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Sample records for 13c nuclear magnetic

  1. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance study of the complexation of calcium by taurine

    13C Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts, 1J/sub c-c/ scalar coupling constants, spin-lattice relaxation times, and nuclear Overhauser effects were determined for taurine-[1, 2 13C] and a taurine-[1 13C] and taurine-[2 13C] mixture in the presence and absence of calcium. Comparison of taurine titration shifts to values for related compounds reveals some unusual electronic properties of the taurine molecule. Stability constants of 1:1 calcium complexes with taurine zwitterions and anions, as well as their 13C chemical shifts, were obtained by least squares analysis of titration curves measured in the presence of calcium. The stability constants of calcium-taurine complexes were significantly lower than previous values and led to estimates that only approximately one percent of intracellular calcium of mammalian myocardial cells would exist in a taurine complex

  2. Biosynthetic pathways in Methanospirillum hungatei as determined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Ekiel, I; Smith, I C; Sprott, G D

    1983-01-01

    The main metabolic pathways in Methanospirillum hungatei GP1 were followed by using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, with 13C-labeled acetate and CO2 as carbon sources. The labeling patterns found in carbohydrates, amino acids, lipids, and nucleosides were consistent with the formation of pyruvate from acetate and CO2 as the first step in biosynthesis. Carbohydrates are formed by the glucogenic pathway, and no scrambling of label was observed, indicating that the oxidative or reductive pentose...

  3. Citrate and Sugar Cofermentation in Leuconostoc oenos, a (sup13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    Ramos, A.; Santos, H.

    1996-01-01

    (sup13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to investigate citrate-glucose cometabolism in nongrowing cell suspensions of the wine lactic acid bacterium Leuconostoc oenos. The use of isotopically enriched substrates allowed us to identify and quantify in the end products the carbon atoms derived from each of the substrates supplied; furthermore, it was possible to differentiate between products derived from the metabolism of endogenous carbon reserves and those derived from exte...

  4. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the studies of biosynthetic routes of natural products

    During the last five decades, as a result of an interaction between natural product chemistry, synthetic organic chemistry, molecular biology and spectroscopy, scientists reached an extraordinary level of comprehension about the natural processes by which living organisms build up complex molecules. In this context, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, allied with isotopic labeling, played a determinant role. Nowadays, the widespread use of modern NMR techniques allows an even more detailed picture of the biochemical steps by accurate manipulation of the atomic nuclei. This article focuses on the development of such techniques and their impact on biosynthetic studies. (author)

  5. Characterisation of black carbon-rich samples by (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Novotny, Etelvino H; Hayes, Michael H B; Deazevedo, Eduardo R; Bonagamba, Tito J

    2006-09-01

    There are difficulties in quantifying and characterising the organic matter (OM) in soils that contain significant amounts of partially oxidised char or charcoal materials. The anthropogenic black carbon (BC), such as that found in the Terra Preta de Indio soils of the Amazon region, is a good example of the OM that is difficult to analyse in such soils. (13)C direct polarisation/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) at high MAS frequency, (1)H-(13)C cross polarisation (CP)/MAS with total suppression of spinning sidebands (TOSS), and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) filter nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been applied successfully for quantifying the different components of OM. However, because pyrogenic materials present strong local magnetic susceptibility heterogeneities, the use of CSA-filter and TOSS make the pulse sequences very sensitive to imperfections in the pi pulses. In this study, the DP/MAS pulse sequence was replaced by a CP with a radio frequency ramp--variable amplitude CP (VACP)--VACP/MAS pulse sequence, and composite pi pulses were used in the CSA-filter and TOSS pulse sequences. In that way, the component functionalities in a humic acid from a BC soil were successfully determined. The spectrometer time needed was greatly decreased by employing this VACP/MAS technique. This development provides an accurate method for characterising BC-rich samples from different origins. PMID:16688435

  6. Characterisation of black carbon-rich samples by 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Novotny, Etelvino H.; Hayes, Michael H. B.; Deazevedo, Eduardo R.; Bonagamba, Tito J.

    2006-09-01

    There are difficulties in quantifying and characterising the organic matter (OM) in soils that contain significant amounts of partially oxidised char or charcoal materials. The anthropogenic black carbon (BC), such as that found in the Terra Preta de Índio soils of the Amazon region, is a good example of the OM that is difficult to analyse in such soils. 13C direct polarisation/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) at high MAS frequency, 1H-13C cross polarisation (CP)/MAS with total suppression of spinning sidebands (TOSS), and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) filter nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been applied successfully for quantifying the different components of OM. However, because pyrogenic materials present strong local magnetic susceptibility heterogeneities, the use of CSA-filter and TOSS make the pulse sequences very sensitive to imperfections in the π pulses. In this study, the DP/MAS pulse sequence was replaced by a CP with a radio frequency ramp—variable amplitude CP (VACP)—VACP/MAS pulse sequence, and composite π pulses were used in the CSA-filter and TOSS pulse sequences. In that way, the component functionalities in a humic acid from a BC soil were successfully determined. The spectrometer time needed was greatly decreased by employing this VACP/MAS technique. This development provides an accurate method for characterising BC-rich samples from different origins.

  7. High-resolution (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy pattern recognition of fish oil capsules.

    Aursand, Marit; Standal, Inger B; Axelson, David E

    2007-01-10

    13C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy, in conjunction with multivariate analysis of commercial fish oil-related health food products, have been used to provide discrimination concerning the nature, composition, refinement, and/or adulteration or authentication of the products. Supervised (probabilistic neural networks, PNN) and unsupervised (principal component analysis, PCA; Kohonen neural networks; generative topographic mapping, GTM) pattern recognition techniques were used to visualize and classify samples. Simple PCA score plots demonstrated excellent, but not totally unambiguous, class distinctions, whereas Kohonen and GTM visualization provided better results. Quantitative class predictions with accuracies >95% were achieved with PNN analysis. Trout, salmon, and cod oils were completely and correctly classified. Samples reported to be salmon oils and cod liver oils did not cluster with true salmon and cod liver oil samples, indicating mislabeling or adulteration. PMID:17199311

  8. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    Hockaday, W.C.; Masiello, C.A.; Randerson, J.T.; Smernik, R.J.; Baldock, J.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowground carbon pools associated with decadal timescale disturbances (e.g., land use change and fire). The OR of aboveground pools can be measured using conventional approaches including elemental analysis. However, measuring the OR of soil carbon pools is technically challenging, and few soil OR data are available. In this paper we test three solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for measuring soil OR, all based on measurements of the closely related parameter, organic carbon oxidation state (Cox). Two of the three techniques make use of a molecular mixing model which converts NMR spectra into concentrations of a standard suite of biological molecules of known C ox. The third technique assigns Cox values to each peak in the NMR spectrum. We assess error associated with each technique using pure chemical compounds and plant biomass standards whose Cox and OR values can be directly measured by elemental analyses. The most accurate technique, direct polarization solid-state 13C NMR with the molecular mixing model, agrees with elemental analyses to ??0.036 Cox units (??0.009 OR units). Using this technique, we show a large natural variability in soil Cox and OR values. Soil Cox values have a mean of -0.26 and a range from -0.45 to 0.30, corresponding to OR values of 1.08 ?? 0.06 and a range from 0.96 to 1.22. We also estimate the OR of the carbon flux from a boreal forest fire. Analysis of soils from nearby intact soil profiles imply that soil carbon losses associated

  9. Quantitative analysis of carbon--carbon coupling in the 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of molecules biosynthesized from 13C enriched precursors

    The quantitative dependence of the intensities of the various multiplet lines arising from 13C-13C nuclear spin coupling as a function of 13C enrichment is considered. Two cases are distinguished, depending on whether or not the enrichment of the interacting carbons is statistically independent. For statistically independent labeling, the splitting is simply related to the enrichment of the various carbons. For cases in which this condition does not hold, the splitting provides a measure of the correlation in the enrichment of interacting carbons. The quantitative analysis of 13C-13C coupling is shown to provide additional information in biosynthetic experiments in which a correlation in the labeling of the substrates is introduced. In contrast to the information which is obtained by looking for the incorporation of a label into a specific position of a biosynthesized molecule, a quantitative analysis of the correlation in the labeling of the product can give information about the direct incorporation of more complex structural units. Three examples are discussed: the glycolysis of glucose to lactate, the biosynthesis of galactosylglycerol by species of red algae, and the use of doubly labeled acetate to study the biosynthetic incorporation of acetate units into more complex molecules. (U.S.)

  10. Properties of mixtures of cholesterol with phosphatidylcholine or with phosphatidylserine studied by (13)C magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Epand, Richard M.; Bain, Alex D; Sayer, Brian G; Bach, Diana; Wachtel, Ellen

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of cholesterol is different in mixtures with phosphatidylcholine as compared with phosphatidylserine. In (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, resonance peaks of the vinylic carbons of cholesterol are a doublet in samples containing 0.3 or 0.5 mol fraction cholesterol with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylserine (POPS) or in cholesterol monohydrate crystals, but a singlet with mixtures of cholesterol and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidy...

  11. Cellular applications of 31P and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of cells and purified mitochondria are discussed to show the kind of information that can be obtained in vivo. In suspensions of Escherichia coli both phosphorus-31 and carbon-13 NMR studies of glycolysis of bioenergetics are presented. In rat liver cells the pathways of gluconeogenesis from carbon-13-labeled glycerol are followed by carbon-13 NMR. In the intact liver cells cytosolic and mitochondrial pH's were separately measured by phosphorus-31 NMR. In purified mitochondria the internal and external concentrations of inorganic phosphate, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate were determined by phosphorus-31 while the pH difference across the membrane was measured simultaneously

  12. 13C and 31P NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance] studies of prostate tumor metabolism

    The current research on prostate cancer by NMR spectroscopy and microscopy will most significantly contribute to tumor diagnosis and characterization only if sound biochemical models of tumor metabolism are established and tested. Prior searches focused on universal markers of malignancy, have to date, revealed no universal markers by any method. It is unlikely that NMRS will succeed where other methods have failed, however, NMR spectroscopy does provide a non-invasive means to analyze multiple compounds simultaneously in vivo. In order to fully evaluate the ability of NMRS to differentiate non-malignant from malignant tissues it is necessary to determine sufficient multiple parameters from specific, well-diagnosed, histological tumor types that, in comparison to normal tissue and non-neoplastic, non-normal pathologies from which the given neoplasm must be differentiated, one has enough degrees of freedom to make a mathematically and statistically significant determination. Confounding factors may consist of tumor heterogeneity arising from regional variations in differentiation, ischemia, necrosis, hemorrhage, inflammation and the presence of intermingled normal tissue. One related aspect of our work is the development of {13C}-1H metabolic imaging of 13C for metabolic characterization, with enhanced spatial localization (46). This should markedly extend the range of potential clinical NMR uses because the spatial variation in prostate metabolism may prove to be just as important in tumor diagnoses as bulk (volume-averaged) properties themselves. It is our hope that NMRS and spectroscopic imaging will reveal a sound correlation between prostate metabolism and tumor properties that will be clinically straightforward and useful for diagnosis

  13. Conditions to obtain precise and true measurements of the intramolecular 13C distribution in organic molecules by isotopic 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    Highlights: • Evaluation of the trueness and precision criteria of isotopic 13C NMR spectrometry. • Use of bi-labelled [1,2-13C2]acetic acid to determine the performance of the instrumental response. • Inter-calibration of the 13C intramolecular composition of acetic acid using the technique GC-Py–irm-MS. - Abstract: Intramolecular 13C composition gives access to new information on the (bio) synthetic history of a given molecule. Isotopic 13C NMR spectrometry provides a general tool for measuring the position-specific 13C content. As an emerging technique, some aspects of its performance are not yet fully delineated. This paper reports on (i) the conditions required to obtain satisfactory trueness and precision for the determination of the internal 13C distribution, and (ii) an approach to determining the “absolute” position-specific 13C content. In relation to (i), a precision of <1% can be obtained whatever the molecule on any spectrometer, once quantitative conditions are met, in particular appropriate proton decoupling efficiency. This performance is a prerequisite to the measurement of isotope fractionation either on the transformed or residual compound when a chemical reaction or process is being studied. The study of the trueness has revealed that the response of the spectrometer depends on the 13C frequency range of the studied molecule, i.e. the chemical shift range. The “absolute value” and, therefore, the trueness of the 13C NMR measurements has been assessed on acetic acid and by comparison to the results obtained on the fragments from COOH and CH3 by isotopic mass spectrometry coupled to a pyrolysis device (GC-Py–irm-MS), this technique being the reference method for acetic acid. Of the two NMR spectrometers used in this work, one gave values that corresponded to those obtained by GC-Py–irm-MS (thus, the “true” value) while the other showed a bias, which was dependent to the range covered by the resonance frequencies of the

  14. Conditions to obtain precise and true measurements of the intramolecular {sup 13}C distribution in organic molecules by isotopic {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    Bayle, Kevin [EBSI Team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 Rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322, Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Gilbert, Alexis [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Earth–Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Julien, Maxime [EBSI Team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 Rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322, Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Yamada, Keita [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J.; Akoka, Serge [EBSI Team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 Rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322, Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Yoshida, Naohiro [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Earth–Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Remaud, Gérald S., E-mail: gerald.remaud@univ-nantes.fr [EBSI Team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 Rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322, Nantes Cedex 3 (France)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Evaluation of the trueness and precision criteria of isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry. • Use of bi-labelled [1,2-{sup 13}C{sub 2}]acetic acid to determine the performance of the instrumental response. • Inter-calibration of the {sup 13}C intramolecular composition of acetic acid using the technique GC-Py–irm-MS. - Abstract: Intramolecular {sup 13}C composition gives access to new information on the (bio) synthetic history of a given molecule. Isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry provides a general tool for measuring the position-specific {sup 13}C content. As an emerging technique, some aspects of its performance are not yet fully delineated. This paper reports on (i) the conditions required to obtain satisfactory trueness and precision for the determination of the internal {sup 13}C distribution, and (ii) an approach to determining the “absolute” position-specific {sup 13}C content. In relation to (i), a precision of <1% can be obtained whatever the molecule on any spectrometer, once quantitative conditions are met, in particular appropriate proton decoupling efficiency. This performance is a prerequisite to the measurement of isotope fractionation either on the transformed or residual compound when a chemical reaction or process is being studied. The study of the trueness has revealed that the response of the spectrometer depends on the {sup 13}C frequency range of the studied molecule, i.e. the chemical shift range. The “absolute value” and, therefore, the trueness of the {sup 13}C NMR measurements has been assessed on acetic acid and by comparison to the results obtained on the fragments from COOH and CH{sub 3} by isotopic mass spectrometry coupled to a pyrolysis device (GC-Py–irm-MS), this technique being the reference method for acetic acid. Of the two NMR spectrometers used in this work, one gave values that corresponded to those obtained by GC-Py–irm-MS (thus, the “true” value) while the other showed a bias, which was

  15. Site-specific {sup 13}C content by quantitative isotopic {sup 13}C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectrometry: A pilot inter-laboratory study

    Chaintreau, Alain; Fieber, Wolfgang; Sommer, Horst [Firmenich SA, Corporate R and D Division, P.O. Box 239, 1211 Geneva 8 (Switzerland); Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Yoshida, Naohiro [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Pagelot, Alain [Bruker Biospin SAS, 34 rue de l‘Industrie, 67166 Wissembourg Cedex (France); Moskau, Detlef; Moreno, Aitor [Bruker Biospin AG, Industriestrasse 26, 8117 Fällanden (Switzerland); Schleucher, Jürgen [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Umeå University, S-90187 Umeå (Sweden); Reniero, Fabiano; Holland, Margaret; Guillou, Claude [European Commission, Joint Research Centre – Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, via E. Fermi 2749, I-21027 Ispra (Italy); Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge [EBSI team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Remaud, Gérald S., E-mail: gerald.remaud@univ-nantes.fr [EBSI team, Interdisciplinary Chemistry: Synthesis, Analysis, Modelling (CEISAM), University of Nantes-CNRS UMR 6230, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, F-44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •First ring test on isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry. •Evaluation of the intra- and inter-variability of the NMR spectrometers used. •Definition of a protocol for qualification of the performance of the spectrometer. -- Abstract: Isotopic {sup 13}C NMR spectrometry, which is able to measure intra-molecular {sup 13}C composition, is of emerging demand because of the new information provided by the {sup 13}C site-specific content of a given molecule. A systematic evaluation of instrumental behaviour is of importance to envisage isotopic {sup 13}C NMR as a routine tool. This paper describes the first collaborative study of intra-molecular {sup 13}C composition by NMR. The main goals of the ring test were to establish intra- and inter-variability of the spectrometer response. Eight instruments with different configuration were retained for the exercise on the basis of a qualification test. Reproducibility at the natural abundance of isotopic {sup 13}C NMR was then assessed on vanillin from three different origins associated with specific δ{sup 13}C{sub i} profiles. The standard deviation was, on average, between 0.9 and 1.2‰ for intra-variability. The highest standard deviation for inter-variability was 2.1‰. This is significantly higher than the internal precision but could be considered good in respect of a first ring test on a new analytical method. The standard deviation of δ{sup 13}C{sub i} in vanillin was not homogeneous over the eight carbons, with no trend either for the carbon position or for the configuration of the spectrometer. However, since the repeatability for each instrument was satisfactory, correction factors for each carbon in vanillin could be calculated to harmonize the results.

  16. In Situ Determination of Fructose Isomer Concentrations in Wine Using (13)C Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Colombo, Cinzia; Aupic, Clara; Lewis, Andrew R; Pinto, B Mario

    2015-09-30

    A practical method for simultaneously quantifying fructose and ethanol contents in wines using (13)C quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) spectroscopy is reported. Less than 0.6 mL of wine is needed, and the method leaves an unmodified sample available for subsequent testing or additional analyses. The relative ratios of the five known fructose isomers in ethanolic solutions at different pH and their variations with the temperature are also reported. The data are correlated with the sweetness of wines. The technique was applied to commercially available wines, and the results are compared to other methods. Sugar levels above 0.6 g/L can also be measured. A simple adaptation of the method permits measurement of different carbohydrates using integration of single peaks for each compound, in combination with an external reference (13)C qNMR spectrum of a sample with a known concentration. The method can be applied at all stages of wine production, including grape must, during fermentation, and before and after bottling. PMID:26350157

  17. Espectroscopia de Ressonância Magnética Nuclear de 13C no estudo de rotas biossintéticas de produtos naturais 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy in the studies of biosythetic routes of natural products

    Fernando César de Macedo Júnior

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available During the last five decades, as a result of an interaction between natural product chemistry, synthetic organic chemistry, molecular biology and spectroscopy, scientists reached an extraordinary level of comprehension about the natural processes by which living organisms build up complex molecules. In this context, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, allied with isotopic labeling, played a determinant role. Nowadays, the widespread use of modern NMR techniques allows an even more detailed picture of the biochemical steps by accurate manipulation of the atomic nuclei. This article focuses on the development of such techniques and their impact on biosynthetic studies.

  18. Site-specific 13C content by quantitative isotopic 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectrometry: A pilot inter-laboratory study

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •First ring test on isotopic 13C NMR spectrometry. •Evaluation of the intra- and inter-variability of the NMR spectrometers used. •Definition of a protocol for qualification of the performance of the spectrometer. -- Abstract: Isotopic 13C NMR spectrometry, which is able to measure intra-molecular 13C composition, is of emerging demand because of the new information provided by the 13C site-specific content of a given molecule. A systematic evaluation of instrumental behaviour is of importance to envisage isotopic 13C NMR as a routine tool. This paper describes the first collaborative study of intra-molecular 13C composition by NMR. The main goals of the ring test were to establish intra- and inter-variability of the spectrometer response. Eight instruments with different configuration were retained for the exercise on the basis of a qualification test. Reproducibility at the natural abundance of isotopic 13C NMR was then assessed on vanillin from three different origins associated with specific δ13Ci profiles. The standard deviation was, on average, between 0.9 and 1.2‰ for intra-variability. The highest standard deviation for inter-variability was 2.1‰. This is significantly higher than the internal precision but could be considered good in respect of a first ring test on a new analytical method. The standard deviation of δ13Ci in vanillin was not homogeneous over the eight carbons, with no trend either for the carbon position or for the configuration of the spectrometer. However, since the repeatability for each instrument was satisfactory, correction factors for each carbon in vanillin could be calculated to harmonize the results

  19. Evidence of 13C non-covalent isotope effects obtained by quantitative 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at natural abundance during normal phase liquid chromatography.

    Botosoa, Eliot P; Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J; Rojas, Jose Manuel Moreno; Guillou, Claude; Remaud, Gérald S

    2009-10-16

    Quantitative isotopic (13)C NMR at natural abundance has been used to determine the site-by-site (13)C/(12)C ratios in vanillin and a number of related compounds eluted from silica gel chromatography columns under similar conditions. Head-to-tail isotope fractionation is observed in all compounds at the majority of carbon positions. Furthermore, the site-specific isotope deviations show signatures characteristic of the position and functionality of the substituents present. The observed effects are more complex than would be obtained by simply summing the individual effects. Such detail is hidden when only the global (13)C content is measured by mass spectrometry. In particular, carbon positions within the aromatic ring are found to show site-specific isotope fractionation between the solute and the stationary phase. These interactions, defined as non-covalent isotope effects, can be normal or inverse and vary with the substitution pattern present. PMID:19748628

  20. A 13C nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the metabolism of leucine to isoamyl alcohol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    The metabolism of leucine to isoamyl alcohol in yeast was examined by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The product of leucine transamination, alpha-ketoisocaproate had four potential routes to isoamyl alcohol. The first, via branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase to isovaleryl-CoA with subsequent conversion to isovalerate by acyl-CoA hydrolase operates in wild-type cells where isovalerate appears to be an end product. This pathway is not required for the synthesis of isoamyl alcohol because abolition of branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase activity in an lpd1 disruption mutant did not prevent the formation of isoamyl alcohol. A second possible route was via pyruvate decarboxylase; however, elimination of pyruvate decarboxylase activity in a pdc1 pdc5 pdc6 triple mutant did not decrease the levels of isoamyl alcohol produced. A third route utilizes alpha-ketoisocaproate reductase (a novel activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) but with no role in the formation of isoamyl alcohol from alpha-hydroxyisocaproate because cell homogenates could not convert alpha-hydroxyisocaproate to isoamyl alcohol. The final possibility was that a pyruvate decarboxylase-like enzyme encoded by YDL080c appears to be the major route of decarboxylation of alpha-ketoisocaproate to isoamyl alcohol although disruption of this gene reveals that at least one other unidentified decarboxylase can substitute to a minor extent. (author)

  1. Quantitative solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometric analyses of wood xylen: effect of increasing carbohydrate content

    Bates, A.L.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    Isolated lignin with a low carbohydrate content was spiked with increasing amounts of alpha-cellulose, and then analysed by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) using cross-polarization with magic angle spinning (CPMAS) and dipolar dephasing methods in order to assess the quantitative reliability of CPMAS measurement of carbohydrate content and to determine how increasingly intense resonances for carbohydrate carbons affect calculations of the degree of lignin's aromatic ring substitution and methoxyl carbon content. Comparisons were made of the carbohydrate content calculated by NMR with carbohydrate concentrations obtained by phenol-sulfuric acid assay and by the calculation from the known amounts of cellulose added. The NMR methods used in this study yield overestimates for carbohydrate carbons due to resonance area overlap from the aliphatic side chain carbons of lignin. When corrections are made for these overlapping resonance areas, the NMR results agree very well with results obtained by other methods. Neither the calculated methoxyl carbon content nor the degree of aromatic ring substitution in lignin, both calculated from dipolar dephasing spectra, change with cellulose content. Likewise, lignin methoxyl content does not correlate with cellulose abundance when measured by integration of CPMAS spectra. ?? 1992.

  2. Chemical structures of swine-manure chars produced under different carbonization conditions investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    Two types of swine manure chars, hydrothermally-produced hydrochar and slow-pyrolysis pyrochar, and their raw swine manure solid were characterized using advanced 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Compared with the parent raw swine manure, both hydrochars and pyrochar di...

  3. Detection of tannins in modern and fossil barks and in plant residues by high-resolution solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    Wilson, M.A.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Bark samples isolated from brown coal deposits in Victoria, Australia, and buried wood from Rhizophora mangle have been studies by high-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. Dipolar dephasing 13C NMR appears to be a useful method of detecting the presence of tannins in geochemical samples including barks, buried woods, peats and leaf litter. It is shown that tannins are selectively preserved in bark during coalification to the brown coal stage. ?? 1988.

  4. Determination of refractory organic matter in marine sediments by chemical oxidation, analytical pyrolysis and solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Rosa Arranz, José M. de la; González-Pérez, José Antonio; Hatcher, Patrick G; Knicker, Heike; González-Vila, Francisco Javier

    2008-01-01

    Seeking to quantify the amount of refractory organic matter (ROM), which includes black carbon-like material (BC), in marine sediments, we have applied a two-step procedure that consists of a chemical oxidation with sodium chlorite of the demineralized sediments followed by integration of the aromatic C region in the remaining residues by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The efficacy for lignin removal was tested by analytical pyrolysis in the presence of tetrame...

  5. Dereplication of depsides from the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea by centrifugal partition chromatography combined to {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance pattern recognition

    Oettl, Sarah K. [Institute of Pharmacy/Pharmacognosy, Center for Molecular Biosciences Innsbruck, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 80–82, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Hubert, Jane, E-mail: jane.hubert@univ-reims.fr [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de Reims (UMR CNRS 7312), SFR CAP' sANTE, UFR de Pharmacie, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Nuzillard, Jean-Marc [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de Reims (UMR CNRS 7312), SFR CAP' sANTE, UFR de Pharmacie, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Stuppner, Hermann [Institute of Pharmacy/Pharmacognosy, Center for Molecular Biosciences Innsbruck, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 80–82, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Renault, Jean-Hugues [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de Reims (UMR CNRS 7312), SFR CAP' sANTE, UFR de Pharmacie, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Rollinger, Judith M. [Institute of Pharmacy/Pharmacognosy, Center for Molecular Biosciences Innsbruck, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 80–82, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • The major depsides of a lichen extract were directly identified within mixtures. • The initial extract was rapidly fractionated by CPC in the pH-zone refining mode. • Hierarchical clustering of {sup 13}C NMR signals resulted in the identification of depside molecular skeletons. • {sup 13}C chemical shift clusters were assigned to structures using a {sup 13}C NMR database. • Six depsides were unambiguously identified by this approach. - Abstract: Lichens produce a diversity of secondary metabolites, among them depsides comprised of two or more hydroxybenzoic acid units linked by ester, ether, or C-C-bonds. During classic solid support-based purification processes, depsides are often hydrolyzed and in many cases time, consuming procedures result only in the isolation of decomposition products. In an attempt to avoid extensive purification steps while maintaining metabolite structure integrity, we propose an alternative method to identify the major depsides of a lichen crude extract (Pseudevernia furfuracea var. ceratea (Ach.) D. Hawksw., Parmeliaceae) directly within mixtures. Exploiting the acidic character of depsides and differences in polarity, the extract was fractionated by centrifugal partition chromatography in the pH-zone refining mode resulting in twelve simplified mixtures of depsides. After {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the produced fractions, the major molecular structures were directly identified within the fraction series by using a recently developed pattern recognition method, which combines spectral data alignment and hierarchical clustering analysis. The obtained clusters of {sup 13}C chemical shifts were assigned to their corresponding molecular structures with the help of an in-house {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift database, resulting in six unambiguously identified compounds, namely methyl β-orcinolcarboxylate (1), atranorin (2), 5-chloroatranorin (3), olivetol carboxylic acid (4), olivetoric acid (5

  6. Dereplication of depsides from the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea by centrifugal partition chromatography combined to 13C nuclear magnetic resonance pattern recognition

    Highlights: • The major depsides of a lichen extract were directly identified within mixtures. • The initial extract was rapidly fractionated by CPC in the pH-zone refining mode. • Hierarchical clustering of 13C NMR signals resulted in the identification of depside molecular skeletons. • 13C chemical shift clusters were assigned to structures using a 13C NMR database. • Six depsides were unambiguously identified by this approach. - Abstract: Lichens produce a diversity of secondary metabolites, among them depsides comprised of two or more hydroxybenzoic acid units linked by ester, ether, or C-C-bonds. During classic solid support-based purification processes, depsides are often hydrolyzed and in many cases time, consuming procedures result only in the isolation of decomposition products. In an attempt to avoid extensive purification steps while maintaining metabolite structure integrity, we propose an alternative method to identify the major depsides of a lichen crude extract (Pseudevernia furfuracea var. ceratea (Ach.) D. Hawksw., Parmeliaceae) directly within mixtures. Exploiting the acidic character of depsides and differences in polarity, the extract was fractionated by centrifugal partition chromatography in the pH-zone refining mode resulting in twelve simplified mixtures of depsides. After 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of the produced fractions, the major molecular structures were directly identified within the fraction series by using a recently developed pattern recognition method, which combines spectral data alignment and hierarchical clustering analysis. The obtained clusters of 13C chemical shifts were assigned to their corresponding molecular structures with the help of an in-house 13C NMR chemical shift database, resulting in six unambiguously identified compounds, namely methyl β-orcinolcarboxylate (1), atranorin (2), 5-chloroatranorin (3), olivetol carboxylic acid (4), olivetoric acid (5), and olivetonide (6)

  7. Applications of the 18O-isotope shift on 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to the study of bioorganic reaction mechanisms

    The study of reactions involving the formation and cleavage of carbon-oxygen or nitrogen-oxygen bonds has been significantly aided by recent demonstrations of the generality and characteristics of the 18O-isotope shift in 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In many instances, the magnitudes of the 18O-induced isotopic shifts are sufficiently large as to permit the use of even modest NMR instrumentation and natural abundance 13C. Studies involving less soluble compounds, higher molecular weight materials or relatively rapid reactions may often be carried out using 13C enrichment. Because NMR spectroscopy is non-destructive, it has proven to be extremely useful in the study of natural product biosynthetic pathways. Another area where important applications are being made is in the study of enzymatic and non-enzymatic reaction mechanisms. The characteristics of the 18O isotope shift in 13C NMR spectroscopy are reviewed. Several examples from the work of other groups in the area of natural product biosynthesis are briefly mentioned. This is followed by a number of illustrative applications in the area of bioorganic and enzymatic reaction mechanism that have been examined in our laboratory. The enzymatic examples include acid phosphatases, epoxide hydratase, acetylcholinesterase and asparaginase. 20 refs.; 1 figure

  8. Post-mortem changes in porcine M. longissimus studied by solid-state 13C cross-polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Bertram, Hanne Christine; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen; Andersen, Henrik Jørgen; Karlsson, Anders Hans; Engelsen, Søren Balling

    2003-03-26

    Solid-state (13)C cross-polarization (CP) magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are carried out for the first time on rapidly frozen muscle biopsies taken in M. longissimus in vivo and at 1 min, 45 min, and 24 h post-mortem from three pigs. Two of the pigs were CO(2)-stunned (control animals), and one was pre-slaughter-stressed (treadmill exercise) followed by electrical stunning to induce difference in metabolism post-mortem. (13)C resonance signals from saturated and unsaturated carbons in fatty acids, carboxylic carbons, and carbons in lactate and glycogen are identified in the solid-state NMR spectra. The (13)C CP MAS spectra obtained for post-mortem samples of the stressed, electrically stunned pig differ significantly from the post-mortem control samples, as the intensity of a resonance line appearing at 30 ppm, assigned to carbons of the methylene chains, is reduced for the stressed pig. This spectral difference is probably due to changes in lipid mobility and indicates altered membrane properties in the muscle of the stressed/electrically stunned animal when compared with the control animals already 1 min post-mortem. In addition, the post-mortem period changes in glycogen carbons can be estimated from the (13)C CP MAS spectra, yielding a correlation of r = 0.74 to subsequent biochemical determination of the glycogen content. PMID:12643674

  9. Alteration of interaction between astrocytes and neurons in different stages of diabetes: a nuclear magnetic resonance study using [1-(13)C]glucose and [2-(13)C]acetate.

    Wang, Na; Zhao, Liang-Cai; Zheng, Yong-Quan; Dong, Min-Jian; Su, Yongchao; Chen, Wei-Jian; Hu, Zi-Long; Yang, Yun-Jun; Gao, Hong-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that the brain is a site of diabetic end-organ damage. This study investigates cerebral metabolism and the interactions between astrocytes and neurons at different stages of diabetes to identify the potential pathogenesis of diabetic encephalopathy. [1-(13)C]glucose or [2-(13)C]acetate is infused into 1- and 15-week diabetic rats, the brain extracts of which are analyzed by using (1)H and (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The (13)C-labeling pattern and enrichment of cerebral metabolites are also investigated. The increased (13)C incorporation in the glutamine, glutamate, and γ-aminobutyric acid carbons from [2-(13)C]acetate suggests that the astrocytic mitochondrial metabolism is enhanced in 1-week diabetic rats. By contrast, the decreased labeling from [1-(13)C]glucose reflected that the neuronal mitochondrial metabolism is impaired. As diabetes developed to 15 weeks, glutamine and glutamate concentrations significantly decreased. The increased labeling of glutamine C4 but unchanged labeling of glutamate C4 from [2-(13)C]acetate suggests decreased astrocyte supply to the neurons. In addition, the enhanced pyruvate recycling pathway manifested by the increased lactate C2 enrichment in 1-week diabetic rats is weakened in 15-week diabetic rats. Our study demonstrates the overall metabolism disturbances, changes in specific metabolic pathways, and interaction between astrocytes and neurons during the onset and development of diabetes. These results contribute to the mechanistic understanding of diabetes pathogenesis and evolution. PMID:25048983

  10. Fermentation and Cost-Effective 13C/15N Labeling of the Nonribosomal Peptide Gramicidin S for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Analysis.

    Berditsch, Marina; Afonin, Sergii; Steineker, Anna; Orel, Nataliia; Jakovkin, Igor; Weber, Christian; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-06-01

    Gramicidin S (GS) is a nonribosomally synthesized decapeptide from Aneurinibacillus migulanus. Its pronounced antibiotic activity is attributed to amphiphilic structure and enables GS interaction with bacterial membranes. Despite its medical use for over 70 years, the peptide-lipid interactions of GS and its molecular mechanism of action are still not fully understood. Therefore, a comprehensive structural analysis of isotope-labeled GS needs to be performed in its biologically relevant membrane-bound state, using advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Here, we describe an efficient method for producing the uniformly (13)C/(15)N-labeled peptide in a minimal medium supplemented by selected amino acids. As GS is an intracellular product of A. migulanus, we characterized the producer strain DSM 5759 (rough-convex phenotype) and examined its biosynthetic activity in terms of absolute and biomass-dependent peptide accumulation. We found that the addition of either arginine or ornithine increases the yield only at very high supplementing concentrations (1% and 0.4%, respectively) of these expensive (13)C/(15)N-labeled amino acids. The most cost-effective production of (13)C/(15)N-GS, giving up to 90 mg per gram of dry cell weight, was achieved in a minimal medium containing 1% (13)C-glycerol and 0.5% (15)N-ammonium sulfate, supplemented with only 0.025% of (13)C/(15)N-phenylalanine. The 100% efficiency of labeling is corroborated by mass spectrometry and preliminary solid-state NMR structure analysis of the labeled peptide in the membrane-bound state. PMID:25795666

  11. High-resolution 13C nuclear magnetic resonance evidence of phase transition of Rb,Cs-intercalated single-walled nanotubes

    Bouhrara, M.

    2011-09-06

    We present 13 C high-resolution magic-angle-turning (MAT) and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance data of Cs and Rb intercalated single walled carbon nanotubes. We find two distinct phases at different intercalation levels. A simple charge transfer is applicable at low intercalation level. The new phase at high intercalation level is accompanied by a hybridization of alkali (s) orbitals with the carbon (sp2) orbitals of the single walled nanotubes, which indicate bundle surface sites is the most probable alkali site.

  12. Analysis of Changes in Biochemical Composition Under Free-Air CO2 enrichment by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Leaf Litter, Roots, and Soils From Oak Ridge

    Hockaday, W. C.; Masiello, C. A.; Baldock, J. A.; Iversen, C. M.; Norby, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    Changes in plant biochemistry as a result of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration [CO2] influence the cycling of the terrestrial carbon pool and thereby constitute a climate feedback. We have investigated molecular-level changes in the chemical composition of the organic carbon pool of a deciduous forest in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, after 9 years of free-air CO2 enrichment. We employ a novel approach based upon solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis and application of a molecular mixing model. This method generates quantitative estimates of total lipids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lignin. 13C NMR spectra were acquired for acid-insoluble soil organic matter from depths of 0 - 5 cm and 5 - 15 cm in two ambient and two elevated [CO2] treatments. In the upper 5 cm, elevated [CO2] soils show a 7% increase in lignin, while lipids and proteins decrease by approximately 10%. Below 5 cm, soil lipid content decreased by 15% relative to ambient [CO2] soils. Changes in the composition of the SOM pool may be attributed to changes in plant biochemistry under elevated [CO2]. Therefore we have performed 13C NMR analysis of major aboveground and belowground biomass inputs: senesced leaves and fine roots (<1 mm diameter). Significant [CO2] effects on root chemistry are observed. Based upon these data, we are able to make a preliminary assessment of the contributions of leaf C and root C to changes in the molecular composition of the SOM pool.

