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Sample records for 14-crystal germanium array

  1. GERmanium detector array, GERDA

    The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, is designed to search for 'neutrinoless double beta decay' (0ν2β) in 76Ge. The high-purity segmented Ge detectors will be directly submerged and operated in liquid N2 or Ar. The measurement of the half-life time of 0ν2β decay will provide information about the absolute neutrino mass scale and indirectly, the hierarchy. The design goal of GERDA is to reach a sensitivity of 0.2 eV on the effective Majorana neutrino mass (mββ). The GERDA experiment is located in hall A of the Grand Sasso national lab (LNGS) and the construction will start in 2006

  2. A Low Noise 64x64 Germanium Array for Far IR Astronomy Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develope a 64x64 far infrared germanium focal-plane array with the following key design features: 1- Four top-illuminated, 32x32 germanium sub-arrays...

  3. Performance of a compact multi-crystal high-purity germanium detector array for measuring coincident gamma-ray emissions

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,γ)15O⁎ reaction for several transition energies at an effective center-of-mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the granular nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within their uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance are presented

  4. Performance of a compact multi-crystal high-purity germanium detector array for measuring coincident gamma-ray emissions

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Stave, Sean C., E-mail: Sean.Stave@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Champagne, Arthur E.; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Glasgow, Brian D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2015-05-21

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the {sup 14}N(p,γ){sup 15}O{sup ⁎} reaction for several transition energies at an effective center-of-mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the granular nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within their uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance are presented.

  5. A Low Noise 64x64 Germanium Array for Far IR Astronomy Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to investigate the feasibility of developing a 64x64 far infrared germanium focal-plane array with the following key design features: 1- Four...

  6. A Silicon-Germanium Single Chip Receiver for S-band Phased Array Radars

    Heij, W. de; Boer, A. de; Hek, A.P. de; Vliet, F.E. van

    2011-01-01

    A Silicon-Germanium single chip receiver has been developed for S-band phased array radars with 2-D digital beamforming. The complete receiver chain from the S-band RF input up to the low-IF output has been integrated on a single SiGe chip. The only external components required to complete the recei

  7. Initial Component Testing for a Germanium Array Cryostat

    Keillor, Martin E.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fast, James E.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Seifert, Allen

    2009-06-01

    This report describes progress on the construction of two ultra-low-background cryostats that are part of the NA-22 funded “Radionuclide Laboratories” (RN Labs) project. Each cryostat will house seven high-purity germanium crystals (HPGe). These cryostats are being built from a limited set of materials that are known to have very low levels of radioactive impurities. The RN Labs instrument is designed to take advantage of low background performance, high detection efficiency, and γ-γ coincidence signatures to provide unprecedented gamma spectroscopy sensitivity. The project is focused on improving gamma analysis capabilities for nuclear detonation detection (NDD) applications. The instrument also has the potential for basic nuclear physics research. Section 1 provides the background for the project. Section 2 discusses germanium crystal acceptance testing. Design problems were found after the first delivery of new detectors from the vendor, Canberra Semiconductors. The first four crystals were returned for repair, resulting in a delay in crystal procurement. Section 3 provides an update on copper electroforming. In general, electroforming parts for RN Labs has proceeded smoothly, but there have been recent problems in electroforming three large copper parts necessary for the project. Section 4 describes the first round of testing for the instrument: anti-cosmic scintillator testing, electronics testing, and initial vacuum testing. Section 5 concludes with an overall description of the state of the project and challenges that remain.

  8. Development of silicon-germanium visible-near infrared arrays

    Zeller, John W.; Rouse, Caitlin; Efstathiadis, Harry; Haldar, Pradeep; Lewis, Jay S.; Dhar, Nibir K.; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal; Puri, Yash R.; Sood, Ashok K.

    2016-05-01

    Photodetectors based on germanium which do not require cooling and can provide good near-infrared (NIR) detection performance offer a low-cost alternative to conventional infrared sensors based on material systems such as InGaAs, InSb, and HgCdTe. As a result of the significant difference in thermal expansion coefficients between germanium and silicon, tensile strain incorporated into Ge epitaxial layers deposited on Si utilizing specialized growth processes can extend the operational range of detection to 1600 nm and longer wavelengths. We have fabricated Ge based PIN photodetectors on 300 mm diameter Si wafers to take advantage of high throughput, large-area complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. This device fabrication process involves low temperature epitaxial deposition of Ge to form a thin p+ (boron) Ge seed/buffer layer, and subsequent higher temperature deposition of a thicker Ge intrinsic layer. This is followed by selective ion implantation of phosphorus of various concentrations to form n+ Ge regions, deposition of a passivating oxide cap, and then top copper contacts to complete the PIN detector devices. Various techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) have been employed to characterize the material and structural properties of the epitaxially grown layers and fabricated detector devices, and these results are presented. The I-V response of the photodetector devices with and without illumination was also measured, for which the Ge based photodetectors consistently exhibited low dark currents of around ~1 nA at -1 V bias.

  9. The Constellation-X Focal Plane Microcalorimeter Array: An NTD-Germanium Solution

    Beeman, J.; Silver, E.; Bandler, S.; Schnopper, H.; Murray, S.; Madden, N.; Landis, D.; Haller, E. E.; Barbera, M.

    2001-01-01

    The hallmarks of Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) germanium cryogenic thermistors include high reliability, reproducibility, and long term stability of bulk carrier transport properties. Using micro-machined NTD Ge thermistors with integral 'flying' leads, we can now fabricate two-dimensional arrays that are built up from a series of stacked linear arrays. We believe that this modular approach of building, assembling, and perhaps replacing individual modules of detectors is essential to the successful fabrication and testing of large multi-element instruments. Details of construction are presented.

  10. The constellation-X focal plane microcalorimeter array: An NTD-germanium solution

    The hallmarks of Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) germanium cryogenic thermistors include high reliability, reproducibility, and long term stability of bulk carrier transport properties. Using micro-machined NTD Ge thermistors with integral 'flying' leads, we can now fabricate two-dimensional arrays that are built up from a series of stacked linear arrays. We believe that this modular approach of building, assembling, and perhaps replacing individual modules of detectors is essential to the successful fabrication and testing of large multi-element spectrometers. Details of construction are presented

  11. The GERmanium Detector Array (Gerda) for the search of neutrinoless ββ decays of 76Ge at LNGS

    This paper describes the proposed Gerda experiment, the GERmanium Detector Array for the search of neutrinoless ββ decays of 76Ge at LNGS. The goal of the Gerda project is to operate bare germanium diodes enriched in 76Ge in an (optional active) cryogenic fluid shield with a sensitivity for neutrinoless ββ decay of T1/2>2-bar 1026 years after an exposure of 100 kg -bar years

  12. Broadband absorptance enhancement of silicon nanowire arrays with germanium as the substrate

    Wang, Han; Xia, Xin-Lin

    2013-08-01

    A composite structure with silicon nanowire arrays on germanium substrate is proposed as a good candidate for highly efficient solar cells. The Bruggeman approximation considering anisotropic wave propagating in uniaxial media is employed to calculate the radiative properties. Meantime, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to verify for both normal and oblique incidence. It is found that the composite structure has superior absorption characteristics over thin Si film, particularly near the bandgap. With a thickness only of 4 μm, the composite structure improved the absorptance to above 0.6 across the whole wavelength band with the lattice constant of 100 nm, and the ultimate efficiency about 10% is higher than that of infinite bulk silicon, owing to the combined effects of suppressed reflection and high light trapping capability. To better understand the absorption enhancement process in the composite structure, the photogeneration profiles are provided by using FDTD method.

  13. First results of neutrinoless double beta decay search with the GERmanium Detector Array "GERDA"

    Janicskó Csáthy, József

    2014-06-01

    The study of neutrinoless double beta decay is the most powerful approach to the fundamental question if the neutrino is a Majorana particle, i.e. its own anti-particle. The observation of the lepton number violating neutrinoless double beta decay would establish the Majorana nature of the neutrino. Until now neutrinoless double beta decay was not observed. The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA is a double beta decay experiment located at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. GERDA operates bare Ge diodes enriched in 76Ge in liquid argon supplemented by a water shield. The exposure accumulated adds up to 21.6 kg· yr with a background level of 1.8 · 10-2 cts/(keV·kg·yr). The results of the Phase I of the experiment are presented and the preparation of the Phase II is briefly discussed.

  14. Segmented Monolithic Germanium Detector Arrays for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. Final Report

    The experimental results from the Phase I effort were extremely encouraging. During Phase I PHDs Co. made the first strides toward a new detector technology that could have great impact on synchrotron x-ray absorption (XAS) measurements, and x-ray detector technology in general. Detector hardware that allowed critical demonstration measurements of our technology was designed and fabricated. This new technology allows good charge collection from many pixels on a single side of a multi-element monolithic germanium planar detector. The detector technology provides 'dot-like' collection electrodes having very low capacitance. The detector technology appears to perform as anticipated in the Phase I proposal. In particular, the 7-pixel detector studied showed remarkable properties; making it an interesting example of detector physics. The technology is enabled by the use of amorphous germanium contact technology on germanium planar detectors. Because of the scalability associated with the fabrication of these technologies at PHDs Co., we anticipate being able to supply larger detector systems at significantly lower cost than systems made in the conventional manner.

  15. Status of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) in the search of neutrinoless ββ decays of 76Ge at LNGS

    The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) in the search for neutrinoless ββ decays of 76Ge at LNGS will operate bare germanium diodes enriched in 76Ge in an (optional active) cryogenic fluid shield to investigate neutrinoless ββ decay with a sensitivity of T1/2 > 2 x 1026 yr after an exposure of 100 kg yr. Recent progress includes the installation of the first underground infrastructures at Gran Sasso, the completion of the enrichment of 37.5 kg of germanium material for detector construction, prototyping of low-mass detector support and contacts, and front-end and DAQ electronics, as well as the preparation for construction of the cryogenic vessel and water tank

  16. Germanium Collimating micro-Channel Arrays For High Resolution, High Energy Confocal X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy

    Agyeman-Budu, David N; Coulthard, Ian; Gordon, Robert; Hallin, Emil; Woll, Arthur R

    2016-01-01

    Confocal x-ray fluorescence microscopy (CXRF) allows direct detection of x-ray fluorescence from a micron-scale 3D volume of an extended, unthinned sample. We have previously demonstrated the use of a novel collection optic, fabricated from silicon, that improves the spatial resolution of this approach by an order of magnitude over CXRF using polycapillaries. The optic, called a collimating channel array (CCA), consists of micron-scale, lithographically-fabricated arrays of collimating channels, all directed towards a single source position. Due to the limited absorbing power of silicon, the useful energy range of these optics was limited to fluorescence emission below about 10 keV. Here, we report fabrication of CCAs from germanium substrates, and demonstrate their practical use for CXRF up to 20 keV. Specifically we demonstrate a nearly energy-independent critical spatial resolution $d_R$ of 2.1$\\pm$0.17 \\um from 2-20 keV, as well as excellent background reduction compared to silicon-based CCAs throughout t...

  17. Large area germanium detector arrays for lung counting: what is the optimum number of detectors?

    Kramer, Gary H; Hauck, Barry M

    2007-01-01

    Using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) torso phantom to calibrate a lung counting system can lead to the conclusion that three large area (i.e. >70 mm diameter) Ge detectors will outperform a four-detector array and provide a lower MDA as a four-detector array of large area Ge detectors covers a significant portion of inactive tissue (i.e. non-lung tissue). The lungs of the LLNL phantom, which are approximately 10 cm too short compared with real lungs, also suggests that a two-detector array could be used under limited circumstances. When tested with modified lungs that are more human-like, it was found that the four-detector array showed the best counting efficiency and the lowest MDA. Fortunately, these findings indicate that, although the LLNL phantom's lungs are too short, there is no adverse impact on the calibration of a lung counter. PMID:17151008

  18. A 32x32 Direct Hybrid Germanium Photoconductor Array with CTIA Readout Multiplexer Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal introduces an innovative concept aimed to develop, for the first time, a 1k pixel far infrared focal-plane array with the following key design...

  19. A 32x32 Direct Hybrid Germanium Photoconductor Array with CTIA Readout Multiplexer Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to investigate the feasibility of developing a two-dimensional far infrared photoconductor array with the following key design features: 1- A...

  20. Gamma-ray observations of SN 1987A with an array of high-purity germanium detectors

    A balloon borne gamma-ray spectrometer comprising an array of high-purity n-type germanium (HPGe) detectors having geometric area 119 cm2, resolution 2.5 keV at 1.0 MeV, surrounded by an active NaI (Tl) collimator and Compton suppressing anticoincidence shield nominally 10 cm thick, was flown from Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia, on May 29--30, 1987, 96 days after the observed neutrino pulse. The average column depth of residual atmosphere in the direction of SN 1987A at float altitude was 6.3 g cm-2 during the observation. SN 1987A was within the 22-deg full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) field of view for about 3300 s during May 29.9--30.3 UT. No excess gamma rays were observed at energies appropriate to the Ni(56)-Co(56) decay chain or from other lines in the energy region from 0.1 to 3.0 MeV. With 80% of the data analyzed, the 3-sigma upper limit obtained for the 1238-keV line from Co(56) at the instrument resolution (about 3 keV) is 1.3 x 10-3 photons cm-2 s-1

  1. GERDA, a GERmanium Detector Array for the search for neutrinoless ββ decay in 76Ge

    The GERDA project, searching for neutrinoless double beta-decay of 76Ge with enriched germanium detectors submerged in a cryogenic bath, has been approved for installation at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. The GERDA technique is aiming at a dramatic reduction of the background due to radioactive contaminations of the materials surrounding the detectors. This will lead to a sensitivity of about 1026 years on the half-life of neutrinoless double beta decay. Already in the first phase of the experiment, GERDA will be able to investigate with high statistical significance the claimed evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge based on the data of the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment

  2. Improved germanium well detectors

    Germanium well detectors with metal surface barrier contact are comparable for general use with conventional germanium coaxial detectors. They offer very high sensitivity, the highest presently available

  3. Effect of an aerosol deposition pattern in the lung on the counting efficiency of a large area germanium detector array.

    Kramer, Gary H; Hauck, Barry M

    2008-01-01

    The Human Monitoring Laboratory has extended the use of sliced lungs containing planar sources to simulate heterogeneous radionuclide deposition patterns. This work examined two deposition patterns and their effect on the counting efficiency of low-energy photons. The results have shown that heterogenous distributions can be difficult to detect in some cases and can still lead to large uncertainties (up to a factor of 2.5) in the activity estimate, especially at low photon energies. At higher energies ( approximately 60 keV), the effect of the heterogeneous distribution is greatly reduced and errors in the activity estimate reduced to approximately 25%. The presence of a heterogenous distribution can be detected by comparing the ratio of the individual detector counts with the expected values obtained from measuring multiple lungs sets that contained a homogeneous distribution. The distributions tested in this paper were detectable (at 2sigma) as heterogeneous by two of the four detectors in the counting array. PMID:18003713

  4. Oriented bottom-up growth of armchair graphene nanoribbons on germanium

    Arnold, Michael Scott; Jacobberger, Robert Michael

    2016-03-15

    Graphene nanoribbon arrays, methods of growing graphene nanoribbon arrays and electronic and photonic devices incorporating the graphene nanoribbon arrays are provided. The graphene nanoribbons in the arrays are formed using a scalable, bottom-up, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in which the (001) facet of the germanium is used to orient the graphene nanoribbon crystals along the [110] directions of the germanium.

  5. Neutron Interactions as Seen by A Segmented Germanium Detector

    Abt, I.; A. Caldwell; Kroeninger, K.; Liu, J.; Liu, X.; Majorovits, B.

    2007-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, is designed for the search for ``neutrinoless double beta decay'' (0-nu-2-beta) with germanium detectors enriched in Ge76. An 18-fold segmented prototype detector for GERDA Phase II was exposed to an AmBe neutron source to improve the understanding of neutron induced backgrounds. Neutron interactions with the germanium isotopes themselves and in the surrounding materials were studied. Segment information is used to identify neutron induced peaks in the rec...

  6. Deep-inelastic heavy-ion collisions at the Tandem accelerator in Orsay - Gamma spectroscopy of fp-shell neutron-rich nuclei with the ORGAM germanium array detector

    The work presented here aimed at producing neutron rich fp shell nuclei through heavy ion collisions at the Tandem accelerator of IPN, and to study them using gamma spectroscopy. For this purpose, a germanium gamma array called ORGAM, and dedicated to high resolution gamma spectroscopy, was set up at the Tandem accelerator. During the year 2008/2009, the individual germanium detectors were tested and repaired, as well as their ancillary anti-Compton shielding. At the same time, the liquid nitrogen auto-fill system was improved for better reliability. The array was finally set up on a beam line of the accelerator.The first experiment using the ORGAM array was performed in July 2009. This experiment aimed to study fully damped deep-inelastic collisions between a 36S beam accelerated to 154 MeV, and a 70Zn target. An additional charged particle detection system was used to detect interesting fragments emitted at backward angles. It was not possible to separate these fragments from the background induced by backscattered ions from the beam. Nevertheless, the study of gamma-gamma coincidences detected with the ORGAM array allowed to identify gamma cascades de-exciting nuclei potentially produced through the mechanism of interest. Data accumulated during another experiment performed at the tandem accelerator in 2005 were analyzed. Fusion-evaporation reaction between a 25 MeV, 14C beam focused on a 48Ca target produced the 57Cr and 59Mn nuclei, whose energy spectra were established up to 3 MeV. We attempted to study theoretically odd Chromium isotopes with a simple model based on the intermediate coupling scheme. This model, which does not take into account correlations between valence nucleons, described in satisfactory way the semi-magic + 1 neutron, 53Cr, but failed to do so for mid-shell nuclei 55Cr and 57Cr. (author)

  7. Germanium and gallium

    Present article is devoted to germanium and gallium content in fluorite. The literature data on germanium and gallium content was analysed. The literature data on germanium and gallium distribution in fluorite of various geologic deposits and ores of Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan and some geologic deposits of Russia were studied. The germanium and gallium content in fluorite of geologic deposits of various mineralogical and genetic type was defined.

  8. Germanium detector studies in the framework of the GERDA experiment

    Budjáš, D.

    2009-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) is an ultra-low background experiment under construction at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. GERDA will search for Ge-76 neutrinoless double beta decay with an aim for 100-fold reduction in background compared to predecessor experiments. This ambition necessitates innovative design approaches, strict selection of low-radioactivity materials, and novel techniques for active background suppression. The core feature of GERDA is its array of germanium dete...

  9. Germanium Detectors in Homeland Security at PNNL

    Stave, Sean C.

    2015-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray detection is used for non-proliferation and national security applications. While lower energy resolution detectors such as NaI(Tl) have their place, high purity germanium (HPGe) also has a role to play. A detection with HPGe is often a characterization due to the very high energy resolution. However, HPGe crystals remain small and expensive leaving arrays of smaller crystals as an excellent solution. PNNL has developed two similar HPGe arrays for two very different applications. One array, the Multisensor Aerial Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a fieldable array that has been tested on trucks, boats, and helicopters. The CASCADES HPGe array is an array designed to assay samples in a low background environment. The history of HPGe arrays at PNNL and the development of MARS and CASCADES will be detailed in this paper along with some of the other applications of HPGe at PNNL.

  10. Calibration of a large hyperpure germanium array for in-vivo detection of the actinides with a tissue-equivalent torso phantom

    For calibration of the array for internally deposited 238Pu, 239Pu, and 241Am, a tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic phantom, was used for efficiency determinations at the ORNL facility. This phantom consists of a tissue-equivalent torso into which is imbedded an adult male skeleton, interchangeable organs containing a homogeneous distribution of various radionuclides, and two sets of chest overlay plates for simulation of progressively thicker tissue over the chest, as well as differing thoracic fat contents

  11. Mesostructured metal germanium sulfides

    MacLachlan, M.J.; Coombs, N.; Bedard, R.L.; White, S.; Thompson, L.K.; Ozin, G.A.

    1999-12-29

    A new class of mesostructured metal germanium sulfide materials has been prepared and characterized. The synthesis, via supramolecular assembly of well-defined germanium sulfide anionic cluster precursors and transition-metal cations in formamide, represents a new strategy for the formation of this class of solids. A variety of techniques were employed to examine the structure and composition of the materials. Structurally, the material is best described as a periodic mesostructured metal sulfide-based coordination framework akin to periodic hexagonal mesoporous silica, MCM-41. At the molecular scale, the materials strongly resemble microstructured metal germanium sulfides, in which the structure of the [Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10}]{sup 4{minus}} cluster building-blocks are intact and linked via {mu}-S-M-S bonds. Evidence for a metal-metal bond in mesostructured Cu/Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10} is also provided.

  12. Neutron Interactions as Seen by A Segmented Germanium Detector

    Abt, I; Kroeninger, K; Liu, J; Liu, X; Majorovits, B

    2007-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, is designed for the search for ``neutrinoless double beta decay'' (0-nu-2-beta) with germanium detectors enriched in Ge76. An 18-fold segmented prototype detector for GERDA Phase II was exposed to an AmBe neutron source to improve the understanding of neutron induced backgrounds. Neutron interactions with the germanium isotopes themselves and in the surrounding materials were studied. Segment information is used to identify neutron induced peaks in the recorded energy spectra. The Geant4 based simulation package MaGe is used to simulate the experiment. Though many photon peaks from germanium isotopes excited by neutrons are correctly described by Geant4, some physics processes were identified as being incorrectly treated or even missing.

  13. Calibration of germanium detectors

    The process of determining the energy-dependent detection probability with measurements using Ge (Li) and high-grade germanium detectors is described. The paper explains which standards are best for a given purpose and given requirements as to accuracy, and how to assess measuring geometry variations and summation corrections. (DG)

  14. Synthesis and characterization of germanium nanowires and germanium/silicon radially heterostructured nanowires

    Goldthorpe, Irene Anne

    Semiconductor nanowires offer new opportunities to study physical phenomena in low-dimensional nanostructures. They also possess technologically useful properties for applications in electronics, optics, sensing, and thermoelectrics. Germanium nanowires are of particular interest, because of germanium's compatibility with standard silicon integrated circuit fabrication processes, its high electronic carrier mobilities, and the low temperature required for germanium nanowire growth. In this work, epitaxially-aligned germanium nanowires are grown on silicon substrates by chemical vapor deposition through the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. Uniform nanowire diameters between 5 and 50 nm are obtained through the use of monodisperse gold colloids as catalysts. The crystallographic orientation of the nanowires, their strain, and their heteroepitaxial relationship with the substrate are characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). A process for removing the gold catalysts from the tips of the germanium nanowires is demonstrated. Silicon shells are then heteroepitaxially deposited around the wires to fabricate radial heterostructures. These shells passivate the germanium nanowire surface, create electronic band offsets to confine holes away the surface where they can scatter or recombine, and induce strain which could allow for the engineering of properties such as band gap and carrier mobilities. However, analogous to planar heteroepitaxy, surface roughening and misfit dislocations can relax this strain. The effects of coaxial dimensions on strain relaxation in these structures are analyzed quantitatively by TEM and synchrotron XRD, and these results are related to continuum elasticity models. Lessons learned generated two successful strategies for synthesizing coherent core-shell nanowires with large misfit strain: chlorine surface passivation and growth of nanowires with low-energy sidewall facets. Both approaches avoid the strain

  15. Identification of photons in double beta-decay experiments using segmented germanium detectors - studies with a GERDA Phase II prototype detector

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Kröninger, K.; Liu, J; X. Liu; Majorovits, B.

    2007-01-01

    The sensitivity of experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta-decay of germanium was so far limited by the background induced by external gamma-radiation. Segmented germanium detectors can be used to identify photons and thus reduce this background component. The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, will use highly segmented germanium detectors in its second phase. The identification of photonic events is investigated using a prototype detector. The results are compared with Monte Carlo d...

  16. Local structure of germanium-sulfur, germanium-selenium, and germanium-tellurium vitreous alloys

    119Sn and 129Te (129I) Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that chalcogen-enriched Ge100-yXy (X = S, Se, Te) glasses are constructed of structural units including two-coordinated chalcogen atoms in chains such as Ge-X-Ge- and Ge-X-X-Ge-. Germanium in these glasses is only tetravalent and four-coordinated, and only chalcogen atoms are in the local environment of germanium atoms. Chalcogen-depleted glasses are constructed of structural units including two-coordinated (in Ge-X-Ge- chains) and three-coordinated chalcogen atoms (in -Ge-X-Ge- chains). Germanium in these glasses stabilizes in both the tetravalent four-coordinated and divalent three-coordinated states, and only chalcogen atoms are in the local environment of germanium atoms.

  17. Experience from operating germanium detectors in GERDA

    Palioselitis, Dimitrios; GERDA Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Phase I of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, searching for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge, was completed in September 2013. The most competitive half-life lower limit for the 0νββ decay of 76Ge was set (T-0ν1/2 > 2.1 · 1025 yr at 90% C.L.). GERDA operates bare Ge diodes immersed in liquid argon. During Phase I, mainly refurbished semi-coaxial high purity Ge detectors from previous experiments were used. The experience gained with handling and operating bare Ge diodes in liquid argon, as well as the stability and performance of the detectors during GERDA Phase I are presented. Thirty additional new enriched BEGe-type detectors were produced and will be used in Phase II. A subgroup of these detectors has already been used successfully in GERDA Phase I. The present paper gives an overview of the production chain of the new germanium detectors, the steps taken to minimise the exposure to cosmic radiation during manufacturing, and the first results of characterisation measurements in vacuum cryostats.

