectrometry was used to investigate site selectivity of the known carcinogens N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene, N-hydroxy-4-aminobiphenyl and (+/-)-anti-benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide with the synthetic double-strand 14-mer long oligonucleotide fragment of the p53 gene containing two mutational hot-spot codons (5'-P-ACC155 CGC156 GTC157 CGC158 GC/5'-GCG CGG ACG CGG GT). The investigation was performed using a monolithic polystyrene divinylbenzene capillary column and triethylammonium bicarbonate as an ion-pair reagent. The exact location of the carcinogen on the modified oligonucleotide backbone was determined using characteristic collision-induced dissociation fragmentation patterns obtained under negative-ion mode ionization. In all these cases, the adducted, isomeric oligonucleotides formed were chromatographically resolved and structural identification was performed without any prior deoxyribonucleic acid cleavage or hydrolysis. The knowledge of the site specificity of a carcinogen, especially at purported mutational hot spots, is of paramount importance (1) in establishing the identity of biomarkers for an early risk assessment of the formed DNA adducts, (2) developing repair mechanisms for the formed carcinogen adducted DNA, and (3) understanding the nature of the covalent bond formed and mapping the frequency of the adduction process. PMID:24881456

  3. Expanding the amino acid repertoire of ribosomal polypeptide synthesis via the artificial division of codon boxes

    Iwane, Yoshihiko; Hitomi, Azusa; Murakami, Hiroshi; Katoh, Takayuki; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki

    2016-04-01

    In ribosomal polypeptide synthesis the library of amino acid building blocks is limited by the manner in which codons are used. Of the proteinogenic amino acids, 18 are coded for by multiple codons and therefore many of the 61 sense codons can be considered redundant. Here we report a method to reduce the redundancy of codons by artificially dividing codon boxes to create vacant codons that can then be reassigned to non-proteinogenic amino acids and thereby expand the library of genetically encoded amino acids. To achieve this, we reconstituted a cell-free translation system with 32 in vitro transcripts of transfer RNASNN (tRNASNN) (S = G or C), assigning the initiator and 20 elongator amino acids. Reassignment of three redundant codons was achieved by replacing redundant tRNASNNs with tRNASNNs pre-charged with non-proteinogenic amino acids. As a demonstration, we expressed a 32-mer linear peptide that consists of 20 proteinogenic and three non-proteinogenic amino acids, and a 14-mer macrocyclic peptide that contains more than four non-proteinogenic amino acids.

  4. Processing of nuclear viroids in vivo: an interplay between RNA conformations.

    María-Eugenia Gas

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Replication of viroids, small non-protein-coding plant pathogenic RNAs, entails reiterative transcription of their incoming single-stranded circular genomes, to which the (+ polarity is arbitrarily assigned, cleavage of the oligomeric strands of one or both polarities to unit-length, and ligation to circular RNAs. While cleavage in chloroplastic viroids (family Avsunviroidae is mediated by hammerhead ribozymes, where and how cleavage of oligomeric (+ RNAs of nuclear viroids (family Pospiviroidae occurs in vivo remains controversial. Previous in vitro data indicated that a hairpin capped by a GAAA tetraloop is the RNA motif directing cleavage and a loop E motif ligation. Here we have re-examined this question in vivo, taking advantage of earlier findings showing that dimeric viroid (+ RNAs of the family Pospiviroidae transgenically expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana are processed correctly. Using this methodology, we have mapped the processing site of three members of this family at equivalent positions of the hairpin I/double-stranded structure that the upper strand and flanking nucleotides of the central conserved region (CCR can form. More specifically, from the effects of 16 mutations on Citrus exocortis viroid expressed transgenically in A. thaliana, we conclude that the substrate for in vivo cleavage is the conserved double-stranded structure, with hairpin I potentially facilitating the adoption of this structure, whereas ligation is determined by loop E and flanking nucleotides of the two CCR strands. These results have deep implications on the underlying mechanism of both processing reactions, which are most likely catalyzed by enzymes different from those generally assumed: cleavage by a member of the RNase III family, and ligation by an RNA ligase distinct from the only one characterized so far in plants, thus predicting the existence of at least a second plant RNA ligase.