  13. Fragment-based (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals: An alternative to planewave methods.

    Hartman, Joshua D; Monaco, Stephen; Schatschneider, Bohdan; Beran, Gregory J O

    2015-09-14

    We assess the quality of fragment-based ab initio isotropic (13)C chemical shift predictions for a collection of 25 molecular crystals with eight different density functionals. We explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, combined cluster/fragment, and the planewave gauge-including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) models relative to experiment. When electrostatic embedding is employed to capture many-body polarization effects, the simple and computationally inexpensive two-body fragment model predicts both isotropic (13)C chemical shifts and the chemical shielding tensors as well as both cluster models and the GIPAW approach. Unlike the GIPAW approach, hybrid density functionals can be used readily in a fragment model, and all four hybrid functionals tested here (PBE0, B3LYP, B3PW91, and B97-2) predict chemical shifts in noticeably better agreement with experiment than the four generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals considered (PBE, OPBE, BLYP, and BP86). A set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided based on these benchmark calculations. Statistical cross-validation procedures are used to demonstrate the robustness of these fits. PMID:26374002

  14. Fragment-based 13C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals: An alternative to planewave methods

    We assess the quality of fragment-based ab initio isotropic 13C chemical shift predictions for a collection of 25 molecular crystals with eight different density functionals. We explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, combined cluster/fragment, and the planewave gauge-including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) models relative to experiment. When electrostatic embedding is employed to capture many-body polarization effects, the simple and computationally inexpensive two-body fragment model predicts both isotropic 13C chemical shifts and the chemical shielding tensors as well as both cluster models and the GIPAW approach. Unlike the GIPAW approach, hybrid density functionals can be used readily in a fragment model, and all four hybrid functionals tested here (PBE0, B3LYP, B3PW91, and B97-2) predict chemical shifts in noticeably better agreement with experiment than the four generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals considered (PBE, OPBE, BLYP, and BP86). A set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided based on these benchmark calculations. Statistical cross-validation procedures are used to demonstrate the robustness of these fits

  15. /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance study of the CO/sub 2/ activation of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase from Rhodospirillum rubrum

    O' Leary, M.H. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison); Joworski, R.J.; Hartman, F.C.

    1979-02-01

    Ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase (3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxy-lyase (dimerizing), EC 4.1.1.39) from Rhodospirillum rubrum is activated by CO/sub 2/ and Mg/sup 2 +/. /sup 13/C NMR spectra were determined for the unactivated enzyme and for enzyme that had been activated by /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ and Mg/sup 2 +/. In addition to the expected resonance for H/sup 13/CO/sub 3//sup -//CO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ at 161.8 ppM downfield from tetramethylsilane, the spectrum of the activated enzyme shows a broad resonance at 164.9 ppM. Analogy with previous NMR studies of /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ binding to hemoglobin suggests that the CO/sub 2/ activation of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase involves formation of a carbamate between an enzyme amino group and CO/sub 2/.

  16. The structure of teichoic acid from Bacillus subtilis var. niger WM as determined by 13C nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy

    The walls of Bacillus subtilis var. niger WM, grown in a Mg2+-limited chemostat culture (carbon source glucose, dilution rate = 0.2 h-1, 370C, pH 7) contained 45% (w/w) teichoic acid, a polymer composed of glycerol, phosphate and glucose in the molar ratio 1.00 : 1.00 : 0.88. Alkaline hydrolysis of this teichoic acid yielded 1-O-β-glucosylglycerol phosphate (together with small amounts of glycerol phosphate), and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of this hydrolysis product, and its derivative after alkaline phosphatase treatment, confirmed that the monomeric unit was 1-O-β-glucosylglycerol-3-phosphate. Assignment of the resonances in the spectrum of undegraded teichoic acid revealed that the polymer was a poly[(2,3)glycerol phosphate], glucosidically substituted on C-1 of glycerol with β-glucose. (orig.)

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Chemical Composition of Mixed and Pure Cultures of Green Algae and Their Decomposed Residues by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Zelibor, J. L.; Romankiw, L.; Hatcher, P. G.; Colwell, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    It is known that macromolecular organic matter in aquatic environments, i.e., humic substances, is highly aliphatic. These aliphatic macromolecules, predominantly paraffinic in structure, are prevalent in marine and lacustrine sediments and are believed to originate from algae or bacteria. A comparative study of mixed and pure cultures of green algae and their decomposed residues was performed by using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as the primary analytical method. Results obtained in this study confirm the presence of components that are chemically refractory and that are defined as alghumin and hydrolyzed alghumin. These were detected in heterogeneous, homogeneous, and axenic biomasses composed of several genera of Chlorophyta. Although the chemical composition of algal biomass varied with culture conditions, the chemical structure of the alghumin and hydrolyzed alghumin, demonstrated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy appeared to be constant for members of the Chlorophyta examined in this study. The alghumin was dominated by carbohydrate-carbon, with minor amounts of amide or carboxyl carbon and paraffinic carbon, the latter surviving strong hydrolysis by 6 N HCI (hydrolyzed alghumin). Bacterial decomposition of heterogeneous algal biomass labeled with 13C was conducted under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions to determine chemical structure and stability of the refractory material. The refractory fraction ranged from 33% in aerobic to 44% in anaerobic cultures. The refractory fraction recovered from either aerobic or anaerobic degradation comprised 40% alghumin, which represented an enrichment by 10% relative to the proportion of alghumin derived from whole cells of algae. The paraffinic component in the hydrolyzed alghumin of whole algal cells was found to be 1.8% and increased to 5.1 and 6.9% after aerobic and anaerobic bacterial degradation, respectively. It is concluded that members of the Chlorophyta contain a

  18. Carbon flux analysis by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance to determine the effect of CO2 on anaerobic succinate production by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Radoš, Dušica; Turner, David L; Fonseca, Luís L; Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Blombach, Bastian; Eikmanns, Bernhard J; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena

    2014-05-01

    Wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum produces a mixture of lactic, succinic, and acetic acids from glucose under oxygen deprivation. We investigated the effect of CO2 on the production of organic acids in a two-stage process: cells were grown aerobically in glucose, and subsequently, organic acid production by nongrowing cells was studied under anaerobic conditions. The presence of CO2 caused up to a 3-fold increase in the succinate yield (1 mol per mol of glucose) and about 2-fold increase in acetate, both at the expense of l-lactate production; moreover, dihydroxyacetone formation was abolished. The redistribution of carbon fluxes in response to CO2 was estimated by using (13)C-labeled glucose and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis of the labeling patterns in end products. The flux analysis showed that 97% of succinate was produced via the reductive part of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, with the low activity of the oxidative branch being sufficient to provide the reducing equivalents needed for the redox balance. The flux via the pentose phosphate pathway was low (~5%) regardless of the presence or absence of CO2. Moreover, there was significant channeling of carbon to storage compounds (glycogen and trehalose) and concomitant catabolism of these reserves. The intracellular and extracellular pools of lactate and succinate were measured by in vivo NMR, and the stoichiometry (H(+):organic acid) of the respective exporters was calculated. This study shows that it is feasible to take advantage of natural cellular regulation mechanisms to obtain high yields of succinate with C. glutamicum without genetic manipulation. PMID:24610842

  19. 18O isotope effect in 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Part 9. Hydrolysis of benzyl phosphate by phosphatase enzymes and in acidic aqueous solutions

    The 18O isotope-induced shifts in 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to establish the position of bond cleavage in the phosphatase-catalyzed and acid-catalyzed hydrolysis reactions of benzyl phosphate. The application of the 18O-isotope effect in NMR spectroscopy affords a continuous, nondestructive assay method for following the kinetics and position of bond cleavage in the hydrolytic process. The technique provides advantages over most discontinuous methods in which the reaction components must be isolated and converted to volatile derivatives prior to analysis. In the present study, [α-13C,ester-18O]benzyl phosphate and [ester-18O]benzyl phosphate were synthesized for use in enzymatic and nonenzymatic studies. Hydrolysis reactions catalyzed by the alkaline phosphatase from E. coli and by the acid phosphatases isolated from human prostate and human liver were all accompanied by cleavage of the substrate phosphorus-oxygen bond consistent with previously postulated mechanisms involving covalent phosphoenzyme intermediates. An extensive study of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of benzyl phosphate at 750C revealed that the site of bond cleavage is dependent on pH. At pH less than or equal to 1.3, the hydrolysis proceeds with C-O bond cleavage; at 1.3 2H]Benzyl phosphate was also synthesized. Hydrolysis of this chiral benzyl derivative demonstrated that the acid-catalyzed C-O bond scission of benzyl phosphate proceeds by an A-1 (S/sub N/1) mechanism with 70% racemization and 30% inversion at carbon. 37 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  20. Chemical structures of coal lithotypes before and after CO2 adsorption as investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Cao, X.; Mastalerz, Maria; Chappell, M.A.; Miller, L.F.; Li, Y.; Mao, J.

    2011-01-01

    Four lithotypes (vitrain, bright clarain, clarain, and fusain) of a high volatile bituminous Springfield Coal from the Illinois Basin were characterized using advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The NMR techniques included quantitative direct polarization/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS), cross polarization/total sideband suppression (CP/TOSS), dipolar dephasing, CHn selection, and recoupled C-H long-range dipolar dephasing techniques. The lithotypes that experienced high-pressure CO2 adsorption isotherm analysis were also analyzed to determine possible changes in coal structure as a result of CO2 saturation at high pressure and subsequent evacuation. The main carbon functionalities present in original vitrain, bright clarain, clarain and fusain were aromatic carbons (65.9%-86.1%), nonpolar alkyl groups (9.0%-28.9%), and aromatic C-O carbons (4.1%-9.5%). Among these lithotypes, aromaticity increased in the order of clarain, bright clarain, vitrain, and fusain, whereas the fraction of alkyl carbons decreased in the same order. Fusain was distinct from other three lithotypes in respect to its highest aromatic composition (86.1%) and remarkably small fraction of alkyl carbons (11.0%). The aromatic cluster size in fusain was larger than that in bright clarain. The lithotypes studied responded differently to high pressure CO2 saturation. After exposure to high pressure CO2, vitrain and fusain showed a decrease in aromaticity but an increase in the fraction of alkyl carbons, whereas bright clarain and clarain displayed an increase in aromaticity but a decrease in the fraction of alkyl carbons. Aromatic fused-rings were larger for bright clarain but smaller for fusain in the post-CO2 adsorption samples compared to the original lithotypes. These observations suggested chemical CO2-coal interactions at high pressure and the selectivity of lithotypes in response to CO2 adsorption. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Effect of 13C enrichment in the glassing matrix on dynamic nuclear polarization of [1-13C]pyruvate

    Lumata, Lloyd; Kovacs, Zoltan; Malloy, Craig; Sherry, A. Dean; Merritt, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) can effectively form a glassy matrix necessary for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments. We tested the effects of 13C enrichment in DMSO on DNP of [1-13C]pyruvate doped with trityl radical OX063Me. We found that the polarization build-up time τ of pyruvate in 13C-labelled DMSO glassing solution is twice as fast as the unenriched DMSO while the NMR enhancement was unchanged. This indicates that 13C-13C spin diffusion is a limiting factor in the kinetics of d...

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Hyperpolarized 13C Contrast Agents

    Gordon, Jeremy W.

    Hyperpolarized 13C substrates offer the potential to non-invasively image metabolism and enzymatic activity. However, hyperpolarization introduces a number of difficulties, and imaging is hampered by non-equilibrium magnetization and the need for spectral encoding. There is therefore a need for fast and RF efficient spectral imaging techniques. This work presents a number of new methods that can be used to improve polarization, increase RF efficiency and improve modeling accuracy in hyperpolarized 13C experiments. In particular, a novel encoding and reconstruction algorithm is presented that can generate spatially and spectrally resolved images with a single RF excitation and echo time. This reconstruction framework increases data acquisition efficiency, enabling accelerated acquisition speed, preserved polarization, and/or improved temporal or spatial resolution. Overall, the methods enumerated in this dissertation have the potential to improve modeling accuracy and to mitigate the conventional tradeoffs between SNR, spatial resolution, and temporal resolution that govern image quality in hyperpolarized 13C experiments.

  3. Possibilities and limitations of sup 1 H and sup 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the identification and the quantitative determination of some naturally occurring carcinogenic risk factors. [Senecio vulgaris; Senecio vernalis; Senecio jacobaea; Euphorbia ingens

    Pieters, L.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a phytochemical screening method for some selected carcinogenic or tumor-promoting principles in higher plants. The pyrrolizidine alkaloids from some Senecio species (Compositae or Asteraceae), and the diterpene ester from Croton tiglium L. and Euphorbia ingens E. Mey (Euphorbiaceae) were chosen as representatives of both groups. The possibilities and limitations of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR) for the analysis of mixtures of carcinogenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids were compared with high performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography with high performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography was well as gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. Senecio vulgaris L., Senecio vernalis Waldst. and Kit. and Senecio jacobaea L. were investigated.

  4. Dynamic nuclear polarization and optimal control spatial-selective 13C MRI and MRS

    Vinding, Mads Sloth; Laustsen, Christoffer; Maximov, Ivan I.;

    2013-01-01

    Aimed at 13C metabolic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) applications, we demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) may be combined with optimal control 2D spatial selection to simultaneously obtain high sensitivity and well-defined spatial restriction. This is ach......Aimed at 13C metabolic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) applications, we demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) may be combined with optimal control 2D spatial selection to simultaneously obtain high sensitivity and well-defined spatial restriction....... This is achieved through the development of spatial-selective single-shot spiral-readout MRI and MRS experiments combined with dynamic nuclear polarization hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate on a 4.7T pre-clinical MR scanner. The method stands out from related techniques by facilitating anatomic shaped region...

  5. Metabolism of D-glucose in a wall-less mutant of Neurospora crassa examined by 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonances: effects of insulin

    13C NMR and 31P NMR have been used to investigate the metabolism of glucose by a wall-less strain of Neurospora crassa (slime), grown in a supplemented nutritionally defined medium and harvested in the early stationary stage of growth. With D-[1-13C]- or D-[6-13C]glucose as substrates, the major metabolic products identified from 13C NMR spectra were [2-13C]ethanol, [3-13C]alanine, and C1- and C6-labeled trehalose. Several observations suggested the existence of a substantial hexose monophosphate (HMP) shunt: (i) a 70% greater yield of ethanol from C6- than from C1-labeled glucose; (ii) C1-labeled glucose yielded 19% C6-labeled trehalose, while C6-labeled glucose yielded only 4% C1-labeled trehalose; (iii) a substantial transfer of 13C from C2-labeled glucose to the C2-position of ethanol. 31P NMR spectra showed millimolar levels of intracellular inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphodiesters, and diphosphates including sugar diphosphates and polyphosphate. Addition of glucose resulted in a decrease in cytoplasmic Pi and an increase in sugar monophosphates, which continued for at least 30 min. Phosphate resonances corresponding to metabolic intermediates of both the glycolytic and HMP pathways were identified in cell extracts. Addition of insulin (100 nM) with the glucose had the following effects relative to glucose alone: (i) a 24% increase (P less than 0.01) in the rate of ethanol production; (ii) a 38% increase (P less than 0.05) in the rate of alanine production; (iii) a 27% increase (P less than 0.05) in the rate of glucose disappearance. Insulin thus increases the rates of production of ethanol and alanine in these cells, in addition to increasing production of CO2 and glycogen, as previously shown. (author)

  6. Fractionation in position-specific isotope composition during vaporization of environmental pollutants measured with isotope ratio monitoring by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    Isotopic fractionation of pollutants in terrestrial or aqueous environments is a well-recognized means by which to track different processes during remediation. As a complement to the common practice of measuring the change in isotope ratio for the whole molecule using isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry (irm-MS), position-specific isotope analysis (PSIA) can provide further information that can be exploited to investigate source and remediation of soil and water pollutants. Position-specific fractionation originates from either degradative or partitioning processes. We show that isotope ratio monitoring by 13C NMR (irm-13C NMR) spectrometry can be effectively applied to methyl tert-butylether, toluene, ethanol and trichloroethene to obtain this position-specific data for partitioning. It is found that each compound exhibits characteristic position-specific isotope fractionation patterns, and that these are modulated by the type of evaporative process occurring. Such data should help refine models of how remediation is taking place, hence back-tracking to identify pollutant sources. - Highlights: • Position-Specific Isotope Analysis (PSIA) by 13C NMR spectrometry. • PSIA on isotope fractionation during several vaporization processes. • PSIA for isotope profiling in environment pollutants. • Intramolecular 13C reveal normal and inverse effects, bulk values being unchanged. - PSIA in pollutants during evaporation processes shows more detailed information for discerning the nature of the process involved than does bulk isotope measurements

  7. Four-dimensional 13C/13C-edited nuclear Overhauser Enhancement Spectroscopy of a protein in solution: Application to interleukin 1β

    A four-dimensional 13C/13C-edited NOESY experiment is described which dramatically improves the resolution of protein NMR spectra and enables the straightforward assignment of nuclear Overhauser effects involving aliphatic and/or aromatic protons in larger proteins. The experiment is demonstrated for uniformly (>95%) 13C-labeled interleukin 1β, a protein of 153 residues and 17.4 kDa, which plays a key role in the immune response. NOEs between aliphatic and/or aromatic protons are first spread out into a third dimension by the 13C chemical shift of the carbon atom attached to the originating proton and subsequently into a fourth dimension by the 13C chemical shift of the carbon atom attached to the destination proton. Thus, each NOE cross peak is labeled by four chemical shifts. By this means, ambiguities in the assignment of NOEs that arise from chemical shift overlap and degeneracy are completely removed. Further, NOEs between protons with the same chemical shifts can readily be detected providing their attached carbon atoms have different 13C chemical shifts. The design of the pulse sequence requires special care to minimize the level of artifacts arising from undesired coherence transfer pathways, and in particular those associated with diagonal peaks which correspond to magnetization that has not been transferred from one proton to another. The 4D 13C/13C-edited NOESY experiment is characterized by high sensitivity as the through-bond transfer steps involve the large 1JCH (130 Hz) couplings, and it is possible to obtain high-quality spectra on 1-2 mM samples of 13C-labeled protein in as little as 3 days. This experiment should open up the application of protein structure determination by NMR to a large number of medium-sized proteins (150-300 residues) of biological interest

  8. Hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    Hurd, Ralph E.; Yen, Yi‐Fen; Chen, Albert;

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the basic physics of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dissolution‐DNP), and the impact of the resulting highly nonequilibrium spin states, on the physics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection. The hardware requirements for clinical translation of this techn......This article describes the basic physics of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dissolution‐DNP), and the impact of the resulting highly nonequilibrium spin states, on the physics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection. The hardware requirements for clinical translation...

  9. Studies on molecular motion in lyotropic mesophases of hexaethylene glycol dodecyl ether-D2O system by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    The 13C spin-lattice relaxation time(T1) and the resonance line width corresponding to T2 * were measured for each of the carbons in hexaethylene glycol dodecyl ether-water(D2O) system, which exists as two distinct lyotropic mesophases(neat and middle phase). The line width is very narrow in the isotropic state, such as in organic solvents and in a lower concentration aqueous solution, whereas in a mesophase and in a higher concentration aqueous solution, the line width of the alkyl chain was broadened. Here the line widths for glycol carbons were about an order of magnitude smaller than for an alkyl chain, demonstrating the difference of molecular motion. The chemical shifts of the alkyl chain in the middle phase were different from those in the isotropic state; this difference was clearly shown in the spectrum of the middle/isotropic coexistent phase. 13C-T1 was not sensitive enough to differentiate between the isotropic and the lyotropic phase at room temperature. It was found that T1 did not equal T2 * for any of the methylene carbons, the difference being most marked for the terminal methyl carbon in the alkyl chain. The orientational order in the phases had an influence on the T2 * values. (author)

  10. An overview of the metabolic differences between Bradyrhizobium japonicum 110 bacteria and differentiated bacteroids from soybean (Glycine max) root nodules: an in vitro 13C- and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria that induce root nodules formation in legume soybean (Glycine max.). Using 13C- and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have analysed the metabolite profiles of cultivated B. japonicum cells and bacteroids isolated from soybean nodules. Our results revealed some quantitative and qualitative differences between the metabolite profiles of bacteroids and their vegetative state. This includes in bacteroids a huge accumulation of soluble carbohydrates such as trehalose, glutamate, myo-inositol and homo-spermidine as well as Pi, nucleotide pools and intermediates of the primary carbon metabolism. Using this novel approach, these data show that most of the compounds detected in bacteroids reflect the metabolic adaptation of rhizobia to the surrounding microenvironment with its host plant cells. (authors)

  11. Detection of kestoses and kestose-related oligosaccharides in extracts of Festuca arundinacea, Dactylis glomerate L. , and Asparagus officinalis L. root cultures and invertase by sup 13 C and sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Forsythe, K.L.; Feather, M.S.; Gracz, H.; Wong, T.C. (Univ. of Missouri, Columbia (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Previous studies show that {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to detect and identify mixtures of 1-kestose and neokestose after conversion to the acetate derivatives. In this study, unequivocal assignments are made for the anomeric carbon and proton signals for the above two trisaccharide acetates as well as for 6-kestose hendecaacetate and for nystose tetradecaacetate (a 1-kestose-derived tetrasaccharide). A number of oligosaccharide fractions were isolated from several plant species, converted to the acetates, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra obtained. Using the above reference data, the following information was obtained. The trisaccharide fraction from Dactylis gomerata L. stem tissue and Asparagus officinalis L. roots contain both 1-kestose and neokestose, and the tetrasaccharide fractions contain three components, one of which is nystose. Penta- and hexasaccharide acetates were also isolated from A. officinalis L. roots and were found to contain, respectively, four and at least five components. All components of both of the above species appear to contain a kestose residue and to be produced by the sequential addition of fructofuranosyl units to these. The trisaccharide fraction from Festuca arundinacea is complex, and contains at least five different components, two of which appear to be 1-kestose and neokestose.

  12. High-field dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization of [1-13C]pyruvic acid

    Yoshihara, Hikari A. I.; Can, Emine; Karlsson, Magnus;

    2016-01-01

    [1-13C]pyruvate is the most widely used hyperpolarized metabolic magnetic resonance imaging agent. Using a custom-built 7.0 T polarizer operating at 1.0 K and trityl radical-doped [1-13C]pyruvic acid, unextrapolated solution-state 13C polarization greater than 60% was measured after dissolution a...

  13. Spectral editing for in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Xiang, Yun; Shen, Jun

    2012-01-01

    In vivo detection of carboxylic/amide carbons is a promising technique for studying cerebral metabolism and neurotransmission due to the very low RF power required for proton decoupling. In the carboxylic/amide region, however, there is severe spectral overlap between acetate C1 and glutamate C5, complicating studies that use acetate as an astroglia-specific substrate. There are no known in vivo MRS techniques that can spectrally resolve acetate C1 and glutamate C5 singlets. In this study, we propose to spectrally separate acetate C1 and glutamate C5 by a two-step J-editing technique after introducing homonuclear 13C- 13C scalar coupling between carboxylic/amide carbons and aliphatic carbons. By infusing [1,2- 13C 2]acetate instead of [1- 13C]acetate the acetate doublet can be spectrally edited because of the large separation between acetate C2 and glutamate C4 in the aliphatic region. This technique can be applied to studying acetate transport and metabolism in brain in the carboxylic/amide region without spectral interference.

  14. Carbonyl 13C NMR spectrum of basin pancreatic trypsin inhibitor: resonance assignments by selective amide hydrogen isotope labeling and detection of isotope effects on 13C nuclear shielding

    The carbonyl region of the natural abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor is examined, and 65 of the 66 expected signals are characterized at varying pH and temperature. Assignments are reported for over two-thirds of the signals, including those of all buried backbone amide groups with slow proton exchange and all side-chain carbonyl groups. This is the first extensively assigned carbonyl spectrum for any protein. A method for carbonyl resonance assignments utilizing amide proton exchange and isotope effects on nuclear shielding is described in detail. The assignments are made by establishing kinetic correlation between effects of amide proton exchange observed in the carbonyl 13C region with development of isotope effects and in the amide proton region with disappearance of preassigned resonances. Several aspects of protein structure and dynamics in solution may be investigated by carbonyl 13C NMR spectroscopy. Some effects of side-chain primary amide group hydrolysis are described. The main interest is on information about intramolecular hydrogen-bond energies and changes in the protein due to amino acid replacements by chemical modification or genetic engineering

  15. Study and validity of 13C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and 2H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The δ 13C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H)I ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C4 syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per mille (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with Natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C4 syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying

  16. Study and validity of {sup 13}C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and {sup 2}H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey

    Cotte, J.F. [Cooperative France Miel, BP 5, 330 Mouchard (France); Casabianca, H. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Lheritier, J. [Cooperative France Miel, BP 5, 330 Mouchard (France); Perrucchietti, C. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Sanglar, C. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Waton, H. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France); Grenier-Loustalot, M.F. [Service Central d' Analyse, USR 059-CNRS, BP 22, 69390 Vernaison (France)]. E-mail: mf.grenier-loustalot@sca.cnrs.fr

    2007-01-16

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The {delta} {sup 13}C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H){sub I} ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C{sub 4} syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per mille (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with Natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C{sub 4} syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying.

  17. Study and validity of 13C stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry and 2H site-specific natural isotopic fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance isotopic measurements to characterize and control the authenticity of honey.

    Cotte, J F; Casabianca, H; Lhéritier, J; Perrucchietti, C; Sanglar, C; Waton, H; Grenier-Loustalot, M F

    2007-01-16

    Honey samples were analyzed by stable carbon isotopic ratio analysis by mass spectrometry (SCIRA-MS) and site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to first determine their potentials for characterizing the substance and then to combat adulteration. Honey samples from several geographic and botanical origins were analyzed. The delta(13)C parameter was not significant for characterizing an origin, while the (D/H)(I) ratio could be used to differentiate certain single-flower varieties. Application of the official control method of adding a C(4) syrup (AOAC official method 998.12) to our authentic samples revealed anomalies resulting from SCIRA indices that were more negative than -1 per thousand (permil). A filtration step was added to the experimental procedure and provided results that were compliant with the natural origin of our honey samples. In addition, spiking with a C(4) syrup could be detected starting at 9-10%. The use of SNIF-NMR is limited by the detection of a syrup spike starting only at 20%, which is far from satisfying. PMID:17386484

  18. Electron-nuclear interaction in 13C nanotube double quantum dots

    Churchill, H O H; Bestwick, A J; Harlow, J W;

    2009-01-01

    For coherent electron spins, hyperfine coupling to nuclei in the host material can either be a dominant source of unwanted spin decoherence or, if controlled effectively, a resource enabling storage and retrieval of quantum information. To investigate the effect of a controllable nuclear...... environment on the evolution of confined electron spins, we have fabricated and measured gate-defined double quantum dots with integrated charge sensors made from single-walled carbon nanotubes with a variable concentration of 13C (nuclear spin I=1/2) among the majority zero-nuclear-spin 12C atoms. We observe...... strong isotope effects in spin-blockaded transport, and from the magnetic field dependence estimate the hyperfine coupling in 13C nanotubes to be of the order of 100 ¿µeV, two orders of magnitude larger than anticipated. 13C-enhanced nanotubes are an interesting system for spin-based quantum information...

  19. Unambiguous assigning of the signals of the nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of {sup 1} H and {sup 13} C of monoterpenes using computational methods; Asignacion inequivoca de las senales del espectro de resonancia magnetica nuclear de {sup 1} H y {sup 13} C de monoterpenos empleando metodos computacionales

    Cortes, F.; Cuevas, G.; Tenorio, J.; Rochin, A.L. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Quimica, A.P. 70213, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    Ab initio calculations, within the frame of Density Functional Theory were carried out on camphene and {alpha}-pinene. The {sup 1} H and {sup 13} C shifts were estimated according to the recently developed Sum-Over-States Density Functional Perturbation Theory (SOS-DFPT) as implemented in a modified deMon-KS program. The calculations not only reproduced the observed NMR chemical shifts, quantitatively in the case of {sup 1} H nuclei and qualitatively in the case of {sup 13} C nuclei, but also allow assigning unambiguously the signal on these spectra. (Author)

  20. The use of dynamic nuclear polarization in 1H and 13C solid state NMR

    The Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) effect is used at room temperature in combination with 13C NMR. Due to the low natural abundance of 13C spins (1%) the signal is very weak, but when the DNP effect is used the 13C signal can be enhanced and therefore the number of scans and the measuring time considerably reduced. The theory is presented and the experimental set-up is described. Experiments on polystyrene, artificially doped with free radicals are described and it is examined whether the theory of the DNP effect can be used in a quantitative way. Applications of the use of the DNP effect in 13C NMR are shown. Excellent spectra are presented of artificial and natural diamonds, possibly to be used for diamond characterization purposes. 161 refs.; 61 figs.; 3 tabs

  1. Imaging cerebral 2-ketoisocaproate metabolism with hyperpolarized (13)C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging

    Butt, Sadia Asghar; Søgaard, Lise Vejby-Christensen; Magnusson, Peter O.; Lauritzen, Mette Hauge; Laustsen, Christoffer; Akeson, Per; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan H

    2012-01-01

    The branched chain amino acid transaminase (BCAT) has an important role in nitrogen shuttling and glutamate metabolism in the brain. The purpose of this study was to describe the cerebral distribution and metabolism of hyperpolarized 2-keto[1-(13)C]isocaproate (KIC) in the normal rat using magnetic...

  2. Magnetic resonance butterfly coils: Design and application for hyperpolarized 13C studies

    Giovannetti, Giulio; Frijia, Francesca; Attanasio, Simona;

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy in pig models enables cardiac metabolism assessment and provides a powerful tool for heart physiology studies, although the low molar concentration of derivate metabolites gives rise to technological limitations in terms of data quality. The design...... coil throughout the volume of interest for cardiac imaging in pig. Experimental SNR-vs-depth profiles, extracted from the [1-13C]acetate phantom chemical shift image (CSI), permitted to highlight the performance of the proposed coils configuration. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  3. Astroglial Contribution to Brain Energy Metabolism in Humans Revealed by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Elucidation of the Dominant Pathway for Neurotransmitter Glutamate Repletion and Measurement of Astrocytic Oxidative Metabolism

    Lebon, Vincent; Petersen, Kitt F.; Cline, Gary W.; Shen, Jun; Mason, Graeme F.; Dufour, Sylvie; Behar, Kevin L.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Rothman, Douglas L.

    2002-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports a crucial role for glial metabolism in maintaining proper synaptic function and in the etiology of neurological disease. However, the study of glial metabolism in humans has been hampered by the lack of noninvasive methods. To specifically measure the contribution of astroglia to brain energy metabolism in humans, we used a novel noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic approach. We measured carbon 13 incorporation into brain glutamate and glutamine in...

  4. Exploring the conformational energy landscape of glassy disaccharides by cross polarization magic angle spinning 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and numerical simulations. II. Enhanced molecular flexibility in amorphous trehalose

    Lefort, Ronan; Bordat, Patrice; Cesaro, Attilio; Descamps, Marc

    2007-01-01

    This paper uses chemical shift surfaces to simulate experimental C13 cross polarization magic angle spinning spectra for amorphous solid state disaccharides, paying particular attention to the glycosidic linkage atoms in trehalose, sucrose, and lactose. The combination of molecular mechanics with density functional theory/gauge invariant atomic orbital ab initio methods provides reliable structural information on the conformational distribution in the glass. The results are interpreted in terms of an enhanced flexibility that trehalose possesses in the amorphous solid state, at least on the time scale of C13 nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. Implications of these findings for the fragility of trehalose glass and bioprotectant action are discussed.

  5. Solution (sup13)C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Analysis of the Amino Acids of Methanosphaera stadtmanae: Biosynthesis and Origin of One-Carbon Units from Acetate and Carbon Dioxide

    Miller, T L; Chen, X; B. Yan; Bank, S.

    1995-01-01

    We found that general pathways for amino acid synthesis of Methanosphaera stadtmanae, a methanogen that forms CH(inf4) from H(inf2) and methanol, resembled those of methanogens that form CH(inf4) from CO(inf2) or from the methyl group of acetate. We determined the incorporation of (sup14)C-labeled CO(inf2), formate, methanol, methionine, serine, and acetate into cell macromolecules. Labeling of amino acid carbons was determined by solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy after growth ...

  6. Spectral density mapping at multiple magnetic fields suitable for 13C NMR relaxation studies

    Kadeřávek, Pavel; Zapletal, Vojtěch; Fiala, Radovan; Srb, Pavel; Padrta, Petr; Přecechtělová, Jana Pavlíková; Šoltésová, Mária; Kowalewski, Jozef; Widmalm, Göran; Chmelík, Josef; Sklenář, Vladimír; Žídek, Lukáš

    2016-05-01

    Standard spectral density mapping protocols, well suited for the analysis of 15N relaxation rates, introduce significant systematic errors when applied to 13C relaxation data, especially if the dynamics is dominated by motions with short correlation times (small molecules, dynamic residues of macromolecules). A possibility to improve the accuracy by employing cross-correlated relaxation rates and on measurements taken at several magnetic fields has been examined. A suite of protocols for analyzing such data has been developed and their performance tested. Applicability of the proposed protocols is documented in two case studies, spectral density mapping of a uniformly labeled RNA hairpin and of a selectively labeled disaccharide exhibiting highly anisotropic tumbling. Combination of auto- and cross-correlated relaxation data acquired at three magnetic fields was applied in the former case in order to separate effects of fast motions and conformational or chemical exchange. An approach using auto-correlated relaxation rates acquired at five magnetic fields, applicable to anisotropically moving molecules, was used in the latter case. The results were compared with a more advanced analysis of data obtained by interpolation of auto-correlated relaxation rates measured at seven magnetic fields, and with the spectral density mapping of cross-correlated relaxation rates. The results showed that sufficiently accurate values of auto- and cross-correlated spectral density functions at zero and 13C frequencies can be obtained from data acquired at three magnetic fields for uniformly 13C -labeled molecules with a moderate anisotropy of the rotational diffusion tensor. Analysis of auto-correlated relaxation rates at five magnetic fields represents an alternative for molecules undergoing highly anisotropic motions.

  7. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of [1-13C] enriched monosaccharides. Signal assignments and orientational dependence of geminal and vicinal carbon--carbon and carbon--hydrogen spin--spin coupling constants

    Early assignments of the 13C resonances in the natural abundance 13C NMR spectra of monosaccharides have been reevaluated in light of recent coupling data from the spectra of 13C-1 labeled sugars. The technique of specific 13C enrichment not only identifies the labeled carbon unambiguously but can be used to assign more remote carbon resonances due to scalar carbon-carbon coupling. The pattern of carbon-carbon coupling observed in all of the sugars thus far studied is remarkably constant. In addition to the large (approximately 46 Hz) one-bond coupling between C-1 and C-2, C-3 exhibits a coupling to C-1 only in the β anomer (approximately 4 Hz) while C-5 is coupled to C-1 only in the α anomer (approximately 2 Hz). In addition, C-6 is coupled to C-1 in both anomers and C-4 shows no evidence of coupling to C-1 in any of the sugars examined. These couplings have been used to reassign several resonances and the original assignments are discussed in terms of the predictive rules used for resonance assignments in carbohydrates. The vicinal couplings of C-6 and C-4 to C-1 appear to obey a Karplus-type relationship. The geminal 2J/sub CCC/ and 2J/sub COC/ couplings are discussed in terms of a dihedral angle dependence where the angle is defined by the relative orientations of C-3 or C-5 and the electronegative oxygen substituents on C-1. Additional data on 2J/sub CCH/ couplings involving C-1 and H-2 are also readily obtained with the C-1 labeled sugars

  8. A polymer-based magnetic resonance tracer for visualization of solid tumors by 13C spectroscopic imaging.

    Yoshikazu Suzuki

    Full Text Available Morphological imaging precedes lesion-specific visualization in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI because of the superior ability of this technique to depict tissue morphology with excellent spatial and temporal resolutions. To achieve lesion-specific visualization of tumors by MRI, we investigated the availability of a novel polymer-based tracer. Although the 13C nucleus is a candidate for a detection nucleus because of its low background signal in the body, the low magnetic resonance sensitivity of the nucleus needs to be resolved before developing a 13C-based tracer. In order to overcome this problem, we enriched polyethylene glycol (PEG, a biocompatible polymer, with 13C atoms. 13C-PEG40,000 (13C-PEG with an average molecular weight of 40 kDa emitted a single 13C signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio due to its ability to maintain signal sharpness, as was confirmed by in vivo investigation, and displayed a chemical shift sufficiently distinct from that of endogenous fat. 13C-PEG40,000 intravenously injected into mice showed long retention in circulation, leading to its effective accumulation in tumors reflecting the well-known phenomenon that macromolecules accumulate in tumors because of leaky tumor capillaries. These properties of 13C-PEG40,000 allowed visualization of tumors in mice by 13C spectroscopic imaging. These findings suggest that a technique based on 13C-PEG is a promising strategy for tumor detection.

  9. Intermolecular interactions in nuclear magnetic resonance: medium shifts of the 1H and 13C nuclei in methane in the gas phase and in solution and of gaseous 3He

    An analysis has been carried out of the continuum and the binary collision models used in the description of NMR solvent shifts caused by Van der Waals intermolecular interactions. The basic assumption underlying the models, i.e. σ sub(w)= -BE2 (I) is examined. The possible effects on I of such phenomena as B anisotropy and field gradients are discussed, as well as the inadequacy of I in representing the true intermolecular shielding. A new expression for E2 is proposed, which in connection with I forms the bais of a modified binary collision model. The new E2 expression takes into account the dynamic character of the interaction. The major obstacle to the binary collision model, the requirement for accurate parameters for the intermolecular potential employed in the statistical-mechanical averaging, is alleviated by the establishment of priority rules to be used in the selection of these paramters. The proposed binary collision model and a collision model are used to interpret the 1H and 13C medium shifts of methane in the gas phase and in solution. The proton shift data conform equally well to either model; the 13C data indicate that a large solvent-dependent term contributes to the observed medium shifts in addition to I. Proton and 13C B parameters of methane in the gas phase and in solution are discussed. Preliminary results of 3He medium shifts as a function of gas density are presented. An extracted B parameter based on the proposed binary collision model appears to agree well with the result of a quantum-mechanical calculation of B for a 3He atom in a uniform static electric field. (LL)

  10. A conformational study of the adducts of 2'-deoxythymidine and 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1,4-piperidone-N-oxyl by sup(1)H and sup(13)C nuclear magnetic resonance

    γ-Irradiation of oxygen-free, aqueous solutions of 2'-deoxythymidine in the presence of the organic nitroxide free radical, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1,4-piperidone-N-oxyl (TAN) leads to a complex mixture of products in which the TAN moiety is linked to the C5 or C6 position of a 5,6-saturated thymine ring. Extensive sup(1)H and sup(13)C nmr data are provided for the eight TAN-dT adducts which are produced in the largest amounts. The results show that the conformational properties of the sugar moiety are dependent on the point of attachment of the TAN group and the configuration of the standard thymine ring

  11. Magnetic shielding tensors of 13C and 15N in organic solids

    Magnetic shielding tensors delta have become accessible by Fourier transform NMR in high magnetic fields. Measurements were performed on 13C and 15N in powders and single crystals at frequencies of 61 and 32 MHz, respectively. Some of the general features of the shielding tensors have been established regarding the size of the anisotropy as well as the orientation of the principal axes system of delta relative to the molecule. This holds in particular for carbons involved sp2 bonds, where the direction of the largest shielding is found to be perpendicular to the sp2 plane. This can be understood theoretically showing that the shielding is dominated by the paramagnetic contribution. For 13C and 15N shielding tensors can be studied for isoelectronic systems, e.g. benzoation and nitrobenzene. Comparison of the shielding anisotropies Δdelta for a number of isoelectronic pairs shows that Δdelta generally seems to be substantially larger for 15N. The powder spectra are affected in a characteristic way by molecular motions in the solid. By analysis of the lineshapes observed it is therefore possible to get reliable information about molecular reorientation in solids. As an example the motion of the P4 tetrahedra in solid white phosphorus is discussed. (orig.)