  18. Pulse shapes and surface effects in segmented germanium detectors

    Lenz, Daniel

    2010-03-24

    It is well established that at least two neutrinos are massive. The absolute neutrino mass scale and the neutrino hierarchy are still unknown. In addition, it is not known whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) will be used to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. The discovery of this decay could help to answer the open questions. In the GERDA experiment, germanium detectors enriched in the isotope {sup 76}Ge are used as source and detector at the same time. The experiment is planned in two phases. In the first, phase existing detectors are deployed. In the second phase, additional detectors will be added. These detectors can be segmented. A low background index around the Q value of the decay is important to maximize the sensitivity of the experiment. This can be achieved through anti-coincidences between segments and through pulse shape analysis. The background index due to radioactive decays in the detector strings and the detectors themselves was estimated, using Monte Carlo simulations for a nominal GERDA Phase II array with 18-fold segmented germanium detectors. A pulse shape simulation package was developed for segmented high-purity germanium detectors. The pulse shape simulation was validated with data taken with an 19-fold segmented high-purity germanium detector. The main part of the detector is 18-fold segmented, 6-fold in the azimuthal angle and 3-fold in the height. A 19th segment of 5mm thickness was created on the top surface of the detector. The detector was characterized and events with energy deposited in the top segment were studied in detail. It was found that the metalization close to the end of the detector is very important with respect to the length of the of the pulses observed. In addition indications for n-type and p-type surface channels were found. (orig.)

  19. Germanium detector studies in the framework of the GERDA experiment

    Budjas, Dusan

    2009-05-06

    The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) is an ultra-low background experiment under construction at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. GERDA will search for {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless double beta decay with an aim for 100-fold reduction in background compared to predecessor experiments. This ambition necessitates innovative design approaches, strict selection of low-radioactivity materials, and novel techniques for active background suppression. The core feature of GERDA is its array of germanium detectors for ionizing radiation, which are enriched in {sup 76}Ge. Germanium detectors are the central theme of this dissertation. The first part describes the implementation, testing, and optimisation of Monte Carlo simulations of germanium spectrometers, intensively involved in the selection of low-radioactivity materials. The simulations are essential for evaluations of the gamma ray measurements. The second part concerns the development and validation of an active background suppression technique based on germanium detector signal shape analysis. This was performed for the first time using a BEGe-type detector, which features a small read-out electrode. As a result of this work, BEGe is now one of the two detector technologies included in research and development for the second phase of the GERDA experiment. A suppression of major GERDA backgrounds is demonstrated, with (0.93{+-}0.08)% survival probability for events from {sup 60}Co, (21{+-}3)% for {sup 226}Ra, and (40{+-}2)% for {sup 228}Th. The acceptance of {sup 228}Th double escape events, which are analogous to double beta decay, was kept at (89{+-}1)%. (orig.)

  20. Germanium detector studies in the framework of the GERDA experiment

    The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) is an ultra-low background experiment under construction at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. GERDA will search for 76Ge neutrinoless double beta decay with an aim for 100-fold reduction in background compared to predecessor experiments. This ambition necessitates innovative design approaches, strict selection of low-radioactivity materials, and novel techniques for active background suppression. The core feature of GERDA is its array of germanium detectors for ionizing radiation, which are enriched in 76Ge. Germanium detectors are the central theme of this dissertation. The first part describes the implementation, testing, and optimisation of Monte Carlo simulations of germanium spectrometers, intensively involved in the selection of low-radioactivity materials. The simulations are essential for evaluations of the gamma ray measurements. The second part concerns the development and validation of an active background suppression technique based on germanium detector signal shape analysis. This was performed for the first time using a BEGe-type detector, which features a small read-out electrode. As a result of this work, BEGe is now one of the two detector technologies included in research and development for the second phase of the GERDA experiment. A suppression of major GERDA backgrounds is demonstrated, with (0.93±0.08)% survival probability for events from 60Co, (21±3)% for 226Ra, and (40±2)% for 228Th. The acceptance of 228Th double escape events, which are analogous to double beta decay, was kept at (89±1)%. (orig.)

  1. Pulse shapes and surface effects in segmented germanium detectors

    It is well established that at least two neutrinos are massive. The absolute neutrino mass scale and the neutrino hierarchy are still unknown. In addition, it is not known whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) will be used to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. The discovery of this decay could help to answer the open questions. In the GERDA experiment, germanium detectors enriched in the isotope 76Ge are used as source and detector at the same time. The experiment is planned in two phases. In the first, phase existing detectors are deployed. In the second phase, additional detectors will be added. These detectors can be segmented. A low background index around the Q value of the decay is important to maximize the sensitivity of the experiment. This can be achieved through anti-coincidences between segments and through pulse shape analysis. The background index due to radioactive decays in the detector strings and the detectors themselves was estimated, using Monte Carlo simulations for a nominal GERDA Phase II array with 18-fold segmented germanium detectors. A pulse shape simulation package was developed for segmented high-purity germanium detectors. The pulse shape simulation was validated with data taken with an 19-fold segmented high-purity germanium detector. The main part of the detector is 18-fold segmented, 6-fold in the azimuthal angle and 3-fold in the height. A 19th segment of 5mm thickness was created on the top surface of the detector. The detector was characterized and events with energy deposited in the top segment were studied in detail. It was found that the metalization close to the end of the detector is very important with respect to the length of the of the pulses observed. In addition indications for n-type and p-type surface channels were found. (orig.)

  2. Neutron interactions with segmented germanium detectors studies with a GERDA Phase II prototype detector

    The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, is designed to search for ''neutrinoless double beta decay'' (0ν2β) with Germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge. The estimate of neutron induced background relies purely on Geant4 simulations. In order to study neutron interactions with the Germanium itself as well as the surrounding materials, a prototype detector for GERDA Phase II with 18 segments was exposed to an AmBe neutron source. The simulated results from the Geant4-based MaGe MC package agree in general with the measurements, thus verifying the MC used. The Geant4 package is able to simulate most de-excitation photons from the Germanium isotopes and the nuclei recoil process after interacting with neutrons. However, some physics processes are missing in the simulation. (orig.)

  3. Vapor pressure of germanium precursors

    Pangrác, Jiří; Fulem, Michal; Hulicius, Eduard; Melichar, Karel; Šimeček, Tomislav; Růžička, K.; Morávek, Pavel; Růžička, V.; Rushworth, S. A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 310, č. 23 (2008), s. 4720-4723. ISSN 0022-0248 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0217 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : characterization * phase equilibria * metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy * germanium compounds Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.757, year: 2008

  4. Structural, electronic, and linear optical properties of organic photovoltaic PBTTT-C14 crystal

    Li, Long-Hua; Kontsevoi, Oleg Y.; Rhim, S. H.; Freeman, Arthur J.

    2013-04-01

    Poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2yl)thieno(3,2-b)thiophene) (PBTTT-C14) is an important electro-optical polymer, whose three-dimensional crystal structure is somewhat ambiguous and the fundamental electronic and linear optical properties are not well known. We carried out first-principles calculations to model the crystal structure and to study the effect of side-chains on the physical structure and electronic properties. Our calculations suggest that the patterns of side-chain has little direct effect on the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum but they do have impact on the bandgap through changing the π-π stacking distance. By examining the band structure and wave functions, we conclude that the fundamental bandgap of the PBTTT-C14 crystal is determined by the conduction band energy at the Q point. The calculations indicate that the bandgap of PBTTT-C14 crystal may be tunable by introducing different side-chains. The significant peak in the imaginary part of the dielectric function arises from transitions along the polymer backbone axis, as determined by the critical-point analysis and the large optical transition matrix elements in the direction of the backbone.

  5. Laser synthesis of germanium tin alloys on virtual germanium

    Stefanov, S; Conde, J. C.; Chiussi, S; De Benedetti, A.; Serra, C.; Werner, J.; Oehme, M.; Schulze, J.; Buca, D.; Holländer, B; Mantl, S.

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of heteroepitaxial germanium tin (GeSn) alloys using excimer laser processing of a thin 4 nm Sn layer on Ge has been demonstrated and studied. Laser induced rapid heating, subsequent melting, and re-solidification processes at extremely high cooling rates have been experimentally achieved and also simulated numerically to optimize the processing parameters. "In situ" measured sample reflectivity with nanosecond time resolution was used as feedback for the simulations and directly co...

  6. The GALATEA test facility and a first study of alpha-induced surface events in a Germanium detector

    Irlbeck, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Germanium detectors are a choice technology in fundamental research. They are suitable for the search for rare events due to their high sensitivity and excellent energy resolution. As an example, the GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment searching for neutrinoless double beta decay is described. The observation of this decay would resolve the fundamental question whether the neutrino is its own antiparticle. Especially adapted detector technologies and low background rates n...

  7. Radiation damage of germanium detectors

    Pehl, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Energetic particles can produce interstitial-vacancy pairs in a crystal by knocking the atoms from their normal positions. Detectors are unique among semiconductor devices in depending on very low concentrations of electrically active impurities, and also on efficient transport of holes and electrons over relatively large distances. Because the dense regions of damage produced by energetic particles may result in donors and/or acceptors, and also provide trapping sites for holes and electrons, detectors are very sensitive to radiation damage. In addition to these effects occurring within the detector, radiation may also change the characteristics of the exposed surfaces causing unpredictable effects on the detector leakage current. Radiation-induced surface degradation has rarely, if ever, been observed for germanium detectors. The possibility of minimizing hole trapping in charge collection by the use of a high-purity germanium coaxial detector configured with the p (+) contact on the coaxial periphery is discussed.

  8. Harmonic Lattice Dynamics of Germanium

    The phonon dispersion relations of the Δ-, Λ-, and Σ-directions of germanium at 80 K are analysed in terms of current harmonic lattice dynamical models. On the basis of this experience, a new model is proposed which gives a unified account of the strong points of the previous models. The principal elements of the presented theory are quasiparticle bond charges combined with a valence force field

  9. Germanium Microsphere High-Q Resonator

    Wang, Pengfei; Lee, Timothy; Ding, Ming; Dhar, Anirban; Hawkins, Thomas; Foy, Paul; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang; Sahu, Jayanta; Farrell, Gerald; Ballato, John; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter, the fabrication and characterization of a microsphere resonator from the semiconductor germanium is demonstrated. Whispering gallery modes are excited in a 46 μm diameter germanium microsphere resonator using evanescent coupling from a tapered silica optical fiber with a waist diameter of 2 μm. Resonances with Q factors as high as 3.8×104 at wavelengths near 2 μm are observed. Because of their ultrahigh optical nonlinearities and extremely broad transparency window, germanium ...

  10. Study on the local atomic structure of germanium in organic germanium compounds by EXAFS

    1999-01-01

    Organic germanium compounds have been extensively applied in medicine as tonics,In this paper,the local structures of two organic germanium compounds,carboxyethylgermanium sesquioxide and polymeric germanium glutamate,were determined by EXAFS.The structure parameters including coordination numbers and bond lengths were reported,and possible structure patterns were discussed.

  11. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR: A Search for Neutrinoless Double-beta Decay of Germanium-76

    Schubert, A G; Avignone, F T; Back, H O; Barabash, A S; Bergevin, M; Bertrand, F E; Boswell, M; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Collar, J I; Combs, D C; Cooper, R J; Detwiler, J A; Leon, J; Doe, P J; Efremenko, Yu; Egorov, V; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Esterline, J; Fast, J E; Fields, N; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Gehman, V M; Giovanetti, G K; Green, M P; Guiseppe, V E; Gusey, K; Hallin, A L; Hazama, R; Henning, R; Hime, A; Hoppe, E W; Horton, M; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Johnson, R A; Keeter, K J; Keillor, M E; Keller, C; Kephart, J D; Kidd, M F; Knecht, A; Kochetov, O; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B; LaRoque, B H; Leviner, L E; Loach, J C; MacMullin, S; Marino, M G; Martin, R D; Mei, D -M; Merriman, J; Miller, M L; Mizouni, L; Nomachi, M; Orrell, J L; Overman, N; Phillips, D G; Poon, A W P; Perumpilly, G; Prior, G; Radford, D C; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Ronquest, M C; Shima, T; Shirchenko, M; Snavely, K J; Sobolev, V; Steele, D; Strain, J; Thomas, K; Timkin, V; Tornow, W; Vanyushin, I; Varner, R L; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; Wilkerson, J F; Wolfe, B A; Yakushev, E; Young, A R; Yu, C ?H; Yumatov, V; Zhan, C

    2011-01-01

    The observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay would determine whether the neutrino is a Majorana particle and provide information on the absolute scale of neutrino mass. The MAJORANA Collaboration is constructing the DEMONSTRATOR, an array of germanium detectors, to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76-Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will contain 40 kg of germanium; up to 30 kg will be enriched to 86% in 76-Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will be deployed deep underground in an ultra-low-background shielded environment. Operation of the DEMONSTRATOR aims to determine whether a future tonne-scale germanium experiment can achieve a background goal of one count per tonne-year in a 4-keV region of interest around the 76-Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay Q-value of 2039 keV.

  12. Interfacial properties of germanium nitride dielectric layers in germanium

    Meiners, L. G.

    The first year's effort on this project has been primarily devoted to the design and construction of a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition system for growth of the germanium nitride layers. The gas manifold layout is shown schematically, as is the reactor assembly, and the vacuum pumping assembly. The generator-cavity system is capable of delivering 0-600 W of microwave power at 2.45 GHz. The power generating section has been constructed from components contained in a portable home microwave oven and the cavity was assembled from easily machinable pieces. The cw magnetron source was mounted directly on a cylindrical microwave cavity. The plasma was contained in an on-axis 20-mm o.d. quartz tube. Design tradeoffs and operating information are discussed.

  13. Zone refining high-purity germanium

    The effects of various parameters on germanium purification by zone refining have been examined. These parameters include the germanium container and container coatings, ambient gas and other operating conditions. Four methods of refining are presented which reproducibly yield 3.5 kg germanium ingots from which high purity (vertical barN/sub A/ - N/sub D/vertical bar less than or equal to2 x 1010 cm-3) single crystals can be grown. A qualitative model involving binary and ternary complexes of Si, O, B, and Al is shown to account for the behavior of impurities at these low concentrations

  14. Solution synthesis of germanium nanocrystals

    Gerung, Henry; Boyle, Timothy J.; Bunge, Scott D.

    2009-09-22

    A method for providing a route for the synthesis of a Ge(0) nanometer-sized material from. A Ge(II) precursor is dissolved in a ligand heated to a temperature, generally between approximately 100.degree. C. and 400.degree. C., sufficient to thermally reduce the Ge(II) to Ge(0), where the ligand is a compound that can bond to the surface of the germanium nanomaterials to subsequently prevent agglomeration of the nanomaterials. The ligand encapsulates the surface of the Ge(0) material to prevent agglomeration. The resulting solution is cooled for handling, with the cooling characteristics useful in controlling the size and size distribution of the Ge(0) materials. The characteristics of the Ge(II) precursor determine whether the Ge(0) materials that result will be nanocrystals or nanowires.

  15. Silicon Germanium Quantum Well Solar Cell Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Quantum-well structures embodied on single crystal silicon germanium drastically enhanced carrier mobilities.  The cell-to-cell circuits of quantum-well PV...

  16. Metal induced crystallization of silicon germanium alloys

    Gjukic, M.

    2007-05-15

    In the framework of this thesis the applicability of the aluminium-induced layer exchange on binary silicon germanium alloys was studied. It is here for the first time shown that polycrstalline silicon-germanium layers can be fabricated over the whole composition range by the aluminium-induced layer exchange. The experimental results prove thet the resulting material exhibits a polycrystalline character with typocal grain sizes of 10-100 {mu}m. Raman measurements confirm that the structural properties of the resulting layers are because of the large crystallites more comparable with monocrystalline than with nano- or microcrystalline silicon-germanium. The alloy ratio of the polycrystalline layer correspondes to the chemical composition of the amorphous starting layer. The polycrystalline silicon-germanium layers possess in the range of the interband transitions a reflection spectrum, as it is otherwise only known from monocrystalline reference layers. The improvement of the absorption in the photovoltaically relevant spectral range aimed by the application of silicon-germanium could be also proved by absorption measurments. Strongly correlated with the structural properties of the polycrystalline layers and the electronic band structure resulting from this are beside the optical properties also the electrical properties of the material, especially the charge-carrier mobility and the doping concentration. For binary silicon-germanium layers the hole concentration of about 2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} for pure silicon increrases to about 5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sub -3} for pure germanium. Temperature-resolved measurements were applied in order to detect doping levels respectively semiconductor-metal transitions. In the last part of the thesis the hydrogen passivation of polycrystalline thin silicon-germanium layers, which were fabricated by means of aluminium-induced layer exchange, is treated.

  17. Germanium Resistance Thermometer For Subkelvin Temperatures

    Castles, Stephen H.

    1993-01-01

    Improved germanium resistance thermometer measures temperatures as small as 0.01 K accurately. Design provides large area for electrical connections (to reduce electrical gradients and increase sensitivity to changes in temperatures) and large heat sink (to minimize resistance heating). Gold pads on top and bottom of germanium crystal distribute electrical current and flow of heat nearly uniformly across crystal. Less expensive than magnetic thermometers or superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUID's) otherwise used.

  18. Sensitive germanium thermistors for cryogenic thermal detector of Tokyo dark matter search programme

    Ootani, Wataru; Ito, Yutaka; Nishigaki, Keiji; Kishimoto, Yasuhiro; Minowa, Makoto; Ootuka, Youiti

    1995-01-01

    Sensitive n-type and p-type germanium thermistors were fabricated by the melt doping technique and by the neutron transmutation doping (NTD) technique, respectively, aiming at a use for the cryogenic thermal detector, or bolometer of Tokyo dark matter search programme. We report on the measurements of the sensitivities of these thermistors. In particular, the p-type thermistors are sensitive enough to scale up our existing prototype LiF bolometer and realize a multiple array of the bolometers...

  19. Recovering germanium from coal ash by chlorination with ammonium chloride

    2002-01-01

    A new process of enriching germanium from coal ash was developed. The process involves in mixing the coal ash and ammonium chloride and then roasting the mixture to produce germanium chloride that is then absorbed by dilute hydrochloric acid and hydrolyzed to germanium oxide. The germanium recovery reached to 80.2% at the optimum condition: mass ratio of NH4Cl/coal ash is 0.15, roasting temperature 400℃ and roasting time 90 min.

  20. electrocatalytic nitrate reduction on palladium based catalysts activated with germanium

    Gootzen, J.F.E.; Lefferts, L.; Veen, van J.A.R.

    1999-01-01

    The electrocatalytic reduction of nitrate has been studied with electrochemical methods on palladium and palladium–platinum electrodes activated with germanium. The formation of a palladium–germanium alloy that occurs at germanium coverage above 0.2 has a strong enhancing effect on the rate of nitra

  1. Film germanium strain gauges for cryogenic temperatures

    Strain-measuring characteristics of strain gauges (SG) based on germanium films on gallium arsenide designed for operation in 4-100 K temperature interval and strain range ε∼(±0.3%) are presented. SG are characterized by weak temperature dependences of resistance and strain sensitivity in the temperature range measured. It is shown that in the low-temperature region SG based on heteroepitaxial germanium films on gallium arsenide are no worse than the best domestic and foreign semiconducting and metal SG and are perspective for cryogenic object diagnostics under magnetic field effect

  2. Germanium-overcoated niobium Dayem bridges

    Holdeman, L. B.; Peters, P. N.

    1976-01-01

    Overcoating constriction microbridges with semiconducting germanium provides additional thermal conductivity at liquid-helium temperatures to reduce the effects of self-heating in these Josephson junctions. Microwave-induced steps were observed in the I-V characteristics of an overcoated Dayem bridge fabricated in a 15-nm-thick niobium film; at least 20 steps could be counted at 4.2 K. No steps were observed in the I-V characteristics of the bridge prior to overcoating. In addition, the germanium overcoat can protect against electrical disturbances at room temperature.

  3. Germanium-Based Nanomaterials for Rechargeable Batteries.

    Wu, Songping; Han, Cuiping; Iocozzia, James; Lu, Mingjia; Ge, Rongyun; Xu, Rui; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-07-01

    Germanium-based nanomaterials have emerged as important candidates for next-generation energy-storage devices owing to their unique chemical and physical properties. In this Review, we provide a review of the current state-of-the-art in germanium-based materials design, synthesis, processing, and application in battery technology. The most recent advances in the area of Ge-based nanocomposite electrode materials and electrolytes for solid-state batteries are summarized. The limitations of Ge-based materials for energy-storage applications are discussed, and potential research directions are also presented with an emphasis on commercial products and theoretical investigations. PMID:27281435

  4. The GALATEA test facility and a first study of α-induced surface events in a germanium detector

    Germanium detectors are a choice technology in fundamental research. They are suitable for the search for rare events due to their high sensitivity and excellent energy resolution. As an example, the GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment searching for neutrinoless double beta decay is described. The observation of this decay would resolve the fundamental question whether the neutrino is its own antiparticle. Especially adapted detector technologies and low background rates needed to detect very rare events such as neutrinoless double beta decays are discussed. The identification of backgrounds originating from the interaction of radiation, especially α-particles, is a focus of this thesis. Low background experiments face problems from α-particles due to unavoidable surface contaminations of the germanium detectors. The segmentation of detectors is used to obtain information about the special characteristics of selected events. The high precision test stand GALATEA was especially designed for surface scans of germanium detectors. As part of this work, GALATEA was completed and commissioned. The final commissioning required major upgrades of the original design which are described in detail. Collimator studies with two commercial germanium detectors are presented. Different collimation levels for a β-source were investigated and crystal axis effects were examined. The first scan with an α-source of the passivated end-plate of a special 19-fold segmented prototype detector mounted in GALATEA is described. The α-induced surface events were studied and characterized. Crosstalk and mirror pulses seen in the segments of the germanium detector were analyzed. The detector studies presented in this thesis will help to further improve the design of germanium detectors for low background experiments.

  5. The GALATEA test facility and a first study of α-induced surface events in a germanium detector

    Irlbeck, Sabine

    2014-01-30

    Germanium detectors are a choice technology in fundamental research. They are suitable for the search for rare events due to their high sensitivity and excellent energy resolution. As an example, the GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment searching for neutrinoless double beta decay is described. The observation of this decay would resolve the fundamental question whether the neutrino is its own antiparticle. Especially adapted detector technologies and low background rates needed to detect very rare events such as neutrinoless double beta decays are discussed. The identification of backgrounds originating from the interaction of radiation, especially α-particles, is a focus of this thesis. Low background experiments face problems from α-particles due to unavoidable surface contaminations of the germanium detectors. The segmentation of detectors is used to obtain information about the special characteristics of selected events. The high precision test stand GALATEA was especially designed for surface scans of germanium detectors. As part of this work, GALATEA was completed and commissioned. The final commissioning required major upgrades of the original design which are described in detail. Collimator studies with two commercial germanium detectors are presented. Different collimation levels for a β-source were investigated and crystal axis effects were examined. The first scan with an α-source of the passivated end-plate of a special 19-fold segmented prototype detector mounted in GALATEA is described. The α-induced surface events were studied and characterized. Crosstalk and mirror pulses seen in the segments of the germanium detector were analyzed. The detector studies presented in this thesis will help to further improve the design of germanium detectors for low background experiments.

  6. Electron tunnelling into amorphous germanium and silicon.

    Smith, C. W.; Clark, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of tunnel conductance versus bias, capacitance versus bias, and internal photoemission were made in the systems aluminum-oxide-amorphous germanium and aluminium-oxide-amorphous silicon. A function was extracted which expresses the deviation of these systems from the aluminium-oxide-aluminium system.

  7. Vacancy-hydrogen complexes in germanium

    Coomer, B.J.; Leary, P.; Jones, R. [Exeter Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Budde, M.; Bech Nielsen, B. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-80000, Aarhus (Denmark); Oeberg, S. [Department of Mathematics, University of Luleaa, Luleaa, S95 187 (Sweden); Briddon, P.R. [Department of Physics, The University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    1999-02-12

    Local-density-functional pseudopotential theory is used to investigate the structural, electronic and vibrational properties of vacancy-hydrogen complexes in germanium. The results are compared with recent infrared absorption data from proton and deuteron implanted Ge. The acceptor and donor levels of the VH{sub n} defects are derived semi-empirically from the relaxed structures. (orig.) 7 refs.

  8. Method for copper staining of germanium crystals

    Rivet, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    Proper conditions for copper staining of germanium crystals include a low solution temperature of 3 degrees C, illumination of the sample by infrared light, and careful positioning of the light source relative to the sample so as to minimize absorption of the infrared light.

  9. Research and Development Supporting a Next Generation Germanium Double Beta Decay Experiment

    Rielage, Keith; Elliott, Steve; Chu, Pinghan; Goett, Johnny; Massarczyk, Ralph; Xu, Wenqin

    2015-10-01

    To improve the search for neutrinoless double beta decay, the next-generation experiments will increase in source mass and continue to reduce backgrounds in the region of interest. A promising technology for the next generation experiment is large arrays of Germanium p-type point contact detectors enriched in 76-Ge. The experience, expertise and lessons learned from the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and GERDA experiments naturally lead to a number of research and development activities that will be useful in guiding a future experiment utilizing Germanium. We will discuss some R&D activities including a hybrid cryostat design, background reduction in cabling, connectors and electronics, and modifications to reduce assembly time. We acknowledge the support of the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program.

  10. gamma-ray tracking in germanium the backtracking method

    Marel, J V D

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of a European TMR network project the concept for a gamma-ray tracking array is being developed for nuclear physics spectroscopy in the energy range of approx 10 keV up to several MeV. The tracking array will consist of a large number of position-sensitive germanium detectors in a spherical geometry around a target. Due to the high segmentation, a Compton scattered gamma-ray will deposit energy in several different segments. A method has been developed to reconstruct the tracks of multiple coincident gamma-rays and to find their initial energies. By starting from the final point the track can be reconstructed backwards to the origin with the help of the photoelectric and Compton cross-sections and the Compton scatter formula. Every reconstructed track is given a figure of merit, thus allowing suppression of wrongly reconstructed tracks and gamma-rays that have scattered out of the detector system. This so-called backtracking method has been tested on simulated events in a shell-like geometry ...