  5. Deep-sequencing of the peach latent mosaic viroid reveals new aspects of population heterogeneity.

    Jean-Pierre Sehi Glouzon

    Full Text Available Viroids are small circular single-stranded infectious RNAs characterized by a relatively high mutation level. Knowledge of their sequence heterogeneity remains largely elusive and previous studies, using Sanger sequencing, were based on a limited number of sequences. In an attempt to address sequence heterogeneity from a population dynamics perspective, a GF305-indicator peach tree was infected with a single variant of the Avsunviroidae family member Peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd. Six months post-inoculation, full-length circular conformers of PLMVd were isolated and deep-sequenced. We devised an original approach to the bioinformatics refinement of our sequence libraries involving important phenotypic data, based on the systematic analysis of hammerhead self-cleavage activity. Two distinct libraries yielded a total of 3,939 different PLMVd variants. Sequence variants exhibiting up to ∼17% of mutations relative to the inoculated viroid were retrieved, clearly illustrating the high level of divergence dynamics within a unique population. While we initially assumed that most positions of the viroid sequence would mutate, we were surprised to discover that ∼50% of positions remained perfectly conserved, including several small stretches as well as a small motif reminiscent of a GNRA tetraloop which are the result of various selective pressures. Using a hierarchical clustering algorithm, the different variants harvested were subdivided into 7 clusters. We found that most sequences contained an average of 4.6 to 6.4 mutations compared to the variant used to initially inoculate the plant. Interestingly, it was possible to reconstitute and compare the sequence evolution of each of these clusters. In doing so, we identified several key mutations. This study provides a reliable pipeline for the treatment of viroid deep-sequencing. It also sheds new light on the extent of sequence variation that a viroid population can sustain, and which may give

  6. Deep-sequencing of the peach latent mosaic viroid reveals new aspects of population heterogeneity.

    Glouzon, Jean-Pierre Sehi; Bolduc, François; Wang, Shengrui; Najmanovich, Rafael J; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Viroids are small circular single-stranded infectious RNAs characterized by a relatively high mutation level. Knowledge of their sequence heterogeneity remains largely elusive and previous studies, using Sanger sequencing, were based on a limited number of sequences. In an attempt to address sequence heterogeneity from a population dynamics perspective, a GF305-indicator peach tree was infected with a single variant of the Avsunviroidae family member Peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd). Six months post-inoculation, full-length circular conformers of PLMVd were isolated and deep-sequenced. We devised an original approach to the bioinformatics refinement of our sequence libraries involving important phenotypic data, based on the systematic analysis of hammerhead self-cleavage activity. Two distinct libraries yielded a total of 3,939 different PLMVd variants. Sequence variants exhibiting up to ∼17% of mutations relative to the inoculated viroid were retrieved, clearly illustrating the high level of divergence dynamics within a unique population. While we initially assumed that most positions of the viroid sequence would mutate, we were surprised to discover that ∼50% of positions remained perfectly conserved, including several small stretches as well as a small motif reminiscent of a GNRA tetraloop which are the result of various selective pressures. Using a hierarchical clustering algorithm, the different variants harvested were subdivided into 7 clusters. We found that most sequences contained an average of 4.6 to 6.4 mutations compared to the variant used to initially inoculate the plant. Interestingly, it was possible to reconstitute and compare the sequence evolution of each of these clusters. In doing so, we identified several key mutations. This study provides a reliable pipeline for the treatment of viroid deep-sequencing. It also sheds new light on the extent of sequence variation that a viroid population can sustain, and which may give rise to a