  12. Impact of Ho(3+)-doping on (13)C dynamic nuclear polarization using trityl OX063 free radical.

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Martins, André; Fidelino, Leila; Khemtong, Chalermchai; Song, Likai; Sherry, A Dean; Lumata, Lloyd

    2016-08-21

    We have investigated the effects of Ho-DOTA doping on the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of [1-(13)C] sodium acetate using trityl OX063 free radical at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. Our results indicate that addition of 2 mM Ho-DOTA on 3 M [1-(13)C] sodium acetate sample in 1 : 1 v/v glycerol : water with 15 mM trityl OX063 improves the DNP-enhanced (13)C solid-state nuclear polarization by a factor of around 2.7-fold. Similar to the Gd(3+) doping effect on (13)C DNP, the locations of the positive and negative (13)C maximum polarization peaks in the (13)C microwave DNP sweep are shifted towards each other with the addition of Ho-DOTA on the DNP sample. W-band electron spin resonance (ESR) studies have revealed that while the shape and linewidth of the trityl OX063 ESR spectrum was not affected by Ho(3+)-doping, the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of trityl OX063 was prominently reduced at cryogenic temperatures. The reduction of trityl OX063 electron T1 by Ho-doping is linked to the (13)C DNP improvement in light of the thermodynamic picture of DNP. Moreover, the presence of Ho-DOTA in the dissolution liquid at room temperature has negligible reduction effect on liquid-state (13)C T1, in contrast to Gd(3+)-doping which drastically reduces the (13)C T1. The results here suggest that Ho(3+)-doping is advantageous over Gd(3+) in terms of preservation of hyperpolarized state-an important aspect to consider for in vitro and in vivo NMR or imaging (MRI) experiments where a considerable preparation time is needed to administer the hyperpolarized (13)C liquid. PMID:27424954

  13. Detection of Reduced GABA Synthesis Following Inhibition of GABA Transaminase Using in Vivo Magnetic Resonance Signal of [13C]GABA C1

    Yang, Jehoon; Johnson, Christopher; Shen, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Previous in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis have relied on 13C label incorporation into GABA C2 from [1-13C] or [1,6-13C2]glucose. In this study, the [13C]GABA C1 signal at 182.3 ppm in the carboxylic/amide spectral region of localized in vivo 13C spectra was detected. GABA-transaminase of rat brain was inhibited by administration of gabaculine after pre-labeling of GABA C1 and its metabolic precursors with exogenous [2,5-13C2]glu...

  14. Simultaneous PET/MRI with 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (hyperPET): phantom-based evaluation of PET quantification

    Hansen, Adam E.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Henriksen, Sarah T.;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Integrated PET/MRI with hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (13C-MRSI) offers simultaneous, dual-modality metabolic imaging. A prerequisite for the use of simultaneous imaging is the absence of interference between the two modalities. This has been documented for...... and 13C-MRSI phantoms including a NEMA [18F]-FDG phantom, 13C-acetate and 13C-urea sources, and hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate were imaged repeatedly with PET and/or 13C-MRSI. Measurements evaluated for interference effects included PET activity values in the largest sphere and a background region; total...... number of PET trues; and 13C-MRSI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for urea and acetate phantoms. Differences between measurement conditions were evaluated using t tests. Results: PET and 13C-MRSI data acquisition could be performed simultaneously without any discernible artifacts. The average difference in...

  15. Model free approach to kinetic analysis of real-time hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy data.

    Deborah K Hill

    Full Text Available Real-time detection of the rates of metabolic flux, or exchange rates of endogenous enzymatic reactions, is now feasible in biological systems using Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Magnetic Resonance. Derivation of reaction rate kinetics from this technique typically requires multi-compartmental modeling of dynamic data, and results are therefore model-dependent and prone to misinterpretation. We present a model-free formulism based on the ratio of total areas under the curve (AUC of the injected and product metabolite, for example pyruvate and lactate. A theoretical framework to support this novel analysis approach is described, and demonstrates that the AUC ratio is proportional to the forward rate constant k. We show that the model-free approach strongly correlates with k for whole cell in vitro experiments across a range of cancer cell lines, and detects response in cells treated with the pan-class I PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941 with comparable or greater sensitivity. The same result is seen in vivo with tumor xenograft-bearing mice, in control tumors and following drug treatment with dichloroacetate. An important finding is that the area under the curve is independent of both the input function and of any other metabolic pathways arising from the injected metabolite. This model-free approach provides a robust and clinically relevant alternative to kinetic model-based rate measurements in the clinical translation of hyperpolarized (13C metabolic imaging in humans, where measurement of the input function can be problematic.

  16. Applications of the nuclear Techniques in medicine: 13C or 14C respiration tests

    The 14C or 13C respiration tests have been applied to the study of metabolic and infectious processes, but most of them have not entered yet the clinical practice stage. In this paper, it is offered an overview of the present and future of respiration tests and how they are taking part and will take part in a future in the non-invasive diagnosis of diverse pathologies

  17. Relativistic Force Field: Parametrization of (13)C-(1)H Nuclear Spin-Spin Coupling Constants.

    Kutateladze, Andrei G; Mukhina, Olga A

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we reported a reliable DU8 method for natural bond orbital (NBO)-aided parametric scaling of Fermi contacts to achieve fast and accurate prediction of proton-proton spin-spin coupling constants (SSCC) in (1)H NMR. As sophisticated NMR experiments for precise measurements of carbon-proton SSCCs are becoming more user-friendly and broadly utilized by the organic chemistry community to guide and inform the process of structure determination of complex organic compounds, we have now developed a fast and accurate method for computing (13)C-(1)H SSCCs. Fermi contacts computed with the DU8 basis set are scaled using selected NBO parameters in conjunction with empirical scaling coefficients. The method is optimized for inexpensive B3LYP/6-31G(d) geometries. The parametric scaling is based on a carefully selected training set of 274 ((3)J), 193 ((2)J), and 143 ((1)J) experimental (13)C-(1)H spin-spin coupling constants reported in the literature. The DU8 basis set, optimized for computing Fermi contacts, which by design had evolved from optimization of a collection of inexpensive 3-21G*, 4-21G, and 6-31G(d) bases, offers very short computational (wall) times even for relatively large organic molecules containing 15-20 carbon atoms. The most informative SSCCs for structure determination, i.e., (3)J, were computed with an accuracy of 0.41 Hz (rmsd). The new unified approach for computing (1)H-(1)H and (13)C-(1)H SSCCs is termed "DU8c". PMID:26414291

  18. Characterization of hyperfine interaction between an NV electron spin and a first-shell 13C nuclear spin in diamond

    Rao, K. Rama Koteswara; Suter, Dieter

    2016-08-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has attractive properties for a number of quantum technologies that rely on the spin angular momentum of the electron and the nuclei adjacent to the center. The nucleus with the strongest interaction is the 13C nuclear spin of the first shell. Using this degree of freedom effectively hinges on precise data on the hyperfine interaction between the electronic and the nuclear spin. Here, we present detailed experimental data on this interaction, together with an analysis that yields all parameters of the hyperfine tensor, as well as its orientation with respect to the atomic structure of the center.

  19. In vivo measurement of ethanol metabolism in the rat liver using magnetic resonance spectroscopy of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate

    Spielman, Daniel M; Mayer, Dirk; Yen, Yi-Fen; Tropp, James; Hurd, Ralph E.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2009-01-01

    [1-13C]pyruvate is readily polarizable substrate that has been the subject of numerous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies of in vivo metabolism. In this work, 13C-MRS of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate is used to interrogate a metabolic pathway involved in neither aerobic nor anaerobic metabolism. In particular, ethanol consumption leads to altered liver metabolism, which when excessive is associated with adverse medical conditions including fatty liver disease, hepatitis, cirrhosis...

  20. Tricarboxylic acid cycle activity measured by 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy in rats subjected to the kaolin model of obstructed hydrocephalus

    Melø, Torun M; Håberg, Asta K; Risa, Øystein;

    2011-01-01

    weeks after rats were subjected to kaolin-induced progressive hydrocephalus. In vivo and ex vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), combined with the infusion of [1,6-(13)C]glucose, was used to monitor the time courses of (13)C label incorporation into the different carbon positions of glutamate in...

  1. Characterization of Biochar by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and 13 C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance%X射线光电子能谱与13 C核磁共振在生物质碳表征中的应用

    徐东昱; 金洁; 颜钰; 韩兰芳; 康明洁; 王子莹; 赵烨; 孙可

    2014-01-01

    近年来,生物质碳(biochar)作为新型吸附剂被广泛研究。但由于制备biochar的生物质原料和热解温度的不同,使biochar的结构和组成存在差异,从而影响其对污染物的吸附。目前关于biochar的结构和组成的研究还不够全面。因此,结合了能谱与光谱分析的手段,对biochar的结构和组成进行了深入的分析。选取木质类(柳树枝条)和草类(水稻秸秆)作为原料,分别在不同热解温度(300,450和600℃)下制得bio-chars,并对biochars样品进行元素分析、X射线光电子能谱分析(XPS)和固态13C核磁共振(13CNMR)研究,以阐明不同热解温度和生物质来源的biochars的结构和组成。结果显示:biochar的H/C,O/C和(O+N)/C的比值随着热解温度的升高而降低;草类biochar比木质类biochar具有更高的灰分含量和表面极性;木质类biochar的矿物主要分布在样品颗粒内部,其表面被有机质覆盖,而草类biochar部分矿物暴露在样品颗粒表面;13CNMR显示低温制得的biochar主要由芳香碳、脂肪碳、羧基和羰基碳组成,高温制得的biochar主要由芳香碳组成,且低温制得biochars中,木质类biochars比草类biochars含有更高的木质素的残留碳结构,这是由于木质类biochars原材料中含有更高的木质素。%The wood (willow branch) and grass (rice straw ) materials were pyrolyzed at different temperatures (300 ,450 and 600 ℃) to obtain the biochars used in the present study .The biochars were characterized using elementary analysis ,X-ray pho-toelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and solid state 13 C cross-polarization and magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spec-troscopy (13C NMR) to illuminate the structure and composition of the biochars which were derived from the different thermal temperatures and biomass .The results showed that the H/C ,O/C and (O+N)/C ratios of the biochars decreased with

  2. 13C-NMR of diterpenes with pimarane skeleton

    The effect of substituent groups on the chemical shift of carbons using nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of carbon 13 (13C-NMR) is discussed. Diterpenes having pimarane skeleton, isolated from plants of Velloziaceae family are analysed. (ARHC)

  3. The use of dynamic nuclear polarization (13)C-pyruvate MRS in cancer

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam Espe; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth;

    2015-01-01

    (MRS) is a potent technique for non-invasive in vivo investigation of tissue chemistry and cellular metabolism. Hyperpolarization by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) is capable of creating solutions of molecules with polarized nuclear spins in a range of biological molecules and has enabled the real......-time investigation of in vivo metabolism. The development of this new method has been demonstrated to enhance the nuclear polarization more than 10,000-fold, thereby significantly increasing the sensitivity of the MRS with a spatial resolution to the millimeters and a temporal resolution at the subsecond range...

  4. Temperature dependence of high field 13C dynamic nuclear polarization processes with trityl radicals below 35 Kelvin.

    Walker, Shamon A; Edwards, Devin T; Siaw, Ting Ann; Armstrong, Brandon D; Han, Songi

    2013-09-28

    In order to facilitate versatile applications with high field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), it is important to be able to optimize the DNP performance, i.e. reach high nuclear hyperpolarization within a short signal build up time. Given that the solid-state DNP process is strongly temperature-dependent, it is important to benchmark the temperature dependence of various DNP and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) parameters that can then be used to test and develop theories and models for high field DNP mechanisms. However, DNP and EPR experiments at high fields and cryogenic temperatures below 20 Kelvin usually require home built instrumentation, and therefore even basic experimental observations are lacking in the literature. DNP and EPR experiments at 7 T (197 GHz) and 8.5 T (240 GHz), respectively, were conducted at temperatures between 35 K and 3.7 K where the electron thermal polarization changes from 13.4% to 85.6%, respectively. The samples are frozen solutions of 15 mM OX063Me trityl radicals in various mixtures of [1-(13)C]pyruvic acid, glycerol, and Gd(3+)-chelates. For all sample mixtures, the trityl EPR lines are found to be inhomogeneously broadened and the dominant DNP mechanism is shown to be the cross effect (CE). A 20%, 11%, and 6.77% (13)C polarization is achieved at 3.7 K with a [1-(13)C]pyruvic-glycerol-H2O sample, the addition of 2 mM of Gd(3+)-chelates, and pure [1-(13)C]pyruvic acid, respectively. When T1n is sufficiently long, our results seem to suggest T1e is a key variable in the DNP process, where longer T1e values correlate with larger DNP enhancements (εDNP). The experimental data reported here on the temperature dependence of T1n, T1e, Tm (electron phase memory time), the EPR linewidth, TDNP and ε(DNP) at high fields will be helpful for testing the mechanism and theory of DNP processes. PMID:23925724

  5. Conformation and dynamics of melittin bound to magnetically oriented lipid bilayers by solid-state (31)P and (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    Naito, A.; T. Nagao; Norisada, K; Mizuno, T; Tuzi, S.; Saitô, H.

    2000-01-01

    The conformation and dynamics of melittin bound to the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer and the magnetic orientation in the lipid bilayer systems were investigated by solid-state (31)P and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Using (31)P NMR, it was found that melittin-lipid bilayers form magnetically oriented elongated vesicles with the long axis parallel to the magnetic field above the liquid crystalline-gel phase transition temperature (T(m) = 24 degrees C). The conformation, orientation, ...

  6. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of Non-Self-Glassing Agents: Spectroscopy and Relaxation of Hyperpolarized [1-13C]Acetate

    Flori, Alessandra; Liserani, Matteo; Bowen, Sean;

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic physicochemical properties of the sample formulation are the key factors for efficient hyperpolarization through dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dissolution-DNP). We provide a comprehensive characterization of the DNP process for Na-[1-13C]acetate selected as a model for non...

  7. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolism. Applications of proton and sup 13 C NMR to the study of glutamate metabolism in cultured glial cells and human brain in vivo

    Portais, J.C.; Pianet, I.; Merle, M.; Raffard, G.; Biran, M.; Labouesse, J.; Canioni, P. (Bordeaux-2 Univ., 33 (FR)); Allard, M.; Kien, P.; Caille, J.M. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 33 Bordeaux (FR))

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the metabolism of cells from the central nervous system both in vitro on perchloric acid extracts obtained either from cultured tumoral cells (C6 rat glioma) or rat astrocytes in primary culture, and in vivo within the human brain. Analysis of carbon 13 NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts prepared from cultured cells in the presence of NMR (1-{sup 13}C) glucose as substrate allowed determination of the glutamate and glutamine enrichments in both normal and tumoral cells. Preliminary results indicated large changes in the metabolism of these amino acids (and also of aspartate and alanine) in the C6 cell as compared to its normal counterpart. Localized proton NMR spectra of the human brain in vivo were obtained at 1.5 T, in order to evaluate the content of various metabolites, including glutamate, in peritumoral edema from a selected volume of 2 x 2 x 2 cm{sup 3}. N-acetyl aspartate, glutamate, phosphocreatine, creatine, choline and inositol derivative resonances were observed in 15 min spectra. N-acetyl-aspartate was found to be at a lower level in contrast to glutamate which was detected at a higher level in the injured area as compared to the controlateral unaffected side.

  8. A combination strategy for extraction and isolation of multi-component natural products by systematic two-phase solvent extraction-(13)C nuclear magnetic resonance pattern recognition and following conical counter-current chromatography separation: Podophyllotoxins and flavonoids from Dysosma versipellis (Hance) as examples.

    Yang, Zhi; Wu, Youqian; Wu, Shihua

    2016-01-29

    Despite of substantial developments of extraction and separation techniques, isolation of natural products from natural resources is still a challenging task. In this work, an efficient strategy for extraction and isolation of multi-component natural products has been successfully developed by combination of systematic two-phase liquid-liquid extraction-(13)C NMR pattern recognition and following conical counter-current chromatography separation. A small-scale crude sample was first distributed into 9 systematic hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (HEMWat) two-phase solvent systems for determination of the optimum extraction solvents and partition coefficients of the prominent components. Then, the optimized solvent systems were used in succession to enrich the hydrophilic and lipophilic components from the large-scale crude sample. At last, the enriched components samples were further purified by a new conical counter-current chromatography (CCC). Due to the use of (13)C NMR pattern recognition, the kinds and structures of major components in the solvent extracts could be predicted. Therefore, the method could collect simultaneously the partition coefficients and the structural information of components in the selected two-phase solvents. As an example, a cytotoxic extract of podophyllotoxins and flavonoids from Dysosma versipellis (Hance) was selected. After the systematic HEMWat system solvent extraction and (13)C NMR pattern recognition analyses, the crude extract of D. versipellis was first degreased by the upper phase of HEMWat system (9:1:9:1, v/v), and then distributed in the two phases of the system of HEMWat (2:8:2:8, v/v) to obtain the hydrophilic lower phase extract and lipophilic upper phase extract, respectively. These extracts were further separated by conical CCC with the HEMWat systems (1:9:1:9 and 4:6:4:6, v/v). As results, total 17 cytotoxic compounds were isolated and identified. In general, whole results suggested that the strategy was very

  9. The Decoherence of the Electron Spin and Meta-Stability of 13C Nuclear Spins in Diamond

    Peter Crompton

    2011-01-01

    Following the recent successful experimental manipulation of entangled 13C atoms on the surface of Diamond, we calculate the decoherence of the electron spin in Nitrogen Vacancy NV centers of Diamond via a nonperturbative treatment of the time-dependent Greens function of a Central-Spin model in order to identify the Replica Symmetry Breaking mechanism associated with intersystem mixing between the ms = 0 sublevel of the 3A2 and 1A1 states of the NV− centers, which we identify as mediated via...

  10. The Decoherence of the Electron Spin and Meta-Stability of 13C Nuclear Spins in Diamond

    Peter Crompton

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Following the recent successful experimental manipulation of entangled 13C atoms on the surface of Diamond, we calculate the decoherence of the electron spin in Nitrogen Vacancy NV centers of Diamond via a nonperturbative treatment of the time-dependent Greens function of a Central-Spin model in order to identify the Replica Symmetry Breaking mechanism associated with intersystem mixing between the ms = 0 sublevel of the 3A2 and 1A1 states of the NV− centers, which we identify as mediated via the meta-stability of 13C nuclei bath processes in our calculations. Rather than the standard exciton-based calculation scheme used for quantum dots, we argue that a new scheme is needed to formally treat the Replica Symmetry Breaking of the 3A2 → 3E excitations of the NV− centers, which we define by extending the existing Generalized Master Equation formalism via the use of fractional time derivatives. Our calculations allow us to accurately quantify the dangerously irrelevant scaling associated with the Replica Symmetry Breaking and provide an explanation for the experimentally observed room temperature stability of Diamond for Quantum Computing applications.

  11. Tracing bacterial metabolism using multi-nuclear (1H, 2H, and 13C) Solid State NMR: Realizing an Idea Initiated by James Scott

    Cody, G.; Fogel, M. L.; Jin, K.; Griffen, P.; Steele, A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Approximately 6 years ago, while at the Geophysical Laboratory, James Scott became interested in the application of Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to study bacterial metabolism. As often happens, other experiments intervened and the NMR experiments were not pursued. We have revisited Jame's question and find that using a multi-nuclear approach (1H, 2H, and 13C Solid State NMR) on laboratory cell culture has some distinct advantages. Our experiments involved batch cultures of E. coli (MG1655) harvested at stationary phase. In all experiments the growth medium consisted of MOPS medium for enterobacteria, where the substrate is glucose. In one set of experiments, 10 % of the water was D2O; in another 10 % of the glucose was per-deuterated. The control experiment used both water and glucose at natural isotopic abundance. A kill control of dead E. coli immersed in pure D2O for an extended period exhibited no deuterium incorporation. In both deuterium enriched experiments, considerable incorporation of deuterium into E. coli's biomolecular constituents was detected via 2H Solid State NMR. In the case of the D2O enriched experiment, 58 % of the incorporated deuterium is observed in a sharp peak at a frequency of 0.31 ppm, consistent with D incorporation in the cell membrane lipids, the remainder is observed in a broad peak at a higher frequency (centered at 5.4 ppm, but spanning out to beyond 10 ppm) that is consistent with D incorporation into predominantly DNA and RNA. In the case of the D-glucose experiments, 61 % of the deuterium is observed in a sharp resonance peak at 0.34 ppm, also consistent with D incorporation into membrane lipids, the remainder of the D is observed at a broad resonance peak centered at 4.3 ppm, consistent with D enrichment in glycogen. Deuterium abundance in the E. coli cells grown in 10 % D2O is nearly 2X greater than that grown with 10 % D-glucose. Very subtle differences are observed in both the 1H and 13C solid

  12. The 1H and 13C dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhancement for novel silica phase immobilized nitroxide (SPIN) samples

    Gitti, Rossitza K.

    1991-01-01

    The solid/liquid intermolecular transfer (SLIT) flow dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiment potentially provides new methodology for studying interfacial phenomena (e.g., weak hydrogen bonding). In addition, the high efficiency of the transfer also ensures dramatically enhanced NMR signals. These large DNP enhancements could alleviate sensitivity limitations in various flow NMR experiments. Previous studies have established that silica phase immobilized nitroxide (SPIN) ...

  13. Solid state 13C NMR analysis of Brazilian cretaceous ambers

    13C cross polarization with magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (13C CPMAS NMR) spectra have been obtained for the first time to three Cretaceous amber samples from South America. The samples were dated to Lower Cretaceous and collected in sediments from the Amazonas, Araripe and Reconcavo basins, Brazil. All samples have very similar spectra, consistent with a common paleobotanical source. Some aspects of the spectra suggest a relationship between Brazilian ambers and Araucariaceae family, such as intense resonances at 38-39 ppm. All samples are constituted by polylabdane structure associated to Class Ib resins, constituted by polymers of labdanoid diterpenes. Finally, information concerning some structural changes during maturation, such as isomerization of Δ8(17) and Δ12(13) unsaturations, were obtained by 13C NMR analyses. The results concerning botanical affinities are in accordance with previous results obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). (author)

  14. 13C-NMR of forest soil lipids

    Almendros Martín, Gonzalo; Tinoco, Pilar; González-Vila, Francisco Javier; Lüdemann, H.-D.; Sanz Perucha, Jesús; Velasco de Pedro, F.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular characterization of soil lipids often provides valuable biogeochemical information about the impact of vegetation, microorganisms, and abiotic factors on the soil C sequestration process. The total lipid extracted with petroleum ether from nine soils developed under three types of Mediterranean forest (stone pine (Pinus pinea L.), evergreen oak (Quercus rotundifolia L.), and Spanish juniper (Juniperus thurifera L)) has been analyzed by high-resolution 13C nuclear magnetic resonance ...

  15. Design and test of a double-nuclear RF coil for 1H MRI and 13C MRSI at 7 T

    Rutledge, Omar; Kwak, Tiffany; Cao, Peng; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2016-06-01

    RF coil operation at the ultrahigh field of 7 T is fraught with technical challenges that limit the advancement of novel human in vivo applications at 7 T. In this work, a hybrid technique combining a microstrip transmission line and a lumped-element L-C loop coil to form a double-nuclear RF coil for proton magnetic resonance imaging and carbon magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7 T was proposed and investigated. Network analysis revealed a high Q-factor and excellent decoupling between the coils. Proton images and localized carbon spectra were acquired with high sensitivity. The successful testing of this novel double-nuclear coil demonstrates the feasibility of this hybrid design for double-nuclear MR imaging and spectroscopy studies at the ultrahigh field of 7 T.

  16. Design and test of a double-nuclear RF coil for (1)H MRI and (13)C MRSI at 7T.

    Rutledge, Omar; Kwak, Tiffany; Cao, Peng; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2016-06-01

    RF coil operation at the ultrahigh field of 7T is fraught with technical challenges that limit the advancement of novel human in vivo applications at 7T. In this work, a hybrid technique combining a microstrip transmission line and a lumped-element L-C loop coil to form a double-nuclear RF coil for proton magnetic resonance imaging and carbon magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T was proposed and investigated. Network analysis revealed a high Q-factor and excellent decoupling between the coils. Proton images and localized carbon spectra were acquired with high sensitivity. The successful testing of this novel double-nuclear coil demonstrates the feasibility of this hybrid design for double-nuclear MR imaging and spectroscopy studies at the ultrahigh field of 7T. PMID:27078089

  17. High altitude may alter oxygen availability and renal metabolism in diabetics as measured by hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate magnetic resonance imaging.

    Laustsen, Christoffer; Lycke, Sara; Palm, Fredrik; Østergaard, Jakob A; Bibby, Bo M; Nørregaard, Rikke; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Pedersen, Michael; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan H

    2014-07-01

    The kidneys account for about 10% of the whole body oxygen consumption, whereas only 0.5% of the total body mass. It is known that intrarenal hypoxia is present in several diseases associated with development of kidney disease, including diabetes, and when renal blood flow is unaffected. The importance of deranged oxygen metabolism is further supported by deterioration of kidney function in patients with diabetes living at high altitude. Thus, we argue that reduced oxygen availability alters renal energy metabolism. Here, we introduce a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approach to monitor metabolic changes associated with diabetes and oxygen availability. Streptozotocin diabetic and control rats were given reduced, normal, or increased inspired oxygen in order to alter tissue oxygenation. The effects on kidney oxygen metabolism were studied using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate MRI. Reduced inspired oxygen did not alter renal metabolism in the control group. Reduced oxygen availability in the diabetic kidney altered energy metabolism by increasing lactate and alanine formation by 23% and 34%, respectively, whereas the bicarbonate flux was unchanged. Thus, the increased prevalence and severity of nephropathy in patients with diabetes at high altitudes may originate from the increased sensitivity toward inspired oxygen. This increased lactate production shifts the metabolic routs toward hypoxic pathways. PMID:24352155

  18. Mapping metabolic changes associated with early Radiation Induced Lung Injury post conformal radiotherapy using hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging

    Purpose: Radiation Pneumonitis (RP) limits radiotherapy. Detection of early metabolic changes in the lungs associated with RP may provide an opportunity to adjust treatment before substantial toxicities occur. In this work, regional lactate-to-pyruvate signal ratio (lac/pyr) was quantified in rat lungs and heart following administration of hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at day 5, 10, 15 and 25-post conformal radiotherapy. These results were also compared to histology and blood analyses. Methods: The lower right lungs of 12 Sprague Dawley rats were irradiated in 2 fractions with a total dose of 18.5 Gy using a modified micro-CT system. Regional lactate and pyruvate data were acquired from three irradiated and three age-matched healthy rats at each time point on days 5, 10, 15 and 25-post radiotherapy. Arterial blood was collected from each animal prior to the 13C-pyruvate injection and was analyzed for blood lactate concentration and arterial oxygen concentration (paO2). Macrophage count was computed from the histology of all rat lungs. Results: A significant increase in lac/pyr was observed in both right and left lungs of the irradiated cohort compared to the healthy cohort for all time points. No increase in lac/pyr was observed in the hearts of the irradiated cohort compared to the hearts of the healthy cohorts. Blood lactate concentration and paO2 did not show a significant change between the irradiated and the healthy cohorts. Macrophage count in both right and left lungs was elevated for the irradiated cohort compared to the healthy cohort. Conclusions: Metabolic changes associated with RP may be mapped as early as five days post conformal radiotherapy. Over the small sample size in each cohort, elevated macrophage count, consistent with early phase of inflammation was highly correlated to increases in lac/pyr in both the irradiated and unirradiated lungs. Further experiments with larger sample size may improve the confidence of

  19. Sensitive Magnetic Control of Ensemble Nuclear Spin Hyperpolarisation in Diamond

    Wang, Hai-Jing; Avalos, Claudia E; Seltzer, Scott J; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander; Bajaj, Vikram S

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarisation, which transfers the spin polarisation of electrons to nuclei, is routinely applied to enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance; it is also critical in spintronics, particularly when spin hyperpolarisation can be produced and controlled optically or electrically. Here we show the complete polarisation of nuclei located near the optically-polarised nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in diamond. When approaching the ground-state level anti-crossing condition of the NV electron spins, 13C nuclei in the first-shell are polarised in a pattern that depends sensitively and sharply upon the magnetic field. Based on the anisotropy of the hyperfine coupling and of the optical polarisation mechanism, we predict and observe a complete reversal of the nuclear spin polarisation with a few-mT change in the magnetic field. The demonstrated sensitive magnetic control of nuclear polarisation at room temperature will be useful for sensitivity-enhanced NMR, nuclear-based spintronics, and quant...

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway

    The goal of this work is to investigate the potential for and limitations of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for quantitation of glucose flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (shunt). Interest in the shunt is motivated by the possibility that its activity may be greatly increased in cancer and in the pathological states of cardiac and cerebral ischemia. The ability to dynamically monitor flux through the pentose shunt can give new knowledge about metabolism in pathological states. 13C NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor shunt activity by determination of the ratios of [13C-4] to [13C-5]-glutamate, [13C-3] to [13C-2]-alanine or [13C-3] to [13C-2]-lactate produced when [13C-2]-glucose is infused. These methods provide measures of the effect of oxidative stresses on shunt activity in systems ranging from cell free enzyme-substrate preparations to cell suspensions and whole animals. In anaerobic cell free preparations, the fraction of glucose flux through the shunt was monitored with a time resolution of 3 minutes. This work predicts the potential for in vivo human studies of pentose phosphate pathway activity based on the mathematical simulation of the 13C fractional enrichments of C4 and C5-glutamate as a function of shunt activity and on the signal-to- noise ratio acquired in 13C NMR human studies from the current literature

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway

    Bolo, N.R.

    1991-11-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate the potential for and limitations of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for quantitation of glucose flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (shunt). Interest in the shunt is motivated by the possibility that its activity may be greatly increased in cancer and in the pathological states of cardiac and cerebral ischemia. The ability to dynamically monitor flux through the pentose shunt can give new knowledge about metabolism in pathological states. {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor shunt activity by determination of the ratios of ({sup 13}C-4) to ({sup 13}C-5)-glutamate, ({sup 13}C-3) to ({sup 13}C-2)-alanine or ({sup 13}C-3) to ({sup 13}C-2)-lactate produced when ({sup 13}C-2)-glucose is infused. These methods provide measures of the effect of oxidative stresses on shunt activity in systems ranging from cell free enzyme-substrate preparations to cell suspensions and whole animals. In anaerobic cell free preparations, the fraction of glucose flux through the shunt was monitored with a time resolution of 3 minutes. This work predicts the potential for in vivo human studies of pentose phosphate pathway activity based on the mathematical simulation of the {sup 13}C fractional enrichments of C4 and C5-glutamate as a function of shunt activity and on the signal-to- noise ratio acquired in {sup 13}C NMR human studies from the current literature.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the regulation of the pentose phosphate pathway

    Bolo, N.R.

    1991-11-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate the potential for and limitations of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for quantitation of glucose flux through the pentose phosphate pathway (shunt). Interest in the shunt is motivated by the possibility that its activity may be greatly increased in cancer and in the pathological states of cardiac and cerebral ischemia. The ability to dynamically monitor flux through the pentose shunt can give new knowledge about metabolism in pathological states. {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor shunt activity by determination of the ratios of [{sup 13}C-4] to [{sup 13}C-5]-glutamate, [{sup 13}C-3] to [{sup 13}C-2]-alanine or [{sup 13}C-3] to [{sup 13}C-2]-lactate produced when [{sup 13}C-2]-glucose is infused. These methods provide measures of the effect of oxidative stresses on shunt activity in systems ranging from cell free enzyme-substrate preparations to cell suspensions and whole animals. In anaerobic cell free preparations, the fraction of glucose flux through the shunt was monitored with a time resolution of 3 minutes. This work predicts the potential for in vivo human studies of pentose phosphate pathway activity based on the mathematical simulation of the {sup 13}C fractional enrichments of C4 and C5-glutamate as a function of shunt activity and on the signal-to- noise ratio acquired in {sup 13}C NMR human studies from the current literature.

  3. Refined Analysis of Brain Energy Metabolism Using In Vivo Dynamic Enrichment of 13C Multiplets

    Dehghani M., Masoumeh; Duarte, João M. N.; Kunz, Nicolas; Gruetter, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with the infusion of 13C-labeled precursors is a unique approach to study in vivo brain energy metabolism. Incorporating the maximum information available from in vivo localized 13C spectra is of importance to get broader knowledge on cerebral metabolic pathways. Metabolic rates can be quantitatively determined from the rate of 13C incorporation into amino acid neurotransmitters such as glutamate and glutamine using suitable mathematical models. The time course of multiplets arising from 13C-13C coupling between adjacent carbon atoms was expected to provide additional information for metabolic modeling leading to potential improvements in the estimation of metabolic parameters. The aim of the present study was to extend two-compartment neuronal/glial modeling to include dynamics of 13C isotopomers available from fine structure multiplets in 13C spectra of glutamate and glutamine measured in vivo in rats brain at 14.1 T, termed bonded cumomer approach. Incorporating the labeling time courses of 13C multiplets of glutamate and glutamine resulted in elevated precision of the estimated fluxes in rat brain as well as reduced correlations between them. PMID:26969691

  4. Study of the fusion reaction 13C+13C

    The fusion reaction 13C+13C has been studied, it must allow, by comparisons with the system 12C+13C already studied to determine how the presence of a supplementary nucleon in the interaction nuclei of the entrance channel affects the energy dependence of the reaction cross section. The reaction 13C+13C has been studied for incident energies E(CM)=3.05 - 6.88 MeV and no resonant structure seems to appear in the coulombian energies. The reaction products are identified by the energy of their gamma transition using a germanium detector situated at zero degree with respect to the incident beam at approximately 1 cm from the target

  5. LAMPF polarized 13C targets

    Ethylene glycol, 1-butanol, and toluene highly enriched in 13C have been used at LAMPF to produce dynamically polarized 13C targets for scattering experiments with protons and pions. Preparation of the materials and characteristic properties of these targets are described. 17 refs., 1 fig

  6. Computer Assisted Instruction (Cain) For Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    A computer assisted instruction program for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was developed by using Author ware 5.0, Adobe Image Styler 1.0, Adobe Photo shop 7.0 and Flash MX. The contents included the basic theory of 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the instrumentation of NMR spectroscopy, the two dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy and the interpretation of NMR spectra. The program was also provided examples, and exercises, with emphasis on NMR spectra interpretation to determine the structure of unknown compounds and solutions for self study. The questionnaire from students showed that they were very satisfied with the software

  7. Synthesis of 13C-labelled lactose for metabolic studies in subjects with gastrointestinal disorders

    The long-range goals included development of a 13C-labelled lactose method for measuring lactose malabsorption in patients with diarrhea. The short-term goals included assembling a nuclear magnetic resonance system and a computer system for spectra analysis. The latter results are the subject of the report. (author)

  8. 13 C signal attribution of 5-bromine-2(2'-thienyl)thiophene

    This work has carried out a study of C-H coupling constants in oligothiophenes, through 1 H and 13 C NMR spectra analysis. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been used in order to characterize the molecular structure of them. Chemical shifts were also studied and spectral data have been shown and analysed

  9. Resolving the sources of plasma glucose excursions following a glucose tolerance test in the rat with deuterated water and [U-13C]glucose

    Delgado, T.C.; Barosa, C.; Nunes, P.M.; Cerdán, S.; Geraldes, C.F.G.C.; Jones, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Sources of plasma glucose excursions (PGE) following a glucose tolerance test enriched with [U-(13)C]glucose and deuterated water were directly resolved by (13)C and (2)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy analysis of plasma glucose and water enrichments in rat. Plasma water (2)H-enrichment att

  10. Science and history explored by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Baias, Maria Antoaneta

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance was chosen as the main tool for investigating different biological and chemical systems, as it is unique in providing the information details about the morphology and molecular structures and conformations by which the fundamental properties of these biological and chemical systems can be understood. Proton spin-diffusion experiments combined with 13C CPMAS spectroscopy were successfully applied to characterize the changes that occur during the thermal denaturation ...

  11. Parahydrogen enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    Theis, Thomas; Kervern, Gwendal; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Ledbetter, Micah; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), conventionally detected in multi-tesla magnetic fields, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure, and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and alternative detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), NMR in very low- (~earth's field), and even zero-field, has recently attracted considerable attention. Despite the use of SQUIDs or atomic magnetometers, low-field NMR typically suffers from low sensitivity compared to conventional high-field NMR. Here we demonstrate direct detection of zero-field NMR signals generated via parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP), enabling high-resolution NMR without the use of any magnets. The sensitivity is sufficient to observe spectra exhibiting 13C-1H J-couplings in compounds with 13C in natural abundance in a single transient. The resulting spectra display distinct features that have straightforward interpretation and can be...