  11. Constraining neutrino electromagnetic properties by germanium detectors

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Huang, Keh-Ning; Li, Hau-Bin; Liu, C -P; Singh, Lakhwinder; Wong, Henry T; Wu, Chih-Liang; Wu, Chih-Pan

    2014-01-01

    The electromagnetic properties of neutrinos, which are either trivial or negligible in the context of the Standard Model, can probe new physics and have significant implications in astrophysics and cosmology. The current best direct limits on the neutrino millicharges and magnetic moments are both derived from data taken with germanium detectors with low thresholds at keV levels. In this paper, we discuss in detail a robust, ab initio method: the multiconfiguration relativistic random phase approximation, that enables us to reliably understand the germanium detector response at the sub-keV level, where atomic many-body physics matters. Using existing data with sub-keV thresholds, limits on reactor antineutrino's millicharge, magnetic moment, and charge radius squared are derived. The projected sensitivities for next generation experiments are also given and discussed.

  12. Vacancy-indium clusters in implanted germanium

    Chroneos, Alexander I.

    2010-04-01

    Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements of heavily indium doped germanium samples revealed that a significant proportion of the indium dose is immobile. Using electronic structure calculations we address the possibility of indium clustering with point defects by predicting the stability of indium-vacancy clusters, InnVm. We find that the formation of large clusters is energetically favorable, which can explain the immobility of the indium ions. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Bottom-up assembly of metallic germanium

    Scappucci, Giordano; Klesse, Wolfgang M.; Yeoh, Lareine A.; Carter, Damien J.; Warschkow, Oliver; Marks, Nigel A.; Jaeger, David L.; Capellini, Giovanni; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hamilton, Alexander R.

    2015-08-01

    Extending chip performance beyond current limits of miniaturisation requires new materials and functionalities that integrate well with the silicon platform. Germanium fits these requirements and has been proposed as a high-mobility channel material, a light emitting medium in silicon-integrated lasers, and a plasmonic conductor for bio-sensing. Common to these diverse applications is the need for homogeneous, high electron densities in three-dimensions (3D). Here we use a bottom-up approach to demonstrate the 3D assembly of atomically sharp doping profiles in germanium by a repeated stacking of two-dimensional (2D) high-density phosphorus layers. This produces high-density (1019 to 1020 cm-3) low-resistivity (10-4Ω · cm) metallic germanium of precisely defined thickness, beyond the capabilities of diffusion-based doping technologies. We demonstrate that free electrons from distinct 2D dopant layers coalesce into a homogeneous 3D conductor using anisotropic quantum interference measurements, atom probe tomography, and density functional theory.

  14. Next Generation Germanium Systems for Safeguards Applications

    We are developing the latest generation of highly portable, mechanically cooled germanium systems for safeguard applications. In collaboration with our industrial partner, Ph.D.s Co, we have developed the Germanium Gamma Ray Imager (GeGI), an imager with a 2π field of view. This instrument has been thoroughly field tested in a wide range of environments and have performed reliably even in the harshest conditions. The imaging capability of GeGI complements existing safeguards techniques by allowing for the spatial detection, identification, and characterization of nuclear material. Additionally, imaging can be used in design information verification activities to address potential material diversions. Measurements conducted at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant highlight the advantages this instrument offers in the identification and localization of LEU, HEU and Pu holdup. GeGI has also been deployed to the Savannah River Site for the measurement of radioactive waste canisters, providing information valuable for waste characterization and inventory accountancy. Measuring 30 x 15 x 23 cm and weighing approximately 15 kg, this instrument is the first portable germanium-based imager. GeGI offers high reliability with the convenience of mechanical cooling, making this instrument ideal for the next generation of safeguards instrumentation. (author)

  15. Formation of Germanium Nitride Nanowires on the Surface of Crystalline Germanium

    We report on the growth mechanisms of germanium nitride nanowires on the surface of crystalline Ge annealed in hydrazine vapor at different temperatures. In spite of the presence of water (and hence oxygen precursors) in hydrazine, the pure germanium nitride single crystal nanowires were produced in the temperature range of 480-580 degree C. At temperatures below 520 degree C, the GeOx clusters were formed first at the Ge surface, followed by the nucleation and growth of nanowires through the Vapor-Liquid-Solid mechanism. The Vapor-Solid growth mechanism was observed at temperatures exceeding 520 degree C, and Ge3N4 nanobelts were produced instead of nanowires with circular cross-sections. All nanostructures have the alpha germanium nitride structure; however, at the nucleation stage, the presence of beta Ge3N4 phase was also observed in the roots of nanowires.

  16. Low Power Silicon Germanium Electronics for Microwave Radiometers

    Doiron, Terence A.; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Space-based radiometric observations of key hydrological parameters (e.g., soil moisture) at the spatial and temporal scales required in the post-2002 era face significant technological challenges. These measurements are based on relatively low frequency thermal microwave emission (at 1.4 GHz for soil moisture and salinity, 10 GHz and up for precipitation, and 19 and 37 GHz for snow). The long wavelengths at these frequencies coupled with the high spatial and radiometric resolutions required by the various global hydrology communities necessitate the use of very large apertures (e.g., greater than 20 m at 1.4 GHz) and highly integrated stable RF electronics on orbit. Radio-interferometric techniques such as Synthetic Thinned Array Radiometry (STAR), using silicon germanium (SiGe) low power radio frequency integrated circuits (RFIC), is one of the most promising technologies to enable very large non-rotating apertures in space. STAR instruments are composed of arrays of small antenna/receiving elements that are arranged so that the collecting area is smaller than an equivalent real aperture system, allowing very high packing densities for launch. A 20 meter aperture at L-band, for example, will require greater than 1000 of these receiving elements. SiGe RFIC's reduce power consumption enough to make an array like this possible in the power-limited environment of space flight. An overview of the state-of-the-art will be given, and current work in the area of SiGe radiometer development for soil moisture remote sensing will be discussed.

  17. Separation of radioarsenic from a germanium dioxide target

    A procedure for the separation and recovery of arsenic radionuclides from a germanium oxide target using a liquid-liquid extraction technique is described. The effects of target material and preparation were investigated. The effects of hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide concentration on germanium recovery were determined. The efficacy of various reducing agents were evaluated for recovery of arsenic. In addition, the effects of hydrochloric acid and reducing agent concentration were evaluated for optimum arsenic extraction conditions. The germanium oxide target material was recovered in greater than 99% radiochemical yield with less than 1% crossover contamination of germanium radionuclides. (author)

  18. Development of segmented germanium detectors for neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    The results from neutrino oscillation experiments indicate that at least two neutrinos have mass. However, the value of the masses and whether neutrinos and anti-neutrinos are identical, i.e., Majorana particles, remain unknown. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments can help to improve our understanding in both cases and are the only method currently possible to tackle the second question. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, which will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge, is currently under construction in Hall A of the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. In order to achieve an extremely low background level, segmented germanium detectors are considered to be operated directly in liquid argon which serves simultaneously as cooling and shielding medium. Several test cryostats were built at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik in Muenchen to operate segmented germanium detectors both in vacuum and submerged in cryogenic liquid. The performance and the background discrimination power of segmented germanium detectors were studied in detail. It was proven for the first time that segmented germanium detectors can be operated stably over long periods submerged in a cryogenic liquid. It was confirmed that the segmentation scheme employed does well in the identification of photon induced background and demonstrated for the first time that also neutron interactions can be identified. The C++ Monte Carlo framework, MaGe (Majorana-GERDA), is a joint development of the Majorana and GERDA collaborations. It is based on GEANT4, but tailored especially to simulate the response of ultra-low background detectors to ionizing radiation. The predictions of the simulation were veri ed to be accurate for a wide range of conditions. Some shortcomings were found and corrected. Pulse shape analysis is complementary to segmentation in identifying background events. Its efficiency can only be correctly determined using reliable pulse shape

  19. Development of segmented germanium detectors for neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    Liu, Jing

    2009-06-09

    The results from neutrino oscillation experiments indicate that at least two neutrinos have mass. However, the value of the masses and whether neutrinos and anti-neutrinos are identical, i.e., Majorana particles, remain unknown. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments can help to improve our understanding in both cases and are the only method currently possible to tackle the second question. The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, which will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge, is currently under construction in Hall A of the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy. In order to achieve an extremely low background level, segmented germanium detectors are considered to be operated directly in liquid argon which serves simultaneously as cooling and shielding medium. Several test cryostats were built at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik in Muenchen to operate segmented germanium detectors both in vacuum and submerged in cryogenic liquid. The performance and the background discrimination power of segmented germanium detectors were studied in detail. It was proven for the first time that segmented germanium detectors can be operated stably over long periods submerged in a cryogenic liquid. It was confirmed that the segmentation scheme employed does well in the identification of photon induced background and demonstrated for the first time that also neutron interactions can be identified. The C++ Monte Carlo framework, MaGe (Majorana-GERDA), is a joint development of the Majorana and GERDA collaborations. It is based on GEANT4, but tailored especially to simulate the response of ultra-low background detectors to ionizing radiation. The predictions of the simulation were veri ed to be accurate for a wide range of conditions. Some shortcomings were found and corrected. Pulse shape analysis is complementary to segmentation in identifying background events. Its efficiency can only be correctly determined using reliable pulse

  20. Performance of bare high-purity germanium detectors in liquid argon for the GERDA experiment

    Heider, Marik Barnabé; Chkvorets, Oleg; Di Vacri, Assunta; Gusev, Konstantin; Schönert, Stefan; Shirchenko, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, will search for neutrinoless double beta decay in 76Ge at the National Gran Sasso Laboratory of the INFN. Bare high-purity germanium detectors enriched in 76Ge will be submerged in liquid argon serving simultaneously as a shield against external radioactivity and as a cooling medium. In GERDA Phase-I, reprocessed enriched-Ge detectors, which were previously operated by the Heidelberg-Moscow and IGEX collaborations, will be redeployed. Before operating the enriched detectors, tests are performed with non-enriched bare HPGe detectors in the GERDA underground Detector Laboratory to test the Phase-I detector assembly, the detector handling protocols, the refurbishment technology and to study the long-term stability in liquid argon. The leakage currents in liquid argon and liquid nitrogen have been extensively studied under varying gamma irradiation conditions. In total three non-enriched high-purity p-type prototype germanium detectors have been operated successfully. The dete...

  1. AGATA - Advanced Gamma Tracking Array

    Akkoyun, S; Alikhani, B; Ameil, F; de Angelis, G; Arnold, L; Astier, A; Ataç, A; Aubert, Y; Aufranc, C; Austin, A; Aydin, S; Azaiez, F; Badoer, S; Balabanski, D L; Barrientos, D; Baulieu, G; Baumann, R; Bazzacco, D; Beck, F A; Beck, T; Bednarczyk, P; Bellato, M; Bentley, M A; Benzoni, G; Berthier, R; Berti, L; Beunard, R; Bianco, G Lo; Birkenbach, B; Bizzeti, P G; Bizzeti-Sona, A M; Blanc, F Le; Blasco, J M; Blasi, N; Bloor, D; Boiano, C; Borsato, M; Bortolato, D; Boston, A J; Boston, H C; Bourgault, P; Boutachkov, P; Bouty, A; Bracco, A; Brambilla, S; Brawn, I P; Brondi, A; Broussard, S; Bruyneel, B; Bucurescu, D; Burrows, I; Bürger, A; Cabaret, S; Cahan, B; Calore, E; Camera, F; Capsoni, A; Carrió, F; Casati, G; Castoldi, M; Cederwall, B; Cercus, J -L; Chambert, V; Chambit, M El; Chapman, R; Charles, L; Chavas, J; Clément, E; Cocconi, P; Coelli, S; Coleman-Smith, P J; Colombo, A; Colosimo, S; Commeaux, C; Conventi, D; Cooper, R J; Corsi, A; Cortesi, A; Costa, L; Crespi, F C L; Cresswell, J R; Cullen, D M; Curien, D; Czermak, A; Delbourg, D; Depalo, R; Descombes, T; Désesquelles, P; Detistov, P; Diarra, C; Didierjean, F; Dimmock, M R; Doan, Q T; Domingo-Pardo, C; Doncel, M; Dorangeville, F; Dosme, N; Drouen, Y; Duchêne, G; Dulny, B; Eberth, J; Edelbruck, P; Egea, J; Engert, T; Erduran, M N; Ertürk, S; Fanin, C; Fantinel, S; Farnea, E; Faul, T; Filliger, M; Filmer, F; Finck, Ch; de France, G; Gadea, A; Gast, W; Geraci, A; Gerl, J; Gernhäuser, R; Giannatiempo, A; Giaz, A; Gibelin, L; Givechev, A; Goel, N; González, V; Gottardo, A; Grave, X; Grȩbosz, J; Griffiths, R; Grint, A N; Gros, P; Guevara, L; Gulmini, M; Görgen, A; Ha, H T M; Habermann, T; Harkness, L J; Harroch, H; Hauschild, K; He, C; Hernández-Prieto, A; Hervieu, B; Hess, H; Hüyük, T; Ince, E; Isocrate, R; Jaworski, G; Johnson, A; Jolie, J; Jones, P; Jonson, B; Joshi, P; Judson, D S; Jungclaus, A; Kaci, M; Karkour, N; Karolak, M; Kaşkaş, A; Kebbiri, M; Kempley, R S; Khaplanov, A; Klupp, S; Kogimtzis, M; Kojouharov, I; Korichi, A; Korten, W; Kröll, Th; Krücken, R; Kurz, N; Ky, B Y; Labiche, M; Lafay, X; Lavergne, L; Lazarus, I H; Leboutelier, S; Lefebvre, F; Legay, E; Legeard, L; Lelli, F; Lenzi, S M; Leoni, S; Lermitage, A; Lersch, D; Leske, J; Letts, S C; Lhenoret, S; Lieder, R M; Linget, D; Ljungvall, J; Lopez-Martens, A; Lotodé, A; Lunardi, S; Maj, A; van der Marel, J; Mariette, Y; Marginean, N; Marginean, R; Maron, G; Mather, A R; Mȩczyński, W; Mendéz, V; Medina, P; Melon, B; Menegazzo, R; Mengoni, D; Merchan, E; Mihailescu, L; Michelagnoli, C; Mierzejewski, J; Milechina, L; Million, B; Mitev, K; Molini, P; Montanari, D; Moon, S; Morbiducci, F; Moro, R; Morrall, P S; Möller, O; Nannini, A; Napoli, D R; Nelson, L; Nespolo, M; Ngo, V L; Nicoletto, M; Nicolini, R; Noa, Y Le; Nolan, P J; Norman, M; Nyberg, J; Obertelli, A; Olariu, A; Orlandi, R; Oxley, D C; Özben, C; Ozille, M; Oziol, C; Pachoud, E; Palacz, M; Palin, J; Pancin, J; Parisel, C; Pariset, P; Pascovici, G; Peghin, R; Pellegri, L; Perego, A; Perrier, S; Petcu, M; Petkov, P; Petrache, C; Pierre, E; Pietralla, N; Pietri, S; Pignanelli, M; Piqueras, I; Podolyak, Z; Pouhalec, P Le; Pouthas, J; Pugnére, D; Pucknell, V F E; Pullia, A; Quintana, B; Raine, R; Rainovski, G; Ramina, L; Rampazzo, G; La Rana, G; Rebeschini, M; Recchia, F; Redon, N; Reese, M; Reiter, P; Regan, P H; Riboldi, S; Richer, M; Rigato, M; Rigby, S; Ripamonti, G; Robinson, A P; Robin, J; Roccaz, J; Ropert, J -A; Rossé, B; Alvarez, C Rossi; Rosso, D; Rubio, B; Rudolph, D; Saillant, F; Şahin, E; Salomon, F; Salsac, M -D; Salt, J; Salvato, G; Sampson, J; Sanchis, E; Santos, C; Schaffner, H; Schlarb, M; Scraggs, D P; Seddon, D; Şenyiğit, M; Sigward, M -H; Simpson, G; Simpson, J; Slee, M; Smith, J F; Sona, P; Sowicki, B; Spolaore, P; Stahl, C; Stanios, T; Stefanova, E; Stézowski, O; Strachan, J; Suliman, G; Söderström, P -A; Tain, J L; Tanguy, S; Tashenov, S; Theisen, Ch; Thornhill, J; Tomasi, F; Toniolo, N; Touzery, R; Travers, B; Triossi, A; Tripon, M; Tun-Lanoë, K M M; Turcato, M; Unsworth, C; Ur, C A; Valiente-Dobon, J J; Vandone, V; Vardaci, E; Venturelli, R; Veronese, F; Veyssiere, Ch; Viscione, E; Wadsworth, R; Walker, P M; Warr, N; Weber, C; Weisshaar, D; Wells, D; Wieland, O; Wiens, A; Wittwer, G; Wollersheim, H J; Zocca, F; Zamfir, N V; Ziȩbliński, M; Zucchiatti, A

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) is a European project to develop and operate the next generation gamma-ray spectrometer. AGATA is based on the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented high-purity germanium crystals. This technique requires the accurate determination of the energy, time and position of every interaction as a gamma ray deposits its energy within the detector volume. Reconstruction of the full interaction path results in a detector with very high efficiency and excellent spectral response. The realization of gamma-ray tracking and AGATA is a result of many technical advances. These include the development of encapsulated highly-segmented germanium detectors assembled in a triple cluster detector cryostat, an electronics system with fast digital sampling and a data acquisition system to process the data at a high rate. The full characterization of the crystals was measured and compared with detector-response simulations. This enabled pulse-shape analysis algorith...

  2. Optical Activation of Germanium Plasmonic Antennas in the Mid-Infrared.

    Fischer, Marco P; Schmidt, Christian; Sakat, Emilie; Stock, Johannes; Samarelli, Antonio; Frigerio, Jacopo; Ortolani, Michele; Paul, Douglas J; Isella, Giovanni; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Biagioni, Paolo; Brida, Daniele

    2016-07-22

    Impulsive interband excitation with femtosecond near-infrared pulses establishes a plasma response in intrinsic germanium structures fabricated on a silicon substrate. This direct approach activates the plasmonic resonance of the Ge structures and enables their use as optical antennas up to the mid-infrared spectral range. The optical switching lasts for hundreds of picoseconds until charge recombination redshifts the plasma frequency. The full behavior of the structures is modeled by the electrodynamic response established by an electron-hole plasma in a regular array of antennas. PMID:27494498

  3. Heterostructures of germanium nanowires and germanium-silicon oxide nanotubes and growth mechanisms

    Huang, J Q; Chim, W K [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, 117576 (Singapore); Chiam, S Y; Wong, L M; Wang, S J, E-mail: elecwk@nus.edu.s [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore)

    2009-10-21

    We report on a method to fabricate one-dimensional heterostructures of germanium nanowires (GeNWs) and germanium-silicon oxide nanotubes (GeSiO{sub x}NTs). The synthesis of the wire-tube heterostructures is carried out using a simple furnace set-up with germanium tetraiodide and germanium powders as growth precursors, gold-dotted silicon wafers as substrates and by controlling the temperature ramp rate/sequence of the growth precursors. Two types of wire-tube heterostructures resulting from distinct growth mechanisms are obtained. The type-1 heterostructure consists of a GeNW, grown via a gold-catalyzed vapour-liquid-solid process, at the lower end and a GeSiO{sub x}NT at the upper end. In contrast, the type-2 heterostructure is made up of a solid wire at the upper end and a hollow tube at the lower end. The solid wire portion of the type-2 heterostructure is formed through an oxide-assisted growth process.

  4. Heterostructures of germanium nanowires and germanium-silicon oxide nanotubes and growth mechanisms

    We report on a method to fabricate one-dimensional heterostructures of germanium nanowires (GeNWs) and germanium-silicon oxide nanotubes (GeSiOxNTs). The synthesis of the wire-tube heterostructures is carried out using a simple furnace set-up with germanium tetraiodide and germanium powders as growth precursors, gold-dotted silicon wafers as substrates and by controlling the temperature ramp rate/sequence of the growth precursors. Two types of wire-tube heterostructures resulting from distinct growth mechanisms are obtained. The type-1 heterostructure consists of a GeNW, grown via a gold-catalyzed vapour-liquid-solid process, at the lower end and a GeSiOxNT at the upper end. In contrast, the type-2 heterostructure is made up of a solid wire at the upper end and a hollow tube at the lower end. The solid wire portion of the type-2 heterostructure is formed through an oxide-assisted growth process.

  5. Ultraviolet-light-induced processes in germanium-doped silica

    Kristensen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    A model is presented for the interaction of ultraviolet (UV) light with germanium-doped silica glass. It is assumed that germanium sites work as gates for transferring the excitation energy into the silica. In the material the excitation induces forbidden transitions to two different defect state...

  6. Tensile strain mapping in flat germanium membranes

    Scanning X-ray micro-diffraction has been used as a non-destructive probe of the local crystalline quality of a thin suspended germanium (Ge) membrane. A series of reciprocal space maps were obtained with ∼4 μm spatial resolution, from which detailed information on the strain distribution, thickness, and crystalline tilt of the membrane was obtained. We are able to detect a systematic strain variation across the membranes, but show that this is negligible in the context of using the membranes as platforms for further growth. In addition, we show evidence that the interface and surface quality is improved by suspending the Ge

  7. Silicon germanium mask for deep silicon etching

    Serry, Mohamed

    2014-07-29

    Polycrystalline silicon germanium (SiGe) can offer excellent etch selectivity to silicon during cryogenic deep reactive ion etching in an SF.sub.6/O.sub.2 plasma. Etch selectivity of over 800:1 (Si:SiGe) may be achieved at etch temperatures from -80 degrees Celsius to -140 degrees Celsius. High aspect ratio structures with high resolution may be patterned into Si substrates using SiGe as a hard mask layer for construction of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and semiconductor devices.

  8. Tensile strain mapping in flat germanium membranes

    Rhead, S. D., E-mail: S.Rhead@warwick.ac.uk; Halpin, J. E.; Myronov, M.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Wilson, N. R.; Leadley, D. R. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Shah, V. A. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Reparaz, J. S. [ICN2 - Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Sotomayor Torres, C. M. [ICN2 - Institut Catala de Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2014-04-28

    Scanning X-ray micro-diffraction has been used as a non-destructive probe of the local crystalline quality of a thin suspended germanium (Ge) membrane. A series of reciprocal space maps were obtained with ∼4 μm spatial resolution, from which detailed information on the strain distribution, thickness, and crystalline tilt of the membrane was obtained. We are able to detect a systematic strain variation across the membranes, but show that this is negligible in the context of using the membranes as platforms for further growth. In addition, we show evidence that the interface and surface quality is improved by suspending the Ge.

  9. Silicon/Germanium Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Ericsson, Leif

    2006-01-01

    Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) is a well-established method to grow low-dimensional structures for research applications. MBE has given many contributions to the rapid expanding research-area of nano-technology and will probably continuing doing so. The MBE equipment, dedicated for Silicon/Germanium (Si/Ge) systems, at Karlstads University (Kau) has been studied and started for the first time. In the work of starting the system, all the built in interlocks has been surveyed and connected, and t...

  10. High-purity germanium crystal growing

    The germanium crystals used for the fabrication of nuclear radiation detectors are required to have a purity and crystalline perfection which is unsurpassed by any other solid material. These crystals should not have a net electrically active impurity concentration greater than 1010cm-3 and be essentially free of charge trapping defects. Such perfect crystals of germanium can be grown only because of the highly favorable chemical and physical properties of this element. However, ten years of laboratory scale and commercial experience has still not made the production of such crystals routine. The origin and control of many impurities and electrically active defect complexes is now fairly well understood but regular production is often interrupted for long periods due to the difficulty of achieving the required high purity or to charge trapping in detectors made from crystals seemingly grown under the required conditions. The compromises involved in the selection of zone refining and crystal grower parts and ambients is discussed and the difficulty in controlling the purity of key elements in the process is emphasized. The consequences of growing in a hydrogen ambient are discussed in detail and it is shown how complexes of neutral defects produce electrically active centers

  11. Electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector system

    We have successfully developed and fielded an electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector (EMC-HPGe) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This detector system was designed to provide optimum energy resolution, long lifetime, and extremely reliable operation for unattended and portable applications. For most analytical applications, high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are the standard detectors of choice, providing an unsurpassed combination of high energy resolution performance and exceptional detection efficiency. Logistical difficulties associated with providing the required liquid nitrogen (LN) for cooling is the primary reason that these systems are found mainly in laboratories. The EMC-HPGe detector system described in this paper successfully provides HPGe detector performance in a portable instrument that allows for isotopic analysis in the field. It incorporates a unique active vibration control system that allows the use of a Sunpower Stirling cycle cryocooler unit without significant spectral degradation from microphonics. All standard isotopic analysis codes, including MGA and MGA++, GAMANL, GRPANL and MGAU, typically used with HPGe detectors can be used with this system with excellent results. Several national and international Safeguards organisations including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have expressed interest in this system. The detector was combined with custom software and demonstrated as a rapid Field Radiometric Identification System (FRIS) for the U.S. Customs Service . The European Communities' Safeguards Directorate (EURATOM) is field-testing the first Safeguards prototype in their applications. The EMC-HPGe detector system design, recent applications, and results will be highlighted

  12. Experimental test of the background rejection, through imaging capability, of a highly segmented AGATA germanium detector

    Doncel, M., E-mail: doncel@usal.e [Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Universidad de Salamanca (Spain); Recchia, F. [INFN sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Quintana, B. [Laboratorio de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Universidad de Salamanca (Spain); Gadea, A. [IFIC Valencia, Valencia (Spain); INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Farnea, E. [INFN sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    2010-10-21

    The development of highly segmented germanium detectors as well as the algorithms to identify the position of the interaction within the crystal opens the possibility to locate the {gamma}-ray source using Compton imaging algorithms. While the Compton-suppression shield, coupled to the germanium detector in conventional arrays, works also as an active filter against the {gamma} rays originated outside the target, the new generation of position sensitive {gamma}-ray detector arrays has to fully rely on tracking capabilities for this purpose. In specific experimental conditions, as the ones foreseen at radioactive beam facilities, the ability to discriminate background radiation improves the sensitivity of the gamma spectrometer. In this work we present the results of a measurement performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) aiming the evaluation of the AGATA detector capabilities to discriminate the origin of the {gamma} rays on an event-by-event basis. It will be shown that, exploiting the Compton scattering formula, it is possible to track back {gamma} rays coming from different positions, assigning them to specific emitting locations. These imaging capabilities are quantified for a single crystal AGATA detector.