  7. Assembly and Structure of alpha-helical Peptide Films on Hydrophobic Fluorocarbon Surfaces

    Weidner, T.; Samual, N; McCrea, K; Gamble, L; Ward, R; Castner, D

    2010-01-01

    The structure, orientation, and formation of amphiphilic {alpha}-helix model peptide films on fluorocarbon surfaces has been monitored with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The {alpha}-helix peptide is a 14-mer of hydrophilic lysine and hydrophobic leucine residues with a hydrophobic periodicity of 3.5. This periodicity yields a rigid amphiphilic peptide with leucine and lysine side chains located on opposite sides. XPS composition analysis confirms the formation of a peptide film that covers about 75% of the surface. NEXAFS data are consistent with chemically intact adsorption of the peptides. A weak linear dichroism of the amide {pi}* is likely due to the broad distribution of amide bond orientations inherent to the {alpha}-helical secondary structure. SFG spectra exhibit strong peaks near 2865 and 2935 cm{sup -1} related to aligned leucine side chains interacting with the hydrophobic surface. Water modes near 3200 and 3400 cm{sup -1} indicate ordering of water molecules in the adsorbed-peptide fluorocarbon surface interfacial region. Amide I peaks observed near 1655 cm{sup -1} confirm that the secondary structure is preserved in the adsorbed peptide. A kinetic study of the film formation process using XPS and SFG showed rapid adsorption of the peptides followed by a longer assembly process. Peptide SFG spectra taken at the air-buffer interface showed features related to well-ordered peptide films. Moving samples through the buffer surface led to the transfer of ordered peptide films onto the substrates.

  8. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the DNA-binding domain of AdpA, the central transcription factor in the A-factor regulatory cascade in the filamentous bacterium Streptomyces griseus, in complex with a duplex DNA

    The DNA-binding domain of AdpA, the central transcription factor in the A-factor regulatory cascade in the filamentous bacterium S. griseus, was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized in complex with a duplex DNA by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The best crystal diffracted X-rays to 2.8 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2221. Streptomyces griseus AdpA is the central transcription factor in the A-factor regulatory cascade and activates a number of genes that are required for both secondary metabolism and morphological differentiation, leading to the onset of streptomycin biosynthesis as well as aerial mycelium formation and sporulation. The DNA-binding domain of AdpA consists of two helix–turn–helix DNA-binding motifs and shows low nucleotide-sequence specificity. To reveal the molecular basis of the low nucleotide-sequence specificity, an attempt was made to obtain cocrystals of the DNA-binding domain of AdpA and several kinds of duplex DNA. The best diffracting crystal was obtained using a 14-mer duplex DNA with two-nucleotide overhangs at the 5′-ends. The crystal diffracted X-rays to 2.8 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 76.86, b = 100.96, c = 101.25 Å. The Matthews coefficient (VM = 3.71 Å3 Da−1) indicated that the crystal was most likely to contain one DNA-binding domain of AdpA and one duplex DNA in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 66.8%

  9. Targeting membrane heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) on tumors by cmHsp70.1 antibody

    Stangl, Stefan; Gehrmann, Mathias; Riegger, Julia; Kuhs, Kristin; Riederer, Isabelle; Sievert, Wolfgang; Hube, Kathrin; Mocikat, Ralph; Dressel, Ralf; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Pockley, Alan G.; Friedrich, Lars; Vigh, Laszlo; Skerra, Arne; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Immunization of mice with a 14-mer peptide TKDNNLLGRFELSG, termed “TKD,” comprising amino acids 450–461 (aa450–461) in the C terminus of inducible Hsp70, resulted in the generation of an IgG1 mouse mAb cmHsp70.1. The epitope recognized by cmHsp70.1 mAb, which has been confirmed to be located in the TKD sequence by SPOT analysis, is frequently detectable on the cell surface of human and mouse tumors, but not on isogenic cells and normal tissues, and membrane Hsp70 might thus serve as a tumor-specific target structure. As shown for human tumors, Hsp70 is associated with cholesterol-rich microdomains in the plasma membrane of mouse tumors. Herein, we show that the cmHsp70.1 mAb can selectively induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of membrane Hsp70+ mouse tumor cells by unstimulated mouse spleen cells. Tumor killing could be further enhanced by activating the effector cells with TKD and IL-2. Three consecutive injections of the cmHsp70.1 mAb into mice bearing CT26 tumors significantly inhibited tumor growth and enhanced the overall survival. These effects were associated with infiltrations of NK cells, macrophages, and granulocytes. The Hsp70 specificity of the ADCC response was confirmed by preventing the antitumor response in tumor-bearing mice by coinjecting the cognate TKD peptide with the cmHsp70.1 mAb, and by blocking the binding of cmHsp70.1 mAb to CT26 tumor cells using either TKD peptide or the C-terminal substrate-binding domain of Hsp70. PMID:21187371