  12. The electric dipole moment of $^{13}$C

    Yamanaka, Nodoka; Hiyama, Emiko; Funaki, Yasuro

    2016-01-01

    We calculate for the first time the electric dipole moment (EDM) of $^{13}$C generated by the isovector CP-odd pion exchange nuclear force in the $\\alpha$-cluster model, which describes well the structures of low lying states of the $^{13}$C nucleus. The linear dependence of the EDM of $^{13}$C on the neutron EDM and the isovector CP-odd nuclear coupling is found to be $d_{^{13}{\\rm C}} = -0.33 d_n - 0.0012 \\bar G_\\pi^{(1)}$. The linear enhancement factor of the CP-odd nuclear coupling is smaller than that of the deuteron, due to the difference of the structure between the $1/2^-_1$ state and the opposite parity ($1/2^+$) states. We clarify the role of the structure played in the enhancement of the EDM. This result provides good guiding principles to search for other nuclei with large enhancement factor. We also mention the role of the EDM of $^{13}$C in determining the new physics beyond the standard model.

  13. Magnetic catalysis in nuclear matter

    Haber, Alexander; Preis, Florian; Schmitt, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    A strong magnetic field enhances the chiral condensate at low temperatures. This so-called magnetic catalysis thus seeks to increase the vacuum mass of nucleons. We employ two relativistic field-theoretical models for nuclear matter, the Walecka model and an extended linear sigma model, to discuss the resulting effect on the transition between vacuum and nuclear matter at zero temperature. In both models we find that the creation of nuclear matter in a sufficiently strong magnetic field becom...

  14. Valence neutrons' role in the collisions 13C+12C and 13C+13C

    The resonant behaviour is not limited to collisions between α-like nuclei: resonance structures have been observed in the direct channels for the 13C+12C and 13C+13C collisions; in the contrary, the resonances observed in the fusion channels are not so pronounced as in the 12C+12C case: the valence neutrons increase the number of reaction channels and the density of states in the states in the compound nuclei, the resonances are therefore 'washed out' and it is difficult to observe them experimentally

  15. Hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes in the liquid-state: relating structures and T1 relaxation times

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Hashami, Zohreh; Fidelino, Leila; Kovacs, Zoltan; Lumata, Lloyd

    Among the various attempts to solve the insensitivity problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the physics-based technique dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is probably the most successful method of hyperpolarization or amplifying NMR signals. Using this technique, liquid-state NMR signal enhancements of several thousand-fold are expected for low-gamma nuclei such as carbon-13. The lifetimes of these hyperpolarized 13C NMR signals are directly related to their 13C spin-lattice relaxation times T1. Depending upon the 13C isotopic location, the lifetimes of hyperpolarized 13C compounds can range from a few seconds to minutes. In this study, we have investigated the hyperpolarized 13C NMR lifetimes of several 13C compounds with various chemical structures from glucose, acetate, citric acid, naphthalene to tetramethylallene and their deuterated analogs at 9.4 T and 25 deg C. Our results show that the 13C T1s of these compounds can range from a few seconds to more than 60 s at this field. Correlations between the chemical structures and T1 relaxation times will be discussed and corresponding implications of these results on 13C DNP experiments will be revealed. US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance of D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzyl penicillin; Ressonancia magnetica nuclear da D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzil penicilina

    Aguiar, Monica R.M.P.; Gemal, Andre L.; San Gil, Rosane A.S. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Menezes, Sonia M.C. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1995-12-31

    The development of new drugs from penicillins has induced the study of this substances by nuclear magnetic resonance. Several samples of D(-)-{alpha}-amino-benzyl penicillin were analysed using {sup 13} C NMR techniques in aqueous solution and solid state. Spectral data of this compounds were shown and the results were presented and analysed 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. 13C-NMR studies of membrane lipid-protein interactions upon protein heat denaturation

    Spinach chloroplast membranes were studied by natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) spectroscopy in their normal state and after heat denaturation of membrane proteins. The membrane proteins were denaturated by raising the temperature of the sample to 67degC for 5 minutes. Line-broadening of 13C-NMR resonances arising from the 1st (carbonyl), 7th, 9th and 12th carbon atom of fatty-acyl chains at these locations, obviously caused by changes in interactions between membrane lipids and proteins upon heat denaturation of membrane proteins. (author). 7 refs.; 1 fig

  18. Alpha Resonant States in 13C

    The 9Be(6Li,d)13C reaction was used to investigate alpha resonant states in 13C up to 15 MeV of excitation. The reaction was measured at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the Sao Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion detection technique. An energy resolution of 50 keV was obtained. Several narrow alpha resonant states not previously measured were detected, in particular the one at the (3α+n) threshold populated by an L = 2 transfer, revealing a 9Be+α component for the 1/2- cluster state candidate at this threshold. Experimental angular distributions are presented in comparison with DWBA predictions.

  19. Efficient Synthesis of Molecular Precursors for Para-Hydrogen-Induced Polarization of Ethyl Acetate-1-(13) C and Beyond.

    Shchepin, Roman V; Barskiy, Danila A; Coffey, Aaron M; Manzanera Esteve, Isaac V; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2016-05-10

    A scalable and versatile methodology for production of vinylated carboxylic compounds with (13) C isotopic label in C1 position is described. It allowed synthesis of vinyl acetate-1-(13) C, which is a precursor for preparation of (13) C hyperpolarized ethyl acetate-1-(13) C, which provides a convenient vehicle for potential in vivo delivery of hyperpolarized acetate to probe metabolism in living organisms. Kinetics of vinyl acetate molecular hydrogenation and polarization transfer from para-hydrogen to (13) C via magnetic field cycling were investigated. Nascent proton nuclear spin polarization (%PH ) of ca. 3.3 % and carbon-13 polarization (%P13C ) of ca. 1.8 % were achieved in ethyl acetate utilizing 50 % para-hydrogen corresponding to ca. 50 % polarization transfer efficiency. The use of nearly 100% para-hydrogen and the improvements of %PH of para-hydrogen-nascent protons may enable production of (13) C hyperpolarized contrast agents with %P13C of 20-50 % in seconds using this chemistry. PMID:27061815

  20. Nuclear Current and Magnetic Rotation

    PENG Jing; XING Li-Feng

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic rotational bands based on the configuration πh211/2 ⊕Vh-211/2 in 142 Gd are investigated with the newly developed tilted axis cranking relativistic mean field (RMF) theory with and without nuclear current.The effect of the nuclear current is discussed by comparing the total Routhians,single particle levels,electromagnetic transition probabilities B(M1) and B(E2) in self-consistent tilted axis cranking RMF calculation with those obtained without the nuclear current.The nuclear currents are found to play an important role in the magnetic rotation of nuclei.

  1. Integrated Magnetic Susceptibility and Geochemical Record of d13C Anomalies in the Berriasian and Valanginian Sections from the Tethyan Domain (Western Carpathians, Poland)

    Grabowski, J.; Krzemiński, L.; Schnyder, J.; Sobien, K.; Hejnar, J.; Koptíková, Leona; Pszcólkowski, A.; Schnabl, Petr

    Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2014 - (Rocha, R.; Pais, J.; Finney, S.; Kullberg, J.), s. 847-851 ISBN 978-3-319-04363-0. [STRATI 2013 : International Congress on Stratigraphy At the Cutting Edge of Stratigraphy. Lisboa (PT), 01.07.2013-07.07.2013] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Berriasian * Valanginian * magnetic susceptibility * major and trace elements Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  2. Direct detection of solanesol in tobacco by 1H and 13C magic angle spinning NMR

    1H and 13C NMR have been used to detect solanesol directly in tobacco without destroying or modifying the sample. Magic angle sample spinning was employed to remove the resonance line broadening due to variations of magnetic susceptibility within the sample. 13C line widths of ca . 10 Hz were obtained. The 1H MAS spectrum of tobacco allows the solanesol signals to be resolved from the broad signal of exchangeable protons. 13C spin-lattice relaxation times (T3) and nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOE) of solanesol in chloroform solution, in intact tobacco, and as nest oil indicate that the polyisoprene chain motion in tobacco is restricted relative to the motion in solution but still sufficient to average out the dipolar couplings between protons and carbons. (author)

  3. Solid state {sup 13}C NMR analysis of Brazilian cretaceous ambers

    Pereira, Ricardo; Azevedo, Debora A., E-mail: ricardopereira@iq.ufrj.b, E-mail: debora@iq.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IQ/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Lab. de Geoquimica Organica Molecular e Ambiental; San Gil, Rosane A.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IQ/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Lab. de RMN de Solidos; Carvalho, Ismar S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Geologia; Fernandes, Antonio Carlos S. [Museu Nacional (MN/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia e Paleontologia

    2011-07-01

    {sup 13}C cross polarization with magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 13}C CPMAS NMR) spectra have been obtained for the first time to three Cretaceous amber samples from South America. The samples were dated to Lower Cretaceous and collected in sediments from the Amazonas, Araripe and Reconcavo basins, Brazil. All samples have very similar spectra, consistent with a common paleobotanical source. Some aspects of the spectra suggest a relationship between Brazilian ambers and Araucariaceae family, such as intense resonances at 38-39 ppm. All samples are constituted by polylabdane structure associated to Class Ib resins, constituted by polymers of labdanoid diterpenes. Finally, information concerning some structural changes during maturation, such as isomerization of {Delta}{sup 8(17)} and {Delta}{sup 12(13)} unsaturations, were obtained by {sup 13}C NMR analyses. The results concerning botanical affinities are in accordance with previous results obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). (author)

  4. Nuclear Bag Model and Nuclear Magnetic Moments

    Liu, Liang-Gang

    1999-01-01

    In 1991, we proposed a model in which nucleus is treated as a spherical symmetric MIT bag and nucleon satisfies the MIT bag model boundary condition. The model was employed to calculate nuclear magnetic moments. The results are in good agreement with experiment data. Now, we found this model is still interesting and illuminating.

  5. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  6. Selective carbon 13 enrichment of side chain carbons of ginkgo lignin traced by carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance

    Although carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C-NMR) is widely used in lignin structural studies, serious difficulties are encountered in the assignments of 13C signals because of their extensive overlaps resulting from the complex structure of lignin and of delicate detection of minor structures. To overcome these difficulties, specifically 13C-enriched precursors of lignin biosynthesis, coniferin-[side chain-β-13C] and coniferin-[side chain-γ-13C], were administered to growing stems of ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba). The NMR analysis of the milled wood lignins isolated from the newly formed xylem showed that selective enrichment of specific carbons of protolignin in the cell wall was achieved without seriously disturbing the lignin biosynthesis. The presence of saturated methylene side chains in the protolignin was shown for the first time by this selective enrichment technique in combination with NMR analysis. (authors). 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  7. Selective carbon 13 enrichment of side chain carbons of ginkgo lignin traced by carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance

    Xie, Y. (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture); Robert, D.R. (CEA Centre d' Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee); Terashima, N. (Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States))

    Although carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([sup 13]C-NMR) is widely used in lignin structural studies, serious difficulties are encountered in the assignments of [sup 13]C signals because of their extensive overlaps resulting from the complex structure of lignin and of delicate detection of minor structures. To overcome these difficulties, specifically [sup 13]C-enriched precursors of lignin biosynthesis, coniferin-[side chain-[beta]-[sup 13]C] and coniferin-[side chain-[gamma]-[sup 13]C], were administered to growing stems of ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba). The NMR analysis of the milled wood lignins isolated from the newly formed xylem showed that selective enrichment of specific carbons of protolignin in the cell wall was achieved without seriously disturbing the lignin biosynthesis. The presence of saturated methylene side chains in the protolignin was shown for the first time by this selective enrichment technique in combination with NMR analysis. (authors). 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. {sup 13}C hyperfine interactions in the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond

    Smeltzer, Benjamin; Childress, Lilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bates College, Lewiston, ME (United States); Gali, Adam, E-mail: lchildre@bates.edu [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, PO Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-02-15

    The electronic spin associated with the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre in diamond interacts with an environment formed by isotopic impurities and paramagnetic defects; the strength of these interactions depends on the location of each impurity relative to the NV centre. From the electron spin resonance spectra of individual NV centres we infer the possible values and signs of hyperfine splittings from nearby {sup 13}C nuclear spins at different lattice sites. Moreover, single-defect-centre nuclear magnetic resonance allows the examination of some of the inhomogeneities associated with the mesoscopic environment of NV-{sup 13}C systems. These measurements provide a check on ab initio calculations of electron spin density and have relevance for potential applications in nuclear spin quantum registers.

  9. Simultaneous hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate MRI and (18)F-FDG-PET in cancer (hyperPET)

    Gutte Borgwardt, Henrik; Hansen, Adam E; Henriksen, Sarah T;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of a new imaging concept - combined hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and (18)F-FDG-PET imaging. This procedure was performed in a clinical PET/MRI scanner with a canine cancer patient. We...... have named this concept hyper PET. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate results in an increase of (13)C-lactate, (13)C-alanine and (13)C-CO2 ((13)C-HCO3) resonance peaks relative to the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. Accordingly, with dynamic nuclear polarization...... local recurrence of a liposarcoma on the right forepaw was imaged using a combined PET/MR clinical scanner. PET was performed as a single-bed, 10 min acquisition, 107 min post injection of 310 MBq (18)F-FDG. (13)C-chemical shift imaging (CSI) was performed just after FDG-PET and 30 s post injection of...

  10. Synthesis of D-[U-{sup 13}C]Glucal, D-[U-{sup 13}C] Galactal, and L-[U-{sup 13}C]Fucose for NMR structure studies of oligosaccharides

    Wu, R.; Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The role of carbohydrates is well recognized in a variety of important biological phenomena such as cell surface recognition. Recent advances in carbohydrate chemistry, including the development of solid phase synthesis methods, have helped to provide significant quantities of material by offering general protocols for synthesis of well-defined, pure material. However, the study of the solution structure of oligosaccharides by nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been hampered by the lack of enriched {sup 13}C material. In an effort to help alleviate this situation, we have been interested in the construction of the title compounds from a single economical carbon source, D-[U-{sup 13}C]glucose. Details of the syntheses will be provided.

  11. Hyperpolarized 13C MR for Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    Wilson, David M.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarization using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization has emerged as a versatile method to dramatically improve the MR signal of low-sensitivity nuclei. This technique facilitates the study of real-time metabolism in vitro and in vivo using 13C-enriched substrates and has been applied to numerous models of human disease. In particular, several mechanisms underlying prostate cancer have been interrogated using hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy. This review highlights key metabolic ...

  12. Multi-Spectroscopic Analysis of Seed Quality and 13C-Stable-Iotopologue Monitoring in Initial Growth Metabolism of Jatropha curcas L.

    Takanori Komatsu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we applied nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, as well as near-infrared (NIR spectroscopy, to Jatropha curcas to fulfill two objectives: (1 to qualitatively examine the seeds stored at different conditions, and (2 to monitor the metabolism of J. curcas during its initial growth stage under stable-isotope-labeling condition (until 15 days after seeding. NIR spectra could non-invasively distinguish differences in storage conditions. NMR metabolic analysis of water-soluble metabolites identified sucrose and raffinose family oligosaccharides as positive markers and gluconic acid as a negative marker of seed germination. Isotopic labeling patteren of metabolites in germinated seedlings cultured in agar-plate containg 13C-glucose and 15N-nitrate was analyzed by zero-quantum-filtered-total correlation spectroscopy (ZQF-TOCSY and 13C-detected 1H-13C heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy (HETCOR. 13C-detected HETOCR with 13C-optimized cryogenic probe provided high-resolution 13C-NMR spectra of each metabolite in molecular crowd. The 13C-13C/12C bondmer estimated from 1H-13C HETCOR spectra indicated that glutamine and arginine were the major organic compounds for nitrogen and carbon transfer from roots to leaves.

  13. Multi-Spectroscopic Analysis of Seed Quality and 13C-Stable-Iotopologue Monitoring in Initial Growth Metabolism of Jatropha curcas L.

    Komatsu, Takanori; Ohishi, Risa; Shino, Amiu; Akashi, Kinya; Kikuchi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we applied nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, to Jatropha curcas to fulfill two objectives: (1) to qualitatively examine the seeds stored at different conditions, and (2) to monitor the metabolism of J. curcas during its initial growth stage under stable-isotope-labeling condition (until 15 days after seeding). NIR spectra could non-invasively distinguish differences in storage conditions. NMR metabolic analysis of water-soluble metabolites identified sucrose and raffinose family oligosaccharides as positive markers and gluconic acid as a negative marker of seed germination. Isotopic labeling patteren of metabolites in germinated seedlings cultured in agar-plate containg 13C-glucose and 15N-nitrate was analyzed by zero-quantum-filtered-total correlation spectroscopy (ZQF-TOCSY) and 13C-detected 1H-13C heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy (HETCOR). 13C-detected HETOCR with 13C-optimized cryogenic probe provided high-resolution 13C-NMR spectra of each metabolite in molecular crowd. The 13C-13C/12C bondmer estimated from 1H-13C HETCOR spectra indicated that glutamine and arginine were the major organic compounds for nitrogen and carbon transfer from roots to leaves. PMID:25401292

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of metabolic regulation

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for the detection of the metabolic transformations of biological compounds labeled with stable isotopes, particularly carbon-13 have been explored. We have studied adipose tissue in the intact rat, the exteriorized epididymal fat pad, and the isolated adipocyte. Triacylglycerol metabolism in adipose tissue is regulated by lipogenic factors (insulin, corticosterone, thyroxine, and growth hormone) and lipolytic factors (glucagon and catecholamines). The synthesis of triglyceride from 5.5 mM glucose was stimulated by about 4-fold by 10 nM insulin. Triglyceride synthesis from glucose in the presence of insulin occurred at a rate of 330 nmol/hr/106 cells. Since the NMR signals from free and esterified fatty acids and glycerol are distinct, we could directly measure the rate of hormone-stimulated lipolysis. Epinephrine (10 μM) gave a lipolytic rate of 0.30 μmol/hr/106 cells as monitored by free-glycerol appearance in the medium. 13C NMR provides a superior method for the measurement of triglyceride metabolism since it directly measures the changes in the substrates and products in situ

  15. Nuclear magnetic gamma double resonance

    A number of problems corresponding to different variants of experiments using nuclear magnetic-gamma double resonance (NMGDR) are theoretically investigated. Calculation is carried out and its results are compared to experimental ones concerning NMGDR for tantalum. Time dynamics of the source or scatterer nucleus sublevel populations under double resonance conditions with non-uniform initial population of this nucleus sublevels is studied

  16. Combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations to Characterize Carvedilol Polymorphs.

    Rezende, Carlos A; San Gil, Rosane A S; Borré, Leandro B; Pires, José Ricardo; Vaiss, Viviane S; Resende, Jackson A L C; Leitão, Alexandre A; De Alencastro, Ricardo B; Leal, Katia Z

    2016-09-01

    The experiments of carvedilol form II, form III, and hydrate by (13)C and (15)N cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP MAS) are reported. The GIPAW (gauge-including projector-augmented wave) method from DFT (density functional theory) calculations was used to simulate (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts. A very good agreement was found for the comparison between the global results of experimental and calculated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts for carvedilol polymorphs. This work aims a comprehensive understanding of carvedilol crystalline forms employing solution and solid-state NMR as well as DFT calculations. PMID:26372719

  17. Altered 13C glucose metabolism in the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical loop in the MK-801 rat model of schizophrenia

    Eyjolfsson, Elvar M; Nilsen, Linn Hege; Kondziella, Daniel;

    2011-01-01

    on day 6, they also received an injection of [1-(13)C]glucose. Extracts of frontal cortex (FCX), parietal and temporal cortex (PTCX), thalamus, striatum, nucleus accumbens (NAc), and hippocampus were analyzed using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography......, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A pronounced reduction in glycolysis was found only in PTCX, in which (13)C labeling of glucose, lactate, and alanine was decreased. (13)C enrichment in lactate, however, was reduced in all areas investigated. The largest reductions in glutamate labeling were...... detected in FCX and PTCX, whereas in hippocampus, striatum, and Nac, (13)C labeling of glutamate was only slightly but significantly reduced. The thalamus was the only region with unaffected glutamate labeling. ¿-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) labeling was reduced in all areas, but most significantly in FCX...

  18. Magnetometer of nuclear magnetic resonance

    We present a nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer that measures magnetic fields, between 2,500 gauss and 5,000 gauss, with an accuracy of a few parts per million. The circuit of the magnetometer, based on a marginal oscillator, permits a continuous tunning in the frequency range comprised between 10.0 MHz, with a signal to noise ratio of about 20. The radiofrequency amplifier is of the cascode type in integrated circuit and it operates with two 9V batteries. The modulation is at 35 Hz and it is provided by an external oscillator. The instrument is compact, inexpensive and easy to operate; it can also be used for didactic purposes to show the phenomenon of magnetic nuclear resonance and its main characteristics. (author)

  19. Metabolic origin of the {delta}{sup 13}C of respired CO{sub 2} in roots of Phaseolus vulgaris

    Bathellier, C.; Tcherkez, G.; Cornic, G.; Ghashghaie, J. [Laboratoire d' Ecologie, Systematique et Evolution - ESE, CNRS-UMR 8079 - IFR 87, Batiment 362, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405-Orsay Cedex (France); Tcherkez, G. [Plateforme Metabolisme-Metabolome, IFR87 La Plante et son Environnement, Institut de Biotechnologie des Plantes, Batiment 630, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405-Orsay Cedex (France); Bligny, R.; Gout, E. [Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Vegetale CEA-Grenoble 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2009-07-01

    - Root respiration is a major contributor to soil CO{sub 2} efflux, and thus an important component of ecosystem respiration. But its metabolic origin, in relation to the carbon isotope composition ({delta}{sup 13}C), remains poorly understood. - Here, {sup 13}C analysis was conducted on CO{sub 2} and metabolites under typical conditions or under continuous darkness in French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) roots. {sup 13}C contents were measured either under natural abundance or following pulse-chase labeling with {sup 13}C-enriched glucose or pyruvate, using isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. - In contrast to leaves, no relationship was found between the respiratory quotient and the {delta}{sup 13}C of respired CO{sub 2}, which stayed constant at a low value (c. -27.5 per thousand) under continuous darkness. With labeling experiments, it is shown that such a pattern is explained by the {sup 13}C-depleting effect of the pentose phosphate pathway; and the involvement of the Krebs cycle fueled by either the glycolytic input or the lipid/protein recycling. The anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) activity sustained glutamic acid (Glu) synthesis, with no net effect on respired CO{sub 2}. - These results indicate that the root {delta}{sup 13}C signal does not depend on the availability of root respiratory substrates and it is thus plausible that, unless the {sup 13}C photosynthetic fractionation varies at the leaf level, the root {delta}{sup 13}C signal hardly changes under a range of natural environmental conditions. (authors)

  20. Real-time cardiac metabolism assessed with hyperpolarized [1-13C]acetate in a large-animal model

    Flori, Alessandra; Liserani, Matteo; Frijia, Francesca;

    2015-01-01

    Dissolution-dynamic nuclear polarization (dissolution-DNP) for magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic imaging has recently emerged as a novel technique for noninvasive studies of the metabolic fate of biomolecules in vivo. Since acetate is the most abundant extra- and intracellular short-chain fatty...... acid, we focused on [1-13C]acetate as a promising candidate for a chemical probe to study the myocardial metabolism of a beating heart. The dissolution-DNP procedure of Na[1-13C]acetate for in vivo cardiac applications with a 3 T MR scanner was optimized in pigs during bolus injection of doses of up to...

  1. Characterization of a Mixture of CO2 Adsorption Products in Hyperbranched Aminosilica Adsorbents by (13)C Solid-State NMR.

    Moore, Jeremy K; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Chaikittisilp, Watcharop; Mehta, Anil K; Conradi, Mark S; Jones, Christopher W; Hayes, Sophia E

    2015-11-17

    Hyperbranched amine polymers (HAS) grown from the mesoporous silica SBA-15 (hereafter "SBA-15-HAS") exhibit large capacities for CO2 adsorption. We have used static in situ and magic-angle spinning (MAS) ex situ (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the adsorption of CO2 by SBA-15-HAS. (13)C NMR distinguishes the signal of gas-phase (13)CO2 from that of the chemisorbed species. HAS polymers possess primary, secondary, and tertiary amines, leading to multiple chemisorption reaction outcomes, including carbamate (RnNCOO(-)), carbamic acid (RnNCOOH), and bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) moieties. Carbamates and bicarbonate fall within a small (13)C chemical shift range (162-166 ppm), and a mixture was observed including carbamic acid and carbamate, the former disappearing upon evacuation of the sample. By examining the (13)C-(14)N dipolar coupling through low-field (B0 = 3 T) (13)C{(1)H} cross-polarization MAS NMR, carbamate is confirmed through splitting of the (13)C resonance. A third species that is either bicarbonate or a second carbamate is evident from bimodal T2 decay times of the ∼163 ppm peak, indicating the presence of two species comprising that single resonance. The mixture of products suggests that (1) the presence of amines and water leads to bicarbonate being present and/or (2) the multiple types of amine sites in HAS permit formation of chemically distinct carbamates. PMID:26477882

  2. (13) C-TmDOTA as versatile thermometer compound for solid-state NMR of hydrated lipid bilayer membranes.

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yuya; Nobuaki, Matsumori; Murata, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as magic angle spinning and high-power decoupling, have dramatically increased the sensitivity and resolution of NMR. However, these NMR techniques generate extra heat, causing a temperature difference between the sample in the rotor and the variable temperature gas. This extra heating is a particularly crucial problem for hydrated lipid membrane samples. Thus, to develop an NMR thermometer that is suitable for hydrated lipid samples, thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (TmDOTA) was synthesized and labeled with (13) C (i.e., (13) C-TmDOTA) to increase the NMR sensitivity. The complex was mixed with a hydrated lipid membrane, and the system was subjected to solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. The physical properties of the lipid bilayer and the quality of the NMR spectra of the membrane were negligibly affected by the presence of (13) C-TmDOTA, and the (13) C chemical shift of the complex exhibited a large-temperature dependence. The results demonstrated that (13) C-TmDOTA could be successfully used as a thermometer to accurately monitor temperature changes induced by (1) H decoupling pulses and/or by magic angle spinning and the temperature distribution of the sample inside the rotor. Thus, (13) C-TmDOTA was shown to be a versatile thermometer for hydrated lipid assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26460094

  3. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad;

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to char...... a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging....

  4. Tomography by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Imaging methods based on nuclear magnetic resonance allow the production of sectional images of the human body without ionizing radiation. It is possible to measure the density and relaxation times of the water protons in body fluids or tissue. This allows not only to obtain morphological information but also to get some insight into the spatial distribution of physiological data. Starting with a review of the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance it is explained how the measured signal can be associated with an image point; it is also explained what type of apparatus is necessary and what the physical limitations are. Possible risks the patient may be exposed to in an examination using nuclear magnetic resonance are discussed. The present state of the technical development enables the production of whole-body sectional images of a living person within about one minute. By means of some typical examples the nature and properties of these images are explained. Although extensive clinical studies will be necessary before a more general assessment can be made of this method, an outlook is provided on expected further developments and possible future fields of application. (orig.)

  5. Synthesis of 13C-labelled medroxyprogesterone acetate with three 13C isotopes [1

    17α-hydroxyprogesterone was condensed with phenyl acetate 13C2 in the presence of sodium hydride. Treatment with acetic and hydrochloric acids and acetylation gave 17α-acetoxyprogesterone 13C2. Treatment with tetrabromomethane 13C and hydrogenation yielded medroxyprogesterone acetate with three 13C isotopes. (U.K.)

  6. Synthesis of /sup 13/C-labelled medroxyprogesterone acetate with three /sup 13/C isotopes (1)

    Rao, P.N.; Damodaran, K.M. (Southwest Foundation for Research and Education, San Antonio, TX (USA))

    1982-03-01

    17..cap alpha..-hydroxyprogesterone was condensed with phenyl acetate /sup 13/C/sub 2/ in the presence of sodium hydride. Treatment with acetic and hydrochloric acids and acetylation gave 17..cap alpha..-acetoxyprogesterone /sup 13/C/sub 2/. Treatment with tetrabromomethane /sup 13/C and hydrogenation yielded medroxyprogesterone acetate with three /sup 13/C isotopes.

  7. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance with magic-angle spinning and dynamic nuclear polarization below 25 K

    Thurber, Kent R.; Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We describe an apparatus for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS) at 20-25 K and 9.4 Tesla. The MAS NMR probe uses helium to cool the sample space and nitrogen gas for MAS drive and bearings, as described earlier [1], but also includes a corrugated waveguide for transmission of microwaves from below the probe to the sample. With a 30 mW circularly polarized microwave source at 264 GHz, MAS at 6.8 kHz, and 21 K sample temperature, greater than 25-fold enhancements of cross-polarized 13C NMR signals are observed in spectra of frozen glycerol/water solutions containing the triradical dopant DOTOPA-TEMPO when microwaves are applied. As demonstrations, we present DNP-enhanced one-dimensional and two-dimensional 13C MAS NMR spectra of frozen solutions of uniformly 13C-labeled L-alanine and melittin, a 26-residue helical peptide that we have synthesized with four uniformly 13C-labeled amino acids.

  8. Hyperpolarized 13C MR angiography

    Lipsø, Hans Kasper Wigh; Magnusson, Peter; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a non-invasive technology that can be used for diagnosis and monitoring of cardiovascular disease; the number one cause of mortality worldwide. Hyperpolarized imaging agents provide signal enhancement of more than 10, 000 times, which implies large reduction...... angiography in the rat, and compare the performance of two standard angiographic pulse sequences, the gradient echo (GRE) sequence and the balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP). 2D coronal cerebral angiographies using intra-arterial injections were acquired with a GRE sequence with in-plane resolution...

  9. Wide-range nuclear magnetic resonance detector

    Sturman, J. C.; Jirberg, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Compact and easy to use solid state nuclear magnetic resonance detector is designed for measuring field strength to 20 teslas in cryogenically cooled magnets. Extremely low noise and high sensitivity make detector applicable to nearly all types of analytical nuclear magnetic resonance measurements and can be used in high temperature and radiation environments.

  10. Measuring changes in substrate utilization in the myocardium in response to fasting using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]butyrate and [1-(13)C]pyruvate.

    Bastiaansen, Jessica A M; Merritt, Matthew E; Comment, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is often associated with a shift in substrate preference for ATP production. Hyperpolarized (HP) (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has the unique ability to detect real-time metabolic changes in vivo due to its high sensitivity and specificity. Here a protocol using HP [1-(13)C]pyruvate and [1-(13)C]butyrate is used to measure carbohydrate versus fatty acid metabolism in vivo. Metabolic changes in fed and fasted Sprague Dawley rats (n = 36) were studied at 9.4 T after tail vein injections. Pyruvate and butyrate competed for acetyl-CoA production, as evidenced by significant changes in [(13)C]bicarbonate (-48%), [1-(13)C]acetylcarnitine (+113%), and [5-(13)C]glutamate (-63%), following fasting. Butyrate uptake was unaffected by fasting, as indicated by [1-(13)C]butyrylcarnitine. Mitochondrial pseudoketogenesis facilitated the labeling of the ketone bodies [1-(13)C]acetoacetate and [1-(13)C]β-hydroxybutyryate, without evidence of true ketogenesis. HP [1-(13)C]acetoacetate was increased in fasting (250%) but decreased during pyruvate co-injection (-82%). Combining HP (13)C technology and co-administration of separate imaging agents enables noninvasive and simultaneous monitoring of both fatty acid and carbohydrate oxidation. This protocol illustrates a novel method for assessing metabolic flux through different enzymatic pathways simultaneously and enables mechanistic studies of the changing myocardial energetics often associated with disease. PMID:27150735

  11. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging. PMID:26751800

  12. Nuclear magnetic ordering in silver

    Nuclear antiferromagnetic ordering has been observed by neutron diffraction in a single crystal of 109Ag. The critical temperature is found to 700 pK, and the critical field is 100 μT. From the paramagnetic phase a second order phase transition leads into a type-I 1-k structure with long range order. The experiments have taken place at the Hahn-Meitner Institut in Berlin in collaboration with the low Temperature Laboratory in Helsinki, the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, and Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde. The present report is a Ph.D. thesis which has been successfully defended at the Niels Bohr Institute. Besides the results of the nuclear ordering experiments the thesis contains a description of the theoretical background for nuclear magnetism and a review of earlier nuclear ordering experiments as well as theoretical work. The principles for studying polarized nuclei with use of polarized and unpolarized neutrons are presented, as well as the results of such experiments. (au) 11 tabs., 59 ills., 143 refs

  13. Nuclear magnetic ordering in silver

    Lefmann, K.

    1995-12-01

    Nuclear antiferromagnetic ordering has been observed by neutron diffraction in a single crystal of {sup 109}Ag. The critical temperature is found to 700 pK, and the critical field is 100 {mu}T. From the paramagnetic phase a second order phase transition leads into a type-I 1-k structure with long range order. The experiments have taken place at the Hahn-Meitner Institut in Berlin in collaboration with the low Temperature Laboratory in Helsinki, the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, and Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde. The present report is a Ph.D. thesis which has been successfully defended at the Niels Bohr Institute. Besides the results of the nuclear ordering experiments the thesis contains a description of the theoretical background for nuclear magnetism and a review of earlier nuclear ordering experiments as well as theoretical work. The principles for studying polarized nuclei with use of polarized and unpolarized neutrons are presented, as well as the results of such experiments. (au) 11 tabs., 59 ills., 143 refs.

  14. Protein dynamics from nuclear magnetic relaxation.

    Charlier, Cyril; Cousin, Samuel F; Ferrage, Fabien

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is a ubiquitous spectroscopic tool to explore molecules with atomic resolution. Nuclear magnetic relaxation is intimately connected to molecular motions. Many methods and models have been developed to measure and interpret the characteristic rates of nuclear magnetic relaxation in proteins. These approaches shed light on a rich and diverse range of motions covering timescales from picoseconds to seconds. Here, we introduce some of the basic concepts upon which these approaches are built and provide a series of illustrations. PMID:26932314

  15. Evaluating pyrolysis-GC/MS and 13C CPMAS NMR in conjunction with a molecular mixing model of the Penido Vello peat deposit, NW Spain

    Kaal, J.; Baldock, J.A.; Buurman, P.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Pontevedra-Pombal, X.; Martínez-Cortizas, A.