  13. Effects of Germanium on Movement of Dislocations in p-Type Czochralski Silicon

    2006-01-01

    By indentation at room temperature followed by annealing at high temperatures, the pinning effect of germanium on dislocations in germanium-doped Czochralski silicon was investigated. Experimental results show that the dislocations in germanium-doped Czochralski silicon move shorter and slower than those in Czochralski silicon undoping with germanium when the concentration of germanium is over 1×1018 cm-3. The retarding velocity of dislocations is contributed to the dislocations pinning effect of the strain field introduced by the high concentration germanium, and the Ge4B cluster and the oxygen precipitation those are preferred to form at higher concentration germanium.

  14. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies

  15. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    Chroneos, A., E-mail: alexander.chroneos@imperial.ac.uk [Faculty of Engineering and Computing, Coventry University, Priory Street, Coventry CV1 5FB (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A. [Solid State Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, 157 84 Athens (Greece); Schwingenschlögl, U. [PSE Division, KAUST, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-06-15

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  16. Oxygen defect processes in silicon and silicon germanium

    Chroneos, A.

    2015-06-18

    Silicon and silicon germanium are the archetypical elemental and alloy semiconductor materials for nanoelectronic, sensor, and photovoltaic applications. The investigation of radiation induced defects involving oxygen, carbon, and intrinsic defects is important for the improvement of devices as these defects can have a deleterious impact on the properties of silicon and silicon germanium. In the present review, we mainly focus on oxygen-related defects and the impact of isovalent doping on their properties in silicon and silicon germanium. The efficacy of the isovalent doping strategies to constrain the oxygen-related defects is discussed in view of recent infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory studies.

  17. Synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires.

    Clement, Teresa J. (Arizona State University); Hsu, Julia W. P.

    2007-11-01

    The vapor-liquid-solid growth process for synthesis of group-IV semiconducting nanowires using silane, germane, disilane and digermane precursor gases has been investigated. The nanowire growth process combines in situ gold seed formation by vapor deposition on atomically clean silicon (111) surfaces, in situ growth from the gaseous precursor(s), and real-time monitoring of nanowire growth as a function of temperature and pressure by a novel optical reflectometry technique. A significant dependence on precursor pressure and growth temperature for the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires is observed, depending on the stability of the specific precursor used. Also, the presence of a nucleation time for the onset of nanowire growth has been found using our new in situ optical reflectometry technique.

  18. Interactions of germanium atoms with silica surfaces

    Stanley, Scott K.; Coffee, Shawn S.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2005-11-01

    GeH 4 is thermally cracked over a hot filament depositing 0.7-15 ML Ge onto 2-7 nm SiO 2/Si(1 0 0) at substrate temperatures of 300-970 K. Ge bonding changes are analyzed during annealing with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ge, GeH x, GeO, and GeO 2 desorption is monitored through temperature programmed desorption in the temperature range 300-1000 K. Low temperature desorption features are attributed to GeO and GeH 4. No GeO 2 desorption is observed, but GeO 2 decomposition to Ge through high temperature pathways is seen above 750 K. Germanium oxidization results from Ge etching of the oxide substrate. With these results, explanations for the failure of conventional chemical vapor deposition to produce Ge nanocrystals on SiO 2 surfaces are proposed.

  19. Germanium detectors and natural radioactivity in food

    Potassium is a very important mineral for many physiological processes, like fluid balance, protein synthesis and signal transmission in nerves. Many aliments like raisins, bananas or chocolate contain potassium. Natural potassium contains 0.012% of the radioactive isotope Potassium 40. This isotope decays via β+ decay into a metastable state of Argon 40, which reaches its ground state emitting a gamma of 1460 keV. A commercially produced Germanium detector has been used to measure the energy spectra of different selected food samples. It was calibrated with KCl and potassium contents were extracted. Results verify the high potassium content of commonly recommended food samples. However, the measurement quantitatively differ from the expectations in several cases. One of the most interesting results concerns chocolate bars with different percentages of cacao.

  20. Germanium detectors and natural radioactivity in food

    Garbini, Lucia [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GeDet-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Potassium is a very important mineral for many physiological processes, like fluid balance, protein synthesis and signal transmission in nerves. Many aliments like raisins, bananas or chocolate contain potassium. Natural potassium contains 0.012% of the radioactive isotope Potassium 40. This isotope decays via β{sup +} decay into a metastable state of Argon 40, which reaches its ground state emitting a gamma of 1460 keV. A commercially produced Germanium detector has been used to measure the energy spectra of different selected food samples. It was calibrated with KCl and potassium contents were extracted. Results verify the high potassium content of commonly recommended food samples. However, the measurement quantitatively differ from the expectations in several cases. One of the most interesting results concerns chocolate bars with different percentages of cacao.

  1. Electron paramagnetic resonance at dislocations in germanium

    Pakulis, E.J.

    1982-06-01

    The first observation of the paramagnetic resonance of electrons at dislocations in germanium single crystals is reported. Under subband gap optical excitation, two sets of lines are detected: four lines about the <111> axes with g/sub perpendicular to/ = 0.34 and g/sub parallel/ = 1.94, and 24 lines with g/sub perpendicular to/ = 0.73 and g/sub parallel/ = 1.89 about <111> axes with the six-fold 1.2/sup 0/ distortion. This represents the first measurement of the disortion angle of a dislocation dangling bond. The possibility that the distortion results from a Peierls transition along the dislocation line is discussed.

  2. Interactions of germanium atoms with silica surfaces

    GeH4 is thermally cracked over a hot filament depositing 0.7-15 ML Ge onto 2-7 nm SiO2/Si(1 0 0) at substrate temperatures of 300-970 K. Ge bonding changes are analyzed during annealing with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ge, GeH x, GeO, and GeO2 desorption is monitored through temperature programmed desorption in the temperature range 300-1000 K. Low temperature desorption features are attributed to GeO and GeH4. No GeO2 desorption is observed, but GeO2 decomposition to Ge through high temperature pathways is seen above 750 K. Germanium oxidization results from Ge etching of the oxide substrate. With these results, explanations for the failure of conventional chemical vapor deposition to produce Ge nanocrystals on SiO2 surfaces are proposed

  3. Lattice site and thermal stability of transition metals in germanium

    Augustyns, Valérie; Pereira, Lino

    Although the first transistor was based on germanium, current chip technology mainly uses silicon due to its larger abundance, a lower price and higher quality silicon-oxide. However, a very important goal in microelectronics is to obtain faster integrated circuits. The advantages of germanium compared to silicon (e.g. a higher mobility of the charge carriers) motivates further research on germanium based materials. Semiconductor doping (e.g. introducing impurities into silicon and germanium in order to alter - and control - their properties) can be done by ion implantation or by in situ doping, whereby the host material is doped during growth. This thesis focuses on introducing dopants by ion implantation. The implantation as well as the subsequent measurements were performed in ISOLDE (CERN) using the emission channeling technique. Although ion implantation generates undesired defects in the host material (e.g. vacancies), such damage can be reduced by performing the implantation at an elevated temperature....

  4. Protective infrared antireflection coating based on sputtered germanium carbide

    Gibson, Des; Waddell, Ewan; Placido, Frank

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes optical, durablility and environmental performance of a germanium carbide based durable antireflection coating. The coating has been demonstrated on germanium and zinc selenide infra-red material however is applicable to other materials such as zinc sulphide. The material is deposited using a novel reactive closed field magnetron sputtering technique, offering significant advantages over conventional evaporation processes for germanium carbide such as plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The sputtering process is "cold", making it suitable for use on a wide range of substrates. Moreover, the drum format provide more efficient loading for high throughput production. The use of the closed field and unbalanced magnetrons creates a magnetic confinement that extends the electron mean free path leading to high ion current densities. The combination of high current densities with ion energies in the range ~30eV creates optimum thin film growth conditions. As a result the films are dense, spectrally stable, supersmooth and low stress. Films incorporate low hydrogen content resulting in minimal C-H absorption bands within critical infra-red passbands such as 3 to 5um and 8 to 12um. Tuning of germanium carbide (Ge(1-x)Cx) film refractive index from pure germanium (refractive index 4) to pure germanium carbide (refractive index 1.8) will be demonstrated. Use of film grading to achieve single and dual band anti-reflection performance will be shown. Environmental and durability levels are shown to be suitable for use in harsh external environments.

  5. Astroparticle physics with a customized low-background broad energy Germanium detector

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barbeau, P. S.; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Bugg, William; Burritt, Tom H.; Busch, Matthew; Capps, Greg L.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, R. J.; Creswick, R.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Diaz, J.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, Steven R.; Ely, James H.; Esterline, James H.; Farach, H. A.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fujikawa, Brian; Fuller, Erin S.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Harper, Gregory; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keillor, Martin E.; Keller, C.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Miley, Harry S.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Myers, Allan W.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Peterson, David; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Prior, Gersende; Qian, J.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rodriguez, Larry; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof P.; Salazar, Harold; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Swift, Gary; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Van Wechel, T. D.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wolfe, B. A.; Xiang, W.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.; Zimmerman, S.

    2011-10-01

    The Majorana Collaboration is building the Majorana Demonstrator, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The Majorana Demonstrator will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/c² mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the Majorana Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a low-background environment.

  6. Astroparticle Physics with a Customized Low-Background Broad Energy Germanium Detector

    Aalseth, C E; Avignone, F T; Back, H O; Barabash, A S; Barbeau, P S; Bergevin, M; Bertrand, F E; Boswell, M; Brudanin, V; Bugg, W; Burritt, T H; Busch, M; Capps, G; Chan, Y-D; Collar, J I; Cooper, R J; Creswick, R; Detwiler, J A; Diaz, J; Doe, P J; Efremenko, Yu; Egorov, V; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Ely, J; Esterline, J; Farach, H; Fast, J E; Fields, N; Finnerty, P; Fujikawa, B; Fuller, E; Gehman, V M; Giovanetti, G K; Guiseppe, V E; Gusey, K; Hallin, A L; Harper, G C; Hazama, R; Henning, R; Hime, A; Hoppe, E W; Hossbach, T W; Howe, M A; Johnson, R A; Keeter, K J; Keillor, M; Keller, C; Kephart, J D; Kidd, M F; Knecht, A; Kochetov, O; Konovalov, S I; Kouzes, R T; Leviner, L; Loach, J C; Luke, P N; MacMullin, S; Marino, M G; Martin, R D; Mei, D -M; Miley, H S; Miller, M L; Mizouni, L; Meyers, A W; Nomachi, M; Orrell, J L; Peterson, D; Phillips, D G; Poon, A W P; Prior, G; Qian, J; Radford, D C; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Rodriguez, L; Rykaczewski, K P; Salazar, H; Schubert, A G; Shima, T; Shirchenko, M; Steele, D; Strain, J; Swift, G; Thomas, K; Timkin, V; Tornow, W; Van Wechel, T D; Vanyushin, I; Varner, R L; Vetter, K; Wilkerson, J F; Wolfe, B A; Xiang, W; Yakushev, E; Yaver, H; Young, A R; Yu, C -H; Yumatov, V; Zhang, C; Zimmerman, S

    2010-01-01

    The MAJORANA Collaboration is building the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, a 60 kg array of high purity germanium detectors housed in an ultra-low background shield at the Sanford Underground Laboratory in Lead, SD. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge while demonstrating the feasibility of a tonne-scale experiment. It may also carry out a dark matter search in the 1-10 GeV/c^2 mass range. We have found that customized Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors produced by Canberra have several desirable features for a neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, including low electronic noise, excellent pulse shape analysis capabilities, and simple fabrication. We have deployed a customized BEGe, the MAJORANA Low-Background BEGe at Kimballton (MALBEK), in a low-background cryostat and shield at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Virginia. This paper will focus on the detector characteristics and measurements that can be performed with such a radiation detector in a ...

  7. Consistency check of pulse shape discrimination for broad energy germanium detectors using double beta decay data

    The Gerda (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment was built to study fundamental neutrino properties via neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ). 0νββ events are single-site events (SSE) confined to a scale about millimeter. However, most of backgrounds are multi-site events (MSE). Broad Energy Germanium detectors (BEGes) offer the potential merits of improved pulse shape recognition efficiencies of SSE/MSE. They allow us to reach the goal of Phase II with a background index of 10-3 cts/(keV.kg.yr) in the ROI. BEGe detectors with a total target mass of 3.63 kg have been installed to the Gerda setup in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in July 2012 and are collecting data since. A consistency check of the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) efficiencies by comparison of calibration data and 2νββ data will be presented. The PSD power of these detectors is demonstrated.

  8. Consistency check of pulse shape discrimination for broad energy germanium detectors using double beta decay data

    Liao, Heng-Ye [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The Gerda (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment was built to study fundamental neutrino properties via neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ). 0νββ events are single-site events (SSE) confined to a scale about millimeter. However, most of backgrounds are multi-site events (MSE). Broad Energy Germanium detectors (BEGes) offer the potential merits of improved pulse shape recognition efficiencies of SSE/MSE. They allow us to reach the goal of Phase II with a background index of 10{sup -3} cts/(keV.kg.yr) in the ROI. BEGe detectors with a total target mass of 3.63 kg have been installed to the Gerda setup in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in July 2012 and are collecting data since. A consistency check of the pulse shape discrimination (PSD) efficiencies by comparison of calibration data and 2νββ data will be presented. The PSD power of these detectors is demonstrated.

  9. Focusing of a new germanium counter type : the composite detector. Uses of the TREFLE detector in the EUROGAM multidetector

    The aim of this thesis is the development of new types of germanium detectors: the composite detectors. Two types of prototypes are then conceived: the stacked planar detector (EDP) and the assembly of coaxial diodes (TREFLE). They are designed for the multidetector EUROGAM destined to the research of nuclear structure at high angular momentum. The four planar diodes of EDP detector were of 7 cm diameter and of 15 to 20 mm thick. The difference between the calculated and measured photopic efficiency is observed. The importance of surface channel induces a weak resistance of neutron damages. The sputtering method for the surface treatment reducing the germanium dead layer as well as a rule of selection concerning the impurity concentration and the thickness of crystal is helpful for the later production of germanium detector. The CLOVER detector consist of for mean size crystals in the same cryostat. The photopic efficiency is much larger than that of the greatest monocrystal detector. And the granulation of composite detector allowed the Doppler broadening correction of gamma ray observed in the nuclear reaction where the recoil velocity is very high. This new type of detector enable the linear polarization measurement of gamma ray. Twenty-four CLOVER detector are actually mounted in the EUROGAM array. The characteristics measured in source as well as in beam, reported in this thesis, meet exactly the charge account. (author). 47 refs., 61 figs., 18 tabs

  10. Nanoindentation of ion-implanted crystalline germanium

    Most indentation studies to date on crystalline germanium (c-Ge) and related covalent semiconductors have been carried out on pristine defect-free material. This paper addresses the paucity of studies on imperfect crystalline materials by exploring the impact of defects generated by ion implantation, prior to contact damage, upon the mechanical properties of c-Ge. Implantation with Ge ions is carried out to generate a layer of highly defective but still-crystalline Ge. Under nanoindentation with a sharp diamond tip, enhanced plasticity is observed relative to pristine material. Characterization by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and load curve analysis shows softening, quasiductile extrusion, and cracking suppression taking place. These changes can be explained by the high density of defects, and dangling bonds in particular, created by ion implantation and revealed by positron-annihilation spectroscopy, and are proportional to the fraction of 'missing bonds' or vacancies in the material. A thermal annealing step at 200 deg. C is sufficient to restore the mechanical response of pristine material, despite incomplete recovery of the original pristine crystal structure.

  11. Low background germanium detector technology from Canberra

    Full text: Since Eurisys Mesures and Canberra merged into one company under the wings of Cogema-Areva in February 2001, decades of know-how and experience in building Germanium detectors for low level gamma ray analysis have been brought together. This vast experience means that Canberra can offer a large variety of 'low level detectors' depending on the application. The complexity and cost of these detectors increase with the decreasing detection limits that our customers want to obtain. In this paper we give a short overview of the various categories of 'low level HP Ge detectors' that we produce. We present some examples of detection limits that can be obtained with each of these and we show what measures are taken to come to the next lower limit of detection. The spectroscopist should be aware, however, that the detection limit that can be obtained with a particular source and isotope mix depends in the first place on the choice of the detector element geometry and size, and on the geometry of the cryostat and source. Reference discusses this aspect of the optimum counting conditions. The choice of the shielding and the location of the detector-shield combination (above or below ground level) comes in second place. The precise design and choice of materials for the cryostat -- the subject of this paper -- are generally only the third factor of importance. The simplest low level gamma counting system that we consider in this paper consists of a standard high purity germanium detector in a standard lead shield. The cryostat materials used for these standard detectors are selected mainly for their mechanical properties and cost. Selection of the cryostat materials for their radio-purity comes only in the second place. The contribution of their activities to the background in the spectrum is neglectable since the measuring times are usually limited (typically 1 hour) and the background coming from the room and from the sample is generally higher. Detection limits

  12. Low background Germanium detector technology from Canberra

    Full text: Since Eurisys Mesures and Canberra merged into one company under the wings of Cogema-Areva in February 2001, decades of know-how and experience in building Germanium detectors for low level gamma ray analysis have been brought together. This vast experience means that Canberra can offer a large variety of 'low level detectors' depending on the application. The complexity and cost of these detectors increase with the decreasing detection limits that our customers want to obtain. In this paper we give a short overview of the various categories of 'low level HP Ge detectors' that we produce. We present some examples of detection limits that can be obtained with each of these and we show what measures are taken to come to the next lower limit of detection. The spectroscopist should be aware, however, that the detection limit that can be obtained with a particular source and isotope mix depends in the first place on the choice of the detector element geometry and size, and on the geometry of the cryostat and source. Reference discusses this aspect of the optimum counting conditions. The choice of the shielding and the location of the detector-shield combination (above or below ground level) comes in second place. The precise design and choice of materials for the cryostat - the subject of this paper - are generally only the third factor of importance. The simplest low level gamma counting system that we consider in this paper consists of a standard high purity germanium detector in a standard lead shield. The cryostat materials used for these standard detectors are selected mainly for their mechanical properties and cost. Selection of the cryostat materials for their radio-purity comes only in second place. The contribution of their activities to the background in the spectrum is negligible since the measuring times are usually limited (typically 1 hour) and the background coming from the room and the sample is generally higher. Detection limits that are

  13. Anisotropic Optical Properties of Layered Germanium Sulfide

    Tan, Dezhi; Wang, Feijiu; Mohamed, Nur Baizura; Mouri, Shinichiro; Sandhaya, Koirala; Zhang, Wenjing; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Ohfuchi, Mari; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorus, have attracted much interest from the viewpoints of fundamental physics and device applications. The establishment of new functionalities in anisotropic layered 2D materials is a challenging but rewarding frontier, owing to their remarkable optical properties and prospects for new devices. Here, we report the anisotropic optical properties of layered 2D monochalcogenide of germanium sulfide (GeS). Three Raman scattering peaks corresponding to the B3g, A1g, and A2g modes with strong polarization dependence are demonstrated in the GeS flakes, which validates polarized Raman spectroscopy as an effective method for identifying the crystal orientation of anisotropic layered GeS. Photoluminescence (PL) is observed with a peak at around 1.66 eV that originates from the direct optical transition in GeS at room temperature. Moreover, determination of the polarization dependent characteristics of the PL and absorption reveals...

  14. Erbium in silicon-germanium quantum wells

    Strained Si1-xGex/Si quantum wells have been doped with erbium by implantation. A comparison is made with strained Si1-xGex/Si quantum wells and relaxed Si1-xGex, with x between 10% and 25%, doped with erbium during MBE growth. The erbium concentration was between 1x1018 and 5x1018 cm-3 throughout the active regions. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and photoluminescence studies indicate that good regrowth can been achieved after full amorphisation by implantation of the strained quantum wells. The erbium luminescence is more intense in the Si1-xGex/Si layers, but erbium-implanted samples containing Si1-xGex exhibit defect luminescence in the region of 0.9-1.0 eV. These defects are also present when Si1-xGex/Si quantum wells are implanted with an amorphising dose of silicon, and then regrown. They are attributed to small germanium-rich platelets, rather than to erbium-related defects. Electroluminescence is presented from a forward biased erbium-implanted Si0.87Ge0.13/Si structure at a drive current density of only 1.8 mA/cm2. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. Development of a low-temperature germanium detector via mechanical cooling with a compact pulse-tube refrigerator

    We have developed a new germanium (Ge) detector unit for hypernuclear γ-ray spectroscopy at J-PARC, which comprises a new Ge detector array Hyperball-J. A compact pulse-tube refrigerator is coupled to a coaxial Ge detector in order to achieve lower crystal temperatures as a means to increase radiation hardness. The obtained crystal temperature is 72 K, while an energy resolution is maintained at (FWHM) 3.1(1) keV for 1.33 MeV γ rays using a gate-integrated shaping amplifier (ORTEC 973U). Gain shifts with changing crystal temperature are also confirmed for the Ge detector

  16. Development of a low-temperature germanium detector via mechanical cooling with a compact pulse-tube refrigerator

    Koike, T., E-mail: tkoike@lambda.phys.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-7858 (Japan); Chiga, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-7858 (Japan); Haruyama, T. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Hosomi, K. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-7858 (Japan); Advance Science Research Center, JAEA, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ichinohe, H. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Hino 191-8502 (Japan); Kasami, K. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Matsushita, T.; Mizoguchi, Y. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Hino 191-8502 (Japan); Ono, H. [SEIKO EG and G Co. Ltd., Matsudo 270-2222 (Japan); Shirotori, K. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-7858 (Japan); Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Ibaraki 567-0047 (Japan); Takeuchi, T. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Hino 191-8502 (Japan); Tamura, H.; Yamamoto, T.O. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-7858 (Japan)

    2015-01-11

    We have developed a new germanium (Ge) detector unit for hypernuclear γ-ray spectroscopy at J-PARC, which comprises a new Ge detector array Hyperball-J. A compact pulse-tube refrigerator is coupled to a coaxial Ge detector in order to achieve lower crystal temperatures as a means to increase radiation hardness. The obtained crystal temperature is 72 K, while an energy resolution is maintained at (FWHM) 3.1(1) keV for 1.33 MeV γ rays using a gate-integrated shaping amplifier (ORTEC 973U). Gain shifts with changing crystal temperature are also confirmed for the Ge detector.

  17. Single-molecule conductance in atomically precise germanium wires.

    Su, Timothy A; Li, Haixing; Zhang, Vivian; Neupane, Madhav; Batra, Arunabh; Klausen, Rebekka S; Kumar, Bharat; Steigerwald, Michael L; Venkataraman, Latha; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-09-30

    While the electrical conductivity of bulk-scale group 14 materials such as diamond carbon, silicon, and germanium is well understood, there is a gap in knowledge regarding the conductivity of these materials at the nano and molecular scales. Filling this gap is important because integrated circuits have shrunk so far that their active regions, which rely so heavily on silicon and germanium, begin to resemble ornate molecules rather than extended solids. Here we unveil a new approach for synthesizing atomically discrete wires of germanium and present the first conductance measurements of molecular germanium using a scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction (STM-BJ) technique. Our findings show that germanium and silicon wires are nearly identical in conductivity at the molecular scale, and that both are much more conductive than aliphatic carbon. We demonstrate that the strong donor ability of C-Ge σ-bonds can be used to raise the energy of the anchor lone pair and increase conductance. Furthermore, the oligogermane wires behave as conductance switches that function through stereoelectronic logic. These devices can be trained to operate with a higher switching factor by repeatedly compressing and elongating the molecular junction. PMID:26373928

  18. Germanium, Arsenic, and Selenium Abundances in Metal-Poor Stars

    Roederer, Ian U

    2012-01-01

    The elements germanium (Ge, Z=32), arsenic (As, Z=33), and selenium (Se, Z=34) span the transition from charged-particle or explosive synthesis of the iron-group elements to neutron-capture synthesis of heavier elements. Among these three elements, only the chemical evolution of germanium has been studied previously. Here we use archive observations made with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope and observations from several ground-based facilities to study the chemical enrichment histories of seven stars with metallicities -2.6 < [Fe/H] < -0.4. We perform a standard abundance analysis of germanium, arsenic, selenium, and several other elements produced by neutron-capture reactions. When combined with previous derivations of germanium abundances in metal-poor stars, our sample reveals an increase in the [Ge/Fe] ratios at higher metallicities. This could mark the onset of the weak s-process contribution to germanium. In contrast, the [As/Fe] and [Se/Fe] ratios rema...