  10. HLA-B27, but not HLA-B7, immunodominance to influenza is ERAP dependent.

    Akram, Ali; Lin, Aifeng; Gracey, Eric; Streutker, Catherine J; Inman, Robert D

    2014-06-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum-associated aminopeptidase-1 (ERAP1) plays a critical role in the processing of peptides prior to binding to MHC class I molecules. In this article, we show for the first time, to our knowledge, that the HLA-B27 immunodominant influenza nucleoprotein (NP) 383-391 epitope is made as an N-terminally extended 14-mer before it is trimmed by ERAP. In the absence of ERAP, there is a significant reduction in the CTL response to the B27/NP383-391 epitope in influenza A (flu)-infected B27/ERAP(-/-) mice. With the use of tetramer staining, the number of naive CD8(+) T cells expressing TCR Vβ8.1 in B27/ERAP(-/-) transgenic mice is significantly lower than that seen in B27/ERAP(+/+) mice. HLA-B27 surface expression in naive and flu-infected B27/ERAP(-/-) mice is also lower than the expression seen for the same allele in naive and flu-infected B27/ERAP(+/+) mice. In contrast, surface expression of HLA-B7 was unaffected by the absence of ERAP in B7/ERAP(-/-) transgenic mice. The B7-restricted NP418-426 CTL response in flu-infected B7/ERAP(-/-) and B7/ERAP(+/+) mice was also similar. These results provide, to our knowledge, the first in vivo demonstration of ERAP functionally influencing host immune response in an HLA allele-specific manner. This principle has relevance to diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis, in which HLA-B27 and ERAP jointly contribute to disease predisposition. PMID:24835397

  11. Molecular recognition of DNA by ligands: Roughness and complexity of the free energy profile

    Zheng, Wenwei; Vargiu, Attilio Vittorio; Rohrdanz, Mary A.; Carloni, Paolo; Clementi, Cecilia

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanism by which probes and chemotherapeutic agents bind to nucleic acids is a fundamental issue in modern drug design. From a computational perspective, valuable insights are gained by the estimation of free energy landscapes as a function of some collective variables (CVs), which are associated with the molecular recognition event. Unfortunately the choice of CVs is highly non-trivial because of DNA's high flexibility and the presence of multiple association-dissociation events at different locations and/or sliding within the grooves. Here we have applied a modified version of Locally-Scaled Diffusion Map (LSDMap), a nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique for decoupling multiple-timescale dynamics in macromolecular systems, to a metadynamics-based free energy landscape calculated using a set of intuitive CVs. We investigated the binding of the organic drug anthramycin to a DNA 14-mer duplex. By performing an extensive set of metadynamics simulations, we observed sliding of anthramycin along the full-length DNA minor groove, as well as several detachments from multiple sites, including the one identified by X-ray crystallography. As in the case of equilibrium processes, the LSDMap analysis is able to extract the most relevant collective motions, which are associated with the slow processes within the system, i.e., ligand diffusion along the minor groove and dissociation from it. Thus, LSDMap in combination with metadynamics (and possibly every equivalent method) emerges as a powerful method to describe the energetics of ligand binding to DNA without resorting to intuitive ad hoc reaction coordinates.

  12. Predicted Coverage and Immuno-Safety of a Recombinant C-Repeat Region Based Streptococcus pyogenes Vaccine Candidate.

    McNeilly, Celia; Cosh, Samantha; Vu, Therese; Nichols, Jemma; Henningham, Anna; Hofmann, Andreas; Fane, Anne; Smeesters, Pierre R; Rush, Catherine M; Hafner, Louise M; Ketheesan, Natkuman; Sriprakash, Kadaba S; McMillan, David J