    2007-01-01

    We performed solid state 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and pyrolysis¿gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py¿GC/MS) on the Penido Vello peat deposit located in Galicia, NW Spain. Often regarded as complementary techniques, solid st

  16. {sup 13}C NMR and EPR spectroscopic evaluation of oil shale mined soil recuperation

    Santos, J.V. dos, E-mail: mangrich@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Mangrich, A.S. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia: Energia e Ambiente, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Pereira, B.F. [EMBRAPA Clima Temperado, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Pillon, C.N. [EMBRAPA Clima Temperado, Pelotas, RS (Brazil). Estacao Experimental Cascata; Novotny, E.H. [EMBRAPA Solos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bonagamba, T.J. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Abbt-Braun, G.; Frimmel, F.H. [Engler-Bunte-Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe, TH (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    In this work, native forest soil (NFS) organic matter (SOM) sample and SOM samples from a neighboring forest soil area of an oil shale mine which is being rehabilitated for thirty years (RFS) were analyzed. X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and solid-state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies were used to evaluate the soil reclamation of the Brazilian oil shale mining process. Two-dimensional heterospectral correlation studies of the results obtained from EPRand {sup 13}C NMR were used to obtain information about SOM structures and their interactions with residual paramagnetic metal ion. The signal of the residual metallic oxycation, VO{sup 2+} correlated positively with uronic acid-type hydrophilic organic structures, determined from the {sup 13}C NMR spectra, and correlated negatively with the organic free radical (OFR) signal associated with oxygen atoms (g = 2.0042). The hydrophobic aromatic structures correlate positively with the EPR OFR signal associated with carbon atoms (g = 2.0022). The data from the two spectroscopic magnetic techniques show that the used recuperation process is effective. (author)

  17. 13C NMR and EPR spectroscopic evaluation of oil shale mined soil recuperation

    In this work, native forest soil (NFS) organic matter (SOM) sample and SOM samples from a neighboring forest soil area of an oil shale mine which is being rehabilitated for thirty years (RFS) were analyzed. X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies were used to evaluate the soil reclamation of the Brazilian oil shale mining process. Two-dimensional heterospectral correlation studies of the results obtained from EPRand 13C NMR were used to obtain information about SOM structures and their interactions with residual paramagnetic metal ion. The signal of the residual metallic oxycation, VO2+ correlated positively with uronic acid-type hydrophilic organic structures, determined from the 13C NMR spectra, and correlated negatively with the organic free radical (OFR) signal associated with oxygen atoms (g = 2.0042). The hydrophobic aromatic structures correlate positively with the EPR OFR signal associated with carbon atoms (g = 2.0022). The data from the two spectroscopic magnetic techniques show that the used recuperation process is effective. (author)

  18. Synthesis of 13C-labeled methanol

    A novel convenient method for the synthesis of 13C-methanol was described. 13C- methanol was prepared by means of catalytic hydrogenation, and then as-synthesized methanol solution was further purified in a microscale high-efficient rectification column. The chemical purity of 13C-methanol was more than 99.5%. The synthetic route was featured by mild conditions and high yields of more than 90% based on isotopic substrate consumed. The product was characterized by GC-MS and 1H NMR, and the 13C abundance of 13C- methanol was more than 97%. Compared with the raw materials, the reduction of relative isotopic abundance of product was less than 1%. (authors)

  19. Microsolvation of methylmercury: structures, energies, bonding and NMR constants ((199)Hg, (13)C and (17)O).

    Flórez, Edison; Maldonado, Alejandro F; Aucar, Gustavo A; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2016-01-21

    Hartree-Fock (HF) and second order perturbation theory (MP2) calculations within the scalar and full relativistic frames were carried out in order to determine the equilibrium geometries and interaction energies between cationic methylmercury (CH3Hg(+)) and up to three water molecules. A total of nine structures were obtained. Bonding properties were analyzed using the Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules (QTAIM). The analyses of the topology of electron densities reveal that all structures exhibit a partially covalent HgO interaction between methylmercury and one water molecule. Consideration of additional water molecules suggests that they solvate the (CH3HgOH2)(+) unit. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants σ((199)Hg), σ((13)C) and σ((17)O), as well as indirect spin-spin coupling constants J((199)Hg-(13)C), J((199)Hg-(17)O) and J((13)C-(17)O), were calculated for each one of the geometries. Thermodynamic stability and the values of NMR constants correlate with the ability of the system to directly coordinate oxygen atoms of water molecules to the mercury atom in methylmercury and with the formation of hydrogen bonds among solvating water molecules. Relativistic effects account for 11% on σ((13)C) and 14% on σ((17)O), which is due to the presence of Hg (heavy atom on light atom, HALA effect), while the relativistic effects on σ((199)Hg) are close to 50% (heavy atom on heavy atom itself, HAHA effect). J-coupling constants are highly influenced by relativity when mercury is involved as in J((199)Hg-(13)C) and J((199)Hg-(17)O). On the other hand, our results show that the values of NMR constants for carbon and oxygen, atoms which are connected through mercury (C-HgO), are highly correlated and are greatly influenced by the presence of water molecules. Water molecules introduce additional electronic effects to the relativistic effects due to the mercury atom. PMID:26670708

  20. Solid state CP/MAS 13C n.m.r. analysis of particle size and density fractions of soil incubated with uniformly labelled 13C-glucose

    A soil incubated for 34 days in the absence (control) and presence (treated) of uniformly labelled 13C-glucose was dispersed using an ultrasonic probe and fractionated by sedimentation in water and a polytungstate solution of density 2.0 Mg m-3. Solid state CP/MAS 13C n.m.r. (cross polarization/magic angle spinning 13C nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy was used to characterize the chemical structure of the native soil organic carbon and the residual substrate carbon in the fractions of the control and treated soils. To obtain quantitative results it was essential to determine the spin lattice relaxation time in a rotating frame of the individual carbon types in the spectra as the relaxation behaviour of the native organic material in the clay fraction was different from that of the residual substrate carbon. The residual substrate carbon was found to accumulate in predominantly alkyl and O-alkyl structures in both fractions. However, significant amounts of acetal and carboxyl carbon were also observed in the clay fraction. Little if any aromatic or phenolic carbon was synthesized by the soil microorganisms utilizing substrate carbon. Dipolar dephasing CP/MAS 13C n.m.r. experiments were also performed and allowed the proportion of each type of carbon which was protonated and nonprotonated to be estimated. Essentially all of the O-alkyl and acetal carbon, 25-40% of the aromatic carbon and 66-80% of the alkyl carbon was protonated in the fractions isolated from the treated soil. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Solid-state NMR determination of sugar ring pucker in (13)C-labeled 2'-deoxynucleosides.

    van Dam, Lorens; Ouwerkerk, Niels; Brinkmann, Andreas; Raap, Jan; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    2002-01-01

    The H3'-C3'-C4'-H4' torsional angles of two microcrystalline 2'-deoxynucleosides, thymidine and 2'-deoxycytidine.HCl, doubly (13)C-labeled at the C3' and C4' positions of the sugar ring, have been measured by solid-state magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). A double-quantum heteronuclear local field experiment with frequency-switched Lee-Goldberg homonuclear decoupling was used. The H3'-C3'-C4'-H4' torsional angles were obtained by comparing the experimental curves with nume...

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis and molecular properties of berberine

    Huang, Ming-Ju; Lee, Ken S.; Hurley, Sharon J.

    An extensive theoretical study of berberine has been performed at the ab initio HF/6-31G**, HF/6-311G**, and B3LYP/6-311G** levels with and without solvent effects. The optimized structures are compared with X-ray data. We found that the optimized structures with solvent effects are in slightly better agreement with X-ray data than those without solvent effects. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of berberine were calculated by using the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) (with and without solvent effects), CSGT, and IGAIM methods. The calculated chemical shifts were compared with the two-dimensional NMR experimental data. Overall, the calculated chemical shifts show very good agreement with the experimental results. The harmonic vibrational frequencies for berberine were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G** level.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cytochromes c in solution

    Cytochromes c are small soluble proteins, which have been extensively studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The specific NMR features of paramagnetic proteins are discussed for the oxidized form (paramagnetic shift and line broadening). Early NMR studies have focused on the electronic structure of the heme and its direct environment. The conformations of cytochromes c are now investigated by two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy combined with restrained molecular dynamics. 15N and 13C NMR, which greatly benefit from isotopic enrichment, may help in obtaining reliable 1H assignments and thus high quality solution structure. Finally, hydrogen exchange rates provide insight in the rigidity (and stability) of cytochromes c in both redox states at the atomic level. (author). 50 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  4. {sup 13}C NMR investigation of re-entrant antiferromagnetic states of (TMTTF){sub 2}SbF{sub 6}

    Nakamura, Toshikazu; Iwase, Fumitatsu; Furukawa, Ko [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Satsukawa, Hidetaka; Takahashi, Toshihiro, E-mail: t-nk@ims.ac.j [Department of Physics, Gakushuin University, Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan)

    2009-03-01

    {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) investigations were performed on the one-dimensional organic conductor (TMTTF){sub 2}SbF{sub 6} to clarify its electronic properties in the proximity of the ground states. An abrupt broadening of {sup 13}C NMR absorption lines below 8 K (T{sub N} = 8 K), confirmed a long-range antiferromagnetic phase transition. Below T{sub N}, the absorption lines are composed of four distinct broad lines, indicating a commensurate magnetic structure. The amplitude of staggered magnetization, rho, is comparable to (TMTTF){sub 2}Br, and on the order of 0.1 mu{sub B} according to the splitting of {sup 13}C NMR lines at 3 K.

  5. Solid-, Solution-, and Gas-state NMR Monitoring of 13C-Cellulose Degradation in an Anaerobic Microbial Ecosystem

    Yasuhiro Date

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion of biomacromolecules in various microbial ecosystems is influenced by the variations in types, qualities, and quantities of chemical components. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing the degradation of solids to gases in anaerobic digestion processes. Here we describe a characterization strategy using NMR spectroscopy for targeting the input solid insoluble biomass, catabolized soluble metabolites, and produced gases. 13C-labeled cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus was added as a substrate to stirred tank reactors and gradually degraded for 120 h. The time-course variations in structural heterogeneity of cellulose catabolism were determined using solid-state NMR, and soluble metabolites produced by cellulose degradation were monitored using solution-state NMR. In particular, cooperative changes between the solid NMR signal and 13C-13C/13C-12C isotopomers in the microbial degradation of 13C-cellulose were revealed by a correlation heat map. The triple phase NMR measurements demonstrated that cellulose was anaerobically degraded, fermented, and converted to methane gas from organic acids such as acetic acid and butyric acid.

  6. Synthesis of encainide-13C hydrochloride from 2-nitrobenzaldehyde-formyl-13C

    A facile synthesis of 2-nitrobenzaldehyde-formyl-13C was developed. This compound was converted to the labelled antiarrhythmic agent, encainide-13C hydrochloride, 4-methoxy-N-[2-(1-methyl-2-piperidinyl)ethyl-1-13C]phenyl]benzamide hydrochloride. (author)

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of erythrocyte membranes

    Chapman, D.; Kamat, V.B.; Gier, J. de; Penkett, S.A.

    1968-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for studying molecular interactions in biological membranes has been investigated using erythrocyte membrane fragments. Sonic dispersion of these fragments produces a sharp and well-defined high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum. The sp

  8. Contribution to nuclear magnetic resonance imager using permanent magnets

    After some recalls of nuclear magnetic resonance, ways to get a stable and homogeneous magnetic field are studied with permanent magnets. Development of correction coils on integrated circuits has been particularly stressed. Gradient coil specific systems have been studied taking in account ferromagnetic material presence. Antenna system has been improved and possibility of image obtention with the prototype realized has been shown

  9. The Branchings of the Main s-process: Their Sensitivity to alpha-induced Reactions on 13C and 22Ne and to the Uncertainties of the Nuclear Network

    Bisterzo, Sara; Kaeppeler, Franz; Wiescher, Michael; Imbriani, Gianluca; Straniero, Oscar; Cristallo, Sergio; Goerres, Joachim; deBoer, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed analysis of the main component of the slow neutron capture process (the s-process), which accounts for the solar abundances of half of the nuclei with 90 <~ A <~ 208. We examine the impact of the uncertainties of the two neutron sources operating in low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars: the 13C(alpha, n)16O reaction, which releases neutrons radiatively during interpulse periods (kT ~ 8 keV), and the 22Ne(alpha, n)25Mg reaction, partially activated during the convective thermal pulses (TPs). We focus our attention on the branching points that mainly influence the abundance of s-only isotopes. In our AGB models, the 13C is fully consumed radiatively during interpulse. In this case, we find that the present uncertainty associated to the 13C(alpha, n)16O reaction has marginal effects on s-only nuclei. On the other hand, a reduction of this rate may increase the amount of residual (or unburned) 13C at the end of the interpulse: in this condition, the residual 13C is bur...

  10. Neutron halo state of 13C

    2001-01-01

    Angular distributions for the 12C(d, p)13C transfer reactionshave been measured at Ed = 11.8 MeV, and compared with those of the DWBA calculations. By means of this comparison, density distributions of the last neutron in the ground state and the first 1/2+ state of 13C are extracted. The properties of these states in 13C have also been studied in the framework of the nonlinear relativistic mean-field theory with NL-SH parameters. It is found that the first 1/2+ state in 13C is a neutron halo state shown by both the experimental and theoretical density distributions of the last neutron.

  11. Electromagnetic Properties of Inner Double Walled Carbon Nanotubes Investigated by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    M. Bouhrara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analytical technique was used to investigate the double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs electromagnetic properties of inner walls. The local magnetic and electronic properties of inner nanotubes in DWNTs were analyzed using 25% 13C enriched C60 by which the effect of dipolar coupling could be minimized. The diamagnetic shielding was determined due to the ring currents on outer nanotubes in DWNTs. The NMR chemical shift anisotropy (CSA spectra and spin-lattice relaxation studies reveal the metallic properties of the inner nanotubes with a signature of the spin-gap opening below 70 K.

  12. Electromagnetic properties of inner double walled carbon nanotubes investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Bouhrara, M.

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analytical technique was used to investigate the double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) electromagnetic properties of inner walls. The local magnetic and electronic properties of inner nanotubes in DWNTs were analyzed using 25% 13C enriched C 60 by which the effect of dipolar coupling could be minimized. The diamagnetic shielding was determined due to the ring currents on outer nanotubes in DWNTs. The NMR chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation studies reveal the metallic properties of the inner nanotubes with a signature of the spin-gap opening below 70 K.

  13. Impact of Gd3+ doping and glassing solvent deuteration on 13C DNP at 5 Tesla

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lama, Bimala; Niedbalski, Peter; Goderya, Mudrekh; Long, Joanna; Lumata, Lloyd

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique which can be used to amplify signals in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by several thousand-fold. The most commonly available DNP system typically operates at the W-band field or 3.35 T, at which it has been shown that 13C NMR signal can be enhanced by deuteration and Gd3+ doping. In this work, we have investigated the applicability of these procedures at 5 T. Our results indicate that the deuteration of the glassing matrix still yields an enhancement of 13C DNP when 4-oxo-TEMPO free radical is used. The effect is attributed to the lower heat load of the deuterons compared to protons. An addition of a trace amount of Gd3+ gives a modest enhancement of the signal when trityl OX063 is used, albeit with a less pronounced relative enhancement compared to the results obtained at 3.35 T. The results suggest that the enhancement obtained via Gd3+ doping may become saturated at higher field. These results will be discussed using a thermodynamic model of DNP. This work is supported by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  14. Synthesis and applications of 13C glycerol

    The authors are currently developing new synthetic routes to the various isotopomers of glycerol. Labeled glycerol is useful for 13C enrichment of biomolecules. However, traditional methods of glycerol synthesis are not easily adapted for isotopic enrichment or have poor overall yields (12-15%). In addition, the use of glycerol for enrichment can be prohibitively expensive and its availability depends on the level of demand. The authors have developed a short de novo synthesis of [U-13C]glycerol from carbon dioxide (∼53% overall yield for four steps) and are currently examining the feasibility of synthesizing site-specific 13C labeled glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) from methanol and carbon dioxide. The authors have examined the enzymatic conversion of [U-13C]glycerol to glyceraldehyde-3-monophosphate or dihydroxyacetone monophosphate (DHAP) with yields ranging from 25-50% (as determined by NMR spectroscopy). The authors are also pursuing the chemical conversion of 13C labeled DHA to DHAP and the results are presented. Labeled DHAP is a possible enzymatic precursor for both labeled 2-deoxyribose and 2-deoxyribonucleic acids

  15. Nuclear reactions in ultra-magnetized supernovae

    The statistical model is employed to investigate nuclear reactions in ultrastrong magnetic fields relevant for supernovae and neutron stars. For radiative capture processes the predominant mechanisms are argued to correspond to modifications of nuclear level densities, and γ-transition energies due to interactions of the field with magnetic moments of nuclei. The density of states reflects the nuclear structure and results in oscillations of reaction cross sections as a function of field strength, while magnetic interaction energy enhances radiative neutron capture process. Implications in the synthesis of r-process nuclei in supernova site are discussed. (author)

  16. 1H to 13C Energy Transfer in Solid State NMR Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Systems

    Berns, Anne E.; Conte, Pellegrino

    2010-05-01

    ., van Lagen, B., Buurman, P. & de Jager, P.A., 1997. Quantitative Aspects of Solid-State 13C-NMR Spectra of Humic Substances from Soils of Volcanic Systems. Geoderma, 80, 327-338. Conte, P., Piccolo, A., van Lagen, B., Buurman, P. & Hemminga, M.A., 2002. Elemental quantitation of natural organic matter by CPMAS C-13 NMR spectroscopy. Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, 21, 158-170. Conte, P., Spaccini, R. & Piccolo, A., 2004. State of the art of CPMAS C-13-NMR spectroscopy applied to natural organic matter. Progress in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, 44, 215-223. Dria, K.J., Sachleben, J.R. & Hatcher, P.G., 2002. Solid-state carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance of humic acids at high magnetic field strengths. Journal of Environmental Quality, 31, 393-401. Kiem, R., Knicker, H., Korschens, M. & Kogel-Knabner, I., 2000. Refractory organic carbon in C-depleted arable soils, as studied by C-13 NMR spectroscopy and carbohydrate analysis. Organic Geochemistry, 31, 655-668. Kögel-Knabner, I., 2000. Analytical approaches for characterizing soil organic matter. Organic Geochemistry, 31, 609-625. Mao, J.D., Hu, W.G., Schmidt-Rohr, K., Davies, G., Ghabbour, E.A. & Xing, B., 2000. Quantitative characterization of humic substances by solid-state carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 64, 873-884. Metz, G., Ziliox, M. & Smith, S.O., 1996. Towards quantitative CP-MAS NMR. Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, 7, 155-160. Preston, C.M., 2001. Carbon-13 solid-state NMR of soil organic matter - using the technique effectively. Canadian Journal of Soil Science, 81, 255-270. Smernik, R.J. & Oades, J.M., 2000a. The use of spin counting for determining quantitation in solid state C-13 NMR spectra of natural organic matter 1. Model systems and the effects of paramagnetic impurities. Geoderma, 96, 101-129. Smernik, R.J. & Oades, J.M., 2000b. The use of spin counting for determining quantitation in solid state C-13 NMR spectra of natural

  17. Performance evaluation of quantitative adiabatic (13)C NMR pulse sequences for site-specific isotopic measurements.

    Thibaudeau, Christophe; Remaud, Gérald; Silvestre, Virginie; Akoka, Serge

    2010-07-01

    (2)H/(1)H and (13)C/(12)C site-specific isotope ratios determined by NMR spectroscopy may be used to discriminate pharmaceutically active ingredients based on the synthetic process used in production. Extending the Site-specific Natural Isotope Fractionation NMR (SNIF-NMR) method to (13)C is highly beneficial for complex organic molecules when measurements of (2)H/(1)H ratios lead to poorly defined molecular fingerprints. The current NMR methodology to determine (13)C/(12)C site-specific isotope ratios suffers from poor sensitivity and long experimental times. In this work, several NMR pulse sequences based on polarization transfer were evaluated and optimized to measure precise quantitative (13)C NMR spectra within a short time. Adiabatic 180 degrees (1)H and (13)C pulses were incorporated into distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT) and refocused insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer (INEPT) to minimize the influence of 180 degrees pulse imperfections and of off-resonance effects on the precision of the measured (13)C peak areas. The adiabatic DEPT sequence was applied to draw up a precise site-specific (13)C isotope profile of ibuprofen. A modified heteronuclear cross-polarization (HCP) experiment featuring (1)H and (13)C spin-locks with adiabatic 180 degrees pulses is also introduced. This sequence enables efficient magnetization transfer across a wide (13)C frequency range although not enough for an application in quantitative (13)C isotopic analysis. PMID:20527737

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Current Capabilities

    Davis, Peter L.; Crooks, Lawrence E.; Margulis, Alexander R.; Kaufman, Leon

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging can produce tomographic images of the body without ionizing radiation. Images of the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities have been obtained and normal structures and pathology have been identified. Soft tissue contrast with this method is superior to that with x-ray computerized tomography and its spatial resolution is approaching that of x-ray computerized tomography. In addition, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enables us to image along the sag...

  19. Nuclear magnetic (ratio-frequency) tomography

    Physical foundations of nuclear magnetic tomography and factors limiting its spatial, contrast and time precision are considered. On the basis of analysis of literature data, it is established that using peculiarities of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) it is possible to detect malignant tumors and edemas, to investigate metabolic processes, to determine blood flow rate and to solve a number of other problems. The classification of methods of NMR - tomography is given

  20. Nuclear magnetic (radio-frequency) tomography

    Pavlov, A.S.; Gurvich, A.M.; Karyakina, N.F.; Revokatov, O.P.; Chikirdin, Eh.G. (Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Rentgenologii i Radiologii, Moscow (USSR))

    Physical foundations of nuclear magnetic tomography and factors limiting its spatial, contrast and time precision are considered. On the basis of analysis of literature data, it is established that using peculiarities of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) it is possible to detect malignant tumors and edemas, to investigate metabolic processes, to determine blood flow rate and to solve a number of other problems. The classification of methods of NMR - tomography is given.

  1. Comparative study of ¹³C composition in ethanol and bulk dry wine using isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry and by nuclear magnetic resonance as an indicator of vine water status.

    Guyon, Francois; van Leeuwen, Cornelis; Gaillard, Laetitia; Grand, Mathilde; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S; Sabathié, Nathalie; Salagoïty, Marie-Hélène

    2015-12-01

    The potential of wine (13)C isotope composition (δ(13)C) is presented to assess vine water status during grape ripening. Measurements of δ(13)C have been performed on a set of 32 authentic wines and their ethanol recovered after distillation. The data, obtained by isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry coupled to an elemental analyser (irm-EA/MS), show a high correlation between δ(13)C of the bulk wine and its ethanol, indicating that the distillation step is not necessary when the wine has not been submitted to any oenological treatment. Therefore, the ethanol/wine δ(13)C correlation can be used as an indicator of possible enrichment of the grape must or the wine with exogenous organic compounds. Wine ethanol δ(13)C is correlated to predawn leaf water potential (R(2) = 0.69), indicating that this parameter can be used as an indicator of vine water status. Position-specific (13)C analysis (PSIA) of ethanol extracted from wine, performed by isotope ratio monitoring by nuclear magnetic resonance (irm-(13)C NMR), confirmed the non-homogenous repartition of (13)C on ethanol skeleton. It is the δ(13)C of the methylene group of ethanol, compared to the methyl moiety, which is the most correlated to predawn leaf water potential, indicating that a phase of photorespiration of the vine during water stress period is most probably occurring due to stomata closure. However, position-specific (13)C analysis by irm-(13)C NMR does not offer a greater precision in the assessment of vine water status compared to direct measurement of δ(13)C on bulk wine by irm-EA/MS. PMID:26438472

  2. A novel method for coil efficiency estimation: Validation with a 13C birdcage

    Giovannetti, Giulio; Frijia, Francesca; Hartwig, Valentina;

    2012-01-01

    Coil efficiency, defined as the B1 magnetic field induced at a given point on the square root of supplied power P, is an important parameter that characterizes both the transmit and receive performance of the radiofrequency (RF) coil. Maximizing coil efficiency will maximize also the signal......-to-noise ratio. In this work, we propose a novel method for RF coil efficiency estimation based on the use of a perturbing loop. The proposed method consists of loading the coil with a known resistor by inductive coupling and measuring the quality factor with and without the load. We tested the method by...... measuring the efficiency of a 13C birdcage coil tuned at 32.13 MHz and verified its accuracy by comparing the results with the nuclear magnetic resonance nutation experiment. The method allows coil performance characterization in a short time and with great accuracy, and it can be used both on the bench and...

  3. Robust hyperpolarized (13)C metabolic imaging with selective non-excitation of pyruvate (SNEP).

    Chen, Way Cherng; Teo, Xing Qi; Lee, Man Ying; Radda, George K; Lee, Philip

    2015-08-01

    In vivo metabolic imaging using hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate provides localized biochemical information and is particularly useful in detecting early disease changes, as well as monitoring disease progression and treatment response. However, a major limitation of hyperpolarized magnetization is its unrecoverable decay, due not only to T1 relaxation but also to radio-frequency (RF) excitation. RF excitation schemes used in metabolic imaging must therefore be able to utilize available hyperpolarized magnetization efficiently and robustly for the optimal detection of substrate and metabolite activities. In this work, a novel RF excitation scheme called selective non-excitation of pyruvate (SNEP) is presented. This excitation scheme involves the use of a spectral selective RF pulse to specifically exclude the excitation of [1-(13)C]pyruvate, while uniformly exciting the key metabolites of interest (namely [1-(13)C]lactate and [1-(13)C]alanine) and [1-(13)C]pyruvate-hydrate. By eliminating the loss of hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate magnetization due to RF excitation, the signal from downstream metabolite pools is increased together with enhanced dynamic range. Simulation results, together with phantom measurements and in vivo experiments, demonstrated the improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the extension of the lifetime of the [1-(13)C]lactate and [1-(13)C]alanine pools when compared with conventional non-spectral selective (NS) excitation. SNEP has also been shown to perform comparably well with multi-band (MB) excitation, yet SNEP possesses distinct advantages, including ease of implementation, less stringent demands on gradient performance, increased robustness to frequency drifts and B0 inhomogeneity as well as easier quantification involving the use of [1-(13)C]pyruvate-hydrate as a proxy for the actual [1-(13)C] pyruvate signal. SNEP is therefore a promising alternative for robust hyperpolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate metabolic imaging with high

  4. Phosphorus-31 and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of glucose and xylose metabolism in Candida tropicalis cell suspensions.

    Lohmeier-Vogel, E M; Hahn-Hägerdal, B.; Vogel, H J

    1995-01-01

    The metabolism of glucose and xylose was studied as a function of oxygenation in suspensions of Candida tropicalis by 31P and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Both the rate of carbohydrate metabolism and the cytoplasmic pH were independent of the rate of oxygenation in cells metabolizing glucose. However, these two parameters were markedly dependent on the rate of oxygenation in C. tropicalis cells metabolizing xylose. For example, the cytoplasmic pH in fully oxygenated xylose-met...

  5. Generation of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    Two generation techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance images, the retro-projection and the direct transformation method are studied these techniques are based on the acquisition of NMR signals which phases and frequency components are codified in space by application of magnetic field gradients. The construction of magnet coils is discussed, in particular a suitable magnet geometry with polar pieces and air gap. The obtention of image contrast by T1 and T2 relaxation times reconstructed from generated signals using sequences such as spin-echo, inversion-recovery and stimulated echo, is discussed. The mathematical formalism of matrix solution for Bloch equations is also presented. (M.C.K.)

  6. A preliminary investigation of 13C background in 13C-urea breath test

    During the 13C-urea breath test which is used for diagnosis of the helicobacter pylori infection (HP), the 13C background values are measured in 495 normal donors in Beijing, Shandong, Jiangsu and Guizhou. The fluctuation is less than 0.2% for these areas and is about 0.1% within the same area. Through replacing of the individual 13C background values by the averaged values from local areas, the coincident rate for diagnosis of HP is higher than 98%

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR): principles and applications

    The basis for the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the ability of certain nuclei possessing both intrinsic angular momentum or ''spin'' I and magnetic moment to absorb electromagnetic energy in the radio frequency range. In principle, there are approximately 200 nuclei which may be investigated using the NMR technique. The NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum consists of intensity peaks along an axis calibrated in terms of the steady magnetic field or the frequency of the radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Analysis of the number, spacing, position and intensity of the lines in an NMR spectrum provides a variety of qualitative and quantitative analytical applications. The most obvious applications consist of the measurements of nuclear properties, such as spin number and nuclear magnetic moment. In liquids, the fine structure of resonance spectra provides a tool for chemical identification and molecular structure analysis. Other applications include the measurements of self-diffusion coefficients, magnetic fields and field homogeneity, inter-nuclear distances, and, in some cases, the water content of biological materials. (author)

  8. Theory of nuclear magnetic moments - LT-35

    The purpose of these notes is to give an account of some attempts at interpreting the observed values of nuclear magnetic moments. There is no attempt at a complete summary of the field as that would take much more space than is used here. In many cases the arguments are only outlined and references are given for those interested in further details. A discussion of the theory of nuclear magnetic moments necessitates many excursions into the details of the nuclear models because the magnetic moments have a direct bearing on the validity of these models. However the main emphasis here is on those features which tend to explain the magnetic moments and other evidence is not discussed unless it has a direct bearing on the problem. In the first part of the discussion the Shell Model of the nucleus is used, as this model seems to correlate a large body of data relating to the heavier nuclei. Included here are the modifications proposed to explain the fact that the experimental magnetic moments do not fit quantitatively with the exact predictions of the Shell Model. The next sections deal with some of the more drastic modifications introduced to explain the large nuclear quadrupole moments and the effect of these modifications on the magnetic moments. Finally we turn to more detailed investigations of the light nuclei, in particular the - Conjugate nuclei. (author)

  9. In vivo 13C MRS studies of carbohydrate metabolism

    The work described in this thesis was performed by the author, except where indicated, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre at the University of Nottingham during the period between October 1999 and October 2002. Although much is known about the major pathways of carbohydrate metabolism, there is still much to be learnt about the exact mechanisms of many of these pathways. Of particular interest is how these pathways are modified under different physiological conditions and in diseased states. 13C NMR spectroscopy provides a non-invasive means for studying carbohydrate metabolism in vivo, and the work presented within this thesis gives two such examples of this in human subjects. Natural abundance 13C NMR spectroscopy was used to measure glycogen levels in gastrocnemius muscle. The diurnal changes in response to mixed meals were measured in both type 2 diabetic subjects and age and weight matched controls. Metabolic studies were performed to complement the NMR measurements. The data obtained in these studies show the effect of the failure of muscle glucose storage upon post-prandial hyperglycaemia despite a supra-normal increase in plasma insulin in type 2 diabetes. 13C NMR spectroscopy was also used to study cerebral metabolism. Accumulation of 13C label into glutamate and glutamine following infusion of [113C] glucose allows the determination of the rates of the TCA cycle (FTCA) and neurotransmitter cycling (Fcyc). These rates were measured in the visual cortex under control and activated conditions. The increases seen in FTCA upon activation, together with the lack of label accumulation in lactate, suggest that cerebral glucose metabolism is oxidative, even during strong activation. No conclusion can be made as to whether or not a similar increase is seen in Fcyc due to the large associated errors in these values. (author)

  10. Alpha-resonant states in {sup 13}C

    Borello-Lewin, T.; Rodrigues, M.R.D.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L.B.; Duarte, J.L.M.; Rodrigues, C.L.; Souza, M.A.; Miyake, H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F. [Universita di Catania (Italy); Istituto Nazionali di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Catania (Italy). Lab. Nazionali del Sud; Ukita, G.M. [Universidade de Santo Amaro (UNISA), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculty of Psychology

    2010-07-01

    Full text: The research program in progress aims to achieve a better understanding of the alpha-clustering phenomenon in light (x{alpha} + {nu}) nuclei. The {sup 9}Be({sup 6}Li,d){sup 13}C reaction was used in the present work to investigate alpha resonant states in {sup 13}C up to 15 MeV of excitation. The data have been taken at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the Sao Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion detection technique. The plates covered 100 cm along the focal surface and spectra were measured at seven scattering angles, between 3 deg and 20 degrees in the laboratory frame. The resolution of 50 keV allowed for the separation of the resonant contributions to the known 7/2{sup -} at 10.753 MeV and (5/2{sup -}) at 10.818 MeV {sup 13}C states. Particularly interesting is the the narrow alpha resonance seen at E{sub x} = 12.3 MeV close the (3{alpha} + n) threshold, not previously measured, populated by an L = 2 transfer. Detected, near this threshold by alpha inelastic scattering, a large E0 isoscalar transition, the signature of a spatially developed 1/2{sup -} cluster-state, was reported by T. Kawabata. The L = 2 transfer agrees with the 1/2{sup -} attribution. The present work is underway. Taking the benefit of the use of the emulsion plates and applying the track selective reading methodology, at least other three narrow alpha resonances in {sup 13}C up to 15 MeV of excitation, not previously measured, were detected. (author)

  11. Pulsed nuclear-electronic magnetic resonance

    Morley, Gavin W; Mohammady, M Hamed; Aeppli, Gabriel; Kay, Christopher W M; Jeschke, Gunnar; Monteiro, Tania S

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed magnetic resonance is a wide-reaching technology allowing the quantum state of electronic and nuclear spins to be controlled on the timescale of nanoseconds and microseconds respectively. The time required to flip either dilute electronic or nuclear spins is orders of magnitude shorter than their decoherence times, leading to several schemes for quantum information processing with spin qubits. We investigate instead the novel regime where the eigenstates approximate 50:50 superpositions of the electronic and nuclear spin states forming "nuclear-electronic" qubits. Here we demonstrate quantum control of these states, using bismuth-doped silicon, in just 32 ns: orders of magnitude shorter than previous experiments where pure nuclear states were used. The coherence times of our states are over four orders of magnitude longer, being 1 ms or more at 8 K, and are limited by the naturally-occurring 29Si nuclear spin impurities. There is quantitative agreement between our experiments and no-free-parameter anal...

  12. Progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Emsley, J W; Sutcliffe, L H

    2013-01-01

    Progress in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Part 1 is a two-chapter text that reviews significant developments in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications.The first chapter discusses NMR studies of molecules physisorbed on homogeneous surfaces. This chapter also describes the phase changes in the adsorbed layer detected by following the variation in the NMR parameters. The second chapter examines the process to obtain a plotted, data reduced Fourier transform NMR spectrum. This chapter highlights the pitfalls that can cause a decrease in information content in a NMR spectrum. The

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance of thermally oriented nuclei

    The more recent developments in the spectroscopy of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance on Oriented Nuclei (NMRON) are reviewed; both theoretical and experimental advances are summarised with applications to On-Line and Off-Line determination of magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine parameters. Some emphasis is provided on solid state considerations with indications of where likely enhancements in technique will lead in conventional hyperfine studies. (orig.)

  14. A comparative study of the 13C(p,p')13C and 13C(p,n)13N reactions at Ep = 35 MeV

    Differential cross sections were measured at Ep = 35 MeV for the 13C(p,n) and 13C(p,p') reactions leading to the four low-lying states in the mirror nuclei 13N and 13C. In addition, the analyzing powers were measured for the 13C(p,p') reaction. The data are generally well accounted for by DWBA calculations except for the 13C(p,p')13C(3.09 MeV, 1/2+) reaction, for which the calculations can not even reproduce the qualitative features of the data. A comparison of the (p,n) and the (p,p') results suggests that the isoscalar part of the 13C(g.s., 1/2-) → 13C(3.09 MeV, 1/2+) transition is not correctly described by currently available shell-model wave functions. (author)

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance in Kondo lattice systems

    Curro, Nicholas J.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance has emerged as a vital tool to explore the fundamental physics of Kondo lattice systems. Because nuclear spins experience two different hyperfine couplings to the itinerant conduction electrons and to the local f moments, the Knight shift can probe multiple types of spin correlations that are not accessible via other techniques. The Knight shift provides direct information about the onset of heavy electron coherence and the emergence of the heavy electron fluid.

  16. Alpha-cluster structure in 13C

    We study the structure of low-lying states of 13C with a microscopic cluster model. In addition to the 3α-n model space, the breaking effect of one of the α-clusters due to the spin-orbit interaction is also taken into account. The iso-scalar E0 transition probabilities from the ground 1/2- state to the excited 1/2- states have been shown to be large associated with the cluster structure of these states. However the values are small due to the effect of one additional valence neutron compared to the case of the second 0+ state in 12C. (author)

  17. Structural Characterization of Amadori Rearrangement Product of Glucosylated Nα-Acetyl-Lysine by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Chuanjiang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maillard reaction is a nonenzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and free amino acid moieties, which is known as one of the most important modifications in food science. It is essential to characterize the structure of Amadori rearrangement products (ARPs formed in the early stage of Maillard reaction. In the present study, the Nα-acetyl-lysine-glucose model had been successfully set up to produce ARP, Nα-acetyl-lysine-glucose. After HPLC purification, ARP had been identified by ESI-MS with intense [M+H]+ ion at 351 m/z and the purity of ARP was confirmed to be over 90% by the relative intensity of [M+H]+ ion. Further structural characterization of the ARP was accomplished by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, including 1D 1H NMR and 13C NMR, the distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT-135 and 2D 1H-1H and 13C-1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY and 2D nuclear overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY. The complexity of 1D 1H NMR and 13C NMR was observed due to the presence of isomers in glucose moiety of ARP. However, DEPT-135 and 2D NMR techniques provided more structural information to assign the 1H and 13C resonances of ARP. 2D NOESY had successfully confirmed the glycosylated site between 10-N in Nα-acetyl-lysine and 7′-C in glucose.

  18. magnetic order studied by nuclear methods

    Reichl, C

    2001-01-01

    investigated within the frame of this work. The studies on the highly concentrated deuterides revealed a gradual loss in local field due to a distribution of 'local Curie temperatures' depending on the number of Fe neighbours and their distances from the Moessbauer nucleus. On rising the temperature, during a magnetic transition, an increasing number of Fe sites with different local environment loose their hyperfine fields, whereas bulk measurements showed a relatively sharp, however, incomplete transition. By using a combination of neutron diffraction- and muon spin relaxation studies the complex magnetic phase diagram of the system Ce(Rh,Ru) sub 3 B sub 2 , where weak magnetic moments exist, could be studied. There, transitions from para- to ferromagnetism, and more complicated magnetic structures could be observed. Due to the existence of several isotopes of B and Ru, each carrying different nuclear spins and magnetic moment, particularly complicated second moment simulations for interpreting the muon data...

  19. High-throughput hyperpolarized 13C metabolic investigations using a multi-channel acquisition system

    Lee, Jaehyuk; Ramirez, Marc S.; Walker, Christopher M.; Chen, Yunyun; Yi, Stacey; Sandulache, Vlad C.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Bankson, James A.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of hyperpolarized (HP) compounds such as [1-13C]-pyruvate have shown tremendous potential for offering new insight into disease and response to therapy. New applications of this technology in clinical research and care will require extensive validation in cells and animal models, a process that may be limited by the high cost and modest throughput associated with dynamic nuclear polarization. Relatively wide spectral separation between [1-13C]-pyruvate and its chemical endpoints in vivo are conducive to simultaneous multi-sample measurements, even in the presence of a suboptimal global shim. Multi-channel acquisitions could conserve costs and accelerate experiments by allowing acquisition from multiple independent samples following a single dissolution. Unfortunately, many existing preclinical MRI systems are equipped with only a single channel for broadband acquisitions. In this work, we examine the feasibility of this concept using a broadband multi-channel digital receiver extension and detector arrays that allow concurrent measurement of dynamic spectroscopic data from ex vivo enzyme phantoms, in vitro anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells, and in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. Throughput and the cost of consumables were improved by up to a factor of four. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential for efficient multi-sample studies employing hyperpolarized agents.