  19. Investigation of germanium Raman lasers for the mid-infrared.

    De Leonardis, Francesco; Troia, Benedetto; Soref, Richard A; Passaro, Vittorio M N

    2015-06-29

    In this paper we present a detailed theoretical investigation of integrated racetrack Raman lasers based on the germanium material system operating in the mid-infrared beyond the germanium two-photon absorption cut-off wavelength of 3.17 μm. The effective Raman gain has been estimated in waveguides based on germanium-on-silicon, germanium-on-SOI and germanium-on-Si3N4 technology platforms as a function of their crystallographic orientations. Furthermore, general design guidelines have been determined by means of a comparative analysis of Raman laser performance, i.e. the threshold power, polarization and directionality of the excited Stokes signals as a function of racetrack cavity length and directional-coupler dimensions. Finally, the emitted Raman laser power has been evaluated as a function of overall propagation losses and operative wavelengths up to 3.8 μm, while the time dynamics of Raman lasers has been simulated assuming continuous and pulse waves as input pump signals. PMID:26191733

  20. Anisotropy of thermal expansion and electric resistance of cermet germanium telluride

    Anisotropies of thermal expansion α and electric resistance ρ of cermet germanium telluride were investigated depending on pressing conditions. It is shown that anisotropy of cermet germanium telluride depends sufficiently on pressing conditions with respect to thermal expansion and electric resistance. It was established that anisotropy of the cermet germanium telluride was strongly affected by pressing force and temperature. Anisotropy of the cermet germanium telluride also depends with respect to α and ρ on the material and size of the mould

  1. Porous structure formation in ion irradiated germanium

    The ion beam induced modification of amorphous germanium is characterised by the formation of voids close to the sample surface and the transformation into a sponge-like porous surface layer at high ion fluences. This extreme structural modification of the sample surface is independent of the (heavy) ion species used and accompanied by a strong volume expansion. Nevertheless, recently it was demonstrated that buried voids (and buried sponge-like layers) can be formed in the depth of the projected ion range, however, only for the irradiation with I-ions at high ion fluences. Thus, the ion species and their chemical properties seem to play an important role in the structural modification around the projected ion range. In this paper we investigate the influence of the ion species on the ion beam induced void formation in Ge for room temperature irradiation with 380 keV I- and Au-ions as a function of the ion fluence. Independent of the ion species, a strong volume expansion is observed caused by void formation and the transformation into a sponge-like porous surface layer. For both ion species used, the final porous layers are structurally identical as established by cross section and plan view electron microscopy investigations. Further ion irradiation of the sponge-like porous structure, however, leads to significant differences in the ion beam induced structural evolution. For the Au-ion irradiation the porous layer remains nearly unchanged, whereas for the irradiation with I-ions a transformation from sponge-like to netlike porous layers occurs which is accompanied again by an extreme volume expansion. The underlying mechanism will be discussed based on chemical properties of the implanted ions

  2. Liquid phase epitaxial growth and characterization of germanium far infrared blocked impurity band detectors

    Bandaru, Jordana

    2001-05-12

    Germanium Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors require a high purity blocking layer (< 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}) approximately 1 mm thick grown on a heavily doped active layer ({approx} 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) approximately 20 mm thick. Epilayers were grown using liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of germanium out of lead solution. The effects of the crystallographic orientation of the germanium substrate on LPE growth modes were explored. Growth was studied on substrates oriented by Laue x-ray diffraction between 0.02{sup o} and 10{sup o} from the {l_brace}111{r_brace} toward the {l_brace}100{r_brace}. Terrace growth was observed, with increasing terrace height for larger misorientation angles. It was found that the purity of the blocking layer was limited by the presence of phosphorus in the lead solvent. Unintentionally doped Ge layers contained {approx}10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} phosphorus as determined by Hall effect measurements and Photothermal Ionization Spectroscopy (PTIS). Lead purification by vacuum distillation and dilution reduced the phosphorus concentration in the layers to {approx} 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} but further reduction was not observed with successive distillation runs. The graphite distillation and growth components as an additional phosphorus source cannot be ruled out. Antimony ({approx}10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}) was used as a dopant for the active BIB layer. A reduction in the donor binding energy due to impurity banding was observed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. A BIB detector fabricated from an Sb-doped Ge layer grown on a pure substrate showed a low energy photoconductive onset ({approx}6 meV). Spreading resistance measurements on doped layers revealed a nonuniform dopant distribution with Sb pile-up at the layer surface, which must be removed by chemomechanical polishing. Sb diffusion into the pure substrate was observed by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) for epilayers grown at 650 C. The Sb concentration at the interface

  3. Liquid phase epitaxial growth and characterization of germanium far infrared blocked impurity band detectors

    Germanium Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors require a high purity blocking layer ( and lt; 10(sup 13) cm(sup -3)) approximately 1 mm thick grown on a heavily doped active layer ((approx) 10(sup 16) cm(sup -3)) approximately 20 mm thick. Epilayers were grown using liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) of germanium out of lead solution. The effects of the crystallographic orientation of the germanium substrate on LPE growth modes were explored. Growth was studied on substrates oriented by Laue x-ray diffraction between 0.02(sup o) and 10(sup o) from the(lbrace)111(rbrace) toward the(lbrace)100(rbrace). Terrace growth was observed, with increasing terrace height for larger misorientation angles. It was found that the purity of the blocking layer was limited by the presence of phosphorus in the lead solvent. Unintentionally doped Ge layers contained(approx)10(sup 15) cm(sup -3) phosphorus as determined by Hall effect measurements and Photothermal Ionization Spectroscopy (PTIS). Lead purification by vacuum distillation and dilution reduced the phosphorus concentration in the layers to(approx) 10(sup 14) cm(sup -3) but further reduction was not observed with successive distillation runs. The graphite distillation and growth components as an additional phosphorus source cannot be ruled out. Antimony ((approx)10(sup 16) cm(sup -3)) was used as a dopant for the active BIB layer. A reduction in the donor binding energy due to impurity banding was observed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. A BIB detector fabricated from an Sb-doped Ge layer grown on a pure substrate showed a low energy photoconductive onset ((approx)6 meV). Spreading resistance measurements on doped layers revealed a nonuniform dopant distribution with Sb pile-up at the layer surface, which must be removed by chemomechanical polishing. Sb diffusion into the pure substrate was observed by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) for epilayers grown at 650 C. The Sb concentration at the interface dropped

  4. Field emission measured from nanostructured germanium and silicon thin films

    We have prepared nanostructured thin films of germanium and silicon. The films were grown by an ion beam sputtering technique followed by a rapid annealing step using an electron beam annealer. The annealing temperature is a comparatively low 500 deg. C, resulting in well defined nano-islands on the film surface. Electron field emission has been measured from the surfaces under high vacuum. The threshold electric field value for significant current flow was measured as 2.5 V μm-1 for a silicon thin film which is comparable to other silicon technologies. A value of 0.5 V μm-1 for a germanium thin film represents an order of magnitude improvement for related germanium nanostructured systems.

  5. Investigation of the performance of various germanium detectors in a Compton suppression shield

    The performance of four germanium detectors with different geometries inside an escape suppression shield have been investigated. The measurements show that the use of escape suppression shields give an improved detection system. The best results were obtained for the biggest germanium detector used and there is also evidence that detectors with less inactive germanium layers give better results. (U.K.)

  6. Epitaxial growth of group IV materials by chemical vapor deposition for Germanium Metal Oxide Semiconductor devices

    Vincent, Benjamin; Loo, Roger; Caymax, Matty [imec, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2011-07-01

    Over the past 5-10 years, germanium has attracted a lot of interest to replace Silicon as a high carrier mobility material in future p-Metal Oxide Semiconductors transistors. This paper reviews developments of epitaxial Group IV materials (silicon, germanium, tin and alloys) by means of Reduced Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition for use as Channel, Gate stack and Source/Drain in high performance Germanium transistors. We first describe Germanium growth on standard Silicon wafers. Selective epitaxial growth within Shallow Trench Isolation structures allows seamless integration of Germanium channels in Si platform with a significant defect reduction down to levels required for state-of-the-art VLSI technology. Next we focus on the most successful passivation approach for Germanium MOS interfaces by means of ultrathin epitaxial Si capping layers. This moves the problem of gate stack formation from a germanium surface to a silicon surface. We discuss novel extremely low temperature CVD processes involving innovative precursors, and impacts of point defects, strain relaxation and Silicon-Germanium intermixing on Germanium device performance. Finally, the implementation of Germanium-Tin alloys in embedded Source/Drain regions in Germanium transistors is proposed as an innovative architecture to implement strain in Germanium channels.

  7. Formation of non-equilibrium germanium-based solid solutions in al-ge-alloys

    O.Yu. Bereza

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the investigation of phase composition and microstructure of the higher cooled aluminum-germanium alloys. The formation of non-equilibrium germanium solid solutions is shown. The influence of the rate of cooling and the germanium percentage on the phase composition of alloys is shown.

  8. Program LEPS to addition of gamma spectra from germanium detectors

    The LEP program, written in FORTRAN IV, performs the addition of two spectra, collected with different detectors, from the same sample. This application, adds the two gamma spectra obtained from two opposite LEPS Germanium Detectors (Low Energy Photon Spectrometer), correcting the differences (channel/energy) between both two spectra, and fitting them before adding. The total-spectrum is recorded at the computer memory as a single spectrum. The necessary equipment, to run this program is: - Two opposite germanium detectors, with their associate electronics. - Multichannel analyzer (2048 memory channel minimum) - Computer on-line interfacing to multichannel analyzer. (Author) 4 refs

  9. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Structure of densified amorphous germanium dioxide

    Micoulaut, Matthieu

    2004-03-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the structure of densified germanium dioxide (GeO2). It is found that the coordination number of germanium changes with increasing density (pressure) while pressure released systems exhibit only a marked angular change in local structure as compared to the virgin system. The structural modification with pressure appears to be stepwise and gradually affects long-range (through the reduction of the long-range correlations as seen from the shift of the first sharp diffraction peak), intermediate-range (by angular reduction) and finally short-range structure (by tetrahedron distortion).

  10. Atomic ionization of germanium due to neutrino magnetic moments

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Huang, Keh-Ning; Liu, C -P; Shiao, Hao-Tse; Singh, Lakhwinder; Wong, Henry T; Wu, Chih-Liang; Wu, Chih-Pan

    2013-01-01

    An ab initio calculation of atomic ionization of germanium (Ge) by neutrinos was carried out in the framework of multiconfiguration relativistic random phase approximation. The main goal is to provide a more accurate cross section formula than the conventional one, which is based on the free electron approximation, for searches of neutrino magnetic moments with Ge detectors whose threshold is reaching down to the sub-keV regime. Limits derived with both methods are compared, using reactor neutrino data taken with low threshold germanium detectors.

  11. Phase transformations in two-layer germanium-tellurium condensates

    Investigation results of phase transformations, occuring in thin two-layer films germanium-tellurium with bilayer thickness of 20-30 up to 70-80 mm are presented. Two-layer films were produced by vacuum precipitation. Amorphous germanium and polycrystalline tellurium layer is detected in the initial films. Condensate warm-up by the electron beam leads to formation of a homogeneous amorphous GeTe film. It is ascertained, that the free energy of the formed compound film is lower than the free energy of thetw-layer condensate, i.e. condensate amorphization appears to be an energetically bemfitial process

  12. Ionization Efficiency Study for Low Energy Nuclear Recoils in Germanium

    Barker, D; Mei, D -M; Zhang, C

    2013-01-01

    We used the internal conversion ($E_0$ transition) of germanium-72 to indirectly measure the low energy nuclear recoils of germanium. Together with a reliable Monte Carlo package, in which we implement the internal conversion process, the data was compared to the Lindhard ($k$=0.159) and Barker-Mei models. A shape analysis indicates that both models agree well with data in the region of interest within 4%. The most probable value (MPV) of the nuclear recoils obtained from the shape analysis is 17.5 keV with an average path-length of 0.014 $\\mu$m.

  13. The GALATEA test-facility for High Purity Germanium Detectors

    Abt, I; Doenmez, B; Garbini, L; Irlbeck, S; Majorovits, B; Palermo, M; Schulz, O; Seitz, H; Stelzer, F

    2014-01-01

    GALATEA is a test facility designed to investigate bulk and surface effects in high purity germanium detectors. A vacuum tank houses an infrared screened volume with a cooled detector inside. A system of three stages allows an almost complete scan of the detector. The main feature of GALATEA is that there is no material between source and detector. This allows the usage of alpha and beta sources as well as of a laser beam to study surface effects. A 19-fold segmented true-coaxial germanium detector was used for commissioning.

  14. The GALATEA test-facility for high purity germanium detectors

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Dönmez, B.; Garbini, L.; Irlbeck, S.; Majorovits, B.; Palermo, M., E-mail: palermo@mpp.mpg.de; Schulz, O.; Seitz, H.; Stelzer, F.

    2015-05-11

    GALATEA is a test facility designed to investigate bulk and surface effects in high purity germanium detectors. A vacuum tank houses a cold volume with the detector inside. A system of three precision motorized stages allows an almost complete scan of the detector. The main feature of GALATEA is that there is no material between source and detector. This allows the usage of alpha and beta sources to study surface effects. A 19-fold segmented true-coaxial germanium detector was used for commissioning. A first analysis of data obtained with an alpha source is presented here.

  15. Detached Bridgman Growth of Germanium and Germanium-Silicon Alloy Crystals

    Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M. P.; Schweizer, M.; Cobb, S. D.; Motakef, S.; Croell, A.; Dold, P.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Earth based experiments on the science of detached crystal growth are being conducted on germanium and germanium-silicon alloys (2 at% Si average composition) in preparation for a series of experiments aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The purpose of the microgravity experiments includes differentiating among proposed mechanisms contributing to detachment, and confirming or refining our understanding of the detachment mechanism. Because large contact angle are critical to detachment, sessile drop measurements were used to determine the contact angles as a function of temperature and composition for a large number of substrates made of potential ampoule materials. Growth experiments have used pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) and fused silica ampoules with the majority of the detached results occurring predictably in the pBN. The contact angles were 173 deg (Ge) and 165 deg (GeSi) for pBN. For fused silica, the contact angle decreases from 150 deg to an equilibrium value of 117 deg (Ge) or from 129 deg to an equilibrium value of 100 deg (GeSi) over the duration of the experiment. The nature and extent of detachment is determined by using profilometry in conjunction with optical and electron microscopy. The stability of detachment has been analyzed, and an empirical model for the conditions necessary to achieve sufficient stability to maintain detached growth for extended periods has been developed. Results in this presentation will show that we have established the effects on detachment of ampoule material, pressure difference above and below the melt, and silicon concentration; samples that are nearly completely detached can be grown repeatedly in pBN.

  16. AGATA - Advanced GAmma Tracking Array

    The Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) is a European project to develop and operate the next generation γ-ray spectrometer. AGATA is based on the technique of γ-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented high-purity germanium crystals. This technique requires the accurate determination of the energy, time and position of every interaction as a γ ray deposits its energy within the detector volume. Reconstruction of the full interaction path results in a detector with very high efficiency and excellent spectral response. The realisation of γ-ray tracking and AGATA is a result of many technical advances. These include the development of encapsulated highly segmented germanium detectors assembled in a triple cluster detector cryostat, an electronics system with fast digital sampling and a data acquisition system to process the data at a high rate. The full characterisation of the crystals was measured and compared with detector-response simulations. This enabled pulse-shape analysis algorithms, to extract energy, time and position, to be employed. In addition, tracking algorithms for event reconstruction were developed. The first phase of AGATA is now complete and operational in its first physics campaign. In the future AGATA will be moved between laboratories in Europe and operated in a series of campaigns to take advantage of the different beams and facilities available to maximise its science output. The paper reviews all the achievements made in the AGATA project including all the necessary infrastructure to operate and support the spectrometer.

  17. Discovery of Gallium, Germanium, Lutetium, and Hafnium Isotopes

    J.L. Gross; Thoennessen, M

    2011-01-01

    Currently, twenty-eight gallium, thirty-one germanium, thirty-five lutetium, and thirty-six hafnium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  18. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  19. Chemical Route for Si/C Coated Germanium Nanowires

    Dřínek, Vladislav; Šubrt, Jan; Klementová, Mariana; Fajgar, Radek

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 2 (2010), s. 255-260. ISSN 0165-2370 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : nanowire * germanium * germylene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.234, year: 2010

  20. Photomask technique for fabricating high purity germanium strip detectors

    A new technology for germanium strip detectors has been developed. This technique uses a photomask process which needs no growing and etching and allows all kinds of segmented electrodes. Typically we have obtained 1.2 keV FWHM on the 122 keV line of 57Co and a X-Y detector having 20 strips in each side. (orig.)

  1. The nitrogen pair in silicon and germanium microstructure and interaction

    The objective of the present work has been to study the microstructure of nitrogen defects in silicon and germanium, especially the nitrogen pair defect which is the dominant nitrogen defect in both materials. The interaction of nitrogen with other impurities as oxygen, boron and phosphorus have also been studied. A number of different experimental techniques have been used especially ion channeling and Fourier Transformation Infra-Red absorption spectroscopy. Although several references to theory are given, this thesis is concerned with the experimental investigations carried out on nitrogen in silicon and germanium. Monocrystals implanted by nitrogen contained typically 6,5x1019 cm-3. After implantation the samples were annealed at 700 deg. C in order to produce the expected nitrogen defects. The structure of nitrogen pair in silicon and germanium by channeling measurements and infrared absorption has been studied. A new model of the pair defect has been proposed. Uniaxial stress on the nitrogen pair in silicon and germanium has been analyzed. A direct theoretical prediction within the antiparallel model regarding the splitting under [001] stress is confirmed experimentally. (EG) 38 refs

  2. Modified matrix volatilization setup for characterization of high purity germanium.

    Meruva, Adisesha Reddy; Raparthi, Shekhar; Kumar, Sunil Jai

    2016-01-01

    Modified matrix volatilization (MV) method has been described to characterize high purity germanium material of 7 N (99.99999%) purity. Transport of both, the chlorine gas generated in-situ in this method and the argon gas (carrier) is fine controlled by means of a mass flow controller. This enabled both uniform reaction of chlorine gas with the germanium matrix and smooth removal of germanium matrix as its chloride. This resulted in improvement in the reproducibility of the analytical results. The use of quartz reaction vessel has lead to the reduction in the process blank levels. The combined effect of these modifications in the MV setup has resulted in very consistent and low process blanks and hence improved detection limits of this method. Applicability of the method has been expanded to rare earth elements and other elements after examining their recoveries. The quantification is done by using inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-QMS) and continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (CS-GFAAS). In the absence of certified reference materials for high pure germanium, the accuracy of the method is established by spike recovery tests. The precision of the method has been found to vary from 1 to 30% for concentrations between 1 and 30 ng g(-1). The limits of detection (LOD) for the target analytes are found to be between 18 and 0.033 ng g(-1). PMID:26695261

  3. Direct observations of the vacancy and its annealing in germanium

    Slotte, J.; Kilpeläinen, S.; Tuomisto, F.;

    2011-01-01

    K. This is identified as the positron lifetime in a germanium monovacancy. Annealing experiments in the temperature interval 35–300 K reveal two annealing stages. The first at 100 K is tentatively associated with the annealing of the Frenkel pair, the second at 200 K with the annealing of the...

  4. Composite germanium monochromators - results for the TriCS

    Schefer, J.; Fischer, S.; Boehm, M.; Keller, L.; Horisberger, M.; Medarde, M.; Fischer, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Composite germanium monochromators are in the beginning of their application in neutron diffraction. We show here the importance of the permanent quality control with neutrons on the example of the 311 wafers which will be used on the single crystal diffractometer TriCS at SINQ. (author) 2 figs., 3 refs.

  5. Characteristics of germanium thin film thermometers at low temperatures

    Germanium thin films as resistance thermometers have been tested at liquid helium temperature. Germanium is deposited in vacuum on insulated substrates and then silver onto the germanium films as ohmic contacts. The thermometers with desired resistances and suitable sensitivities can be easily fabricated by choosing proper deposition conditions. The purpose of this work is to develop a thermometer with a fast response time for heat transfer experiments in liquid helium. The characteristics of a typical thermometer are as follows. The film resistance can be expressed as a function of temperature by a simple correlation, log R=C+m log T, between 4.2K and 20K. The sensitivity is approximately 20Ω/K. After 50 thermal cyclings, the increase rate of the resistance at liquid helium temperature is within 0,8%. An estimated heat capacity of the film is 2x10-8 J/K, and a thermal relaxation time is of the order of 10-12 s at 4.2K. These results prove that the germanium thin film thermometers are promising to measure transient surface temperature near 4.2K. A stainless steel foil with the thermometers is heated by a direct current in a liquid helium bath, and the surface temperature of the foil are measured. Large temperature fluctuations due to occasional liquid solid contacts are observed. (author)

  6. Development of revitalisation technique for impaired lithium doped germanium detector

    Semiconductor detectors play very significant role in photon detection and are important tools in the field of gamma spectroscopy. Lithium doped germanium detectors belong to this category. The development of revitalisation technique for these impaired detectors are discussed in this report

  7. Strained-layer epitaxy of germanium-silicon alloys.

    Bean, J C

    1985-10-11

    Despite the dominant position of silicon in semiconductor electronics, its use is ultimately limited by its incompatibility with other semiconducting materials. Strained-layer epitaxy overcomes problems of crystallographic compatibility and produces high-quality heterostructures of germanium-silicon layers on silicon. This opens the door to a range of electronic and photonic devices that are based on bandstructure physics. PMID:17842673

  8. Broad Band Antireflection Coatings for Silicon and Germanium Substrates.

    Bezuidenhout, Dirk Francois

    Infrared antireflection coatings for silicon and germanium substrates and some of the associated problems are addressed in this thesis. One of the first problems identified and investigated was that of the adhesion of ZnS films to germanium substrates. The cleaning of the Ge discs was evaluated by means of Auger spectroscopy. The main contaminant species found were carbon, oxygen and in the case of germanium substrates sulphur. No sulphur was found on silicon substrates. A wash in a series of organic solutions followed by a bake inside the vacuum chamber lead to much improved though still not acceptable adhesion of ZnS films to germanium substrates. The influence of a contact layer between the substrate and ZnS was investigated. Firstly, metal contact layers (Ni, Cr, Cu) were tried to improve the adhesion of the ZnS films. These samples (germanium-metal-zinc sulphide) were annealed in air in order to transfer the germanium -metal film to a germanide region and thus high optical transmission at long wave-lengths. Slight absorption still results even after the annealing of these samples. A dielectric material, Y_2O_3 , was therefore tested replacing the metal films. The system Ge-Y_2O_3 -ZnS in conjunction with an organic wash and vacuum bake lead to excellent adhesion of the ZnS layers to the germanium substrates. The next problem area addressed was that of a low refractive index material replacement for ThF _4. Four materials were investigated, i.e. ZnS, PbF_2, Y_2O _3 and YF_3. The refractive indices found for these compounds in thin film form at a wavelength of 10 μm is 2,18 for ZnS, 1,7 for PbF_2, 1,42 for Y_2O_3 and 1,3 for YF_3. From these results YF_3 was chosen as low refractive index material in the coating designs. Multi-layer coatings incorporating ZnS, Ge and YF_3 films were designed and evaporated. Measured reflectance values below 0,2% were obtained from 9 μm to 11 mum. These systems were stable and robust. Finally, a silicon ball lens was

  9. Plasmonic Nanoslit Array Enhanced Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Optical Detectors

    Eryilmaz, Sukru Burc; Okyay, Ali K

    2014-01-01

    Metallic nanoslit arrays integrated on germanium metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors show many folds of absorption enhancement for transverse-magnetic polarization in the telecommunication C-band. Such high enhancement is attributed to resonant interference of surface plasmon modes at the metal-semiconductor interface. Horizontal surface plasmon modes were reported earlier to inhibit photodetector performance. We computationally show, however, that horizontal modes enhance the efficiency of surface devices despite reducing transmitted light in the far field.

  10. An environmentally-friendly vacuum reduction metallurgical process to recover germanium from coal fly ash.

    Zhang, Lingen; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-07-15

    The demand for germanium in the field of semiconductor, electronics, and optical devices is growing rapidly; however, the resources of germanium are scarce worldwide. As a secondary material, coal fly ash could be further recycled to retrieve germanium. Up to now, the conventional processes to recover germanium have two problems as follows: on the one hand, it is difficult to be satisfactory for its economic and environmental effect; on the other hand, the recovery ratio of germanium is not all that could be desired. In this paper, an environmentally-friendly vacuum reduction metallurgical process (VRMP) was proposed to recover germanium from coal fly ash. The results of the laboratory scale experiments indicated that the appropriate parameters were 1173K and 10Pa with 10wt% coke addition for 40min, and recovery ratio germanium was 93.96%. On the basis of above condition, the pilot scale experiments were utilized to assess the actual effect of VRMP for recovery of germanium with parameter of 1473K, 1-10Pa and heating time 40min, the recovery ratio of germanium reached 94.64%. This process considerably enhances germanium recovery, meanwhile, eliminates much of the water usage and residue secondary pollution compared with other conventional processes. PMID:27015376

  11. Diffusion of n-type dopants in germanium

    Germanium is being actively considered by the semiconductor community as a mainstream material for nanoelectronic applications. Germanium has advantageous materials properties; however, its dopant-defect interactions are less understood as compared to the mainstream material, silicon. The understanding of self- and dopant diffusion is essential to form well defined doped regions. Although p-type dopants such as boron exhibit limited diffusion, n-type dopants such as phosphorous, arsenic, and antimony diffuse quickly via vacancy-mediated diffusion mechanisms. In the present review, we mainly focus on the impact of intrinsic defects on the diffusion mechanisms of donor atoms and point defect engineering strategies to restrain donor atom diffusion and to enhance their electrical activation

  12. Limits on dark matter from the St. Gotthard germanium detector

    A search for the presence of galactic cold dark matter has been performed using a single 140 cm3 (0.7 kg) germanium crystal. A low background germanium detectors installed in the St. Gotthard tunnel for the purpose of studying 76Ge double beta decay may serve as a sensitive detector for cold galactic dark matter. It is assumed that the dark matter consists of heavy Dirac neutrinos. A low detection threshold of 1.5 keV has been achieved, making the detector sensitive to Dirac neutrinos with masses above 12 GeV and a halo density of 0.30 GeV cm-3 at Earth. (R.P.) 5 refs.; 2 figs

  13. Synthesis and Gas Phase Thermochemistry of Germanium-Containing Compounds

    Nathan Robert Classen

    2002-12-31

    The driving force behind much of the work in this dissertation was to gain further understanding of the unique olefin to carbene isomerization observed in the thermolysis of 1,1-dimethyl-2-methylenesilacyclobutane by finding new examples of it in other silicon and germanium compounds. This lead to the examination of a novel phenylmethylenesilacyclobut-2-ene, which did not undergo olefin to carbene rearrangement. A synthetic route to methylenegermacyclobutanes was developed, but the methylenegermacyclobutane system exhibited kinetic instability, making the study of the system difficult. In any case the germanium system decomposed through a complex mechanism which may not include olefin to carbene isomerization. However, this work lead to the study of the gas phase thermochemistry of a series of dialkylgermylene precursors in order to better understand the mechanism of the thermal decomposition of dialkylgermylenes. The resulting dialkylgermylenes were found to undergo a reversible intramolecular {beta} C-H insertion mechanism.