    2016-01-01

    The C-terminal region of the M-protein of Streptococcus pyogenes is a major target for vaccine development. The major feature is the C-repeat region, consisting of 35-42 amino acid repeat units that display high but not perfect identity. SV1 is a S. pyogenes vaccine candidate that incorporates five 14mer amino acid sequences (called J14i variants) from differing C-repeat units in a single recombinant construct. Here we show that the J14i variants chosen for inclusion in SV1 are the most common variants in a dataset of 176 unique M-proteins. Murine antibodies raised against SV1 were shown to bind to each of the J14i variants present in SV1, as well as variants not present in the vaccine. Antibodies raised to the individual J14i variants were also shown to bind to multiple but different combinations of J14i variants, supporting the underlying rationale for the design of SV1. A Lewis Rat Model of valvulitis was then used to assess the capacity of SV1 to induce deleterious immune response associated with rheumatic heart disease. In this model, both SV1 and the M5 positive control protein were immunogenic. Neither of these antibodies were cross-reactive with cardiac myosin or collagen. Splenic T cells from SV1/CFA and SV1/alum immunized rats did not proliferate in response to cardiac myosin or collagen. Subsequent histological examination of heart tissue showed that 4 of 5 mice from the M5/CFA group had valvulitis and inflammatory cell infiltration into valvular tissue, whereas mice immunised with SV1/CFA, SV1/alum showed no sign of valvulitis. These results suggest that SV1 is a safe vaccine candidate that will elicit antibodies that recognise the vast majority of circulating GAS M-types. PMID:27310707

  13. Evidence of Liquid Crystal-Assisted Abiotic Ligation of Nucleic Acids

    Fraccia, Tommaso P.; Zanchetta, Giuliano; Rimoldi, Valeria; Clark, Noel A.; Bellini, Tommaso

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of early life must have been marked by the appearance in the prebiotic era of complex molecular structures and systems, motivating the investigation of conditions that could not only facilitate appropriate chemical synthesis, but also provide the mechanisms of molecular selection and structural templating necessary to pilot the complexification toward specific molecular patterns. We recently proposed and demonstrated that these functions could be afforded by the spontaneous ordering of ultrashort nucleic acids oligomers into Liquid Crystal (LC) phases. In such supramolecular assemblies, duplex-forming oligomers are held in average end-to-end contact to form chemically discontinuous but physically continuous double helices. Using blunt ended duplexes, we found that LC formation could both provide molecular selection mechanisms and boost inter-oligomer ligation. This paper provides an essential extension to this notion by investigating the catalytic effects of LC ordering in duplexes with mutually interacting overhangs. Specifically, we studied the influence of LC ordering of 5'-hydroxy-3'-phosphate partially self-complementary DNA 14mers with 3'-CG sticky-ends, on the efficiency of non-enzymatic ligation reaction induced by water-soluble carbodiimide EDC as condensing agent. We investigated the ligation products in mixtures of DNA with poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) at three PEG concentrations at which the system phase separates creating DNA-rich droplets that organize into isotropic, nematic LC and columnar LC phases. We observe remarkable LC-enhanced chain lengthening, and we demonstrate that such lengthening effectively promotes and stabilizes LC domains, providing the kernel of a positive feedback cycle by which LC ordering promotes elongation, in turn stabilizing the LC ordering.

  14. Cleavage of Model Substrates by Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 Reveals New Insights into Its Substrate Requirements.

    Mao, Guanzhong; Chen, Tien-Hao; Srivastava, Abhishek S; Kosek, David; Biswas, Pradip K; Gopalan, Venkat; Kirsebom, Leif A

    2016-01-01

    Two broad classes of RNase P trim the 5' leader of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs): ribonucleoprotein (RNP)- and proteinaceous (PRORP)-variants. These two RNase P types, which use different scaffolds for catalysis, reflect independent evolutionary paths. While the catalytic RNA-based RNP form is present in all three domains of life, the PRORP family is restricted to eukaryotes. To obtain insights on substrate recognition by PRORPs, we examined the 5' processing ability of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 (AtPRORP1) using a panel of pre-tRNASer variants and model hairpin-loop derivatives (pATSer type) that consist of the acceptor-T-stem stack and the T-/D-loop. Our data indicate the importance of the identity of N-1 (the residue immediately 5' to the cleavage site) and the N-1:N+73 base pair for cleavage rate and site selection of pre-tRNASer and pATSer. The nucleobase preferences that we observed mirror the frequency of occurrence in the complete suite of organellar pre-tRNAs in eight algae/plants that we analyzed. The importance of the T-/D-loop in pre-tRNASer for tight binding to AtPRORP1 is indicated by the 200-fold weaker binding of pATSer compared to pre-tRNASer, while the essentiality of the T-loop for cleavage is reflected by the near-complete loss of activity when a GAAA-tetraloop replaced the T-loop in pATSer. Substituting the 2'-OH at N-1 with 2'-H also resulted in no detectable cleavage, hinting at the possible role of this 2'-OH in coordinating Mg2+ ions critical for catalysis. Collectively, our results indicate similarities but also key differences in substrate recognition by the bacterial RNase P RNP and AtPRORP1: while both forms exploit the acceptor-T-stem stack and the elbow region in the pre-tRNA, the RNP form appears to require more recognition determinants for cleavage-site selection. PMID:27494328