  20. Multisite Kinetic Modeling of 13C Metabolic MR Using [1-13C]Pyruvate

    Hyperpolarized 13C imaging allows real-time in vivo measurements of metabolite levels. Quantification of metabolite conversion between [1-13C]pyruvate and downstream metabolites [1-13C]alanine, [1-13C]lactate, and [13C]bicarbonate can be achieved through kinetic modeling. Since pyruvate interacts dynamically and simultaneously with its downstream metabolites, the purpose of this work is the determination of parameter values through a multisite, dynamic model involving possible biochemical pathways present in MR spectroscopy. Kinetic modeling parameters were determined by fitting the multisite model to time-domain dynamic metabolite data. The results for different pyruvate doses were compared with those of different two-site models to evaluate the hypothesis that for identical data the uncertainty of a model and the signal-to-noise ratio determine the sensitivity in detecting small physiological differences in the target metabolism. In comparison to the two-site exchange models, the multisite model yielded metabolic conversion rates with smaller bias and smaller standard deviation, as demonstrated in simulations with different signal-to-noise ratio. Pyruvate dose effects observed previously were confirmed and quantified through metabolic conversion rate values. Parameter interdependency allowed an accurate quantification and can therefore be useful for monitoring metabolic activity in different tissues

  1. Multisite Kinetic Modeling of 13C Metabolic MR Using [1-13C]Pyruvate

    Pedro A. Gómez Damián

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarized 13C imaging allows real-time in vivo measurements of metabolite levels. Quantification of metabolite conversion between [1-13C]pyruvate and downstream metabolites [1-13C]alanine, [1-13C]lactate, and [13C]bicarbonate can be achieved through kinetic modeling. Since pyruvate interacts dynamically and simultaneously with its downstream metabolites, the purpose of this work is the determination of parameter values through a multisite, dynamic model involving possible biochemical pathways present in MR spectroscopy. Kinetic modeling parameters were determined by fitting the multisite model to time-domain dynamic metabolite data. The results for different pyruvate doses were compared with those of different two-site models to evaluate the hypothesis that for identical data the uncertainty of a model and the signal-to-noise ratio determine the sensitivity in detecting small physiological differences in the target metabolism. In comparison to the two-site exchange models, the multisite model yielded metabolic conversion rates with smaller bias and smaller standard deviation, as demonstrated in simulations with different signal-to-noise ratio. Pyruvate dose effects observed previously were confirmed and quantified through metabolic conversion rate values. Parameter interdependency allowed an accurate quantification and can therefore be useful for monitoring metabolic activity in different tissues.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the effect of the addition of clay on polypropylene

    Polypropylene (PP) samples and polypropylene (PP)/clay (M) composite prepared by melting mixing have been characterized by solution and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The monomer sequences distribution and the influence of time and temperature of mechanical mix on the modifications in the PP structure were investigated by 13C solution NMR. The solid state NMR investigation showed that the 13C routine spectra such as MAS and CPMAS allowed obtaining information on the molecular domains of chains, and also permits to evaluate the domains mobility. 29Si and 27Al solid state NMR were used to characterize the clay and the PP/M composite samples. The results showed that the heating and friction in the range of temperature and time used in the sample preparation did not affect the distribution of configurational sequence in the PP chains. The effect of clay in the PP/M composite structure could be detected, using both 13C solution and in 29Si solid state NMR spectra. (author)

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the conformation and dynamics of beta-casein at the oil/water interface in emulsions.

    ter Beek, L C; Ketelaars, M; McCain, D C; Smulders, P E; Walstra, P.; Hemminga, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    A (13)C and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study has been carried out on beta-casein adsorbed at the interface of a tetradecane/water emulsion. (13)C NMR spectra show signals from the carbonyl, carboxyl, aromatic, and C alpha carbons in beta-casein, well resolved from solvent resonances. Only a small fraction of all carbon atoms in beta-casein contribute to detectable signals; intensity measurements show that the observable spectrum is derived from about 30 to 40 amino acid residues.(...

  4. Hypermetabolic state in the 7-month-old triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and the effect of lipoic acid: a 13C-NMR study.

    Sancheti, Harsh; Patil, Ishan; Kanamori, Keiko; Díaz Brinton, Roberta; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Ai-Ling; Cadenas, Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by age-dependent biochemical, metabolic, and physiologic changes. These age-dependent changes ultimately converge to impair cognitive functions. This study was carried out to examine the metabolic changes by probing glucose and tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism in a 7-month-old triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTg-AD). The effect of lipoic acid, an insulin-mimetic agent, was also investigated to examine its ability in modulating age-dependent metabolic changes. Seven-month-old 3xTg-AD mice were given intravenous infusion of [1-(13)C]glucose followed by an ex vivo (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance to determine the concentrations of (13)C-labeled isotopomers of glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, gamma aminobutyric acid, and N-acetylaspartate. An intravenous infusion of [1-(13)C]glucose+[1,2-(13)C]acetate was given for different periods of time to distinguish neuronal and astrocytic metabolism. Enrichments of glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate were calculated after quantifying the total ((12)C+(13)C) concentrations by high-performance liquid chromatography. A hypermetabolic state was clearly evident in 7-month-old 3xTg-AD mice in contrast to the hypometabolic state reported earlier in 13-month-old mice. Hypermetabolism was evidenced by prominent increase of (13)C labeling and enrichment in the 3xTg-AD mice. Lipoic acid feeding to the hypermetabolic 3xTg-AD mice brought the metabolic parameters to the levels of nonTg mice. PMID:25099753

  5. Phosphonate Based High Nuclearity Magnetic Cages.

    Sheikh, Javeed Ahmad; Jena, Himanshu Sekhar; Clearfield, Abraham; Konar, Sanjit

    2016-06-21

    Transition metal based high nuclearity molecular magnetic cages are a very important class of compounds owing to their potential applications in fabricating new generation molecular magnets such as single molecular magnets, magnetic refrigerants, etc. Most of the reported polynuclear cages contain carboxylates or alkoxides as ligands. However, the binding ability of phosphonates with transition metal ions is stronger than the carboxylates or alkoxides. The presence of three oxygen donor sites enables phosphonates to bridge up to nine metal centers simultaneously. But very few phosphonate based transition metal cages were reported in the literature until recently, mainly because of synthetic difficulties, propensity to result in layered compounds, and also their poor crystalline properties. Accordingly, various synthetic strategies have been followed by several groups in order to overcome such synthetic difficulties. These strategies mainly include use of small preformed metal precursors, proper choice of coligands along with the phosphonate ligands, and use of sterically hindered bulky phosphonate ligands. Currently, the phosphonate system offers a library of high nuclearity transition metal and mixed metal (3d-4f) cages with aesthetically pleasing structures and interesting magnetic properties. This Account is in the form of a research landscape on our efforts to synthesize and characterize new types of phosphonate based high nuclearity paramagnetic transition metal cages. We quite often experienced synthetic difficulties with such versatile systems in assembling high nuclearity metal cages. Few methods have been emphasized for the self-assembly of phosphonate systems with suitable transition metal ions in achieving high nuclearity. We highlighted our journey from 2005 until today for phosphonate based high nuclearity transition metal cages with V(IV/V), Mn(II/III), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) metal ions and their magnetic properties. We observed that

  6. Theoretical Study of H/D Isotope Effects on Nuclear Magnetic Shieldings Using an ab initio Multi-Component Molecular Orbital Method

    Masanori Tachikawa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We have theoretically analyzed the nuclear quantum effect on the nuclear magnetic shieldings for the intramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems of σ-hydroxy acyl aromatic species using the gauge-including atomic orbital technique combined with our multi-component density functional theory. The effect of H/D quantum nature for geometry and nuclear magnetic shielding changes are analyzed. Our study clearly demonstrated that the geometrical changes of hydrogen-bonds induced by H/D isotope effect (called geometrical isotope effect: GIE is the dominant factor of deuterium isotope effect on 13C chemical shift.

  7. Measuring Long-Lived ^{13}C-Singlet State Lifetimes at Natural Abundance

    Claytor, Kevin E; Feng, Yesu; Warren, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Long-lived singlet states hold the potential to drastically extend the lifetime of hyperpolarization in molecular tracers for in-vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Such long lived hyperpolarization can be used for elucidation of fundamental metabolic pathways, early diagnosis, and optimization of clinical tests for new medication. All previous measurements of 13C singlet state lifetimes rely on costly and time consuming syntheses of 13C labeled compounds. Here we show that it is possible to determine 13C singlet state lifetimes by detecting the naturally abundant doubly-labeled species. This approach allows for rapid and low cost screening of potential molecular biomarkers bearing long-lived singlet states.

  8. Identification of Flavonoid Glycosides in Rosa chinensis Flowers by Liquid Chromatography-tandem Mass Spectrometry in Combination with 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Qing, Lin-Sen; Xue, Ying; Zhang, Jian-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Feng; Liang, Jian; Jiang, Yan; Liu, Yi-Ming; Liao, Xun

    2012-01-01

    Flowers of Rosa chinensis are widely used in traditional Chinese medicine as well as in food industry. Flavonoid glycosides are believed to be the major components in R. chinensis that are responsible for its antioxidant activities. In this work, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC- MS/MS) method was developed for analysis of flavonoid glycosides presented in ethyl acetate extract of dried R. chinensis flowers. Twelve flavonoid glycosides were separated and detected. By com...

  9. Carbon Flux Analysis by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance To Determine the Effect of CO2 on Anaerobic Succinate Production by Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Radoš, Dušica; David L Turner; Fonseca, Luís L.; Carvalho, Ana Lúcia; Blombach, Bastian; Eikmanns, Bernhard J.; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum produces a mixture of lactic, succinic, and acetic acids from glucose under oxygen deprivation. We investigated the effect of CO2 on the production of organic acids in a two-stage process: cells were grown aerobically in glucose, and subsequently, organic acid production by nongrowing cells was studied under anaerobic conditions. The presence of CO2 caused up to a 3-fold increase in the succinate yield (1 mol per mol of glucose) and about 2-fold increase i...

  10. 13C NMR spectroscopy of methane adsorbed in SAPO-11 molecular sieve

    Koskela, Tuomas; Ylihautala, Mika; Vaara, Juha; Jokisaari, Jukka

    1996-10-01

    Static 13C and 13C-{ 1H} NMR spectra of carbon-13 enriched methane ( 13CH 4) adsorbed into SAPO-11 molecular sieve were recorded at variable temperatures. Moreover, the corresponding MAS NMR spectra were measured. These experiments reveal a temperature-dependent, anisotropic and asymmetric 13C nuclear shielding tensor. Ab initio model calculations of methane in the field of a positive point charge suggest that the deformation of the shielding tensor may be related to the interaction between the methane molecule and the charge-compensating protons. A comparison with existing Xe data is made.

  11. Stereoselective synthesis of L-[4-13C]carnitine

    The stereoselective synthesis of L-[4-13C]carnitine was achieved in 5 steps. The label was introduced from K13CN into an easily separated diastereomeric pair of 3-deoxy-D-[1-13C]aldohexoses. Reductive amination of the labeled aldohexose yielded the corresponding D-1-(dimethylamino)[1-13C]alditol which was oxidized in two steps and alkylated with iodomethane to yield L-[4-13C]carnitine. The stereochemical integrity at C-2 of the 3-deoxy-D-[1-13C]glucose precursor was maintained throughout the synthesis of L-[4-13C]carnitine. (author)

  12. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    Laws, David D.

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone ({phi}/{psi}) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined {sup 13}C{sub a}, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly {beta}-sheet.

  13. Tetrapropylammonium Occlusion in Nanoaggregates of Precursor of Silicalite-1 Zeolite Studied by 1H and 13C NMR

    Mohamed Haouas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behavior of tetrapropylammonium (TPA cations in the clear precursor sols for silicalite synthesis has been investigated by 1H diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY, T1, T2, and T1ρ 1H relaxation, as well as 1H→13C cross polarization (CP nuclear magnetic resonance. The DOSY NMR experiments showed the presence of strong solute–solvent interactions in concentrated sols, which are decreasing upon dilution. Similarities in dependence of diffusion coefficients with fractional power of the viscosity constant observed for nanoparticles, TPA cations and water led to the conclusion that they aggregate as anisotropic silicate-TPA particles. Relaxation studies as well as 1H→13C CP experiments provide information on dynamic properties of ethanol, water and TPA cations, which are function of silicate aggregates. The general tendency showed that the presence of silicate as oligomers and particles decreases the relaxation times, in particular T2 and T1ρH, as a consequence of involvement of these latter in ion-pairing interactions with water-solvated TPA molecules slowing down their mobility. Furthermore, from the 1H→13C CP dynamics curve profiles a change in the CP transfer regime was observed from fast (TCH << T1ρH for solutions without silicates to moderate (TCH~T1ρH when silicates are interacting with the TPA cations that may reflect the occlusion of TPA into flexible silicate hydrate aggregates.

  14. 31P and 13C-NMR studies of the phosphorus and carbon metabolites in the halotolerant alga, Dunaliella salina

    The intracellular phosphorus and carbon metabolites in the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina adapted to different salinities were monitored in living cells by 31P- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The 13C-NMR studies showed that the composition of the visible intracellular carbon metabolites other than glycerol is not significantly affected by the salinity of the growth medium. The T1 relaxation rates of the 13C-glycerol signals in intact cells were enhanced with increasing salinity of the growth medium, in parallel to the expected increase in the intracellular viscosity due to the increase in intracellular glycerol. The 31P-NMR studies showed that cells adapted to the various salinities contained inorganic phosphate, phosphomonoesters, high energy phosphate compounds, and long chain polyphosphates. In addition, cells grown in media containing up to 1 molar NaCl contained tripolyphosphates. The tripolyphosphate content was also controlled by the availability of inorganic phosphate during cell growth. Phosphate-depleted D. salina contained no detectable tripolyphosphate signal. Excess phosphate, however, did not result in the appearance of tripolyphosphate in 31P-NMR spectra of cells adapted to high (>1.5 molar NaCl) salinities

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance as a petrophysical measurement

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of hydrogen nuclei in fluids which saturate porous rocks is important in oil exploration and production, since NMR logs can provide good estimates of permeability and fluid flow. This paper reviews developments which connect the NMR properties of rocks with petrophysical properties, and particularly those relating to fluid flow. The recent advances in the use of NMR in boreholes which have spurred these developments are also discussed. The relevance of other NMR measurements on geological samples, including magnetic resonance imaging, is briefly referred to. (author)

  16. Nuclear magnetic ordering ''avant toute chose''

    We give an overview of the research initiated at Saclay to study cooperative phenomena between nuclear spins in the presence of a high magnetic field. These systems exhibit a wealth of different orderings including antiferromagnetism, ferromagnetism with domains and transverse structures rotating about the static magnetic field. These states have been characterized by NMR of the ordered nuclei, NMR of dilute probe nuclei, double resonance methods and neutron diffraction. Some related phenomena involving the coupling of spins with the lattice are reported. Finally we outline future experiments which will benefit of the insight brought by the study of dipolar ordering. (authors). 30 refs., 11 figs

  17. Thin layer and nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometers

    In the first part of this text, magnetometers with sensitive elements in the form of thin cylindrical ferromagnetic layers are described. These layers are anisotropic, uniaxial, C orientated and single domains. In the second part of the text, the principles of the nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer realized at the LETI are presented. This instrument is accurate, of high efficiency, and isotropic. Very small variations in magnetic field intensity (10-7 oersteds) can be detected with a 1Hz pass band at zero frequency

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance and relaxation studies of the structure and segmental motions of 4-vinyl-pyridinic polymers in solution

    The poly 4-vinylpyridine, its quaternized products from HBr and n-alkyl-bromides, and its N-oxide form have been investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance of proton at 100 and 250 MHz and carbon-13 at 25.15 MHz, The 1H and 13C relaxation data of poly-vinylpyridine and its ionized form have been correlated with conformational calculations. They have been interpreted in terms of an isotropic motion of the macromolecular segments introducing a correlation times distribution and of an oscillation motion of the pyridyl groups. The same treatment have been used for the 13C relaxation data of the poly 4- vinyl-pyridines quaternized at various rates by n-alkyl-bromides. The 13C relaxation times in the side-chains have been interpreted first by semi-empirical equations assuming an exponential gradient of the diffusion coefficients along them, and also by a Monte Carlo simulation of the motions. The results have shown that the quaternization induces a strong rigidity of the macromolecular backbone and that the dominant effect is the electrostatic interactions. On the other hand it seems that the motion of pyridyl rings is not affected. Moreover we have found a range of oscillation amplitudes in agreement with conformational energy calculations and the results obtained from a conformational study of the poly 4-vinylpyridine N-oxide by 1H and 13C NMR contact shifts induced by Ni II paramagnetic ions. (author)

  19. Synthesis and structural analysis of 13C-fatty acids

    2000-01-01

    The 13C-labeled fatty acids octanoic-1-13C acid and palmitic-l-13C acid were synthetically prepared from Ba 13CO3. The yield of the former was more than 90% and that of the latter was above 85%. MS, IR, 1H-NMR and 13NMR were performed to analyze the structures of the two 13C-fatty acids, compared with their unlabeled fatty acids.

  20. Separation of extra- and intracellular metabolites using hyperpolarized 13C diffusion weighted MR

    Koelsch, Bertram L.; Sriram, Renuka; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Leon Swisher, Christine; Van Criekinge, Mark; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Wang, Zhen J.; Larson, Peder E. Z.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2016-09-01

    This work demonstrates the separation of extra- and intracellular components of glycolytic metabolites with diffusion weighted hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using b-values of up to 15,000 s mm-2, a multi-exponential signal response was measured for hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate and lactate. By fitting the fast and slow asymptotes of these curves, their extra- and intracellular weighted diffusion coefficients were determined in cells perfused in a MR compatible bioreactor. In addition to measuring intracellular weighted diffusion, extra- and intracellular weighted hyperpolarized 13C metabolites pools are assessed in real-time, including their modulation with inhibition of monocarboxylate transporters. These studies demonstrate the ability to simultaneously assess membrane transport in addition to enzymatic activity with the use of diffusion weighted hyperpolarized 13C MR. This technique could be an indispensible tool to evaluate the impact of microenvironment on the presence, aggressiveness and metastatic potential of a variety of cancers.

  1. Sup(13)C NMR studies of glucose disposal in normal and non-insulin-dependent diabetic humans

    To examine the extent to which the defect in insulin action in subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) can be accounted for by impairment of muscle glycogen synthesis, we performed combined hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp studies with [13C]glucose in five subjects with NIDDM and in six age- and weight-matched healthy subjects. The rate of incorporation of intravenously infused [1-13C]glucose into muscle glycogen was measured directly in the gastrocnemius muscle by means of a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer with a 15.5 min time resolution and a 13C surface coil. The steady-state plasma concentrations of insulin and glucose were similar in both study groups. The mean (±SE) rate of glycogen synthesis, as determined by 13C NMR, was 78±28 and 183±39 μmol-glucosyl units (kg muscle tissue (wet mass))-1 min-1 in the diabetic and normal subjects, respectively. The mean glucose uptake was markedly reduced in the diabetic as compared with the normal subjects. The mean rate of non-oxidative glucose metabolism was 22±4 μmol kg-1 min-1 in the diabetic subjects and 42±4 μmol kg-1 min-1 in the normal subjects. When these rates are extrapolated to apply to the whole body, the synthesis of muscle glycogen would account for most of the total-body glucose uptake and all of the non-oxidative glucose metabolism in both normal and diabetic subjects. We conclude that muscle glycogen synthesis is the principal pathway of glucose disposal in both normal and diabetic subjects and that defects in muscle glycogen synthesis have a dominant role in the insulin resistance that occurs in persons with NIDDM. (author)

  2. Glutamatergic and GABAergic energy metabolism measured in the rat brain by (13) C NMR spectroscopy at 14.1 T.

    Duarte, João M N; Gruetter, Rolf

    2013-09-01

    Energy metabolism supports both inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission processes. This study investigated the specific contribution of astrocytic metabolism to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis and inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission that remained to be ilucidated in vivo. Therefore, we measured (13)C incorporation into brain metabolites by dynamic (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 14.1 T in rats under α-chloralose anaesthesia during infusion of [1,6-(13)C]glucose. The enhanced sensitivity at 14.1 T allowed to quantify incorporation of (13) C into the three aliphatic carbons of GABA non-invasively. Metabolic fluxes were determined with a mathematical model of brain metabolism comprising glial, glutamatergic and GABAergic compartments. GABA synthesis rate was 0.11 ± 0.01 μmol/g/min. GABA-glutamine cycle was 0.053 ± 0.003 μmol/g/min and accounted for 22 ± 1% of total neurotransmitter cycling between neurons and glia. Cerebral glucose oxidation was 0.47 ± 0.02 μmol/g/min, of which 35 ± 1% and 7 ± 1% was diverted to the glutamatergic and GABAergic tricarboxylic acid cycles, respectively. The remaining fraction of glucose oxidation was in glia, where 12 ± 1% of the TCA cycle flux was dedicated to oxidation of GABA. 16 ± 2% of glutamine synthesis was provided to GABAergic neurons. We conclude that substantial metabolic activity occurs in GABAergic neurons and that glial metabolism supports both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in the living rat brain. PMID:23745684

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of biological systems: Applications to liver preservation and metabolism in cultured pituitary tumor cells

    This study centers on applications of both 31P and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to two different biological systems. The first application utilizes 31P NMR to study mobile phospholipids in the MMQ cell line, a pituitary tumor cell line. These measurements characterize membrane phospholipids thought to be part of a RNA-proteolipid complex unique to cellular transformation. The second application utilizes both 31P and 13C spectroscopy to study liver preservation and transplantation an a rat model. In this work, several questions were addressed: (1) to what extent do successful preservation solutions slow ATP breakdown? (2) can clinically successful preservation conditions ameliorate total nucleotide breakdown? (3) to what extent is energy reconstitution following cold storage correlated with transport success? and (4) can any spectroscopic parameter be used as a diagnostic indicator of tissue viability?

  4. Study of the reinforcement of rubber styrene-butadiene with mesoporous silices by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    The knowledge about the interaction rubber/filler for the rubber reinforced with carbon black of silica is important to understand the physical properties, which determine the reinforcement. This paper presents a comparative study of the interactions between styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) and silica for a silica Ultrasil type and mesoporous silica MCM-41 type prepared by different procedures, based on solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: 1H MAS NMR; 13C MAS NMR, 13C CP/MAS, 29Si MAS and 29Si CP/MAS NMR. Mesoporous silica synthesized under certain specific conditions showed better interaction with the rubber than the ultrasil VN3 silica, commonly used as a reinforcement load. Mechanical tests for the SBR vulcanised with this silica indicate an important increase for values of elongation and tearing resistance, but an increase in the vulcanization time in it is compared with the SBR vulcanise with Ultrasil

  5. 16-Channel surface coil for 13C-hyperpolarized spectroscopic imaging of cardiac metabolism in pig heart

    Frijia, Francesca; Santarelli, Maria Filomena; Koellisch, Ulrich;

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate and its metabolites in large animal models is a powerful tool for assessing cardiac metabolism in patho-physiological conditions. In 13C studies, a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is crucial to overcome the intrinsic data quality...

  6. Clinical NOE 13C MRS for neuropsychiatric disorders of the frontal lobe

    Sailasuta, Napapon; Robertson, Larry W.; Harris, Kent C.; Gropman, Andrea L.; Allen, Peter S.; Ross, Brian D.

    2008-12-01

    In this communication, a scheme is described whereby in vivo 13C MRS can safely be performed in the frontal lobe, a human brain region hitherto precluded on grounds of SAR, but important in being the seat of impaired cognitive function in many neuropsychiatric and developmental disorders. By combining two well known features of 13C NMR—the use of low power NOE and the focus on 13C carbon atoms which are only minimally coupled to protons, we are able to overcome the obstacle of SAR and develop means of monitoring the 13C fluxes of critically important metabolic pathways in frontal brain structures of normal volunteers and patients. Using a combination of low-power WALTZ decoupling, variants of random noise for nuclear overhauser effect enhancement it was possible to reduce power deposition to 20% of the advised maximum specific absorption rate (SAR). In model solutions 13C signal enhancement achieved with this scheme were comparable to that obtained with WALTZ-4. In human brain, the low power procedure effectively determined glutamine, glutamate and bicarbonate in the posterior parietal brain after [1- 13C] glucose infusion. The same 13C enriched metabolites were defined in frontal brain of human volunteers after administration of [1- 13C] acetate, a recognized probe of glial metabolism. Time courses of incorporation of 13C into cerebral glutamate, glutamine and bicarbonate were constructed. The results suggest efficacy for measurement of in vivo cerebral metabolic rates of the glutamate-glutamine and tricarboxylic acid cycles in 20 min MR scans in previously inaccessible brain regions in humans at 1.5T. We predict these will be clinically useful biomarkers in many human neuropsychiatric and genetic conditions.

  7. 13C NMR studies of the molecular flexibility of antidepressants

    The solution dynamics of a series of clinically potent antidepressants have been investigated by measuring 13C NMR relaxation parameters. Correlation times and internal motional rates were calculated from spin-lattice relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser effects for the protonated carbons in mianserin, imipramine-like antidepressants, and amitriptyline-like antidepressants. These data were interpreted in terms of overall molecular tumbling, internal rotations, and inherent flexibility of these structures. Of particular interest was the conformational variability of the tricyclic nucleus of the tricyclic antidepressants, where the data indicated a fivefold difference in mobility of the dimethylene bridge of imipramine-like antidepressants relative to amitriptyline-like compounds. The implications of such a difference in internal motions is discussed in relation to previous NMR studies and to the reported differences in pharmacological activity of these antidepressants

  8. Experimental test of nuclear magnetization distribution and nuclear structure models

    Models exist that ascribe the nuclear magnetic fields to the presence of a single nucleon whose spin is not neutralized by pairing it up with that of another nucleon; other models assume that the generation of the magnetic field is shared among some or all nucleons throughout the nucleus. All models predict the same magnetic field external to the nucleus since this is an anchor provided by experiments. The models differ, however, in their predictions of the magnetic field arrangement within the nucleus for which no data exist. The only way to distinguish which model gives the correct description of the nucleus would be to use a probe inserted into the nucleus. The goal of our project was to develop exactly such a probe and to use it to measure fundamental nuclear quantities that have eluded experimental scrutiny. The need for accurately knowing such quantities extends far beyond nuclear physics and has ramifications in parity violation experiments on atomic traps and the testing of the standard model in elementary particle physics. Unlike scattering experiments that employ streams of free particles, our technique to probe the internal magnetic field distribution of the nucleus rests on using a single bound electron. Quantum mechanics shows that an electron in the innermost orbital surrounding the nucleus constantly dives into the nucleus and thus samples the fields that exist inside. This sampling of the nucleus usually results in only minute shifts in the electron s average orbital, which would be difficult to detect. By studying two particular energy states of the electron, we can, however, dramatically enhance the effects of the distribution of the magnetic fields in the nucleus. In fact about 2% of the energy difference between the two states, dubbed the hyperfine splitting, is determined by the effects related to the distribution of magnetic fields in the nucleus, A precise measurement of this energy difference (better than 0.01%) would then allow us to place

  9. Investigating tumor perfusion and metabolism using multiple hyperpolarized 13C compounds: HP001, pyruvate and urea

    von Morze, Cornelius; Larson, Peder E.Z.; Hu, Simon;

    2012-01-01

    compound HP001 (T1=95 s ex vivo, 32 s in vivo at 3 T) using a pulse sequence with balanced steady-state free precession and ramped flip angle over time for efficient utilization of the hyperpolarized magnetization and three-dimensional echo-planar spectroscopic imaging of urea copolarized with [1-13C......The metabolically inactive hyperpolarized agents HP001 (bis-1,1-(hydroxymethyl)-[1-13C]cyclopropane-d8) and urea enable a new type of perfusion magnetic resonance imaging based on a direct signal source that is background-free. The addition of perfusion information to metabolic information obtained...

  10. Nuclear magnetic moments measured by nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented nuclei

    The configurations of nuclei near the shell closures N=40 and Z=40 were studied. The nuclear magnetic moments have been measured by nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented nuclei (NMR/ON). We have determined the ground state spin of 73Se and magnetic moments of isotopes 73Se(9/2+), 77Br3/2-) and 74Brm(4). The 9/2+ spin and parity assignment to the parent state of 73Se is perfectly compatible with the systematics of N + 39 and N = 41 isotones. The bromine moments around the shell closure N = 40, show a change in protonic configuration. In the second part of this work a precise hyperfine field value of zinc in iron has been determined. The relaxation constant of Zn in iron is established. The new hyperfine field value of zinc in iron allows a more precise reevaluation of the magnetic moments of 69Znm and 71Znm measured with NMR/ON

  11. Science and history explored by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance was chosen as the main tool for investigating different biological and chemical systems, as it is unique in providing the information details about the morphology and molecular structures and conformations by which the fundamental properties of these biological and chemical systems can be understood. Proton spin-diffusion experiments combined with 13C CPMAS spectroscopy were successfully applied to characterize the changes that occur during the thermal denaturation of keratin fibers from wool and hair. A model describing both the effect of thermal denaturation and the effect of different chemical treatments on keratin fibers is presented. Proton NMR spectroscopy was used for studying the proton exchange in Sulfonated Polyether Ether Ketone proton exchange membranes revealing that the water exchange processes in hydrated SPEEK-silica membranes are more efficient when low concentrations of polyethoxysiloxane (PEOS) are used for the membrane preparation. Proton 1D exchange spectroscopy combined with transverse relaxation measurements offered good insight in the state of water in hydrated SPEEK/SiO2 membranes revealing that concentrations of 5%-10% wt. PEOS could enhance the electrical conductivity of PEM. Hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR spectroscopy was successfully applied for monitoring the free radical polymerization reactions of methyl methacrylate, methyl acrylate and the copolymerization of methyl methacrylate and methyl acrylate. The observation of Xe chemical shift and linewidths during the reactions reveal information about the polymer chain growths during the polymerizations. The successful application of the NMR-MOUSE to visualise the different anatomical layers with varying proton densities opens the possibility of its use in clinical studies such as osteoporosis for bone density measurements. The NMR-MOUSE was also successfully applied for the analysis of violins and bows and a classification of the violins and bows as a function of

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of amino acids and proteins. Side-chain mobility of methionine in the crystalline amonio acid and in crystallne sperm whale (Physeter catodon) myoglobin

    Deuterium (2H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) were obtained of L-[epsilon-2H3]methionine, L-[epsilon-2H3]methionine in a D,L lattice, and [S-methyl-2H3]methionine in the crystalline solid state, as a function of temperature, in addition to obtaining 2H T1 and line-width results as a function of temperature on [epsilon-2H3]methionine-labeled sperm whale (Physeter catodon) myoglobins by using the method of magnetic ordering. Also recorded were 13C cross-polarization ''magic-angle'' sample-spinning NMR spectra of [epsilon-13C]methionine-labeled crystalline cyanoferrimyoglobin (at 37.7 MHz, corresponding to a magnetic field strength of 3.52 T) and of the same protein in aqueous solution

  13. Characterization of organic matter in sediment cores of the Todos os Santos Bay, Bahia, Brazil, by elemental analysis and 13C NMR

    Highlights: → The impact of human activity on the sediments of Todos os Santos Bay in Brazil was evaluated by EA and 13C NMR. → This article reports a study of six sediment cores collected at different depths and regions. → The elemental profiles of cores suggest an abrupt change in the sedimentation regime, corresponds to about 50 years ago, coinciding with the implantation of major onshore industrial projects. → The results presented illustrate several important aspects of environmental impact of human activity on this bay. - Abstract: The impact of human activity on the sediments of Todos os Santos Bay in Brazil was evaluated by elemental analysis and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (13C NMR). This article reports a study of six sediment cores collected at different depths and regions of Todos os Santos Bay. The elemental profiles of cores collected on the eastern side of Frades Island suggest an abrupt change in the sedimentation regime. Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) analysis corroborates this result. The range of depths of the cores corresponds to about 50 years ago, coinciding with the implantation of major onshore industrial projects in the region. Principal Component Analysis of the 13C NMR spectra clearly differentiates sediment samples closer to the Subae estuary, which have high contents of terrestrial organic matter, from those closer to a local oil refinery. The results presented in this article illustrate several important aspects of environmental impact of human activity on this bay.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory, quadrennial report

    This quadrennial report of the nuclear magnetic resonance common laboratory gives an overview of the main activities. Among the different described activities, only one is interesting for the INIS database: it concerns the Solid NMR of cements used for radioactive wastes storage. In this case, the NMR is used to characterize the structure of the material and the composition, structure and kinetics of formation of the alteration layer which is formed at the surface of concrete during water leaching conditions. The NMR methodology is given. (O.M.)

  15. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Liquids and Solids

    The paper outlines the basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance, trying wherever possible to compare and contrast the method with that of slow neutron scattering as a technique for studying the properties of condensed phases and especially of molecular and atomic motions. It is emphasized that this is not a review of nmr for an expert audience but has a pedagogical aim. It is hoped to give persons with a main interest in neutron scattering some appreciation of the scope and limitations of the nmr method. This is illustrated by recent results on one substance which covers many but by no means all of the important points. (author)

  16. Accurate measurements of 13C-13C distances in uniformly 13C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Application of sets of 13C-13C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important 13C-13C distances in uniformly 13C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl (13C′) and aliphatic (13Caliphatic) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly 13C,15N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of 13C′-13Caliphatic distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform 13C,15N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment

  17. In vivo 13 carbon metabolic imaging at 3T with hyperpolarized 13C-1-pyruvate.

    Kohler, S J; Yen, Y; Wolber, J; Chen, A P; Albers, M J; Bok, R; Zhang, V; Tropp, J; Nelson, S; Vigneron, D B; Kurhanewicz, J; Hurd, R E

    2007-07-01

    We present for the first time dynamic spectra and spectroscopic images acquired in normal rats at 3T following the injection of (13)C-1-pyruvate that was hyperpolarized by the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) method. Spectroscopic sampling was optimized for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and for spectral resolution of (13)C-1-pyruvate and its metabolic products (13)C-1-alanine, (13)C-1-lactate, and (13)C-bicarbonate. Dynamic spectra in rats were collected with a temporal resolution of 3 s from a 90-mm axial slab using a dual (1)H-(13)C quadrature birdcage coil to observe the combined effects of metabolism, flow, and T(1) relaxation. In separate experiments, spectroscopic imaging data were obtained during a 17-s acquisition of a 20-mm axial slice centered on the rat kidney region to provide information on the spatial distribution of the metabolites. Conversion of pyruvate to lactate, alanine, and bicarbonate occurred within a minute of injection. Alanine was observed primarily in skeletal muscle and liver, while pyruvate, lactate, and bicarbonate concentrations were relatively high in the vasculature and kidneys. In contrast to earlier work at 1.5 T, bicarbonate was routinely observed in skeletal muscle as well as the kidney and vasculature. PMID:17659629

  18. A procedure to validate and correct the 13C chemical shift calibration of RNA datasets

    Chemical shifts reflect the structural environment of a certain nucleus and can be used to extract structural and dynamic information. Proper calibration is indispensable to extract such information from chemical shifts. Whereas a variety of procedures exist to verify the chemical shift calibration for proteins, no such procedure is available for RNAs to date. We present here a procedure to analyze and correct the calibration of 13C NMR data of RNAs. Our procedure uses five 13C chemical shifts as a reference, each of them found in a narrow shift range in most datasets deposited in the Biological Magnetic Resonance Bank. In 49 datasets we could evaluate the 13C calibration and detect errors or inconsistencies in RNA 13C chemical shifts based on these chemical shift reference values. More than half of the datasets (27 out of those 49) were found to be improperly referenced or contained inconsistencies. This large inconsistency rate possibly explains that no clear structure–13C chemical shift relationship has emerged for RNA so far. We were able to recalibrate or correct 17 datasets resulting in 39 usable 13C datasets. 6 new datasets from our lab were used to verify our method increasing the database to 45 usable datasets. We can now search for structure–chemical shift relationships with this improved list of 13C chemical shift data. This is demonstrated by a clear relationship between ribose 13C shifts and the sugar pucker, which can be used to predict a C2′- or C3′-endo conformation of the ribose with high accuracy. The improved quality of the chemical shift data allows statistical analysis with the potential to facilitate assignment procedures, and the extraction of restraints for structure calculations of RNA.

  19. Acetylcholinesterase-catalyzed acetate - water oxygen exchange studied by 13C-NMR

    The kinetics of the oxygen exchange reaction between [l-13C,18O2]acetate and H216O catalyzed by homogeneous acetyl-cholinesterase from the electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, was studied using the 18O-isotope-induced shift on 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Pseudo-first-order rate constants for the exchange reactions were determined at pH values from 4.5 to 8. The exchange reaction exhibits a maximum at pH 5.8. The apparent catalytic rate constant for the exchange reaction is 102 to 104 times smaller than that for the deacylation of the acetyl-enzyme intermediate over the pH range tested. Oxygen exchange occurs by a random sequential pathway rather than by multiple (coupled) exchange. The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by sodium acetate showed a sigmoidal dependence on pH, with K/sub i/ increasing 2.5 orders of magnitude over the pH range. Protonation of an active site residue having an apparent pKa of 6.8 is associated with an increase in acetate binding. Deacylation also exhibits a sigmoidal dependence on [H+]. The experimental data fits titration curves with inflection points at 5.0 +/- 0.3 and 6.7 +/-0.1. Results support the role of histidine in acetylation of the active site serine, but the conjugate base of another active site residue with a pKa of 5.0 appears necessary for maximal catalytic activity in both the deacylation and exchange reactions

  20. Connection of nuclear magnetic and infiltration parameters of porous rocks

    The infiltration parameters of porous rocks are determined among others by the specific pore surface. In the case of the sandostones the nuclear magnetic behaviour of the water influx is also influenced by the specific surface of the pores. On this basis the nuclear magnetic and the infiltration parameters of the rocks can be brought into connection with each other. The paper deals with the rock-physics of the nuclear magnetic logging. (author)

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance in hexaferrite/maghemite composite nanoparticles

    Kříšťan, P.; Hondlík, O.; Štěpánková, H.; Chlan, V.; Kouřil, K.; Řezníček, R.; Pollert, Emil; Veverka, Pavel

    Warszawa: Polish Academy of Sciences, 2015, s. 514-516. ISSN 0587-4246. [The European Conference PHYSICS OF MAGNETISM 2014/PM'14/. Poznań (PL), 23.06.2014-27.06.2014] Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nuclear magnetic resonance and relaxation * ferrimagnetics * fine-particle systems * nanocrystalline materials * magnetic oxides * inorganic compounds Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  2. Biosynthesis and identification of 13C-labeled starch

    Biosynthesis of 13C-labeled starch was examined by using a small-scale apparatus. Tobacco leaves were placed in the cylindric photosynthesis chamber (14φx50 cm). After preincubation for 30 h in the dark, incubation with 13C-labeled CO2 was carried out for 48 h under irradiation with fluorescent lights. Labeled starch was extracted from the leaves and was purified. About 500 mg of 13C-labeled starch can be obtained from 50 g of the leaves. The 13C-abundance of the starch formed by the incubation was determined to be 82.0-92.0 atom % by mass spectrometry. (author)

  3. Simultaneous hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate MRI and (18)F-FDG-PET in cancer (hyperPET)

    Borgwardt, Henrik Gutte; Hansen, Adam E; Henriksen, Sarah T; Johannesen, Helle H; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik; Vignaud, Alexandre; Hansen, Anders E; Børresen, Betina; Klausen, Thomas L; Wittekind, Anne-Mette N; Gillings, Nic; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Clemmensen, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    23 mL hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate. Peak heights of (13)C-pyruvate and (13)C-lactate were quantified using a general linear model. Anatomic (1)H-MRI included axial and coronal T1 vibe, coronal T2-tse and axial T1-tse with fat saturation following gadolinium injection. In the tumor we found clearly...... have named this concept hyper PET. Intravenous injection of the hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate results in an increase of (13)C-lactate, (13)C-alanine and (13)C-CO2 ((13)C-HCO3) resonance peaks relative to the tissue, disease and the metabolic state probed. Accordingly, with dynamic nuclear polarization...... local recurrence of a liposarcoma on the right forepaw was imaged using a combined PET/MR clinical scanner. PET was performed as a single-bed, 10 min acquisition, 107 min post injection of 310 MBq (18)F-FDG. (13)C-chemical shift imaging (CSI) was performed just after FDG-PET and 30 s post injection of...