  14. Development of neutron-transmutation-doped germanium bolometer material

    The behavior of lattice defects generated as a result of the neutron-transmutation-doping of germanium was studied as a function of annealing conditions using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and mobility measurements. DLTS and variable temperature Hall effect were also used to measure the activation of dopant impurities formed during the transmutation process. In additioon, a semi-automated method of attaching wires on to small chips of germanium (3) for the fabrication of infrared detecting bolometers was developed. Finally, several different types of junction field effect transistors were tested for noise at room and low temperature (approx. 80 K) in order to find the optimum device available for first stage electronics in the bolometer signal amplification circuit

  15. Diffusion of n-type dopants in germanium

    Chroneos, A., E-mail: alexander.chroneos@imperial.ac.uk [Engineering and Innovation, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bracht, H., E-mail: bracht@uni-muenster.de [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Münster (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Germanium is being actively considered by the semiconductor community as a mainstream material for nanoelectronic applications. Germanium has advantageous materials properties; however, its dopant-defect interactions are less understood as compared to the mainstream material, silicon. The understanding of self- and dopant diffusion is essential to form well defined doped regions. Although p-type dopants such as boron exhibit limited diffusion, n-type dopants such as phosphorous, arsenic, and antimony diffuse quickly via vacancy-mediated diffusion mechanisms. In the present review, we mainly focus on the impact of intrinsic defects on the diffusion mechanisms of donor atoms and point defect engineering strategies to restrain donor atom diffusion and to enhance their electrical activation.

  16. Titania-germanium nanocomposite for photo-thermo-electric application

    The introduction of germanium (Ge) into titania (TiO2) creates an attractive semiconductor. The new semiconductor is named titania-germanium (TiO2-Ge). Ge dots are dispersed in the distorted TiO2 matrix of TiO2-Ge. The quantum Bohr radius of Ge is 24.3 nm, and hence the properties of the Ge dot can be varied by tailoring its size if it is smaller than its Bohr radius due to the quantum confinement effect (QCE). Therefore, simply by changing the Ge concentration, the morphology of TiO2-Ge can be varied within a wide range. Consequently, the optical, electronic and thermal properties of TiO2-Ge can be tailored. TiO2-Ge becomes a promising material for the next generation of photovoltaics as well as thermoelectric devices. It could also be used for photo-thermo-electric applications

  17. Mechanically-cooled germanium detector using two stirling refrigerators

    In this paper, we present a developed mechanically-cooled germanium gamma-ray detector using Stirling refrigerators. Two Stirling refrigerators having cooling faculty of 1.5W at 80K were used to cool down a germanium detector element to 77K instead of a dewar containing liquid nitrogen. An 145cm3 (56.0mmf x 59.1 mml) closed-end Ge(I) detector having relative detection efficiency of 29.4% was attached at the refrigerators. The size of the detector was 60cml x 15cmh x 15cmw. The lowest cooling temperature, 70K was obtained after 8 hours operation. The energy resolutions for 1.33MeV gamma-rays and for pulser signals were 2.43keV and 1.84keV at an amplifier shaping time of 2μsec, respectively

  18. Hole mobility in germanium irradiated with large fluences of fast neutrons

    The Hall mobility of holes in germanium irradiated with large fluences of fast neutrons 1014 cm-219 cm-2 is studied over a wide range of temperature 7 K14 cm-3RD17 cm-3. After irradiation the original samples became p-type, low-resistance samples. Electrical properties of neutron irradiated germanium are determined by acceptor-like radiation defects with energy levels of EV+0.016 eV. It is found that at temperatures above 100 K the hole mobility in neutron irradiated germanium and in germanium doped by gallium changes with temperature by general laws, and their values are comparable. The main scattering mechanisms inherent to homogeneous doped crystalline semiconductors are established also in neutron irradiated germanium. The results give rise to conclude that germanium irradiated with large fluences of fast neutrons can be assumed as crystalline with a homogeneous radiation defect distribution. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Synthesis and characterization of Germanium quantum dots for thermoelectric applications

    Hojabri, arash

    2015-01-01

    Energy resources are a main factor for the development of industry and human life, however, the use of fusil fuels as energy is harmful to the environment. Taking these two matters into consideration, the use of waste energy is a good response. The thermoelectric phenomena, which was, discovered in the 18th century plays a main role in converting waste heat energy to electricity and vice-versa. Germanium quantum dots (Ge QDs) have received special attention due to their unusual electrical and...

  20. Impacts of Atomistic Coating on Thermal Conductivity of Germanium Nanowires

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2012-01-01

    By using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrated that thermal conductivity of Germanium nanowires can be reduced more than 25% at room temperature by atomistic coating. There is a critical coating thickness beyond which thermal conductivity of the coated nanowire is larger than that of the host nanowire. The diameter dependent critical coating thickness and minimum thermal conductivity are explored. Moreover, we found that interface roughness can induce further reducti...

  1. Growth rate and crystal habit of germanium telluride

    Controlling steps of GeTe crystal growth under different experimental conditions were determined. Diffusion coefficient of GeTe molecules in argon was found, and condensation coefficient was evaluated. Influence of mass transfer rate in a gas on crystal habit was studied: crystals have round faces at low rates and dendritic growth is observed at high rates. Optimal conditions of growing edged crystals of germanium telluride of α-3 mm size were determined

  2. Electronic Structure of Germanium Nanocrystal Films Probed with Synchrotron Radiation

    Bostedt, C

    2002-05-01

    The fundamental structure--property relationship of semiconductor quantum dots has been investigated. For deposited germanium nanocrystals strong quantum confinement effects have been determined with synchrotron radiation based x-ray absorption and photoemission techniques. The nanocrystals are condensed out of the gas phase with a narrow size distribution and subsequently deposited in situ onto various substrates. The particles are crystalline in the cubic phase with a structurally disordered surface shell and the resulting film morphology depends strongly on the substrate material and condition. The disordered surface region has an impact on the overall electronic structure of the particles. In a size-dependent study, the conduction and valence band edge of germanium nanocrystals have been measured for the first time and compared to the bulk crystal. The band edges move to higher energies as the particle size is decreased, consistent with quantum confinement theory. To obtain a more accurate analysis of confinement effects in the empty states, a novel analysis method utilizing an effective particle size for the x-ray absorption experiment, which allows a deconvolution of absorption edge broadening effects, has been introduced. Comparison of the present study to earlier studies on silicon reveals that germanium exhibits stronger quantum confinement effects than silicon. Below a critical particle size of 2.3 {+-} 0.7 nm, the band gap of germanium becomes larger than that of silicon--even if it is the opposite for bulk materials. This result agrees phenomenologically with effective mass and tight binding theories but contradicts the findings of recent pseudopotential calculations. The discrepancy between theory and experiments is attributed to the differences in the theoretical models and experimental systems. The experimentally observed structural disorder of the particle surface has to be included in the theoretical models.

  3. Average resonance parameters of germanium and selenium nuclei

    Full sets of average resonance parameters S0, S1, R0', R1', S1,3/2 for germanium and selenium nuclei with natural isotope content are determined. Parameters are received from the analysis of experimental neutron elastic scattering cross sections at energy region up to 440 keV with the help of the method developed by the authors. The analysis of recommended parameters and some literature data is fulfilled as well.

  4. Environmental applications for an intrinsic germanium well detector

    The overall performance of an intrinsic germanium well detector for 125I measurements was investigated in a program of environmental surveillance. Concentrations of 125I and 131I were determined in thyroids of road-killed deer showing the highest activities of 125I in the animals from the near vicinity of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This demonstrates the utility of road-killed deer as a bioindicator for radioiodine around nuclear facilities. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Diffusion of tin in germanium: A GGA+U approach

    Tahini, H. A.

    2011-10-18

    Density functional theory calculations are used to investigate the formation and diffusion of tin-vacancy pairs (SnV) in germanium(Ge). Depending upon the Fermi energy, SnV pairs can form in neutral, singly negative, or doubly negative charged states. The activation energies of diffusion, also as function of the Fermi energy, are calculated to lie between 2.48-3.65 eV, in agreement with and providing an interpretation of available experimental work.

  6. Strain-induced changes to the electronic structure of germanium

    Tahini, H. A.

    2012-04-17

    Density functional theory calculations (DFT) are used to investigate the strain-induced changes to the electronic structure of biaxially strained (parallel to the (001), (110) and (111) planes) and uniaxially strained (along the [001], [110] and [111] directions) germanium (Ge). It is calculated that a moderate uniaxial strain parallel to the [111] direction can efficiently transform Ge to a direct bandgap material with a bandgap energy useful for technological applications. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. HEROICA: an Underground Facility for the Fast Screening of Germanium Detectors

    Andreotti, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Maneschg, W.; Barros, N.; Benato, G.; Brugnera, R.; Costa, F.; Falkenstein, R.; Guthikonda, K.; A. Hegai; Hemmer, S.(Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell‘Università di Padova, Padua, Italy); Hult, M.; Jaenner, K.; Kihm, T.; Lehnert, B.

    2013-01-01

    An infrastructure to characterize germanium detectors has been designed and constructed at the HADES Underground Research Laboratory, located in Mol (Belgium). Thanks to the 223m overburden of clay and sand, the muon flux is lowered by four orders of magnitude. This natural shield minimizes the exposure of radio-pure germanium material to cosmic radiation resulting in a significant suppression of cosmogenic activation in the germanium detectors. The project has been strongly motivated by a sp...

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of the X-ray response of a germanium microstrip detector with energy and position resolution

    Rossi, G; Fajardo, P; Morse, J

    1999-01-01

    We present Monte Carlo computer simulations of the X-ray response of a micro-strip germanium detector over the energy range 30-100 keV. The detector consists of a linear array of lithographically defined 150 mu m wide strips on a high purity monolithic germanium crystal of 6 mm thickness. The simulation code is divided into two parts. We first consider a 10 mu m wide X-ray beam striking the detector surface at normal incidence and compute the interaction processes possible for each photon. Photon scattering and absorption inside the detector crystal are simulated using the EGS4 code with the LSCAT extension for low energies. A history of events is created of the deposited energies which is read by the second part of the code which computes the energy histogram for each detector strip. Appropriate algorithms are introduced to account for lateral charge spreading occurring during charge carrier drift to the detector surface, and Fano and preamplifier electronic noise contributions. Computed spectra for differen...

  9. Ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium; Ionenstrahlinduzierte Strukturmodifikationen in amorphem Germanium

    Steinbach, Tobias

    2012-05-03

    Object of the present thesis was the systematic study of ion-beam induced structure modifications in amorphous germanium (a-Ge) layers due to low- (LEI) and high-energetic (SHI) ion irradiation. The LEI irradiation of crystalline Ge (c-Ge) effects because the dominating nuclear scattering of the ions on the solid-state atoms the formation of a homogeneous a-Ge Layer. Directly on the surface for fluences of two orders of magnitude above the amorphization fluence the formation of stable cavities independently on the irradiation conditions was observed. For the first time for the ion-beam induced cavity formation respectively for the steady expansion of the porous layer forming with growing fluence a linear dependence on the energy {epsilon}{sub n} deposed in nuclear processes was detected. Furthermore the formation of buried cavities was observed, which shows a dependence on the type of ions. While in the c-Ge samples in the range of the high electronic energy deposition no radiation defects, cavities, or plastic deformations were observed, the high electronic energy transfer in the 3.1 {mu}m thick pre-amorphized a-Ge surface layers leads to the formation of randomly distributed cavities. Basing on the linear connection between cavity-induced vertical volume expansion and the fluence determined for different energy transfers for the first time a material-specific threshold value of {epsilon}{sub e}{sup HRF}=(10.5{+-}1.0) kev nm{sup -1} was determined, above which the ion-beam induced cavity formation in a-Ge sets on. The anisotropic plastic deformation of th a-Ge layer superposed at inclined SHI irradiation on the cavity formation was very well described by an equation derived from the viscoelastic Maxwell model, but modified under regardment of the experimental results. The positive deformation yields determined thereby exhibit above a threshold value for the ion-beam induced plastic deformation {epsilon}{sub e}{sup S{sub a}}=(12{+-}2) keV nm{sup -1} for the first

  10. Transfer-less flexible and transparent high-κ/metal gate germanium devices on bulk silicon (100)

    Nassar, Joanna M.

    2014-08-01

    Flexible wearable electronics have been of great interest lately for the development of innovative future technology for various interactive applications in the field of consumer electronics and advanced healthcare, offering the promise of low-cost, lightweight, and multifunctionality. In the pursuit of this trend, high mobility channel materials need to be investigated on a flexible platform, for the development of flexible high performance devices. Germanium (Ge) is one of the most attractive alternatives for silicon (Si) for high-speed computational applications, due its higher hole and electron mobility. Thus, in this work we show a cost effective CMOS compatible process for transforming conventional rigid Ge metal oxide semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPS) into a mechanically flexible and semi-transparent platform. Devices exhibit outstanding bendability with a bending radius of 0.24 cm, and semi-transparency up to 30 %, varying with respect to the diameter size of the release holes array.

  11. Developments in large gamma-ray detector arrays

    Lee, I Y; Vetter, K

    2003-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy was revolutionized with the introduction of high energy-resolution semiconductor germanium (Ge) detectors in the early 1960s. This led to the large increase in sensitivity realized by today's arrays of Compton-suppressed Ge detectors. A still larger increase in sensitivity is expected by implementing the new concept of tracking. A tracking array consists of highly segmented Ge detectors (that can cover the full 4 pi solid-angle) in which gamma rays will be identified by measuring and tracking every gamma ray interaction. This article reviews the physics motivation for such detectors and the development of the new technologies involved. The concept of tracking is explained using the example of a proposed array called gamma-ray energy tracking array (GRETA).

  12. Array tomography: imaging stained arrays.

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. In this protocol, tissue arrays are imaged using conventional wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Images can be captured manually or, with the appropriate software and hardware, the process can be automated. PMID:21041399

  13. Array tomography: production of arrays.

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time consuming and require some practice to perfect. This protocol describes the sectioning of embedded tissues and the mounting of the serial arrays. The procedures require some familiarity with the techniques used for ultramicrotome sectioning for electron microscopy. PMID:21041397

  14. A micro-strip germanium detector for position sensitive X-ray spectroscopy

    For the current X-ray spectroscopy program at the ESR storage ring (GSI-Darmstadt) a position sensitive germanium detector system has been completed. The position sensitive structure of the detector has been realized on an area of 47 mm x 23.4 mm by an array of 200 strips (200 μm wide and 23.4 mm long) separated by 35 μm wide grooves etched through boron implanted contact. The thickness of the detector inclusive a 0.6 mm thick Li-diffused rear contact amounts to 4.1 mm. Each strip has been joined to a preamplifier placed outside the cryostat with printed leads inside the flexible Kapton foil. The energy resolution of the strips has been about 1.8 keV [FWHM] for 60 keV photons. Coincidences between neighbouring strips were measured whereby a time resolution of 70 ns [FWHM] was obtained. First preliminary results obtained with the detector mounted at the transmission X-ray spectrometer FOCAL demonstrated that an energy resolution better than 100 eV is achievable together with a high detection efficiency. Along with a new kind of X-ray spectrometer this detector may play a keyrole for the next step of high precision X-ray experiments, aiming on a precise test of quantum electrodynamics in the heaviest one-electron systems such as hydrogenlike uranium. (orig.)

  15. Demonstration of Surface Electron Rejection with Interleaved Germanium Detectors for Dark Matter Search

    Agnese, R; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Borgland, A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Cherry, M; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Silva, E Do Couto E; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fox, J; Fritts, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hasi, J; Hertel, S A; Hines, B A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kenany, S A; Kennedy, A; Kenney, C J; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nadeau, P; Nelson, R H; Novak, L; Page, K; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Radpour, R; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Resch, R W; Ricci, Y; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schmitt, R; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Seitz, D; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Tomada, A; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2013-01-01

    SuperCDMS, a direct search for WIMPs, is currently operating a 9-kg array of cryogenic germanium (Ge) detectors in the Soudan Underground Laboratory. These detectors, known as iZIPs, use ionization and phonon sensors placed symmetrically on both sides of a Ge crystal to measure both charge and athermal phonons from each particle interaction. The information from each event provides excellent discrimination between electron recoils and nuclear recoils, as well as discrimination between events on the detector surface and those in the interior. To demonstrate the surface electron rejection capabilities, two $^{210}$Pb sources were installed facing detectors, producing $\\sim$130 beta decays/hr. In $\\sim$800 live hours, no events leaked into the WIMP signal region in the recoil energy range 8--115 keVr, providing an upper limit to the surface event leakage fraction of $1.7 \\times 10^{-5}$ at 90% C.L. This rejection factor demonstrates that surface electrons would produce $< 0.6$ event background in the 0.3 ton-...

  16. Dead Layer Measurement in P-type Point Contact Germanium Detectors for the Majorana Demonstrator

    Elia, Sophia; Majorana Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) of the isotope 76Ge. In anticipation of the future large-scale experiments, its goal is to demonstrate a path forward to a background rate of one cnt/(ROI-t-y) in a 4 keV region around the Q-value of the 76Ge 0 νββ . The Majorana Demonstrator consists of an array of high purity germanium detectors arranged in strings. Before installation in the cryostat, each string has been characterized. A vertical scan along the string (Z-scan) using radioactive sources is performed to measure the dead layer of each detector while an azimuthal scan is taken to measure the orientation of the crystal axes, useful for axion physics. Understanding the dead layer of the crystals is crucial to precisely determine the effective mass of the detectors. This poster presents Z-scan measurements and data analysis. The dead layer determination obtained through detailed comparison of simulation and data will be discussed.

  17. Variable-Temperature Cryostat For Radiation-Damage Testing Of Germanium Detectors

    Floyd, Samuel R.; Puc, Bernard P.

    1992-01-01

    Variable-temperature cryostats developed to study radiation damage to, and annealing of, germanium gamma-ray detectors. Two styles: one accommodates large single detector and one accommodates two medium-sized detectors. New cryostats allow complete testing of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detectors without breaking cryostat vacuum and removing detectors for annealing.

  18. DFT normal coordinate analysis of the vibrational spectra of iron and germanium corroles

    Zakharieva, O.; Veeger, C.

    2005-01-01

    DFT calculations on the vibrational modes of [FeCl(OECorr)], [FeCl(TPCorr)], [FeC6H5(OECorr)] and the corresponding germanium systems, [GeCl(OECorr)], [GeCl(TPCorr)] and [GeC6H 5(OECorr)] are for the first time presented. In addition DFT calculations on the electronic structure of the germanium corr

  19. Electonic properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys

    Bullot, J.; Galin, M.; Gauthier, M. (Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)); Bourdon, B. (CIT-Alcatel Transmission, Marcoussis (France))

    1983-06-01

    The electronic properties of some binary hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys a-Sisub(x)Gesub(1-x):H in the silicon rich region (x > 0.6) are investigated. Experimental evidence is presented of photo-induced effects similar to those described in Si:H (Staebler-Wronski effect). The electronic properties are then studied from the dual point of view of the germanium content dependence and of the photo and thermal histories of the films. The dark conductivity changes between the annealed state and the light-soaked state are interpreted in terms of the variation of the temperature coefficient of the Fermi level. The photoconductivity efficiency is shown to remain close to that of a-Si:H for 1 > x >= 0.9 and to strongly decrease when the germanium content is further increased: the photoresponse of the Sisub(0.62)Gesub(0.38) alloy is 10/sup 4/ times smaller than that of a-Si:H. This deterioration of the photoconductive properties is explained in terms of the increase of the density of gap states following Ge substitution. This conclusion is based on the study of the width of the exponential absorption edge and on the results of photoconductivity time response studies. The latter data are interpreted by means of the model of Rose of trapping and recombination kinetics and it is found that for x approximately 0.6 the density of states at 0.4-0.5 eV below the mobility edge is 7 x 10/sup 17/ eV/sup -1/ cm/sup -3/ as compared to 2.4 x 10/sup 16/ eV/sup -1/ cm/sup -3/ for x = 0.97.

  20. Germanium Lift-Off Masks for Thin Metal Film Patterning

    Brown, Ari

    2012-01-01

    A technique has been developed for patterning thin metallic films that are, in turn, used to fabricate microelectronics circuitry and thin-film sensors. The technique uses germanium thin films as lift-off masks. This requires development of a technique to strip or undercut the germanium chemically without affecting the deposited metal. Unlike in the case of conventional polymeric lift-off masks, the substrate can be exposed to very high temperatures during processing (sputter deposition). The reason why polymeric liftoff masks cannot be exposed to very high temperatures (greater than 100 C) is because (a) they can become cross linked, making lift-off very difficult if not impossible, and (b) they can outgas nitrogen and oxygen, which then can react with the metal being deposited. Consequently, this innovation is expected to find use in the fabrication of transition edge sensors and microwave kinetic inductance detectors, which use thin superconducting films deposited at high temperature as their sensing elements. Transition edge sensors, microwave kinetic inductance detectors, and their circuitry are comprised of superconducting thin films, for example Nb and TiN. Reactive ion etching can be used to pattern these films; however, reactive ion etching also damages the underlying substrate, which is unwanted in many instances. Polymeric lift-off techniques permit thin-film patterning without any substrate damage, but they are difficult to remove and the polymer can outgas during thin-film deposition. The outgassed material can then react with the film with the consequence of altered and non-reproducible materials properties, which, in turn, is deleterious for sensors and their circuitry. The purpose of this innovation was to fabricate a germanium lift-off mask to be used for patterning thin metal films.

  1. GERDA: a germanium detector array to search for neutrinoless double beta decay

    The GERDA, a new experiment to search for the double beta decay of 76Ge, is being installed at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. The potentialities of this experiment as well the status of the project are reviewed

  2. Search for neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76 with the GERmanium Detector Array '' GERDA ''

    The study of neutrinoless double beta decay (DBD) is the most powerful approach to the fundamental question if the neutrino is a Majorana particle, i.e. its own anti-particle. The observation of neutrinoless DBD would not only establish the Majorana nature of the neutrino but also represent a determination of its effective mass if the nuclear matrix element is given. So far, the most sensitive results have been obtained with Ge-76, and the group of Klapdor-Kleingrothaus has made a claim of discovery. Future experiments have to reduce radioactive backgrounds to increase the sensitivity. '' GERDA '' is a new double beta-decay experiment which is currently under construction in the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. It is implementing a new shielding concept by operating bare Ge diodes - enriched in Ge-76 - in high purity liquid argon supplemented by a water shield. The aim of '' GERDA '' is to verify or refute the recent claim of discovery, and, in a second phase, to achieve a two orders of magnitude lower background index than recent experiments, increasing the sensitive mass and reaching exposure of 100 kg yr. It be will discuss design, physics reach, and status of construction of '' GERDA '', and present results from various R efforts including long term stability of bare Ge diodes in cryogenic liquids, material screening, cryostat performance, detector segmentation, cryogenic precision electronics, safety aspects, and Monte Carlo simulations. (author)

  3. Search for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay of 76Ge with the GERmanium Detector Array "gerda"

    Garfagnini, Alberto

    2011-10-01

    The study of neutrinoless double beta decay (DBD) is the only presently known approach to the fundamental question if the neutrino is a Majorana particle, i.e. its own anti-particle. The observation of neutrinoless DBD would not only establish the Majorana nature of the neutrino but also represent a determination of its effective mass if the nuclear matrix element is given. So far, the most sensitive results have been obtained with 76Ge, and the group of Klapdor-Kleingrothaus has made a claim of discovery. Future experiments have to reduce radioactive backgrounds to increase the sensitivity. GERDA is a new DBD experiment which is currently under construction in the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. It is implementing a new shielding concept by operating bare Ge diodes - enriched in 76Ge - in high purity liquid argon supplemented by a water shield. The aim of GERDA is to scrutinize the recent claim of discovery, and, in a second phase, to achieve a two orders of magnitude lower background index than recent experiments, increasing the sensitive mass and reaching an exposure of 100 kg yr. The paper will discuss design, physics reach, and status of construction of GERDA.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of Germanium quantum dots for thermoelectric applications

    Hojabri, arash

    2015-01-01

    Energy resources are a main factor for the development of industry and human life, however, the use of fusil fuels as energy is harmful to the environment. Taking these two matters into consideration, the use of waste energy is a good response. The thermoelectric phenomena, which was, discovered in the 18th century plays a main role in converting waste heat energy to electricity and vice-versa.  Germanium quantum dots (Ge QDs) have received special attention due to their unusual electrical an...

  5. Role of hydrogen at germanium/dielectric interfaces

    Hydrogen is an indispensable ingredient in integrated-circuit fabrication, since it is used to passivate defects at the Si/SiO2 interface present in every CMOS transistor. Hydrogen will likely play an equally important role for the novel channel materials and dielectrics that are currently being investigated. We show that first-principles calculations can produce fundamental information about the behavior of hydrogen in relevant semiconductors and oxides. We point out the link between the electronic structure of hydrogen and the band-alignment problem, and specifically highlight why hydrogen at interfaces with germanium will exhibit a very different behavior from what is known to happen in silicon

  6. Phonon Quasidiffusion in Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Large Germanium Detectors

    Leman, S W; McCarthy, K A; Pyle, M; Resch, R; Sadoulet, B; Sundqvist, K M; Brink, P L; Cherry, M; Silva, E Do Couto E; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Mirabolfathi, N; Serfass, B; Tomada, A

    2011-01-01

    We present results on quasidiffusion studies in large, 3 inch diameter, 1 inch thick [100] high purity germanium crystals, cooled to 50 mK in the vacuum of a dilution refrigerator, and exposed with 59.5 keV gamma-rays from an Am-241 calibration source. We compare data obtained in two different detector types, with different phonon sensor area coverage, with results from a Monte Carlo. The Monte Carlo includes phonon quasidiffusion and the generation of phonons created by charge carriers as they are drifted across the detector by ionization readout channels.