  15. Cleavage of Model Substrates by Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 Reveals New Insights into Its Substrate Requirements

    Srivastava, Abhishek S.; Kosek, David; Biswas, Pradip K.; Gopalan, Venkat; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2016-01-01

    Two broad classes of RNase P trim the 5' leader of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs): ribonucleoprotein (RNP)- and proteinaceous (PRORP)-variants. These two RNase P types, which use different scaffolds for catalysis, reflect independent evolutionary paths. While the catalytic RNA-based RNP form is present in all three domains of life, the PRORP family is restricted to eukaryotes. To obtain insights on substrate recognition by PRORPs, we examined the 5' processing ability of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 (AtPRORP1) using a panel of pre-tRNASer variants and model hairpin-loop derivatives (pATSer type) that consist of the acceptor-T-stem stack and the T-/D-loop. Our data indicate the importance of the identity of N-1 (the residue immediately 5' to the cleavage site) and the N-1:N+73 base pair for cleavage rate and site selection of pre-tRNASer and pATSer. The nucleobase preferences that we observed mirror the frequency of occurrence in the complete suite of organellar pre-tRNAs in eight algae/plants that we analyzed. The importance of the T-/D-loop in pre-tRNASer for tight binding to AtPRORP1 is indicated by the 200-fold weaker binding of pATSer compared to pre-tRNASer, while the essentiality of the T-loop for cleavage is reflected by the near-complete loss of activity when a GAAA-tetraloop replaced the T-loop in pATSer. Substituting the 2'-OH at N-1 with 2'-H also resulted in no detectable cleavage, hinting at the possible role of this 2'-OH in coordinating Mg2+ ions critical for catalysis. Collectively, our results indicate similarities but also key differences in substrate recognition by the bacterial RNase P RNP and AtPRORP1: while both forms exploit the acceptor-T-stem stack and the elbow region in the pre-tRNA, the RNP form appears to require more recognition determinants for cleavage-site selection. PMID:27494328

  16. Probing the Orientation and Conformation of alpha-Helix and beta-Strand Model Peptides on Self-Assembled Monolayers Using Sum Frequency Generation and NEXAFS Spectroscopy

    Weidner, T.; Apte, J; Gamble, L; Castner, D

    2010-01-01

    The structure and orientation of amphiphilic {alpha}-helix and {beta}-strand model peptide films on self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been studied with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The {alpha}-helix peptide is a 14-mer, and the {beta}-strand is a 15-mer of hydrophilic lysine and hydrophobic leucine residues with hydrophobic periodicities of 3.5 and 2, respectively. These periodicities result in the leucine side chains located on one side of the peptides and the lysine side chains on the other side. The SAMs were prepared from the assembly of either carboxylic acid- or methyl-terminated alkyl thiols onto gold surfaces. For SFG studies, the deuterated analog of the methyl SAM was used. SFG vibrational spectra in the C-H region of air-dried peptides films on both SAMs exhibit strong peaks near 2965, 2940, and 2875 cm{sup -1} related to ordered leucine side chains. The orientation of the leucine side chains was determined from the phase of these features relative to the nonresonant gold background. The relative phase for both the {alpha}-helix and {beta}-strand peptides showed that the leucine side chains were oriented away from the carboxylic acid SAM surface and oriented toward the methyl SAM surface. Amide I peaks observed near 1656 cm{sup -1} for the {alpha}-helix peptide confirm that the secondary structure is preserved on both SAMs. Strong linear dichroism related to the amide {pi}* orbital at 400.8 eV was observed in the nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS spectra for the adsorbed {beta}-strand peptides, suggesting that the peptide backbones are oriented parallel to the SAM surface with the side chains pointing toward or away from the interface. For the {alpha}-helix the dichroism of the amide {pi}* is significantly weaker, probably because of the broad distribution of amide bond orientations in the {alpha}-helix secondary structure.