  4. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of trans-diacido(tetraamine)cobalt(III)

    Brubaker, G.R.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-06-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of a series of trans-diacido(1,10-diamino-4,7-diazadecane)cobalt(III) complexes (trans-Co(3,2,3-tet)X/sub 2/, X = Br/sup -/, Cl/sup -/, N/sub 3//sup -/, NO/sub 2//sup -/, OAc) and trans-diacido(1,9-diamino-3,7-diazononane)cobalt(III) complexes (trans-Co(2,3,2-tet)X/sub 2/, X = Cl/sup -/, GlyH, /sup -/OAc, NH/sub 3/, NO/sub 2//sup -/) will be discussed. The /sup 13/C chemical shift is found to be linearly dependent on the ligand field strength (estimated from the electronic spectrum) of the axial ligands (X). The shielding of selected carbon atoms within the tetraamine ligand, which has been attributed to the central metal ion, increases with increasing axial ligand field strength.

  5. Practical aspects of 13C surface receive coils with active decoupling and tuning circuit

    Nilsson, Daniel; Mohr, Johan Jacob; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of nuclei other than 1H (e.g. 13C) allows for characterisation of metabolic processes. Imaging of such nuclei, however, requires development of sensitive MRI coils. This paper describes the design of surface receive coils for 13C imaging in small animals. The design...... is based on application-specified coil profile and includes impedance matching and balancing circuits. Active decoupling is implemented in order to minimize the influence of the receiving coil on the homogeneity of the transmit-coil field. Measurement results for a coil prototype are presented...

  6. 13C-NMR assignment, structure, and dynamics of deoxyoligonucleotides

    The unique spectral properties of 13C-NMR for studying nucleic acids and some of the important features of 13C-NMR in oligonucleotide studies are demostrated. The main difficulty in studying oligonucleotides by 13C-NMR and recent improvements in NMR instrumentation and advances in oligonucleotide synthesis are presented. The high resolution 13C-NMR spectra, T1 relaxation times and NOEs were measured for duplex of the self-complementary oligo-DNAs: d(CG)3 and d(GGTATACC) are studied. The target of this study is to developed a systematic 13C-NMR spectral assignment and to investigate the structure and dynamics of these two sequences by this techniques. (M.J.C.)

  7. Use of 13C measurements in humus dynamics studies

    The humic substances of the Ol and Ah horizons of a Spodo-Dystric Cambisol were characterized by exclusion chromatography on controlled pore glass followed by determination of the natural 13C/12C ratios by mass spectrometry. A significant correlation of the molecular weight of the humic substances and the δ13C values was observed. Fractions with higher molecular weight have less negative δ13C values. This relationship holds only for the humic and fulvic acids. In both horizons the non-humic substances and the very small humic substances (Kd > 0.80) were isotopically heavier than the humic substances of the second maximum (brown humic and fulvic acids). The low molecular weight organic substances of the Ol horizon showed a higher δ13C value than all other fractions. These results indicate that the non-humic substances are easily attacked by microorganismus and are therefore richer in 13C. (authors)

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer and method

    A nuclear magnetic resonance techniis described that allows simultaneous temperature determination and spectral acquisition. The technique employs a modification of the lock circuit of a varian xl-100 spectrometer which permits accurate measurement of the difference in resonance frequency between a primary lock nucleus and another , secondary, nucleus. The field stabilization function of the main lock circuit is not compromised. A feedback signal having a frequency equal to the frequency difference is substituted for the normal power supply in the spectrometer's existing radio frequency transmitter to modulate that transmitter. Thus, the transmitter's radio frequency signal is enhanced in a frequency corresponding to the resonance peak of the secondary nucleus. Determination of the frequency difference allows the determination of temperature without interference with the observed spectrum. The feedback character of the circuit and the presence of noise make the circuit self-activating

  9. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance petrophysics.

    Sun, Boqin; Dunn, Keh-Jim

    2005-02-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) opens a wide area for exploration in petrophysics and has significant impact to petroleum logging technology. When there are multiple fluids with different diffusion coefficients saturated in a porous medium, this information can be extracted and clearly delineated from CPMG measurements of such a system either using regular pulsing sequences or modified two window sequences. The 2D NMR plot with independent variables of T2 relaxation time and diffusion coefficient allows clear separation of oil and water signals in the rocks. This 2D concept can be extended to general studies of fluid-saturated porous media involving other combinations of two or more independent variables, such as chemical shift and T1/T2 relaxation time (reflecting pore size), proton population and diffusion contrast, etc. PMID:15833623

  10. Identification, synthesis and characterization of an unknown process related impurity in eslicarbazepine acetate active pharmaceutical ingredient by LC/ESI–IT/MS, 1H, 13C and 1H–1H COSY NMR

    Saji Thomas; Saroj Kumar Paul; Subhash Chandra Joshi; Vineet Kumar; Ashutosh Agarwal; Dharam Vir

    2014-01-01

    A new impurity was detected during high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of eslicarbazepine acetate active pharmaceutical ingredient. The structure of unknown impurity was postulated based on liquid chromatography mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization and ion trap analyzer (LC/ESI–IT/MS) analysis. Proposed structure of impurity was unambiguously confirmed by synthesis followed by characterization using 1H, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), 1H–1H co...

  11. Assigning large proteins in the solid state: a MAS NMR resonance assignment strategy using selectively and extensively 13C-labelled proteins

    In recent years, solid-state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR) has been growing into an important technique to study the structure of membrane proteins, amyloid fibrils and other protein preparations which do not form crystals or are insoluble. Currently, a key bottleneck is the assignment process due to the absence of the resolving power of proton chemical shifts. Particularly for large proteins (approximately >150 residues) it is difficult to obtain a full set of resonance assignments. In order to address this problem, we present an assignment method based upon samples prepared using [1,3-13C]- and [2-13C]-glycerol as the sole carbon source in the bacterial growth medium (so-called selectively and extensively labelled protein). Such samples give rise to higher quality spectra than uniformly [13C]-labelled protein samples, and have previously been used to obtain long-range restraints for use in structure calculations. Our method exploits the characteristic cross-peak patterns observed for the different amino acid types in 13C-13C correlation and 3D NCACX and NCOCX spectra. An in-depth analysis of the patterns and how they can be used to aid assignment is presented, using spectra of the chicken α-spectrin SH3 domain (62 residues), αB-crystallin (175 residues) and outer membrane protein G (OmpG, 281 residues) as examples. Using this procedure, over 90% of the Cα, Cβ, C' and N resonances in the core domain of αB-crystallin and around 73% in the flanking domains could be assigned (excluding 24 residues at the extreme termini of the protein)

  12. Assigning large proteins in the solid state: a MAS NMR resonance assignment strategy using selectively and extensively {sup 13}C-labelled proteins

    Higman, Victoria A. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (Germany); Flinders, Jeremy [Genentech, Inc., Structural Biology Department (United States); Hiller, Matthias; Jehle, Stefan; Markovic, Stefan; Fiedler, Sebastian; Rossum, Barth-Jan van; Oschkinat, Hartmut [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (Germany)], E-mail: oschkinat@fmp-berlin.de

    2009-08-15

    In recent years, solid-state magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR) has been growing into an important technique to study the structure of membrane proteins, amyloid fibrils and other protein preparations which do not form crystals or are insoluble. Currently, a key bottleneck is the assignment process due to the absence of the resolving power of proton chemical shifts. Particularly for large proteins (approximately >150 residues) it is difficult to obtain a full set of resonance assignments. In order to address this problem, we present an assignment method based upon samples prepared using [1,3-{sup 13}C]- and [2-{sup 13}C]-glycerol as the sole carbon source in the bacterial growth medium (so-called selectively and extensively labelled protein). Such samples give rise to higher quality spectra than uniformly [{sup 13}C]-labelled protein samples, and have previously been used to obtain long-range restraints for use in structure calculations. Our method exploits the characteristic cross-peak patterns observed for the different amino acid types in {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation and 3D NCACX and NCOCX spectra. An in-depth analysis of the patterns and how they can be used to aid assignment is presented, using spectra of the chicken {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain (62 residues), {alpha}B-crystallin (175 residues) and outer membrane protein G (OmpG, 281 residues) as examples. Using this procedure, over 90% of the C{alpha}, C{beta}, C' and N resonances in the core domain of {alpha}B-crystallin and around 73% in the flanking domains could be assigned (excluding 24 residues at the extreme termini of the protein)

  13. Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance examination of female reproductive tissues

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful method of investigating the relationship between metabolism and function in living tissues. We present evidence that the phosphorus 31 spectra of myometrium and placenta are functions of physiologic state and gestational age. Specific spectroscopic abnormalities are observed in association with disorders of pregnancy and gynecologic diseases. Our results suggest that noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy examinations may sometimes be a useful addition to magnetic resonance imaging examinations, and that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of biopsy specimens could become a cost-effective method of evaluating certain biochemical abnormalities

  14. Retrobiosynthetic nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of amino acid biosynthesis and intermediary metabolism. Metabolic flux in developing maize kernels.

    Glawischnig, E; Gierl, A; Tomas, A; Bacher, A; Eisenreich, W

    2001-03-01

    Information on metabolic networks could provide the basis for the design of targets for metabolic engineering. To study metabolic flux in cereals, developing maize (Zea mays) kernels were grown in sterile culture on medium containing [U-(13)C(6)]glucose or [1,2-(13)C(2)]acetate. After growth, amino acids, lipids, and sitosterol were isolated from kernels as well as from the cobs, and their (13)C isotopomer compositions were determined by quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The highly specific labeling patterns were used to analyze the metabolic pathways leading to amino acids and the triterpene on a quantitative basis. The data show that serine is generated from phosphoglycerate, as well as from glycine. Lysine is formed entirely via the diaminopimelate pathway and sitosterol is synthesized entirely via the mevalonate route. The labeling data of amino acids and sitosterol were used to reconstruct the labeling patterns of key metabolic intermediates (e.g. acetyl-coenzyme A, pyruvate, phosphoenolpyruvate, erythrose 4-phosphate, and Rib 5-phosphate) that revealed quantitative information about carbon flux in the intermediary metabolism of developing maize kernels. Exogenous acetate served as an efficient precursor of sitosterol, as well as of amino acids of the aspartate and glutamate family; in comparison, metabolites formed in the plastidic compartments showed low acetate incorporation. PMID:11244098

  15. New Approaches to Quantum Computing using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    non-zero nuclear moments (spin 1/2 nuclei such as 1H or 13C) in an organic molecule dissolved in a solvent constitute the required qubits. The logic gates and algorithms correspond to set of instructions containing radio frequency (r.f) pulses and delays that manipulate the qubits and the final spectrum reflects the outcome of the algorithm. Three years ago, when we initiated proposal on NMR-QC, the foremost of the aim is to develop quantum computing as part of LLNL research programs and hence cultivate an interdisciplinary working group in the area of quantum computing. Our success in the proposal is in part responsible for the formation of the laboratory-wide exploratory group on ''quantum computing and information''. The PI's play an integral role in promoting the work performed using the LDRD funded project and hence acquire the attention within the lab as well outside. In specific goals of the project were to (a) develop experimental and sample based methods to improve the performance of NMR-QC, (b) define and estimate actual time cost or efficiency of a QCs, and (c) construct a comprehensive simulator of QC based on the principles of ensemble quantum computing. We were able to accomplish these goals and in particular we have reached some significant milestones in defining the QC efficiency and development of the QC-simulator. These developments have resulted to three publications

  16. Resonant states in 13C and 16,17O at high excitation energy

    The 9Be(6Li,d)13C and 12,13C(6Li,d)16,17O reactions were measured at the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility at 25.5 MeV incident energy. The nuclear emulsion detection technique was applied. Several narrow resonances were populated up to approximately 17 MeV of excitation energy. An excellent energy resolution was obtained: 40 keV for 13C and 15-30 keV for 16O. The upper limit for the resonance widths were determined. Recently, d-a angular correlations were measured at θd = 0° with incident energy of 25 MeV using the LNS Tandem-MAGNEX Spectrometer facility

  17. Investigation of α-cluster states in 13C via the (6Li,d) reaction

    Rodrigues, M R D; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L B; Cunsolo, A; Cappuzzello, F; Duarte, J L M; Rodrigues, C L; Ukita, G M; Souza, M A; Miyake, H

    2010-01-01

    The 9Be(6Li,d)13C reaction was used to investigate possible α-cluster states in 13C. The reaction was measured at 25.5 MeV incident energy, employing the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion detection technique. Ten out of sixteen known levels of 13C, up to 11 MeV of excitation, were observed and, due to the much improved energy resolution of 50 keV, at least three doublets could be resolved. This work presents a preliminary analysis of five of the most intensely populated states, also in comparison with the results of former transfer studies.

  18. Alpha Resonances in 13C Excited by the 9Be (6Li,d) Reaction

    The 9Be(6Li,d)13C reaction was used to investigate alpha resonant states in 13C up to 13 MeV of excitation. The reaction was measured at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the Sao Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion detection technique. The resolution of 50 keV allowed for the separation of the resonant contributions to the known 7/2- at 10.753 MeV and (5/2-) at 10.818 MeV 13C states. The alpha resonance seen at the (3α+n) threshold was not previously reported. The experimental angular distributions are presented in comparison with DWBA predictions.

  19. Characteristic coupling constants 1J(13C-13C) of some mesoionic methylides contaIning a diphenyltetrazolium ring

    Jazwinski, Jaroslaw; Kozminski, Wtktor; stefaniak, Lech; Webl, Graham A.

    1994-01-01

    1J(13C-13C) data are presented for some Types A and B tetrazoliwn methylides. The results show a large amoWlt of double bond character for the C5-C6 bond which is significantly reduced upon protonation. A similar decrease in bond order is noted for the C6-C8 bond following protonation.

  20. Accurate quantitative 13C NMR spectroscopy: repeatability over time of site-specific 13C isotope ratio determination.

    Caytan, Elsa; Botosoa, Eliot P; Silvestre, Virginie; Robins, Richard J; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gérald S

    2007-11-01

    The stability over time (repeatability) for the determination of site-specific 13C/12C ratios at natural abundance by quantitative 13C NMR spectroscopy has been tested on three probes: enriched bilabeled [1,2-13C2]ethanol; ethanol at natural abundance; and vanillin at natural abundance. It is shown in all three cases that the standard deviation for a series of measurements taken every 2-3 months over periods between 9 and 13 months is equal to or smaller than the standard deviation calculated from 5-10 replicate measurements made on a single sample. The precision which can be achieved using the present analytical 13C NMR protocol is higher than the prerequisite value of 1-2 per thousand for the determination of site-specific 13C/12C ratios at natural abundance (13C-SNIF-NMR). Hence, this technique permits the discrimination of very small variations in 13C/12C ratios between carbon positions, as found in biogenic natural products. This observed stability over time in 13C NMR spectroscopy indicates that further improvements in precision will depend primarily on improved signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:17900175

  1. Analysis of the mechanical properties and characterization by solid state 13C NMR of recycled EVA copolymer/silica composites

    Giovanni Chaves Stael

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of micrometer sized silica particles on poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate - EVA - residues from the footwear industry was evaluated. The effects of the processing parameters - temperature and mixing ratio - on the mechanical behavior of molded plates of neat recycled EVA and EVA/silica composites were also investigated. The mechanical properties measured by the tensile test, the fractographic analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and the 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR showed a reduced EVA to silica compatibility. Therefore, incorporation of untreated silica to recycled EVA copolymer produced a slight decrease on the mechanical performance of EVA/silica composites in respect to neat EVA copolymer. The NMR analysis also shows that the crosslinking process on recycled EVA may be occurring at the carbonyl group.

  2. Analysis of the mechanical properties and characterization by solid state 13 C NMR of recycled EVA copolymer/silica composites

    The incorporation of micrometer sized silica particles on poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) - EVA - residues from the footwear industry was evaluated. The effects of the processing parameters - temperature and mixing ratio - on the mechanical behavior of molded plates of neat recycled EVA and EVA/silica composites were also investigated. The mechanical properties measured by the tensile test, the fractographic analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the 13 C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) showed a reduced EVA to silica compatibility. Therefore, incorporation of untreated silica to recycled EVA copolymer produced a slight decrease on the mechanical performance of EVA/silica composites in respect to neat EVA copolymer. The NMR analysis also shows that the crosslinking process on recycled EVA may be occurring at the carbonyl group. (author)

  3. Recent advances in the application of 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy to soil organic matter studies

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been applied to many studies in soil science, geochemistry, and environmental science. In recent years, the study of soil organic matter (SOM) using NMR techniques has progressed rapidly. NMR spectroscopy has been used to study chemical changes of SOM during decomposition, and also of soil extract fractions such as humic acid and fulvic acid. NMR spectroscopy of soils has improved rapidly in recent years with the introduction of pre-treatment and particle-size fractionation. In addition to routine liquid- and solid-state 13C NMR applications, 15N NMR spectra of natural abundant samples have been reported, but 15N-enriched material is more convenient to use due to the low natural abundance of 15N. Some newly developed NMR techniques have also been utilised, such as 2-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and improved 1H NMR techniques. These are reviewed and commented on in this paper. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Publishing

  4. 13C solution NMR spectra of poly(ether)urethanes. Technical memorandum

    The 13C solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the 15 poly(ether)urethanes are presented. The poly(urethane)s were prepared using one of two diisocyanates, either methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) or hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), one of five poly(ether glycol)s, poly(tetramethylene ether glycol) of molecular weight 650, 1000, or 1400, or poly(ethylene glycol) of molecular weight 600 or 1000, and one of three chain extenders, 1,4-butanediol, 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol, or diethylene glycol. These polymers were prepared as part of a modelling study to determine if Group Contribution Theory and Group Interaction Modelling could be used to predict dynamic mechanical properties of poly(ether)urethanes on the basis of the structural fragments in the polymers. The chemical shifts of the unique carbons in each of the poly(urethane)s are assigned. They can be used to unambiguously identify the diisocyanate/diol/poly(ether glycol) used to prepare the various polyurethanes. For some compounds the spectra show resonances for terminal hydroxyl substituted carbons. These could provide a method, under the right experimental conditions, to compare molecular weights of batches of the same polymer. (author)

  5. Synthesis and biosynthesis of {sup 13}C-, {sup 15}N-labeled deoxynucleosides useful for biomolecular structural determinations

    Ashburn, D.A.; Garcia, K.; Hanners, J.L.; Silks, L.A. III; Unkefer, C.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Currently, there is a great emphasis on elucidating the structure, function, and dynamics of DNA. Much of the research involved in this study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Effective use of NMR spectroscopy for DNA molecules with mw > 10,000 requires stable isotope enrichment. We present strategies for site-specific isotopic labeling of the purine bases adenosine and guanosine and the biosynthesis of (U-{sup 13}C, {sup 15}N) DNA from methylotropic bacteria. With commercially available 6-chloropurine, an effective two-step route leads to 2{prime}-deoxy-(amino-{sup 15}N)adenosine (dA). The resulting d(amino-{sup 15}N)A is used in a series of reactions to synthesize 2{prime}-deoxy-(2-{sup 13}C,1,amino-{sup 15}N{sub 2})guanosine or any combination thereof. An improved biosynthesis of labeled DNA has been accomplished using Methylobacterium extorquens AS1. Each liter of growth medium contains 4 g of methanol to yield 1 g of lyophilized cells. As much as 200 mg of RNA per liter of culture has been obtained. We are currently developing large-scale isolation protocols. General synthetic pathways to oligomeric DNA will be presented.

  6. Effects of sulfanilamide and methotrexate on 13C fluxes through the glycine decarboxylase/serine hydroxymethyltransferase enzyme system in Arabidopsis

    In C3 plants large amounts of photorespiratory glycine (Gly) are converted to serine by the tetrahydrofolate (THF)-dependent activities of the Gly decarboxylase complex (GDC) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT). Using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, we monitored the flux of carbon through the GDC/SHMT enzyme system in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Columbia exposed to inhibitors of THF-synthesizing enzymes. Plants exposed for 96 h to sulfanilamide, a dihydropteroate synthase inhibitor, showed little reduction in flux through GDC/SHMT. Two other sulfonamide analogs were tested with similar results, although all three analogs competitively inhibited the partially purified enzyme. However, methotrexate or aminopterin, which are confirmed inhibitors of Arabidopsis dihydrofolate reductase, decreased the flux through the GDC/SHMT system by 60% after 48 h and by 100% in 96 h. The uptake of [alpha-13C]Gly was not inhibited by either drug class. The specificity of methotrexate action was shown by the ability of 5-formyl-THF to restore flux through the GDC/SHMT pathway in methotrexate-inhibited plants. The experiments with sulfonamides strongly suggest that the mitochondrial THF pool has a long half-life. The studies with methotrexate support the additional, critical role of dihydrofolate reductase in recycling THF oxidized in thymidylate synthesis

  7. Enhanced nuclear magnetism: some novel features and prospective experiments

    It is shown that methods used for studying nuclear magnetism and nuclear magnetic ordering can be extended to 'enhanced nuclear magnetism'. These methods include the use of r.f. fields for adiabatic demagnetization in the rotating frame (a.d.r.f) and beams of neutrons whose spins interact with the nuclear spins. The 'enhancement' of the nuclear moment arises from the electronic magnetization M1 induced through the hyperfine interaction. It is shown that the spatial distribution of M1 is the same as that of The Van Vleck magnetization induced by an external field, provided that J is a good quantum number. The spatial distributions are not in general the same in Russell-Saunders coupling, eg. in the 3d group. The Bloch equations are extended to include anisotropic nuclear moments. The 'truncated' spin Hamiltonian is derived for spin-spin interaction between enhanced moments. A general cancellation theorem for second-order processes in spin-lattice relaxation is derived. The interactions of neutrons with the true nuclear moment, the Van Vleck moment, the 'pseudonuclear' moment and the 'pseudomagnetic' nuclear moment are discussed. Ordered states of enhanced nuclear moment systems are considered, together with the conditions under which they might be produced by a.d.r.f. following dynamic nuclear polarization. (U.K.)

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for determining the functional content of organic aerosols: A review

    The knowledge deficit of organic aerosol (OA) composition has been identified as the most important factor limiting our understanding of the atmospheric fate and implications of aerosol. The efforts to chemically characterize OA include the increasing utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Since 1998, the functional composition of different types, sizes and fractions of OA has been studied with one-dimensional, two-dimensional and solid state proton and carbon-13 NMR. This led to the use of functional group ratios to reconcile the most important sources of OA, including secondary organic aerosol and initial source apportionment using positive matrix factorization. Future research efforts may be directed towards the optimization of experimental parameters, detailed NMR experiments and analysis by pattern recognition methods to identify the chemical components, determination of the NMR fingerprints of OA sources and solid state NMR to study the content of OA as a whole. - Highlights: • Organic aerosol composition by 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. • NMR fingerprints of specific sources, types and sizes of organic aerosol. • Source reconciliation and apportionment using NMR spectroscopy. • Research priorities towards understanding organic aerosol composition and origin. - This review presents the recent advances on the characterization of organic aerosol composition using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance of randomly diluted magnetic materials

    The temperature dependence of the nuclear relaxation rates and line shapes of the FO resonance in the diluted antiferromagnet Fex Zn1-x F2 and Mnx Zn1-x F2 are studied over a large temperature range TN 1) of the FO nuclei, which are not transfer hyperfine coupled to the Fe (or Mn) spins, have been measured and calculated as a function of the concentration x. Good agreement with experiment is found for the theoretical results, which have been obtained in the range 0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.8. The temperature dependence of 1/T1 for TN1 data near TN was used to study Random Field Effects on the critical behavior of Mn.65 Zn.35 F2, for fields applied parallel and perpendicular to the easy (C) axis. It was found that the transition temperature TN depressed substantially with field only for Ho || C. The experimental results are in general accord with the theory for Random Field Effects in disordered, anisotropic antiferromagnets. The critical divergence of the inhomogeneously broadened FO NMR was studied in Fe.6 Zn.4 F2 above TN. The experimental results agree with Heller's calculation of the NMR line broadening by Random Field Effects. With Ho || C the line shape changes from Gaussian towards Lozentzian for t -2 and below TN its line width increase qualitatively following the increase in the sublattice magnetization. (author)

  10. Search for magnetic monopoles with nuclear track detectors

    Giorgini, M

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental search for GUT magnetic monopoles in the MACRO experiment using the nuclear track subdetector CR39. After discussing the working principle, the charge resolution and the calibration of the detector, the experimental procedure for searching for magnetic monopoles is described. Since no candidates were found, the upper flux limits obtained by the MACRO CR39 used as a "stand alone detector" for magnetic monopoles of different magnetic charges are presented.

  11. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  12. IRMS detection of testosterone manipulated with 13C labeled standards in human urine by removing the labeled 13C

    Highlights: • 13C labeled testosterone can be used to adjust the isotope ratio of testosterone. • The novel testosterone cannot be detected by the regular IRMS method in doping test. • A method was explored to remove the labeled 13C. • The established method can be used to detect the manipulated testosterone. - Abstract: Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is applied to confirm testosterone (T) abuse by determining the carbon isotope ratios (δ13C value). However, 13C labeled standards can be used to control the δ13C value and produce manipulated T which cannot be detected by the current method. A method was explored to remove the 13C labeled atom at C-3 from the molecule of androsterone (Andro), the metabolite of T in urine, to produce the resultant (A-nor-5α-androstane-2,17-dione, ANAD). The difference in δ13C values between Andro and ANAD (Δδ13CAndro–ANAD, ‰) would change significantly in case manipulated T is abused. Twenty-one volunteers administered T manipulated with different 13C labeled standards. The collected urine samples were analyzed with the established method, and the maximum value of Δδ13CAndro–ANAD post ingestion ranged from 3.0‰ to 8.8‰. Based on the population reference, the cut-off value of Δδ13CAndro–ANAD for positive result was suggested as 1.2‰. The developed method could be used to detect T manipulated with 3-13C labeled standards

  13. 13C fractionation in soil as connected with microbial metabolism

    Šantrůčková, Hana; Šmejkalová, M.; Uhlířová, Eva

    Interlaken : Paul Scherrer Institut, 2004. s. 35. [SIBAE-BASIN Conference, Partitioning of fluxes between the biosphere across spatial scales. 01.04.2004-03.04.2004, Interlaken] Keywords : 13C fractionation * soil * microbial metabolism Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  14. Anomalous 13C enrichment in modern marine organic carbon

    Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.; Claypool, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Marine organic carbon is heavier isotopically (13C enriched) than most land-plant or terrestrial organic C1. Accordingly, ??13C values of organic C in modern marine sediments are routinely interpreted in terms of the relative proportions of marine and terrestrial sources of the preserved organic matter2,3. When independent geochemical techniques are used to evaluate the source of organic matter in Cretaceous or older rocks, those rocks containing mostly marine organic C are found typically to have lighter (more-negative) ??13C values than rocks containing mostly terrestrial organic C. Here we conclude that marine photosynthesis in mid-Cretaceous and earlier oceans generally resulted in a greater fractionation of C isotopes and produced organic C having lighter ??13C values. Modern marine photosynthesis may be occurring under unusual geological conditions (higher oceanic primary production rates, lower PCO2) that limit dissolved CO2 availability and minimize carbon isotope fractionation4. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  15. Cluster states in 13C and 11B

    The cluster structures of the excited states in 11B and 13C were discussed by measuring the isoscalar monopole strengths in the inelastic α scattering at Eα = 388 MeV. It was found that the 1/22-, 1/23-, and 1/24- states in 13C are candidates for the α cluster states with a 3α + n molecular configuration. (author)

  16. An in Vivo 13C NMR Analysis of the Anaerobic Yeast Metabolism of 1-13C-Glucose

    Giles, Brent J.; Matsche, Zenziwe; Egeland, Ryan D.; Reed, Ryan A.; Morioka, Scott S.; Taber, Richard L.

    1999-11-01

    A biochemistry laboratory experiment that studies the dynamics of the anaerobic yeast metabolism of 1-13C-D-glucose via NMR is described. Fleischmann's Active Dry yeast, under anaerobic conditions, produces primarily 2-13C-ethanol and some 1-13C-glycerol as end products. An experiment is described in which the yeast is subjected to osmotic shock from an increasing sodium chloride concentration. Under these conditions, the yeast increases the ratio of glycerol to ethanol. The experiment can be accomplished in a single laboratory period.

  17. Least Squares Magnetic-Field Optimization for Portable Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Magnet Design

    Single-sided and mobile nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have the advantages of portability, low cost, and low power consumption compared to conventional high-field NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. We present fast, flexible, and easy-to-implement target field algorithms for mobile NMR and MRI magnet design. The optimization finds a global optimum in a cost function that minimizes the error in the target magnetic field in the sense of least squares. When the technique is tested on a ring array of permanent-magnet elements, the solution matches the classical dipole Halbach solution. For a single-sided handheld NMR sensor, the algorithm yields a 640 G field homogeneous to 16,100 ppm across a 1.9 cc volume located 1.5 cm above the top of the magnets and homogeneous to 32,200 ppm over a 7.6 cc volume. This regime is adequate for MRI applications. We demonstrate that the homogeneous region can be continuously moved away from the sensor by rotating magnet rod elements, opening the way for NMR sensors with adjustable 'sensitive volumes'

  18. Analysis Method for Isotope Abundance of 13C-urea

    In order to better control the effective content of 13C in 13C-urea reagent, the technique and the conditions for converting 13C-urea sample into the sample gas used in gas isotopic mass spectrometry detection by means of nitrite oxidation method and high temperature burning method were investigated. The results showed that the 13CO2 gas obtained from nitrite oxidation method with 2 mg 13C-urea samples and that from high temperature burning method with 1 mg 13C-urea samples can satisfy the demand of the mass spectrometer detection. The sodium nitrite reagent dosage, the reaction temperature and the reaction time of the sample gas preparation, as well as the treatment effect of copper oxide reagent etc.were sought experimentally. The high abundance 13C-urea testing was completed, the calculation and expression of the detection data were also determined, and the standard deviation were less than ±0.07%. (authors)

  19. Abundance anomaly of the 13C species of CCH

    Sakai, N.; Saruwatari, O.; Sakai, T.; Takano, S.; Yamamoto, S.

    2010-03-01

    Aims: We have observed the N = 1-0 lines of CCH and its 13C isotopic species toward a cold dark cloud, TMC-1 and a star-forming region, L1527, to investigate the 13C abundances and formation pathways of CCH. Methods: The observations have been carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Results: We have successfully detected the lines of 13CCH and C13CH toward the both sources and found a significant intensity difference between the two 13C isotopic species. The [C13CH] /[13CCH] abundance ratios are 1.6 ± 0.4 (3σ) and 1.6 ± 0.1 (3σ) for TMC-1 and L1527, respectively. The abundance difference between C13CH and 13CCH means that the two carbon atoms of CCH are not equivalent in the formation pathway. On the other hand, the [CCH]/[C13CH] and [CCH]/[13CCH] ratios are evaluated to be larger than 170 and 250 toward TMC-1, and to be larger than 80 and 135 toward L1527, respectively. Therefore, both of the 13C species are significantly diluted in comparison with the interstellar 12C/13C ratio of 60. The dilution is discussed in terms of a behavior of 13C in molecular clouds.

  20. Nuclear Composition of Magnetized GRB Jets

    Shibata, Sanshiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the fraction of metal nuclei in the relativistic jets of gamma-ray bursts associated with core-collapse supernovae. We simulate the fallback in jet-induced explosions with two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamics calculations and the jet acceleration with steady, radial, relativistic magnetohydrodynamics calculations, and derive detail nuclear composition of the jet by postprocessing calculation. We found that if the temperature at the jet launch site is above $4.7\\times 10^9$K, quasi-statistical equilibrium (QSE) is established and heavy nuclei are dissociated to light particles such as $^4$He during the acceleration of the jets. The criterion for the survival of metal nuclei is written in terms of the isotropic jet luminosity as $L_{\\rm j}^{\\rm iso} \\lesssim 3.9\\times 10^{50}(R_{\\rm i}/10^7{\\rm cm})^2 (1+\\sigma_{\\rm i})~{\\rm erg~s^{-1}}$, where $R_{\\rm i}$ and $\\sigma_{\\rm i}$ are the initial radius of the jets and the initial magnetization parameter, respectively. If the jet is initially d...

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics.

    Keun, Hector C; Athersuch, Toby J

    2011-01-01

    Biofluids are by far the most commonly studied sample type in metabolic profiling studies, encompassing blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, cell culture media and many others. A number of these fluids can be obtained at a high sampling frequency with minimal invasion, permitting detailed characterisation of dynamic metabolic events. One of the attractive properties of solution-state metabolomics is the ability to generate profiles from these fluids following simple preparation, allowing the analyst to gain a naturalistic, largely unbiased view of their composition that is highly representative of the in vivo situation. Solution-state samples can also be generated from the extraction of tissue or cellular samples that can be tailored to target metabolites with particular properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides an excellent technique for profiling these fluids and is especially adept at characterising complex solutions. Profiling biofluid samples by NMR requires appropriate preparation and experimental conditions to overcome the demands of varied sample matrices, including those with high protein, lipid or saline content, as well as the presence of water in aqueous samples. PMID:21207299

  2. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible

  3. Quantifying microbial utilization of petroleum hydrocarbons in salt-marsh sediments using the ^(13)C content of bacterial rRNA

    Pearson, Ann; Kraunz, Kimberly S.; Sessions, Alex L.; Dekas, Anne E.; Leavitt, William R.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-01-01

    Natural remediation of oil spills is catalyzed by complex microbial consortia. Here we take a whole-community approach to investigate bacterial incorporation of petroleum hydrocarbons from a simulated oil spill. We utilized the natural difference in carbon-isotopic abundance between a salt marsh ecosystem supported by the ^(13)C-enriched C4 grass, Spartina alterniflora, and the ^(13)C-depleted composition of petroleum to monitor changes in the ^(13)C content of biomass. Magnetic-bead capture ...

  4. Quantifying Microbial Utilization of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Salt Marsh Sediments by Using the 13C Content of Bacterial rRNA▿

    Pearson, Ann; Kraunz, Kimberly S.; Sessions, Alex L.; Dekas, Anne E.; Leavitt, William D.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2007-01-01

    Natural remediation of oil spills is catalyzed by complex microbial consortia. Here we took a whole-community approach to investigate bacterial incorporation of petroleum hydrocarbons from a simulated oil spill. We utilized the natural difference in carbon isotopic abundance between a salt marsh ecosystem supported by the 13C-enriched C4 grass Spartina alterniflora and 13C-depleted petroleum to monitor changes in the 13C content of biomass. Magnetic bead capture methods for selective recovery...