  7. Ultra-Low Noise Mechanically Cooled Germanium Detector

    Barton, Paul; Martin, Ryan; Vetter, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Low capacitance, large volume, high purity germanium (HPGe) radiation detectors have been successfully employed in low-background physics experiments. However, some physical processes may not be detectable with existing detectors whose energy thresholds are limited by electronic noise. In this paper, methods are presented which can lower the electronic noise of these detectors. Through ultra-low vibration mechanical cooling and wire bonding of a CMOS charge sensitive preamplifier to a sub-pF p-type point contact HPGe detector, we demonstrate electronic noise levels below 40 eV-FWHM.

  8. Ultra-low noise mechanically cooled germanium detector

    Barton, P.; Amman, M.; Martin, R.; Vetter, K.

    2016-03-01

    Low capacitance, large volume, high purity germanium (HPGe) radiation detectors have been successfully employed in low-background physics experiments. However, some physical processes may not be detectable with existing detectors whose energy thresholds are limited by electronic noise. In this paper, methods are presented which can lower the electronic noise of these detectors. Through ultra-low vibration mechanical cooling and wire bonding of a CMOS charge sensitive preamplifier to a sub-pF p-type point contact HPGe detector, we demonstrate electronic noise levels below 40 eV-FWHM.

  9. Electric current induced modification of germanium nanowire NEM switch contact

    Meija, R.; Kosmaca, J.; Jasulaneca, L.; Petersons, K.; Biswas, S.; Holmes, J. D.; Erts, D.

    2015-05-01

    We present an investigation of contact properties of a germanium (Ge) nanowire based nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switch in its ON state. The contact stiffness in the ON state was evaluated by detecting the nanowire’s resonance frequency. It was found that the resonance frequency increases when electric current flows through the nanowire/counter electrode contact area. The reason for modification in the contact area is referred to as electric-current-induced processes in the native oxide layer covering the nanowires. The presented resonance shift method is a simple way to indicate strengthening of the nanowire/counter electrode contact area without disassembling the contact.

  10. Germanium waveguide photodetectors integrated on silicon with MBE

    A near infrared germanium waveguide photodetector for high speed operation is grown monolithically integrated on Si with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). With a special virtual substrate concept the lattice mismatch between Si and Ge is accommodated. For high speed operation the active device consists of a Ge p-i-n structure with very high-doped contact layers. The challenges on the MBE growth are the abrupt doping transitions over more than 4 orders of magnitudes among p-contact, intrinsic region and the n-contact

  11. Mechanism of Germanium-Induced Perimeter Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon

    Hakim, M. M. A.; Ashburn, P.

    2007-01-01

    We report a study aimed at highlighting the mechanism of a new amorphous silicon crystallization phenomenon that originates from the perimeter of a germanium layer during low-temperature annealing (500°C). Results are reported on doped and undoped amorphous silicon films, with thicknesses in the range 40–200 nm, annealed at a temperature of 500 or 550°C. A comparison is made of crystallization arising from Ge and SiGe layers and the role of damage from a high-dose fluorine implant is investig...

  12. Effect of pressure on arsenic diffusion in germanium

    We report preliminary results of a study of the activation volume for diffusion of arsenic in germanium. High-temperature high-pressure anneals were performed in a liquid argon pressure medium in a diamond anvil cell capable of reaching 5 GPa and 750 C,l which is externally heated for uniform and repeatable temperature profiles. Broadening of an ion-implanted arsenic profile was measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. Hydrostatic pressure retards the diffusivity at 575 C, characterized by an activation volume that is +15% of the atomic volume of Ge. Implications for diffusion mechanisms are discussed

  13. Silicon-germanium nanostructures for on-chip optical interconnects

    Tsybeskov, L.; Lee, E.K.; Chang, H.Y. [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Newark, NJ (United States); Lockwood, D.J.; Baribeau, J.M.; Wu, X. [National Research Council, Institute for Microstructural Sciences, Ottawa (Canada); Kamins, T.I. [Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Information and Quantum Systems Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Silicon-germanium epitaxially grown on silicon in the form of two-dimensional (quantum wells) and three-dimensional (quantum dots) nanostructures exhibits photoluminescence and electroluminescence in the technologically important spectral range of 1.3-1.6 {mu}m. Until recently, the major roadblocks for practical applications of these devices were strong thermal quenching of the luminescence quantum efficiency, and a long carrier radiative lifetime. This paper summarizes recent progress in the understanding of carrier recombination in Si/SiGe nanostructures and presents a potential new route toward CMOS compatible light emitters for on-chip optical interconnects. (orig.)

  14. Cryostat for Ultra-low-energy Threshold Germanium Spectrometers

    Aalseth, Craig E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bonicalzi, Ricco [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fast, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hossbach, Todd W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Orrell, John L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Overman, Cory T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); VanDevender, Brent A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents progress on the development of a cryostat intended to improve upon the low-energy threshold (below 0.5 keV) of p-type point contact germanium gamma-ray spectrometers. Ultra-low energy thresholds are important in the detection of low-energy nuclear recoils, an event class relevant to both dark matter direct detection and measurement of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. The cryostat design, including a thermal and electrical-field model, is presented. A prototype cryostat has been assembled and data acquired to evaluate its vacuum and thermal performance.

  15. Cryostat for Ultra-low-energy Threshold Germanium Spectrometers

    Aalseth, Craig E; Fast, James E; Hossbach, Todd W; Orrell, John L; Overman, Cory T; Vandevender, Brent A

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents progress on the development of a cryostat intended to improve upon the low-energy threshold (below 0.5 keV) of p-type point contact germanium gamma-ray spectrometers. Ultra-low energy thresholds are important in the detection of low-energy nuclear recoils, an event class relevant to both dark matter direct detection and measurement of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. The cryostat design, including a thermal and electrical-field model, is given. A prototype cryostat has been assembled and data acquired to evaluate its vacuum and thermal performance.

  16. Point defect engineering strategies to retard phosphorous diffusion in germanium

    Tahini, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    The diffusion of phosphorous in germanium is very fast, requiring point defect engineering strategies to retard it in support of technological application. Density functional theory corroborated with hybrid density functional calculations are used to investigate the influence of the isovalent codopants tin and hafnium in the migration of phosphorous via the vacancy-mediated diffusion process. The migration energy barriers for phosphorous are increased significantly in the presence of oversized isovalent codopants. Therefore, it is proposed that tin and in particular hafnium codoping are efficient point defect engineering strategies to retard phosphorous migration. © the Owner Societies 2013.

  17. Low capacitance large volume shaped-field germanium detector

    A large volume (150 cm3) germanium detector with a full- depletion capacitance of only ∼1 pf has been fabricated. The effect of impurity space-charge was utilized to obtain an appropriate electric field distribution in the detector so that carriers are collected on a small area electrode. Detectors based on this principle are capable of very low noise operation and have immediate applications in direct detection dark matter particle experiments. Detector pulse shapes and carrier trapping effects were also examined for possible applications involving higher energy radiations. 9 refs., 10 figs

  18. Recycling effect of germanium on ECR ion source

    Leherissier, P.; Barué, C.; Canet, C; Dubois, M.; Dupuis, M.; Flambard, J.L.; Gaubert, G.; Jardin, P.; Lecesne, N.; Lemagnen, F.; R. LEROY; Pacquet, J.Y.

    2003-01-01

    After running for three weeks with a 76Ge beam provided by the ECR-4 ion source at GANILwe have investigated the recycling effect of an SF6 plasma. The initial beam was produced bythe classical method, using germanium dioxide in our micro-oven and helium as support gas.The overall ionization efficiency was measured and found to be around 3%. Without theoven, and using SF6 instead of helium, the ECR-4 ion source has been able to produce a verystable beam during a two-week period. The intensity...

  19. Neutronenaktivierung von Germanium : Sensitivitätsstudie und Wirkungsquerschnittsmessung

    Lier, Alisa

    2013-01-01

    Mithilfe einer (n,γ)-Aktivierung von Germanium am Forschungsreaktor TRIGA in Mainz wurde zum einen in Hinblick auf zukünftige Experiment an der NIF eine Sensitivitätsstudie durchgeführt. Zum anderen wurden die thermischen Neutroneneinfangquerschnitte von 74Ge und 76Ge jeweils für den Einfang in den Isomer- und Grundzustand gemessen, um die Abweichungen der Daten von [Hol93] und [Mug06] zu klären. Zusätzlich wurden die Halbwertszeiten der betrachteten radioaktiven Ge-Isotope bestimmt.

  20. HEROICA: an Underground Facility for the Fast Screening of Germanium Detectors

    Andreotti, E; Maneschg, W; Barros, N; Benato, G; Brugnera, R; Costa, F; Falkenstein, R; Guthikonda, K K; Hegai, A; Hemmer, S; Hult, M; Jaenner, K; Kihm, T; Lehnert, B; Liao, H; Lubashevskiy, A; Lutter, G; Marissens, G; Modenese, L; Pandola, L; Reissfelder, M; Sada, C; Salathe, M; Schmitt, C; Schulz, O; Schwingenheuer, B; Turcato, M; Ur, C; von Sturm, K; Wagner, V; Westermann, J

    2013-01-01

    An infrastructure to characterize germanium detectors has been designed and constructed at the HADES Underground Research Laboratory, located in Mol (Belgium). Thanks to the 223m overburden of clay and sand, the muon flux is lowered by four orders of magnitude. This natural shield minimizes the exposure of radio-pure germanium material to cosmic radiation resulting in a significant suppression of cosmogenic activation in the germanium detectors. The project has been strongly motivated by a special production of germanium detectors for the GERDA experiment. GERDA, currently collecting data at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso of INFN, is searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 76Ge. In the near future, GERDA will increase its mass and sensitivity by adding new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors. The production of the BEGe detectors is done at Canberra in Olen (Belgium), located about 30km from the underground test site. Therefore, HADES is used both for storage of the crystals over night...

  1. Mechanical stresses and crystallization of lithium phosphorous oxynitride-coated germanium electrodes during lithiation and delithiation

    Al-Obeidi, Ahmed; Kramer, Dominik; Mönig, Reiner; Thompson, Carl V.

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of mechanical stresses during the cycling of lithium phosphorous oxynitride (LiPON) coated germanium thin film electrodes was monitored using substrate curvature measurements. By coating germanium thin films with LiPON, morphology evolution, e.g. crack and island formation, can be strongly suppressed. LiPON-coated germanium thin film electrodes can retain their planar form during cycling, resulting in a clear and reproducible stress response originating primarily from the electrochemical processes occurring during lithiation and delithiation. Together with the electrochemical data, stress measurements were used to infer mechanisms underlying the alloying of lithium with germanium. The stress signatures associated with individual phases, crystallization, and amorphization of lithium-germanium alloys are reported and discussed.

  2. Femtosecond Laser Processing of Germanium: An Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study

    Ji, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    An ab initio molecular dynamics study of femtosecond laser processing of germanium is presented in this paper. The method based on the finite temperature density functional theory is adopted to probe the structural change, thermal motion of the atoms, dynamic property of the velocity autocorrelation, and the vibrational density of states. Starting from a cubic system at room temperature (300 K) containing 64 germanium atoms with an ordered arrangement of 1.132 nm in each dimension, the femtosecond laser processing is simulated by imposing the Nose Hoover thermostat to the electronic subsystem lasting for ~100 fs and continuing with microcanonical ensemble simulation of ~200 fs. The simulation results show solid, liquid and gas phases of germanium under adjusted intensities of the femtosecond laser irradiation. We find the irradiated germanium distinguishes from the usual germanium crystal by analyzing their melting and dynamic properties.

  3. Focusing of a new germanium counter type : the composite detector. Uses of the TREFLE detector in the EUROGAM multidetector; Mise au point d`un nouveau type de compteur germanium: le detecteur composite. Utilisation du detecteur TREFLE dans le multidetecteur EUROGAM

    Han, L.

    1995-05-01

    The aim of this thesis is the development of new types of germanium detectors: the composite detectors. Two types of prototypes are then conceived: the stacked planar detector (EDP) and the assembly of coaxial diodes (TREFLE). They are designed for the multidetector EUROGAM destined to the research of nuclear structure at high angular momentum. The four planar diodes of EDP detector were of 7 cm diameter and of 15 to 20 mm thick. The difference between the calculated and measured photopic efficiency is observed. The importance of surface channel induces a weak resistance of neutron damages. The sputtering method for the surface treatment reducing the germanium dead layer as well as a rule of selection concerning the impurity concentration and the thickness of crystal is helpful for the later production of germanium detector. The CLOVER detector consist of for mean size crystals in the same cryostat. The photopic efficiency is much larger than that of the greatest monocrystal detector. And the granulation of composite detector allowed the Doppler broadening correction of gamma ray observed in the nuclear reaction where the recoil velocity is very high. This new type of detector enable the linear polarization measurement of gamma ray. Twenty-four CLOVER detector are actually mounted in the EUROGAM array. The characteristics measured in source as well as in beam, reported in this thesis, meet exactly the charge account. (author). 47 refs., 61 figs., 18 tabs.

  4. Cost-Efficient Thermophotovoltaic Cells based on Germanium (Kostefficiënte thermofotovoltaïsche cellen gebaseerd op germanium)

    van der Heide, Johan

    2009-01-01

    This thesis describes the realisation of cost-efficient thermophotovolta ic cells based on germanium substrates. Because the majority of the incoming phot ons will have a long wavelength it is important to apply optical confinement on the TPV cell. In this thesis this has been done by using a highly reflective rear contact. Electrical contact has been created at the rear with a laser (LFC) such that the metal is locally heated and contact is formed at the rear of the cel l. This applicat...

  5. Silicon-germanium Single-heterojunction Bipolar Transistor

    G.M. Khanduri

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The cutoff frequency performance of an NPN Si/SiGe/SiGe single-heterojunction bipolartransistor (SiGe SHBT at high collector current densities has been analysed using a 2-D MEDICIdevice simulator. A conventional NPN Si/SiGe/Si double-heterojunction bipolar transistor(SiGe DHBT having uniform 20 atomic per cent of germanium in the base region has beeninvestigated for comparison. The analysis shows the formation of a retarding potential barrierfor minority carrier electrons at the base-collector heterojunction of the DHBT structure. Whereas,the base-collector homojunction of the SiGe SHBT structure, having a uniform 15 atomic percent of germanium profile in its base and collector, inhibits the formation of such a retardingpotential barrier, the SHBT structure with a base-collector homojunction shows an improvedcutoff frequency at high collector current density in comparison with conventional SiGe DHBT,which makes it more promising for high speed, scaled down, field-specific applications.

  6. Evaluating a new segmented germanium detector contact technology

    Jackson, E. G.; Lister, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; Hull, E.; Pehl, R.

    2012-10-01

    New technologies for making gamma ray detectors position sensitive have many applications in space science, medical imaging, homeland security, and in nuclear structure research. One promising approach uses high-purity germanium wafers with the planar surfaces segmented into orthogonal strip patterns forming a Double-Sided Strip Detector (DSSD). The combination of data from adjoining strips, or pixels, is physics-rich for Compton image formation and polarization studies. However, sensitivity to charge loss and various kinds of cross-talk [1] have limited the usefulness of first generation devices. We are investigating new contact technologies, developed by PhDs Co [2], based on amorphous-germanium and yttrium contacts RF sputter deposited to a thickness of ˜ 1000 å. New techniques allow both physical and photolithographic segmentation of the contacts with inter-strip gap widths of 0.25 mm. These modifications should improve all aspects of charge collection. The new detector technology employs the same material and fabrication technique for both the n- and p- contacts, thus removing artificial asymmetry in the data. Results from tests of cross-talk, charge collection, and scattering asymmetry will be presented and compared with older technologies. This mechanically cooled counter, NP-7, seems to represent a breakthrough.[4pt] [1] S. Gros et al., Nucl. Inst. Meth. A 602, 467 (2009).[0pt] [2] E. Hull et al Nucl Inst Meth A 626, 39 (2011)

  7. Germanium-76 Isotope Separation by Cryogenic Distillation. Final Report

    The current separation method for Germanium isotopes is electromagnetic separation using Calutrons. The Calutrons have the disadvantage of having a low separation capacity and a high energy cost to achieve the separation. Our proposed new distillation method has the advantage that larger quantities of Germanium isotopes can be separated at a significantly lower cost and in a much shorter time. After nine months of operating the column that is 1.5 meter in length, no significant separation of the isotopes has been measured. We conclude that the length of the column we have been using is too short. In addition, other packing material than the 0.16 inch Propak, 316 ss Protruded metal packing that we used in the column, should be evaluated which may have a better separation factor than the 0.16 inch Propak, 316 ss Protruded metal packing that has been used. We conclude that a much longer column - a minimum of 50 feet length - should be built and additional column packing should be tested to verify that isotopic separation can be achieved by cryogenic distillation. Even a longer column than 50 feet would be desirable.

  8. Performance of a Small Anode Germanium Well detector

    Adekola, A.S., E-mail: aderemi.adekola@canberra.com; Colaresi, J.; Douwen, J.; Mueller, W.F.; Yocum, K.M.

    2015-06-01

    The performance of Small Anode Germanium (SAGe) Well detector [1] has been evaluated for a range of sample sizes and geometries counted inside the well, on the end cap or in Marinelli beakers. The SAGe Well is a new type of low capacitance germanium well detector manufactured using small anode technology. The detector has similar energy resolution performance to semi-planar detectors, and offers significant improvement over the Coaxial and existing Well detectors. Resolution performance of 0.75 keV Full Width at Half Maxiumum (FWHM) at 122 keV γ-ray energy and resolution of 2.0–2.3 keV FWHM at 1332 keV γ-ray energy are guaranteed. Such outstanding resolution performance will benefit environmental applications in revealing the detailed radionuclide content of samples, particularly at low energy, and will enhance the detection sensitivity resulting in reduced counting time. This paper reports the counting performance of SAGe Well detector for range of sample sizes and geometries and how it compares to other detector types.

  9. Materials and Fabrication Issues for Large Machined Germanium Immersion Gratings

    Kuzmenko, P J; Davis, P J; Little, S L; Hale, L C

    2006-05-22

    LLNL has successfully fabricated small (1.5 cm{sup 2} area) germanium immersion gratings. We studied the feasibility of producing a large germanium immersion grating by means of single point diamond flycutting. Our baseline design is a 63.4o blaze echelle with a 6 cm beam diameter. Birefringence and refractive index inhomogeneity due to stresses produced by the crystal growth process are of concern. Careful selection of the grating blank and possibly additional annealing to relieve stress will be required. The Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM) at LLNL is a good choice for the fabrication. It can handle parts up to 1.5 meter in diameter and 0.5 meter in length and is capable of a surface figure accuracy of better than 28 nm rms. We will describe the machine modifications and the machining process for a large grating. A next generation machine, the Precision Optical Grinder and Lathe (POGAL), currently under development has tighter specifications and could produce large gratings with higher precision.

  10. Germanium ion implantation to Improve Crystallinity during Solid Phase Epitaxy and the effect of AMU Contamination

    Germanium ion implantation was investigated for crystallinity enhancement during solid phase epitaxial regrowth (SPE) using high current implantation equipment. Electron back-scatter diffraction(EBSD) measurement showed numerical increase of 19 percent of signal, which might be due to pre-amorphization effect on silicon layer deposited by LPCVD process with germanium ion implantation. On the other hand, electrical property such as off-leakage current of NMOS transistor degraded in specific regions of wafers, which implied non-uniform distribution of donor-type impurities into channel area. It was confirmed that arsenic atoms were incorporated into silicon layer during germanium ion implantation. Since the equipment for germanium pre-amorphization implantation(PAI) was using several source gases such as BF3 and AsH3, atomic mass unit(AMU) contamination during PAI of germanium with AMU 74 caused the incorporation of arsenic with AMU 75 which resided in arc-chamber and other parts of the equipment. It was effective to use germanium isotope of AMU 72 to suppress AMU contamination, however it led serious reduction of productivity because of decrease in beam current by 30 percent as known to be difference in isotope abundance. It was effective to use enriched germanium source gas with AMU 72 in order to improve productivity. Spatial distribution of arsenic impurities in wafers was closely related to hardware configuration of ion implantation equipment

  11. Advances in fractal germanium micro/nanoclusters induced by gold: microstructures and properties.

    Chen, Zhiwen; Shek, Chan-Hung; Wu, C M Lawrence; Lai, Joseph K L

    2014-02-01

    Germanium materials are a class of unique semiconductor materials with widespread technological applications because of their valuable semiconducting, electrical, optical, and thermoelectric power properties in the fields of macro/mesoscopic materials and micro/nanodevices. In this review, we describe the efforts toward understanding the microstructures and various properties of the fractal germanium micro/nanoclusters induced by gold prepared by high vacuum thermal evaporation techniques, highlighting contributions from our laboratory. First, we present the integer and non-integer dimensional germanium micro/nanoclusters such as nanoparticles, nanorings, and nanofractals induced by gold and annealing. In particular, the nonlinear electrical behavior of a gold/germanium bilayer film with the interesting nanofractal is discussed in detail. In addition, the third-order optical nonlinearities of the fractal germanium nanocrystals embedded in gold matrix will be summarized by using the sensitive and reliable Z-scan techniques aimed to determine the nonlinear absorption coefficient and nonlinear refractive index. Finally, we emphasize the thermoelectric power properties of the gold/germanium bilayer films. The thermoelectric power measurement is considered to be a more effective method than the conductivity for investigating superlocalization in a percolating system. This research may provide a novel insight to modulate their competent performance and promote rational design of micro/nanodevices. Once mastered, germanium thin films with a variety of fascinating micro/nanoclusters will offer vast and unforeseen opportunities in the semiconductor industry as well as in other fields of science and technology. PMID:24749428

  12. Features of Stress State of Germanium Nanocrystals in SiOx Matrix

    V.V. Kuryliuk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Features of mechanical stress in germanium nanocrystals synthesised in amorphous SiОx matrix with SixNy buffer layer were studied by means of Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, Raman scattering and computer modeling. It was found that the germanium nanocrystals are under significant compressive stress with a magnitude of up to 2.9 GPa. Such a high strain value can be explained by a partial penetration of the nanocrystals in the silicon substrate. In this case the principal source of mechanical stress is the lattice mismatch between silicon and germanium.

  13. The development of novel analytical methods for the determination of germanium in foodstuffs

    McMahon, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This work represents the development of novel methods of analysis for a wide range of metals, in particular germanium. This research has identified a range of foodstuffs and supplements containing low level concentrations o f germanium. In total germanium was quantified in 28 samples including vegetables such as beetroot (3 23/g)> garlic (2 78^ig/g) and potato (1 85|ng/g) and tablet formulations such as aloe vera tablet (20 83 jug/g), ginger tablet (9 96^g/g) and ginseng tablet (5 48|j.g/g). ...

  14. Discrimination of nuclear and electronic recoil events using plasma effect in germanium detectors

    Wei, W -Z; Mei, D -M

    2016-01-01

    We report a new method of using the plasma time difference, which results from the plasma effect, between the nuclear and electronic recoil events in high-purity germanium detectors to distinguish these two types of events in the search for rare physics processes. The physics mechanism of the plasma effect is discussed in detail. A numerical model is developed to calculate the plasma time for nuclear and electronic recoils at various energies in germanium detectors. It can be shown that under certain conditions the plasma time difference is large enough to be observable. The experimental aspects in realizing such a discrimination in germanium detectors is discussed.

  15. Analysis of Silicon Germanium Standards for the Quantification of SiGe Microelectronic Devices using AES

    Watts, JF; Mallinson, CF; Littlejohns, CG; Gardes, FY; Castle, JE

    2015-01-01

    Four samples of well-defined silicon-germanium alloys were used as standards for calibration purposes to allow accurate quantification of silicon-germanium-on-insulator (SGOI) microelectronic devices using Auger electron spectroscopy. Narrow Si KLL and the Ge LMM, high resolution Si KL_2,3L_2,3 and Ge L_3M_4,5M_4,5 together with survey spectra were collected and are presented from each sample. A matrix effect was observed for silicon in germanium and calculated as 0.85 and 0.95 for the Ge77.5...

  16. Optimization of the geometry of broad energy germanium detectors

    Broad energy germanium (BEGe) detectors are employed in many different scientific experiments and widely used in industrial applications. A circular contact is implanted on a base of the cylindrical shaped detector. This circular contact is used as a read out electrode and is surrounded by a passivated groove that separates it from the high voltage electrode, which spans over the remaining surface. The size of the read out electrode and the groove geometry are assumed to have a major impact onto the energy resolution, pulse shape discrimination and energy threshold. To quantify the impact of the detectors geometry on its performance, the read out contacts size of two BEGe detectors was modified several times. The geometry of the detector was optimized prior to each reprocessing step through the use of simulations. For each configuration, the detectors performance was analysed through distinct measurements. Some general consideration about analysis tools, simulation libraries and first results of this study are presented in this talk.

  17. Band Anticrossing in Dilute Germanium Carbides Using Hybrid Density Functionals

    Stephenson, Chad A.; O'brien, William A.; Qi, Meng; Penninger, Michael; Schneider, William F.; Wistey, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    Dilute germanium carbides (Ge1- x C x ) offer a direct bandgap for compact silicon photonics, but widely varying properties have been reported. This work reports improved band structure calculations for Ge1- x C x using ab initio simulations that employ the HSE06 exchange-correlation density functional. Contrary to Vegard's law, the conduction band minimum at Γ is consistently found to decrease with increasing C content, while L and X valleys change much more slowly. The calculated Ge bandgap is within 11% of experimental values. A decrease in energy at the Γ conduction band valley of (170 meV ± 50)/%C is predicted, leading to a direct bandgap for x > 0.008. These results indicate a promising material for Group IV lasers.

  18. Anomalous compression behavior of germanium during phase transformation

    Yan, Xiaozhi [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); Tan, Dayong [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academic of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ren, Xiangting [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); Yang, Wenge, E-mail: yangwg@hpstar.ac.cn, E-mail: duanweihe@scu.edu.cn [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); High Pressure Synergetic Consortium (HPSynC), Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); He, Duanwei, E-mail: yangwg@hpstar.ac.cn, E-mail: duanweihe@scu.edu.cn [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Institute of Fluid Physics and National Key Laboratory of Shockwave and Detonation Physic, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Mao, Ho-Kwang [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); High Pressure Synergetic Consortium (HPSynC), Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    In this article, we present the abnormal compression and plastic behavior of germanium during the pressure-induced cubic diamond to β-tin structure transition. Between 8.6 GPa and 13.8 GPa, in which pressure range both phases are co-existing, first softening and followed by hardening for both phases were observed via synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. These unusual behaviors can be interpreted as the volume misfit between different phases. Following Eshelby, the strain energy density reaches the maximum in the middle of the transition zone, where the switch happens from softening to hardening. Insight into these mechanical properties during phase transformation is relevant for the understanding of plasticity and compressibility of crystal materials when different phases coexist during a phase transition.

  19. Anomalous compression behavior of germanium during phase transformation

    In this article, we present the abnormal compression and plastic behavior of germanium during the pressure-induced cubic diamond to β-tin structure transition. Between 8.6 GPa and 13.8 GPa, in which pressure range both phases are co-existing, first softening and followed by hardening for both phases were observed via synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. These unusual behaviors can be interpreted as the volume misfit between different phases. Following Eshelby, the strain energy density reaches the maximum in the middle of the transition zone, where the switch happens from softening to hardening. Insight into these mechanical properties during phase transformation is relevant for the understanding of plasticity and compressibility of crystal materials when different phases coexist during a phase transition

  20. Submicron fabrication by local anodic oxidation of germanium thin films

    Oliveira, A. B.; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G.; Azevedo, A.

    2009-08-01

    Here we describe a lithography scheme based on the local anodic oxidation of germanium film by a scanning atomic force microscope in a humidity-controlled atmosphere. The oxidation kinetics of the Ge film were investigated by a tapping mode, in which a pulsed bias voltage was synchronized and applied with the resonance frequency of the cantilever, and by a contact mode, in which a continuous voltage was applied. In the tapping mode we clearly identified two regimes of oxidation as a function of the applied voltage: the trench width increased linearly during the vertical growth and increased exponentially during the lateral growth. Both regimes of growth were interpreted taking into consideration the Cabrera-Mott mechanism of oxidation applied to the oxide/Ge interface. We also show the feasibility of the bottom-up fabrication process presented in this work by showing a Cu nanowire fabricated on top of a silicon substrate.

  1. Specific features of phase transformations in germanium monotelluride

    Phase transformations in germanium monotelluride are studied . using DRON-0.5 and DRON-1 plants with high-temperature chamber GPVT-1500 at Cu, Ksub(α) radiation. It is shown that in the whole homogeneity range α GeTe is a metastable phase which is formed under the conditions of fast cooling of alloy from temperatures >=Tsub(cub) (temperature of transition in cubic crystal system). An equilibrium γ-phase is obtained by annealing of dispersed powders and metal-ceramic specimens of alloys with 50.3; 50.6; 50.9 at % Te. Lattice parameters of rhombic γ-phase do not depend on tellurium content in initial α- phase. α→γ transformation is observed at any temperature less than Tsub(cub) with the change of alloy composition, namely tellurium precipitation. γ-phase transforms into β at higher temperatures than α-phase

  2. Optimization of the geometry of broad energy germanium detectors

    Salathe, Marco [Max Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Broad energy germanium (BEGe) detectors are employed in many different scientific experiments and widely used in industrial applications. A circular contact is implanted on a base of the cylindrical shaped detector. This circular contact is used as a read out electrode and is surrounded by a passivated groove that separates it from the high voltage electrode, which spans over the remaining surface. The size of the read out electrode and the groove geometry are assumed to have a major impact onto the energy resolution, pulse shape discrimination and energy threshold. To quantify the impact of the detectors geometry on its performance, the read out contacts size of two BEGe detectors was modified several times. The geometry of the detector was optimized prior to each reprocessing step through the use of simulations. For each configuration, the detectors performance was analysed through distinct measurements. Some general consideration about analysis tools, simulation libraries and first results of this study are presented in this talk.

  3. Muonium in ultra-pure and Si-doped germanium

    The influence of the isoelectronic impurity silicon ([Si] = 1012 - 1018 cm-3) on the spin precession signals of positive muons in ultra-pure germanium crystals is investigated between 5 and 340 K in transverse magnetic fields of 0.5 to 27.5 mT. Normal ('isotropic') muonium atoms Mu are formed in all samples with about the same probability (approx. 0.7). Down to quite low temperatures (20 K) Mu is found to diffuse very rapidly through the Ge matrix and to become ionized by interaction with the Si atoms. Another ionization process, presumably due to the screening of the μ+ by the increasing number of free charge carriers, sets in at about 180 K. (Auth.)

  4. Towards monolithic integration of germanium light sources on silicon chips

    Saito, Shinichi; Zaher Al-Attili, Abdelrahman; Oda, Katsuya; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Germanium (Ge) is a group-IV indirect band gap semiconductor, and therefore bulk Ge cannot emit light efficiently. However, the direct band gap energy is close to the indirect one, and significant engineering efforts are being made to convert Ge into an efficient gain material monolithically integrated on a Si chip. In this article, we will review the engineering challenges of developing Ge light sources fabricated using nano-fabrication technologies compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor processes. In particular, we review recent progress in applying high-tensile strain to Ge to reduce the direct band gap. Another important technique is doping Ge with donor impurities to fill the indirect band gap valleys in the conduction band. Realization of carrier confinement structures and suitable optical cavities will be discussed. Finally, we will discuss possible applications of Ge light sources in potential photonics-electronics convergent systems.

  5. Radiation-enhanced self- and boron diffusion in germanium

    Schneider, S.; Bracht, H.; Klug, J.N.;

    2013-01-01

    We report experiments on proton radiation-enhanced self- and boron (B) diffusion in germanium (Ge) for temperatures between 515 ∘ C and 720 ∘ C. Modeling of the experimental diffusion profiles measured by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry is achieved on the basis of the Frenkel pair reaction...... and the interstitialcy and dissociative diffusion mechanisms. The numerical simulations ascertain concentrations of Ge interstitials and B-interstitial pairs that deviate by several orders of magnitude from their thermal equilibrium values. The dominance of self-interstitial related defects under...... irradiation leads to an enhanced self- and B diffusion in Ge. Analysis of the experimental profiles yields data for the diffusion of self-interstitials (I ) and the thermal equilibrium concentration of BI pairs in Ge. The temperature dependence of these quantities provides the migration enthalpy of I and...

  6. Characteristics of GRIFFIN high-purity germanium clover detectors

    Rizwan, U.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Andreoiu, C.; Ball, G. C.; Chester, A.; Domingo, T.; Dunlop, R.; Hackman, G.; Rand, E. T.; Smith, J. K.; Starosta, K.; Svensson, C. E.; Voss, P.; Williams, J.

    2016-06-01

    The Gamma-Ray Infrastructure For Fundamental Investigations of Nuclei, GRIFFIN, is a new experimental facility for radioactive decay studies at the TRIUMF-ISAC laboratory. The performance of the 16 high-purity germanium (HPGe) clover detectors that will make up the GRIFFIN spectrometer is reported. The energy resolution, efficiency, timing resolution, crosstalk and preamplifier properties of each crystal were measured using a combination of analog and digital data acquisition techniques. The absolute efficiency and add-back factors are determined for the energy range of 80-3450 keV. The detectors show excellent performance with an average over all 64 crystals of a FWHM energy resolution of 1.89(6) keV and relative efficiency with respect to a 3 in . × 3 in . NaI detector of 41(1)% at 1.3 MeV.

  7. Hydrogen concentration and distribution in high-purity germanium crystals

    High-purity germanium crystals used for making nuclear radiation detectors are usually grown in a hydrogen ambient from a melt contained in a high-purity silica crucible. The benefits and problems encountered in using a hydrogen ambient are reviewed. A hydrogen concentration of about 2 x 1015cm-3 has been determined by growing crystals in hydrogen spiked with tritium and counting the tritium β-decays in detectors made from these crystals. Annealing studies show that the hydrogen is strongly bound, either to defects or as H2 with a dissociation energy > 3 eV. This is lowered to 1.8 eV when copper is present. Etching defects in dislocation-free crystals grown in hydrogen have been found by etch stripping to have a density of about 1 x 107 cm-3 and are estimated to contain 108 H atoms each

  8. Buried Porous Silicon-Germanium Layers in Monocrystalline Silicon Lattices

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Monocrystalline semiconductor lattices with a buried porous semiconductor layer having different chemical composition is discussed and monocrystalline semiconductor superlattices with a buried porous semiconductor layers having different chemical composition than that of its monocrystalline semiconductor superlattice are discussed. Lattices of alternating layers of monocrystalline silicon and porous silicon-germanium have been produced. These single crystal lattices have been fabricated by epitaxial growth of Si and Si-Ge layers followed by patterning into mesa structures. The mesa structures are strain etched resulting in porosification of the Si-Ge layers with a minor amount of porosification of the monocrystalline Si layers. Thicker Si-Ge layers produced in a similar manner emitted visible light at room temperature.

  9. Core and valence thermal vibrations in diamond, silicon, and germanium

    Saravanan, R. (School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj Univ. (India)); Balamurugan, P. (School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj Univ. (India)); Mohanlal, S.K. (School of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj Univ. (India))

    1994-08-01

    An analysis is made using published X-ray data, for the thermal vibrations in diamond, silicon, and germanium. The overall thermal vibration is split into core and valence contributions, because valence electrons can oscillate with different phase and amplitude than core electrons due to bond polarizability. Using indigenously developed computer programs the published data are analyzed. In the first phase, the overall Debye-Waller factor of diamond, Si, and Ge together with scaling and extinction factors are refined using the method of least squares. In the second phase, the core and valence contributions of the harmonic temperature factor are evaluated. Finally, in the third phase, the core and valence contributions of the anharmonic temperature factor are evaluated. The error in the fitting procedure is less than 1% for Si and Ge and about 3% for diamond. (orig.)

  10. Portable electro-mechanically cooled high-resolution germanium detector

    Neufeld, K.W.; Ruhter, W.D.

    1995-05-01

    We have integrated a small, highly-reliable, electro-mechanical cryo-cooler with a high-resolution germanium detector for portable/field applications. The system weighs 6.8 kg and requires 40 watts of power to operate once the detector is cooled to its operating temperature. the detector is a 500 mm{sup 2} by 20-mm thick low-energy configuration that gives a full-width at half maximum (FWHM) energy resolution of 523 eV at 122 keV, when cooled with liquid nitrogen. The energy resolution of the detector, when cooled with the electro-mechanical cooler, is 570 eV at 122 keV. We have field tested this system in measurements of plutonium and uranium for isotopic and enrichment information using the MGA and MGAU analysis programs without any noticeable effects on the results.

  11. Young’s modulus of [111] germanium nanowires

    This paper reports a diameter-independent Young’s modulus of 91.9 ± 8.2 GPa for [111] Germanium nanowires (Ge NWs). When the surface oxide layer is accounted for using a core-shell NW approximation, the YM of the Ge core approaches a near theoretical value of 147.6 ± 23.4 GPa. The ultimate strength of a NW device was measured at 10.9 GPa, which represents a very high experimental-to-theoretical strength ratio of ∼75%. With increasing interest in this material system as a high-capacity lithium-ion battery anode, the presented data provide inputs that are essential in predicting its lithiation-induced stress fields and fracture behavior

  12. An aeronomical application of a germanium near infrared (NIR) detector

    A collaboration between Boston University and the Aerospace corporation has resulted in a germanium based detector used in conjunction with an infrared optimized Fabry-Perot spectrometer. Gold plated mirrors were installed and the appropriate transmissive optics are used in the Fabry-Perot to optimize the NIR transmission. The detector is a germanium PIN diode coated with a layer of silicon-nitride. Current produced by the detector is measured by using a Capacitive Trans-Impedance Amplifier (CITA). An A/D converter samples the amplified capacitor voltage and outputs a 12 bit word that is then passed on to the controlling computer system. The detector, amplifier, and associated electronics are mounted inside a standard IR dewar and operated at 77 K. The authors have operated this detector and spectrometer system at Millstone Hill for about 6 months. Acceptable noise characteristics, a NEP of 10-17 watts, and a QE of 90% at 1.2 microm, have been achieved with an amplifier gain of 200. The system is currently configured for observations of thermospheric helium, and has made the first measurement of the He 10,830 angstrom nightglow emission isolated from OH contamination. In an effort to both increase the sensitivity of the Fabry-Perot in the visible and to adapt it for planetary astronomy the authors have entered into a collaboration with CIDTEC. A Charge Injection Detector or CID has some unique capabilities that distinguish it from a CCD and the authors are evaluating it as a detector for the Hadinger fringe pattern produced by a Fabry-Perot. The CID allows non-destructive readout and random access of individual pixels with in the entire frame, this allows for both ''electronic masking'' of bright objects and allows each fringe to be observed without having to readout a large number of dark pixels

  13. Sensitivity comparison of intrinsic germanium detectors with various efficiencies

    Scientists today are being asked to measure concentrations of radionuclides at increasingly lower levels. This creates a demand for better resolution detectors with larger efficiencies that can provide the necessary sensitivity to accurately determine low levels of radioactivity. This study has acquired a large volume of empirical data for a wide range of relative efficiency germanium detectors. The purpose was to determine the sensitivity of various efficiency high-purity (P-type) germanium detectors produced by a single manufacturer. Selecting efficiency as the only variable and essentially all other variables remaining constant narrowed the field of detectors to 30. This investigation compares the response for the lower limit of detection (LLD), figure-of-merit (FOM), and minimum detectable activity (MDA) versus efficiency. In addition to the efficiency, the resolution, background, peak-to-Compton (P/C), and crystal shape of a p-type detector are of particular importance when considering the parameters of a detectors performance. A concise summary of the results is that the detector of choice for low energy measurements would be a 25% detector with resolution better than 1.8 keV FWHM for the 1.332 keV energy of Co-60. The detector of choice for energy levels greater than 500 keV would be a high efficiency low background detector. If the entire energy range is of interest, then a 70% low background detector with a high P/C and a resolution better than 1.9 keV would yield the lowest MDA and assure the most efficient counting times. 9 refs., 25 figs., 6 tabs

  14. A study on the forms of existence of germanium in uranium-bearing coals of Bangmai basin of Yunnan

    The Bangmai basin is an asymmetrical intermontane synclinal basin with a Hercynian-Yenshan granitic body (γ33-γ52) as its basement. Its overlying strata are made up of the N1 of coal-bearing clastic rocks of Neogene period. Germanium ore mostly occur within the N12 coal-seam. Uranium, germanium-bearing coals are mainly lignites of low grade in coalation and belong to semidurain, semiclarain, duroclarain and clarodurain. In order to probe into the forms of existence of germanium in coal, six kinds of analytical methods (electronic probe analysis, separation of heavy liquid, grain-size analysis, electric osmosis, chemical extraction and grade-extraction) have been adopted. A simulated test of humic complex germanium in the laboratory was carried out. According to infrared spectral analysis, it is found that 1700 cm-1 wavecrest almost disappears, 1250 cm-1 peak weakens and 1600 cm-1 peak strengthens, 1400 cm-1 peak slightly strengthens. No doubt, these illustrate the formatiion of humic germanium complex. Afterward, through differential thermal analysis and measurement of pH variation of media, it futher proves the presence of humic germanium complex. It is considered that the forms of existence of germanium in uranium-bearing coals mainly are: (1) In close chemical combination with organic matter, usually in the form of humic germanium complex and germanium organic compound; (2) In the state of adsorption, germanium is adsorbed by some organic matter, clay minerals and limonite etc.; (3) A very rare part occurring as isomorphous form

  15. An Implant-Passivated Blocked Impurity Band Germanium Detector for the Far Infrared Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to fabricate a germanium blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detector using a novel process which will enable us to: 1- fabricate a suitably-doped active layer...

  16. An Implant-Passivated Blocked Impurity Band Germanium Detector for the Far Infrared Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to investigate the feasibility of fabricating a germanium blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detector using a novel process which will enable us to: 1-...

  17. Methods and software for predicting germanium detector absolute full-energy peak efficiencies

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) and lithium drifted germanium (Ge(Li)) detectors have been the detector of choice for high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy for many years. This is primarily due to the superior energy resolution that germanium detectors present over other gamma-ray detectors. In order to perform quantitative analyses with germanium detectors, such as activity determination or nuclide identification, one must know the absolute full-energy peak efficiency at the desired gamma-ray energy. Many different methods and computer codes have been developed throughout history in an effort to predict these efficiencies using minimal or no experimental observations. A review of these methods and the computer codes that utilize them is presented. (author)

  18. Contribution of a germanium detector in mobile gamma-ray spectrometry. Spectral analysis and performance

    Gutierrez, S; Bourgeois, C

    2002-01-01

    The sensitivity of the germanium semi-conductor detector is 30 times lower than that of the sodium iodide (NaI) detectors frequently used in airborne spectrometry. Its energy resolution however, is 20 times better, giving more accurate identification of radionuclides, especially when complex spectra are involved. The use of the germanium detector in mobile gamma-ray spectrometry provides a large amount of qualitative and quantitative information. In post-accident situations a germanium detector will be sufficient, and should therefore be used in preference to a NaI detector. An algorithm for detecting the total absorption peaks by studying the variations in the spectral profile of germanium gamma-ray spectra has been developed at the CEA. The use of digital filters that take into account the characteristics of the absorption peaks reduces the statistical fluctuations, making possible detection based on the analysis of the first and second derivatives. The absorption peak is then estimated by subtracting the b...

  19. Induced Radioactivity Measured in a Germanium Detector After a Long Duration Balloon Flight

    Starr, R.; Evans, L. G.; Floyed, S. R.; Drake, D. M.; Feldman, W. C.; Squyres, S. W.; Rester, A. C.

    1997-01-01

    A 13-day long duration balloon flight carrying a germanium detector was flown from Williams Field, Antartica in December 1992. After recovery of the payload the activity induced in the detector was measured.

  20. Thermal recrystallization of physical vapor deposition based germanium thin films on bulk silicon (100)

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2013-08-16

    We demonstrate a simple, low-cost, and scalable process for obtaining uniform, smooth surfaced, high quality mono-crystalline germanium (100) thin films on silicon (100). The germanium thin films were deposited on a silicon substrate using plasma-assisted sputtering based physical vapor deposition. They were crystallized by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 700 °C to 1100 °C. We report that the best quality germanium thin films are obtained above the melting point of germanium (937 °C), thus offering a method for in-situ Czochralski process. We show well-behaved high-κ /metal gate metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) using this film. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Operation of a high purity germanium crystal in liquid argon as a Compton suppressed radiation spectrometer

    Orrell, J L; Amsbaugh, J F; Doe, P J; Hossbach, T W; Orrell, John L.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Amsbaugh, John F.; Doe, Peter J.; Hossbach, Todd W.

    2007-01-01

    A high purity germanium crystal was operated in liquid argon as a Compton suppressed radiation spectrometer. Spectroscopic quality resolution of less than 1% of the full-width half maximum of full energy deposition peaks was demonstrated. The construction of the small apparatus used to obtain these results is reported. The design concept is to use the liquid argon bath to both cool the germanium crystal to operating temperatures and act as a scintillating veto. The scintillation light from the liquid argon can veto cosmic-rays, external primordial radiation, and gamma radiation that does not fully deposit within the germanium crystal. This technique was investigated for its potential impact on ultra-low background gamma-ray spectroscopy. This work is based on a concept initially developed for future germanium-based neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments.

  2. Influence of reductant and germanium concentration on the growth and stress development of germanium nanocrystals in silicon oxide matrix

    Germanium (Ge) nanocrystals have been synthesized by annealing co-sputtered SiO2-Ge samples in N2 or forming gas (90% N2+10% H2) at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1000 deg. C. We concluded that the annealing ambient, temperature and Ge concentration have a significant influence on the formation and evolution of the nanocrystals. We showed that a careful selective etching of the annealed samples in hydrofluoric acid solution enabled the embedded Ge nanocrystals to be liberated from the SiO2 matrix. From the Raman results of the as-grown and the liberated nanocrystals, we established that the nanocrystals generally experienced compressive stress in the oxide matrix and the evolution of these stress states was intimately linked to the distribution, density, size and quality of the Ge nanocrystals

  3. Direct band gap electroluminescence from bulk germanium at room temperature using an asymmetric fin type metal/germanium/metal structure

    Wang, Dong, E-mail: wang.dong.539@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Maekura, Takayuki; Kamezawa, Sho [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Yamamoto, Keisuke; Nakashima, Hiroshi [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2015-02-16

    We demonstrated direct band gap (DBG) electroluminescence (EL) at room temperature from n-type bulk germanium (Ge) using a fin type asymmetric lateral metal/Ge/metal structure with TiN/Ge and HfGe/Ge contacts, which was fabricated using a low temperature (<400 °C) process. Small electron and hole barrier heights were obtained for TiN/Ge and HfGe/Ge contacts, respectively. DBG EL spectrum peaked at 1.55 μm was clearly observed even at a small current density of 2.2 μA/μm. Superlinear increase in EL intensity was also observed with increasing current density, due to superlinear increase in population of elections in direct conduction band. The efficiency of hole injection was also clarified.

  4. Tuning the Electro-optical Properties of Germanium Nanowires by Tensile Strain

    Greil, J.; Lugstein, A.; Zeiner, C.; G STRASSER; Bertagnolli, E.

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter we present the electrical and electro-optical characterization of single crystalline germanium nanowires (NWs) under tensile strain conditions. The measurements were performed on vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) grown germanium (Ge) NWs, monolithically integrated into a micromechanical 3-point strain module. Uniaxial stress is applied along the ⟨111⟩ growth direction of individual, 100 nm thick Ge NWs while at the same time performing electrical and optical characterization at room tem...

  5. HEROICA: A fast screening facility for the characterization of germanium detectors

    Andreotti, Erica; Gerda Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    In the course of 2012, a facility for the fast screening of germanium detectors called HEROICA (Hades Experimental Research Of Intrinsic Crystal Appliances) has been installed at the HADES underground laboratory in the premises of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK•CEN, in Mol (Belgium). The facility allows performing a complete characterization of the critical germanium detectors' operational parameters with a rate of about two detectors per week.

  6. HEROICA: A fast screening facility for the characterization of germanium detectors

    Andreotti, Erica [Universität Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tübingen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    In the course of 2012, a facility for the fast screening of germanium detectors called HEROICA (Hades Experimental Research Of Intrinsic Crystal Appliances) has been installed at the HADES underground laboratory in the premises of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK•CEN, in Mol (Belgium). The facility allows performing a complete characterization of the critical germanium detectors' operational parameters with a rate of about two detectors per week.

  7. Germanium isotopic systematics in Ge-rich coal from the Lincang Ge deposit, Yunnan, Southwestern China

    Qi, Hua-wen; Rouxel, Olivier; Hu, Rui-zhong; Bi, Xian-wu; Wen, Han-jie

    2011-01-01

    Organic matter plays an important role in the transport and precipitation of germanium (Ge) in coal-hosted Ge deposits. In this paper. Ge isotopes of coal samples and their combustion products were analyzed in order to investigate the potential use of Ge isotopes as tracers of Ge sources and enrichment mechanisms in coal. Germanium isotopic composition of various samples (mainly Ge-rich lignite) from the Lincang Ge deposit, Yunnan, Southwest China was analyzed using a continuous flow hydride ...

  8. The Primary and Secondary Production of Germanium: A Life-Cycle Assessment of Different Process Alternatives

    Robertz, Benedicte; Verhelle, Jensen; Schurmans, Maarten

    2015-02-01

    Germanium is a semiconducting metalloid element used in optical fibers, catalysis, infrared optics, solar cells, and light-emitting diodes. The need for Ge in these markets is considered to increase by a steady ~1% on a yearly basis. Its economic importance, coupled with the identified supply risks, has led to the classification of germanium as a critical raw material within Europe. Since the early 1950s, Umicore Electro-Optic Materials has supplied germanium-based materials solutions to its markets around the world. Umicore extracts germanium from a wide range of refining and recycling feeds. The main objectives of this study were to quantify the potential environmental impacts of the production of germanium from production scraps from the photovoltaic industry and to compare them with the potential impacts of the primary production of germanium from coal. The data related to the secondary production are Umicore-specific data. Environmental impact scores have been calculated for the impact categories recommended by the International reference life cycle data system. The comparison of the primary and secondary production highlights the benefit linked to the recycling of metals.

  9. Performance of the Fully Digital FPGA-based Front-End Electronics for the GALILEO Array

    Barrientos, D; Bazzacco, D; Bortolato, D; Cocconi, P; Gadea, A; González, V; Gulmini, M; Isocrate, R; Mengoni, D; Pullia, A; Recchia, F; Rosso, D; Sanchis, E; Toniolo, N; Ur, C A; Valiente-Dobón, J J

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present the architecture and results of a fully digital Front End Electronics (FEE) read out system developed for the GALILEO array. The FEE system, developed in collaboration with the Advanced Gamma Tracking Array (AGATA) collaboration, is composed of three main blocks: preamplifiers, digitizers and preprocessing electronics. The slow control system contains a custom Linux driver, a dynamic library and a server implementing network services. The digital processing of the data from the GALILEO germanium detectors has demonstrated the capability to achieve an energy resolution of 1.53 per mil at an energy of 1.33 MeV.

  10. Automation of the Characterization of High Purity Germanium Detectors

    Dugger, Charles ``Chip''

    2014-09-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of the detectors must be characterized. A robotic arm is being tested for future calibration of HPGe detectors. The arm will hold a source at locations relative to the crystal while data is acquired. Several radioactive sources of varying energy levels will be used to determine the characteristics of the crystal. In this poster, I will present our work with the robot, as well as the characterization of data we took with an underground HPGe detector at the WIPP facility in Carlsbad, NM (2013). Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of