  5. A simplified 13C-Urea breath test (13C-UBT) in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection

    Rahman, T.; Bartholomeusz, F.D. L.; Bellon, M.S.; Chatterton, B.E. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide. SA (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-06-01

    Full text: The Urea Breath Test (UBT) is an accurate, noninvasive means of assessing the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. Two tests are currently available, using 13C- and 14C-labelled urea, respectively. 13C is a nonradioactive isotope, unlike 14C, but the 13C-UBT is technically more challenging. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of a simplified 13C-UBT with no test meal, using the 14C-UBT as the previously validated standard. 76 studies were performed on 72 patients; 4 patients performed the test twice. 28 patients were female, 44 male. The mean age was 51.1 years (range 23-86 years). 42 patients presented for post-eradication follow up, and 30 for initial diagnosis. All subjects underwent a 14C-UBT with a 15 minute sample. The 13C-UBT was then performed without a test meal and the breath samples obtained at baseline and 20 minutes. Of the 14C-UBT studies, 27 were positive, ranging from 1372 to 10,987 DPM (Normal <1000 DPM), and 49 were negative, range 177-946 DPM. 26 of the 13C-UBT studies were positive, with a Delta value ranging from 4.29-47.89 (Normal: Delta <3.5), and 50 were negative, range -0.20-2.80. There were 1 false-positive and 2 false-negative 13-UBT studies. This yielded a sensitivity of 92.6% and specificity of 98.0% for the simplified 13C-UBT. From these results we conclude that the simplified 13C-UBT is an accurate means of detecting the presence of Helicobacter pylori within the stomach

  6. A simplified 13C-Urea breath test (13C-UBT) in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection

    Full text: The Urea Breath Test (UBT) is an accurate, noninvasive means of assessing the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. Two tests are currently available, using 13C- and 14C-labelled urea, respectively. 13C is a nonradioactive isotope, unlike 14C, but the 13C-UBT is technically more challenging. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of a simplified 13C-UBT with no test meal, using the 14C-UBT as the previously validated standard. 76 studies were performed on 72 patients; 4 patients performed the test twice. 28 patients were female, 44 male. The mean age was 51.1 years (range 23-86 years). 42 patients presented for post-eradication follow up, and 30 for initial diagnosis. All subjects underwent a 14C-UBT with a 15 minute sample. The 13C-UBT was then performed without a test meal and the breath samples obtained at baseline and 20 minutes. Of the 14C-UBT studies, 27 were positive, ranging from 1372 to 10,987 DPM (Normal <1000 DPM), and 49 were negative, range 177-946 DPM. 26 of the 13C-UBT studies were positive, with a Delta value ranging from 4.29-47.89 (Normal: Delta <3.5), and 50 were negative, range -0.20-2.80. There were 1 false-positive and 2 false-negative 13-UBT studies. This yielded a sensitivity of 92.6% and specificity of 98.0% for the simplified 13C-UBT. From these results we conclude that the simplified 13C-UBT is an accurate means of detecting the presence of Helicobacter pylori within the stomach

  7. Control of coherence among the spins of a single electron and the three nearest neighbor 13C nuclei of a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond

    Individual nuclear spins in diamond can be optically detected through hyperfine couplings with the electron spin of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center; such nuclear spins have outstandingly long coherence times. Among the hyperfine couplings in the NV center, the nearest neighbor 13C nuclear spins have the largest coupling strength. Nearest neighbor 13C nuclear spins have the potential to perform fastest gate operations, providing highest fidelity in quantum computing. Herein, we report on the control of coherences in the NV center where all three nearest neighbor carbons are of the 13C isotope. Coherence among the three and four qubits are generated and analyzed at room temperature

  8. Control of coherence among the spins of a single electron and the three nearest neighbor {sup 13}C nuclei of a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond

    Shimo-Oka, T.; Miwa, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Mizuochi, N., E-mail: mizuochi@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Kato, H.; Yamasaki, S. [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Jelezko, F. [Institut für Quantenoptik, Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2015-04-13

    Individual nuclear spins in diamond can be optically detected through hyperfine couplings with the electron spin of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center; such nuclear spins have outstandingly long coherence times. Among the hyperfine couplings in the NV center, the nearest neighbor {sup 13}C nuclear spins have the largest coupling strength. Nearest neighbor {sup 13}C nuclear spins have the potential to perform fastest gate operations, providing highest fidelity in quantum computing. Herein, we report on the control of coherences in the NV center where all three nearest neighbor carbons are of the {sup 13}C isotope. Coherence among the three and four qubits are generated and analyzed at room temperature.

  9. Delta /sup 13/C fractionation in Tarbela dam fish

    The paper focuses on the study of naturally occurring /sup 13/C fractionation in Tarbela dam fish. Craig noted that gamma /sup 13/C values for animal tissues fall in the range as their food supply. DeNiro and Epstein demonstrated clearly that the carbon isotope composition of an animal greatly depends on its diet. The above mentioned statements were observed while studying the isotopic composition of carbon in different parts of the fish. Living fish was purchased from the Haripur side of the Tarbela lake. Different portions were separated and fish diet was collected from the fish stomach. Samples were dried in the oven at 40-50 deg. C for five days. Ground, homogenized and ignited with research grade oxygen at 900-1000 deg. C. CO and CO /sub 2/ were produced and CO was converted to CO/sub 2/ by circulation over CuO gauge furnace at 900 deg. C. CO/sub 2/ was purified using 70 deg. C slush and analyzed on Varian Mat (GD-150) mass spectrometer for gamma /sup 13/C measurements. The results show that fish flesh sup/13 C value is nearly similar to fish diet gamma /sup 13/C. gamma /sup 13/C values to different parts of the fish departed from that of the diet in the sequence: fish swim bladder (-22.04) >ribs (2-22.26)>skin (122.91)>diet (123.22)>flesh (-23.40)> vertebral column (-24.07). It is concluded that diet is easily metabolized in the fish flesh and skin tissues through blood streams without causing any pronounced fractionation. Fractionation was observed in the fish endo skeleton system due to which fish ribs become enriched in gamma /sup 13/C than vertebral column. Fractionation was also detected in visceral muscles (swim bladder) of the fish as comparison with somatic axial trunk muscle (fish flesh). (author)

  10. Synthesis and GIAO NMR Calculations for Some Novel 4-Heteroarylidenamino-4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5-one Derivatives: Comparison of Theoretical and Experimental 1Hand 13C- Chemical Shifts

    Haci Baykara

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: 3-Alkyl(aryl-4-amino-4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5-ones (1 reacted with 5-methylfuran-2-carboxyaldehyde to afford the corresponding 3-alkyl(aryl-4-(5-methyl-2-furylmethylenamino-4,5-dihydro-1H-1,2,4-triazol-5-ones (2. Four newly synthesized compounds have been characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and UV spectral data. In addition, isotropic 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic shielding constants of compounds 3 were calculated by employing the direct implementation of the gaugeincluding-atomic-orbital (GIAO method at the B3LYP density functional and HF levels of the theory. The geometry of each compound has been optimized using a 6-311G basis set. Nuclear shielding constants were also calculated by using 6-311G basis set. Theoretical values are compared to the experimental data.

  11. Nuclear magnetic tomography in the differential diagnosis of liver disease

    Roedl, W.

    1985-05-01

    In evaluating nuclear magnetic tomography for the diagnosis of liver disease, one must differentiate between circumscribed and diffuse lesions. Nuclear magnetic tomography provides additional information for lesions which are echogenic on ultrasound and can differentiate between metastases, haemangiomas and hamartomas. In diffuse parenchymal disease measurement of relaxation time can differentiate between fatty liver, cirrhosis (alcoholic, primary biliary), haemochromatosis (cirrhotic transformation) and hepatoma. NMR spectroscopy is a method for the future.

  12. Implementation of Quantum Logic Gates by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    DU Jiang-Feng; WU Ji-Hui; SHI Ming-Jun; HAN Liang; ZHOU Xian-Yi; YE Bang-Jiao; WENG Hui-Ming; HAN Rong-Dian

    2000-01-01

    Using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques with a solution of cytosine molecules, we show an implementation of certain quantum logic gates (including NOT gate, square-root of NOT gate and controlled-NOT gate), which have central importance in quantum computing. In addition, experimental results show that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can efficiently measure the result of quantum computing without attendant wave-function collapse.

  13. Coherent control of an NV$^-$ center with one adjacent 13C

    Scharfenberger, Burkhard; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the theoretically achievable fidelities when coherently controlling an effective three qubit system consisting of a negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV$^-$) center in diamond with an additional nearby carbon $^{13}$C spin $I_{\\text{C}}=1/2$ via square radio and microwave frequency pulses in different magnetic field regimes. Such a system has potentially interesting applications in quantum information related tasks such as distributed quantum computation or quantum repeater ...

  14. New methods in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    The advantages of the NMR-spectroscopy at high fields are particularly obvious in structure determination of natural compounds. Only small amounts of substance are necessary today and in most cases classical NMR-techniques are sufficient to get the relevant structure parameters chemical shift and J-coupling. For the examination of smallest amounts, new one dimensional (1D) pulse sequences have been introduced in the last few years. They also allow the observation of weak nuclei e.g. 13C, 15N. The greatest advances are observed in the field of two dimensional (2D) NMR-spectroscopy. There is no doubt that this technique is of general importance for chemists, especially in the determination of complex natural compounds. (orig.)

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the ferroelastic phase transition of order-disorder type in [N(C2H5)4]2CdCl4

    Lim, Ae Ran; Kim, Min Soo; Lim, Kye-Young

    2016-08-01

    This study uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to examine the detailed changes in [N(C2H5)4]2CdCl4 around its phase transition at the temperature TC = 284 K. The chemical shifts and spin-lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame (T1ρ) were determined from 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR and 13C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR spectra. The two sets of inequivalent 1H and 13C nuclei in CH3 and CH2 were distinguished. A ferroelastic phase transition was observed at TC, without structural symmetry change. The phase transition is mainly attributed to the orientational ordering of the [N(C2H5)4]+ cations, and the spectral splitting at low temperature is associated with different ferroelastic domains.

  16. GEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used in the Earth Sciences as a means of obtaining information about the molecular-scale environment of fluids in porous geological materials. Laboratory experiments were conducted to advance our fundamental understanding of the link between the NMR response and the geochemical properties of geological materials. In the first part of this research project, we studied the impact of both the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of the pore space and the surface relaxivity on the NMR response of fluids in sand-clay mixtures. This study highlighted the way in which these two parameters control our ability to use NMR measurements to detect and quantify fluid saturation in multiphase saturated systems. The second part of the project was designed to explore the way in which the mineralogic form of iron, as opposed to simply the concentration of iron, affects the surface relaxation rate and, more generally, the NMR response of porous materials. We found that the magnitude of the surface relaxation rate was different for the various iron-oxide minerals because of changes in both the surface-area-to-volume ratio of the pore space, and the surface relaxivity. Of particular significance from this study was the finding of an anomalously large surface relaxivity of magnetite compared to that of the other iron minerals. Differences in the NMR response of iron minerals were seen in column experiments during the reaction of ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand with aqueous Fe(II) solutions to form goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite; indicating the potential use of NMR as a means of monitoring geochemical reactions. The final part of the research project investigated the impact of heterogeneity, at the pore-scale, on the NMR response. This work highlighted the way in which the geochemistry, by controlling the surface relaxivity, has a significant impact on the link between NMR data and the microgeometry of the pore space.

  17. Synthesis and applications of {sup 13}C glycerol

    Stocking, E.; Khalsa, O.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Due in part to the use of labeled glycerol for the {sup 13}C enrichment of biomolecules, we are currently developing new synthetic routes to various isotopomers of glycerol. Judging from our experience, traditional methods of glycerol synthesis are not easily adapted for isotopic enrichment and/or have poor overall yields (12 to 15%). Furthermore, the use of glycerol for enrichment can be prohibitively expensive and its availability is limited by the level of demand. We are presently developing a short de novo synthesis of glycerol from carbon dioxide ({approximately}53% overall yield for four steps) and are examining the feasibility of synthesizing site-specific {sup 13}C-labeled glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) from labeled methanol and carbon dioxide. One application of {sup 13}C glycerol we have examined is enzymatic conversion of glycerol to glyceraldehyde-3-monophosphate or dihydroxyacetone monophosphate (DHAP) with yields ranging from 25 to 50% (as determined by NMR spectroscopy). We are also pursuing the chemical conversion of {sup 13}C-labeled DHA to DHAP. We are especially interested in {sup 13}C-labeled DHAP because we are investigating its use as a chemo-enzymatic precursor for both labeled 2-deoxyribose and 2-deoxyribonucleic acids.

  18. A scientific workflow framework for (13)C metabolic flux analysis.

    Dalman, Tolga; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2016-08-20

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) with (13)C labeling data is a high-precision technique to quantify intracellular reaction rates (fluxes). One of the major challenges of (13)C MFA is the interactivity of the computational workflow according to which the fluxes are determined from the input data (metabolic network model, labeling data, and physiological rates). Here, the workflow assembly is inevitably determined by the scientist who has to consider interacting biological, experimental, and computational aspects. Decision-making is context dependent and requires expertise, rendering an automated evaluation process hardly possible. Here, we present a scientific workflow framework (SWF) for creating, executing, and controlling on demand (13)C MFA workflows. (13)C MFA-specific tools and libraries, such as the high-performance simulation toolbox 13CFLUX2, are wrapped as web services and thereby integrated into a service-oriented architecture. Besides workflow steering, the SWF features transparent provenance collection and enables full flexibility for ad hoc scripting solutions. To handle compute-intensive tasks, cloud computing is supported. We demonstrate how the challenges posed by (13)C MFA workflows can be solved with our approach on the basis of two proof-of-concept use cases. PMID:26721184

  19. 170 Nanometer Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    Thurber, K R; Smith, D D; Thurber, Kent R.; Harrell, Lee E.; Smith, Doran D.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate one-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the semiconductor GaAs with 170 nanometer slice separation and resolve two regions of reduced nuclear spin polarization density separated by only 500 nanometers. This is achieved by force detection of the magnetic resonance, Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM), in combination with optical pumping to increase the nuclear spin polarization. Optical pumping of the GaAs creates spin polarization up to 12 times larger than the thermal nuclear spin polarization at 5 K and 4 T. The experiment is sensitive to sample volumes containing $\\sim 4 \\times 10^{11}$ $^{71}$Ga$/\\sqrt{Hz}$. These results demonstrate the ability of force-detected magnetic resonance to apply magnetic resonance imaging to semiconductor devices and other nanostructures.

  20. Inclusion of 13C and D in protonated acetylene

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Roueff, Evelyne; Lee, Timothy J.

    2016-04-01

    The rovibrational spectrum of cyclic, protonated acetylene has been established. The improvement in modern telescopes coupled with the different branching ratios in reaction models welcomes study of 13C-substitution for C2H3+. Quartic force fields (QFFs) have been previously utilized to predict the antisymmetric HCCH stretch in standard c-C2H3+ to within 0.1 cm-1 of experiment and are employed here to generate rovibrational insights for the 13C isotopologues. The zero-point energies are also given for the cyclic and 'Y'-shaped isomers for both 13C and D substitutions. Vibrational intensities and the dipole moments are provided in order to characterize more fully this simple cation.

  1. {sup 13}C relaxation in an RNA hairpin

    King, G.C. [Univ. of South Wales, Kensington (Australia)]|[Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Akratos, C. [Univ. of South Wales, Kensington (Australia); Xi, Z.; Michnica, M.J. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This initial survey of {sup 13}C relaxation in the {triangle}TAR RNA element has generated a number of interesting results that should prove generally useful for future studies. The most readily comparable study in the literature monitored {sup 13}C relaxation of the methyl groups from unusual bases in tRNA{sup Phe}. The study, which used T{sub 1} and NOE data only, reported order parameters for the methyl group axis that ranged between 0.51 and 0.97-a range similar to that observed here. However, they reported a breakdown of the standard order parameter analysis at higher (118-MHz {sup 13}C) frequencies, which should serve to emphasize the need for a thorough exploration of suitable motional models.

  2. Backbone dynamics of a model membrane protein: assignment of the carbonyl carbon 13C NMR resonances in detergent-solubilized M13 coat protein

    The major coat protein of the filamentous bacteriophage M13 is a 50-residue amphiphilic polypeptide which is inserted, as an integral membrane-spanning protein, in the inner membrane of the Escherichia coli host during infection. 13C was incorporated biosynthetically into a total of 23 of the peptide carbonyls using labeled amino acids (alanine, glycine, lysine, phenylalanine, and proline). The structure and dynamics of carbonyl-labeled M13 coat protein were monitored by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Assignment of many resonances was achieved by using protease digestion, pH titration, or labeling of the peptide bond with both 13C and 15N. The carbonyl region of the natural-abundance 13C NMR spectrum of M13 coat protein in sodium dodecyl sulfate solution shows approximately eight backbone carbonyl resonances with line widths much narrower than the rest. Three of these more mobile residues correspond to assigned peaks (glycine-3, lysine-48, and alanine-49) in the individual amino acid spectra, and another almost certainly arises from glutamic acid-2. A ninth residue, alanine-1, also gives rise to a very narrow carbonyl resonance if the pH is well above or below the pK/sub a/ of the terminal amino group. These data suggest that only about four residues at either end of the protein experience large-amplitude spatial fluctuations; the rest of the molecule is essentially rigid on the time scale of the overall rotational tumbling of the protein-detergent complex. The relative exposure of different regions of detergent-bound protein was monitored by limited digestion with proteinase K. Comparable spectra and digestion patterns were obtained when the protein was solubilized in sodium deoxycholate, suggesting that the coat protein binds both amphiphiles in a similar fashion

  3. Determination of the 13C/12C ratio of ethanol derived from fruit juices and maple syrup by isotope ratio mass spectrometry: collaborative study.

    Jamin, Eric; Martin, Frédérique; Martin, Gilles G

    2004-01-01

    A collaborative study of the carbon-13 isotope ratio mass spectrometry (13C-IRMS) method based on fermentation ethanol for detecting some sugar additions in fruit juices and maple syrup is reported. This method is complementary to the site-specific natural isotope fractionation by nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) method for detecting added beet sugar in the same products (AOAC Official Methods 995.17 and 2000.19), and uses the same initial steps to recover pure ethanol. The fruit juices or maple syrups are completely fermented with yeast, and the alcohol is distilled with a quantitative yield (>96%). The carbon-13 deviation (delta13C) of ethanol is then determined by IRMS. This parameter becomes less negative when exogenous sugar derived from plants exhibiting a C4 metabolism (e.g., corn or cane) is added to a juice obtained from plants exhibiting a C3 metabolism (most common fruits except pineapple) or to maple syrup. Conversely, the delta13C of ethanol becomes more negative when exogenous sugar derived from C3 plants (e.g., beet, wheat, rice) is added to pineapple products. Twelve laboratories analyzed 2 materials (orange juice and pure cane sugar) in blind duplicate and 4 sugar-adulterated materials (orange juice, maple syrup, pineapple juice, and apple juice) as Youden pairs. The precision of that method for measuring delta13C was similar to that of other methods applied to wine ethanol or extracted sugars in juices. The within-laboratory (Sr) values ranged from 0.06 to 0.16%o (r = 0.17 to 0.46 percent per thousand), and the among-laboratories (SR) values ranged from 0.17 to 0.26 percent per thousand (R = 0.49 to 0.73 percent per thousand). The Study Directors recommend that the method be adopted as First Action by AOAC INTERNATIONAL. PMID:15287660

  4. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Computing Using Liquid Crystal Solvents

    Yannoni, C S; Vandersypen, L M K; Miller, D C; Kubinec, M G; Chuang, I L; Yannoni, Costantino S.; Sherwood, Mark H.; Vandersypen, Lieven M.K.; Miller, Dolores C.; Kubinec, Mark G.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    1999-01-01

    Liquid crystals offer several advantages as solvents for molecules used for NMR quantum computing (NMRQC). The dipolar coupling between nuclear spins manifest in the NMR spectra of molecules oriented by a liquid crystal permits a significant increase in clock frequency, while short spin-lattice relaxation times permit fast recycling of algorithms, and save time in calibration and signal-enhancement experiments. Furthermore, the use of liquid crystal solvents offers scalability in the form of an expanded library of spin-bearing molecules suitable for NMRQC. These ideas are demonstrated with the successful execution of a 2-qubit Grover search using a molecule ($^{13}$C$^{1}$HCl$_3$) oriented in a liquid crystal and a clock speed eight times greater than in an isotropic solvent. Perhaps more importantly, five times as many logic operations can be executed within the coherence time using the liquid crystal solvent.

  5. Transport and imaging of brute-force 13C hyperpolarization

    Hirsch, Matthew L.; Smith, Bryce A.; Mattingly, Mark; Goloshevsky, Artem G.; Rosay, Melanie; Kempf, James G.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate transport of hyperpolarized frozen 1-13C pyruvic acid from its site of production to a nearby facility, where a time series of 13C images was acquired from the aqueous dissolution product. Transportability is tied to the hyperpolarization (HP) method we employ, which omits radical electron species used in other approaches that would otherwise relax away the HP before reaching the imaging center. In particular, we attained 13C HP by 'brute-force', i.e., using only low temperature and high-field (e.g., T water and obtaining a 13C image of the hyperpolarized, dilute, aqueous product (∼0.01% 13C polarization, a >100-fold gain over thermal signals in the 1 T scanner). An annealing step, prior to polarizing the sample, was also key for increasing T1 ∼ 30-fold during transport. In that time, HP was maintained using only modest cryogenics and field (T ∼ 60 K and B = 1.3 T), for T1(13C) near 5 min. Much greater time and distance (with much smaller losses) may be covered using more-complete annealing and only slight improvements on transport conditions (e.g., yielding T1 ∼ 5 h at 30 K, 2 T), whereas even intercity transfer is possible (T1 > 20 h) at reasonable conditions of 6 K and 2 T. Finally, it is possible to increase the overall enhancement near d-DNP levels (i.e., 102-fold more) by polarizing below 100 mK, where nanoparticle agents are known to hasten T1 buildup by 100-fold, and to yield very little impact on T1 losses at temperatures relevant to transport.

  6. Selective diagonal-free 13C,13C-edited aliphatic–aromatic NOESY experiment with non-uniform sampling

    A band-selective aromatic–aliphatic C,C-edited four-dimensional NOESY experiment is proposed here. Its key advantage is the absence of auto-correlation signals which makes it very attractive for joint use with non-uniform sampling. It is demonstrated here that the sensitivity of the experiment is not significantly affected by utilization of selective pulses (for either aromatic-13C or aliphatic-13C spins). The method was applied to the sample of E32Q mutant of human S100A1 protein, a homodimer of total molecular mass ∼20 kDa. High-resolution 4D spectra were obtained from ∼1.5 % of sampling points required conventionally. It is shown that superior resolution facilitates unambiguous assignment of observed aliphatic–aromatic cross-peaks. Additionally, the addition of aliphatic-13C dimension enables to resolve peaks with degenerated aliphatic 1H chemical shifts. All observed cross-peaks were validated against previously determined 3D structure of E32Q mutant of S100A1 protein (PDB 2LHL). The increased reliability of structural constraints obtained from the proposed high-resolution 4D 13C(ali),13C(aro)-edited NOESY can be exploited in the automated protocols of structure determination of proteins

  7. Susceptibility effects in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    The properties of dephasing and the resulting relaxation of the magnetization are the basic principle on which all magnetic resonance imaging methods are based. The signal obtained from the gyrating spins is essentially determined by the properties of the considered tissue. Especially the susceptibility differences caused by magnetized materials (for example, deoxygenated blood, BOLD-effect) or magnetic nanoparticles are becoming more important for biomedical imaging. In the present work, the influence of such field inhomogeneities on the NMR-signal is analyzed. (orig.)

  8. Synthesis of [5,6-13C2, 1-14C]olivetolic acid, methyl [1'-13C]olivetolate and [5,6-13C2, 1-14C]cannabigerolic acid

    Potential advanced intermediates in the biosynthesis of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the major psychoactive principle of marijuana, have been synthesized labeled with two contiguous 13C atoms and 14C. Methyl [5,6-13C2, 1-14C]olivetolate was prepared from lithium [13C2]acetylide and dimethyl [2-14C]malonate. Reaction with geranyl bromide afforded methyl [5,6-13C2, 1-14C]cannabigerolate, and hydrolysis of these methyl esters with lithium propyl mercaptide yielded the corresponding labeled acids. The 13C-13C couplings observable in the 13C NMR spectra of these 13C-enriched compounds and their synthetic precursors are recorded. Methyl [1'-14C]olivetolate was prepared from 13CO2 to confirm assignments of the 13C chemical shifts in the pentyl side chain of these compounds. (author)

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in pancreatic disorders

    Ofer Kaplan

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS is a powerful technique that enables continuous monitoring of biochemical processes in tissues and organs in a non-invasive manner. A model of isolated perfused rat pancreas, suitable for NMRS studies, was developed. Acute pancreatitis was induced by injections of either 0.5 ml 5% sodium taurocholate (TC into the bile duets, or 1.0 ml 10% TC injections into the pancreatic parenchyma. Phosphorous (31P NMRS of experimental pancreatitis were characterized by a transient signal at -0.18±0.04 ppm which was assigned as solubilized lecithin, and can be used as an indicator of the early phases of the discase. Depletion of the high energy phosphorous compounds, phosphocreatine and ATP, were also found during acute pancreatitis, and paralleled the extension of the pathological damage. The role of NMRS in pancreatic cancer diagnosis and its treatment were assessed in three models of pancreatic neoplasms. Perfused MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells, subcutancously implanted pancreatic tumors in hamsters, and pancreatic tumors induced in-situ in rats by direct appiication of the carcinogen 7,12-dimethyl benzanthracene, were studied by phosphorous (31P, sodium (23Na and proton (¹H NMRS. 31P spectra of pancreatic cancer were qualitatively similar to those of intact organs. However, 31P NMRS was found to be useful for monitoring the effects of treatment. Total (infra- and extracellular sodium concentrations, measured in the solid tumors, were similar in both the normal pancreas and the pancreatic tumors (39-40 mmol/g wet weight. Proton spectra of perchloric acid extracts revealed several differences between tumors and control pancreases. The principal findings were elevated levels of the amino acid taurine, from I.17±O.39 mmol/g wet weight in healthy pancreases, to 2.79±0.71 mmol/g wet weight in pancreatic carcinoma in rats, and lactate levels which increased from 0.92±0.2 to 6.19±1.93 mmol/g wet weight

  10. GCE and solar S-process abundances. Dependence on the 13C-pocket structure

    We study the s-process abundances (A>90) at the epoch of the formation of the solar-system as the outcome of nucleosynthesis occurring in AGB stars of various initial masses and metallicities. AGB yields are computed with an updated neutron capture network and updated initial solar abundances. We use a Galactic Chemical Evolution (GCE) code based on, slightly modified accounting for the new determination of the age of the Universe (13.8 Gyr [3]) and solar abundances by [4]. At present, one of the most problematic issues of AGB stellar models is the formation of the 13C-pocket, where the major neutron source of the s-process (the 13C(α, n)16O reaction) burns radiatively. Indeed, the internal structure of the 13C-pocket may depend on the stellar characteristic (e.g., AGB initial mass and metallicity), and on the interplay between physical mechanisms that may compete in the star itself (e.g., rotation, magnetic fields, gravity waves). Because of the present uncertainties, we adopt in our AGB models a free parametrization of the 13C-pocket as has been done by [1]: this approximation allow us to investigate the impact of different internal structures of the 13C-pocket on the GCE s-distribution. We discuss our results in the light of the most recent studies.We follow the chemical evolution of several elements (e.g., α, Zr, Ba, Eu) along the stellar age and metallicity, comparing our results with the most update spectroscopic observations (e.g., [11,12]). (author)

  11. Renal ischemia and reperfusion assessment with three-dimensional hyperpolarized (13) C,(15) N2-urea

    Nielsen, Per Mose; Szocska Hansen, Esben Søvsø; Nørlinger, Thomas Stokholm;

    2016-01-01

    . METHODS: Hyperpolarized three-dimensional balanced steady-state (13) C magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments alongside kidney function parameters and quantitative polymerase chain reaction measurements were performed in rats subjected to unilateral renal ischemia for 60-minute and 24-hour......,(15) N2 urea MRI can be used to successfully detect changes in the intrarenal urea gradient post-IRI, thereby enabling in vivo monitoring of the intrarenal functional status in the rat kidney. Magn Reson Med, 2016. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine....

  12. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance) involving quantum Hall states (QHSs) was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs

  13. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    Tomimatsu, Toru, E-mail: tomimatsu@ils.uec.ac.jp; Shirai, Shota; Hashimoto, Katsushi, E-mail: hashi@m.tohoku.ac.jp; Sato, Ken [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Hirayama, Yoshiro [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance) involving quantum Hall states (QHSs) was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs.

  14. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    Toru Tomimatsu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance involving quantum Hall states (QHSs was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs.

  15. /sup 13/C-NMR of diterpenes with rosane skeleton

    da Cunha Pinto, A.; Garcez, W.S.; Ficara, M.L.G.; Vasconcelos, T.C.; Pereira, A.L.; Gomes, L.N.L.F.; Frechiani, M.doC.; Patitucci, M.L. (Rio de Janeiro Univ. (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisas de Produtos Naturais)

    1982-03-01

    /sup 13/C-NMR data of three diterpenoids with rosane skeleton isolated from Vellozia candida Mikan, and of their oxidated and acetylated derivatives are presented. The main effects caused by small structural differences are discussed and used in the assignment of the chemical shifts of all carbons.

  16. Revisiting the metathesis of 13C-monolabeled ethane

    Maury, Olivier

    2010-12-13

    The metathesis of 13C-monolabeled ethane leads to the parallel occurrence of degenerate and productive reactions, affording the statistical distribution of the various product isotopomers, which can be rationalized in terms of a mechanistic reaction scheme combining both processes. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  17. Direct 13C NMR Detection in HPLC Hyphenation Mode

    Wubshet, Sileshi Gizachew; Johansen, Kenneth; Nyberg, Nils;

    2012-01-01

    is indubitable in simplifying structural elucidations. In the current study, we demonstrated direct (13)C NMR detection of triterpenoids from a Ganoderma lucidum extract in hyphenation mode. The combined advantage of a cryogenically cooled probe, miniaturization, and multiple trapping enabled the...

  18. Cardiac metabolism measured noninvasively by hyperpolarized 13C MRI

    Golman, K.; Petersson, J.S.; Magnusson, P.;

    2008-01-01

    was almost absent (0.2-11%) and the alanine signal was reduced (27-51%). Due to image-folding artifacts the data obtained for lactate were inconclusive. These studies demonstrate that cardiac metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized 1-(13)C-pyruvate is feasible. The changes in concentrations of the...

  19. 13C NMR of diterpenes with isopimarane structure

    Several effects of the Δ sup(8(9)) double bond on the 13C NMR data of isopimarane diterpenoids are discussed, including chemical shifts and acetilation of the C-7 Hydroxyl radical on the above mentioned double bond. (C.L.B.)

  20. Study of hydrogen in coals, polymers, oxides, and muscle water by nuclear magnetic resonance; extension of solid-state high-resolution techniques. [Hydrogen molybdenum bronze

    Ryan, L.M.

    1981-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been an important analytical and physical research tool for several decades. One area of NMR which has undergone considerable development in recent years is high resolution NMR of solids. In particular, high resolution solid state /sup 13/C NMR spectra exhibiting features similar to those observed in liquids are currently achievable using sophisticated pulse techniques. The work described in this thesis develops analogous methods for high resolution /sup 1/H NMR of rigid solids. Applications include characterization of hydrogen aromaticities in fossil fuels, and studies of hydrogen in oxides and bound water in muscle.

  1. Does the Shuram δ13C excursion record Ediacaran oxygenation?

    Husson, J. M.; Maloof, A. C.; Schoene, B.; Higgins, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The most negative carbon isotope excursion in Earth history is found in carbonate rocks of the Ediacaran Period (635-542 Ma). Known colloquially as the the 'Shuram' excursion, workers have long noted its tantalizing, broad concordance with the rise of abundant macro-scale fossils in the rock record, variously interpreted as animals, giant protists, macro-algae and lichen, and known as the 'Ediacaran Biota.' Thus, the Shuram excursion has been interpreted by many in the context of a dramatically changing redox state of the Ediacaran oceans - e.g., a result of methane cycling in a low O2 atmosphere, the final destruction of a large pool of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and the step-wise oxidation of the Ediacaran oceans. More recently, diagenetic interpretations of the Shuram excursion - e.g. sedimentary in-growth of very δ13C depleted authigenic carbonates, meteoric alteration of Ediacaran carbonates, late-stage burial diagenesis - have challenged the various Ediacaran redox models. A rigorous geologic context is required to discriminate between these explanatory models, and determine whether the Shuram excursion can be used to evaluate terminal Neoproterozoic oxygenation. Here, we present chemo-stratigraphic data (δ13C, δ18O, δ44/42Ca and redox sensitive trace element abundances) from 12 measured sections of the Ediacaran-aged Wonoka Formation (Fm.) of South Australia that require a syn-depositional age for the extraordinary range of δ13C values (-12 to +4‰) observed in the formation. In some locations, the Wonoka Fm. is ~700 meters (m) of mixed shelf limestones and siliclastics that record the full 16 ‰ δ13C excursion in a remarkably consistent fashion across 100s of square kilometers of basin area. Fabric-altering diagenesis, where present, occurs at the sub-meter vertical scale, only results in sub-permil offsets in δ13C and cannot be used to explain the full δ13C excursion. In other places, the Wonoka Fm. is host to deep (1 km

  2. Effective Giromagnetic Ratios in Artifical Nuclear Magnetization Pumping of the Noble Gases Mix

    Popov E.N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic of the nuclear magnetization of the two noble gases mix was studied in this research. Nuclear magnetization pumped along the induction of external magnetic field. Vector of nuclear magnetization is given a tilt by the week rotational magnetic field, which makes NMR for noble gases. Interaction between the nuclear magnetic moments of the different noble gases adducted to shifts at the frequency of nuclear moments precession in external magnetic field. Effective gyromagnetic ratios of the nuclear of noble gases is defined and it different from the tabulated value. There is theoretical calculation of effective gyromagnetic ratios in this research.

  3. Magnet Design Considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    Zhai, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kessel, C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); El-Guebaly, L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States) Fusion Technology Institute; Titus, P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility that provides a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared with ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, i.e., 30 times higher neutron fluence with three orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center with a plasma major radius of 4.8 m and a minor radius of 1.2 m and a peak field of 15.5 T on the toroidal field (TF) coils for the FNSF. Both low-temperature superconductors (LTS) and high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high-performance ternary restacked-rod process Nb3Sn strands for TF magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high-aspect-ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets, but low-activation-jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. The material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets.

  4. Magnet design considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility to provide a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between ITER and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared to ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, 30 times higher neutron fluence with 3 orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center with plasma major radius of 4.8 m and minor radius of 1.2 m, and a peak field of 15.5 T on the TF coils for FNSF. Both low temperature superconductor (LTS) and high temperature superconductor (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high performance ternary Restack Rod Process (RRP) Nb3Sn strands for toroidal field (TF) magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high aspect ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets but low activation jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. As a result, the material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets

  5. Resonances excited by the 9Be(6Li,d)13C reaction

    Alpha resonant states in 13C up to 15 MeV were excited by the 9Be(6Li,d)13C reaction. The data were taken at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the Sao Paulo-Pelletron-Enge Split Pole facility and the nuclear emulsion technique. The resolution of 50 keV allowed for the separation of the resonant contributions to the known 7/2- and (5/2-) states near the 9Be + α threshold both associated with an L = 4 transfer. Several narrow alpha resonant states not previously measured were detected, in particular the one at the 3α + n threshold populated by an L = 2 transfer, revealing a 9Be + α component for the 1/2- cluster state candidate at this threshold. (author)

  6. 1H, 13C and 31P-NMR spectroscopic study of glucose metabolism of muscle larva Trichinella spiralis (U.S.A. strain), and the effects of the end-products on the host (mouse)

    1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to identify and quantitate metabolites excreted by muscle larva Trichinella spiralis maintained aerobically in the presence of D- (13C6) glucose and (1, 1'-13C2) succinate. End-products of glucose metabolism studied by 1H-NMR were lactate, acetate, succinate, proionate, n-valerate and alanine, at the molar ratio of 1:2:1:0.6:0.5:0.6. 13C-NMR measurement proved that all the products originated from the glucose in the medium via the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase-succinate pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In vivo 31P-NMR spectra were also taken by the surface coil method from the leg muscle of mice which had been infected with T. spiralis. Intracelluar pH and relative amount of ATP in the leg muscle of the infected mice were found to decrease significantly as compared with that of control mice. (author)

  7. Conformational study of C8 diazocine turn mimics using 3JCH coupling constants with 13C in natural abundance

    The conformations of two diazocine turn mimics, which were later incorporated into GPIIb/IIIa peptide antagonists, were investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The two compounds, methyl (2,5-dioxo-3-(S)-(3-ω-tosylguanidino-propyl)-4-methyl-octahydro-1,4-dazocin-1-yl)acetate (1) and methyl (2,5-dioxo-3-(S)-(3-ω-tosyl-guanidino-propyl)-octahydro-1,5-diazocin-1-yl)acetate (2), differ only in their substituent at the diazocine position 4 nitrogen, yet this substitution results in a marked difference in the affinity of the resulting analogs for the GPIIb/IIIa receptor. It was of interest to determine if the difference observed in the antagonistic potency between these analogs was related to constitutional or, perhaps, conformational differences. The backbone conformations of these two molecules can be determined by measuring vicinal coupling constants along the trimethylene portion of the C8 ring backbone and by measuring interproton NOE intensities between the diazocine methine proton and the protons of the trimethylene group. For compound 1, 3JHH values measured from a P.E.COSY spectrum and interproton distances calculated from ROESY buildup curves indicated the presence of a single C8 ring backbone conformation where the trimethylene bridge adopted a staggered conformation and the Hα1 and Hγ1 protons of the trimethylene group were 2.2 A from the methine proton. For compound 2, however, partial overlap of the central Hβ1 and Hβ2 protons made it impossible to measure 3JHH values from the P.E.COSY spectrum. We therefore used a 13C-filtered TOCSY experiment to measure the 3JCH values in both compounds 1 and 2. These heteronuclear vicinal coupling constants measured with 13C in natural abundance in conjunction with measured interproton NOE intensities indicate that these compounds share a common C8 ring backbone conformation

  8. Application of 13C NMR spectroscopy to characterize organic chemical components of decomposing coarse woody debris from different climatic regions

    Takuya Hishinuma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy was applied to coarse woody debris (CWD in different stages of decomposition and collected from forest floor of a subtropical, a cool temperate, and a subalpine forest in Japan. The purpose was to test its applicability to characterize organic chemical composition of CWD of broad-leaved and coniferous trees from different climatic conditions. O-alkyl-C, mainly representing carbohydrates, was the predominant component of CWD at the three sites, accounting for 43.5-58.1% of the NMR spectra. Generally, the relative area under the signals for aromatic-C and phenolic-C, mainly representing lignin, increased, whereas the relative area for O-alkyl-C decreased, as the decay class advanced. The relative area under NMR chemical shift regions was significantly correlated with the chemical properties examined with proximate analyses. That is, O-alkyl-C and di-O-alkyl-C NMR signal areas were positively correlated with the volumetric density of CWD and the content of total carbohydrates. Methoxyl-C, aromatic-C, phenolic-C, carboxyl-C, and carbonyl-C were positively correlated with the contents of acid-unhydrolyzable residues (lignin, tannins, and cutin and nitrogen. Lignin-C calculated from NMR signals increased, and polysaccharide-C decreased, with the decay class of CWD at the three study sites. A review of previous studies on 13C NMR spectroscopy for decomposing CWD suggested further needs of its application to broad-leaved trees from tropical and subtropical regions.

  9. Identification of aquatically available carbon from algae through solution-state NMR of whole (13)C-labelled cells.

    Akhter, Mohammad; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Fortier-McGill, Blythe; Soong, Ronald; Liaghati-Mobarhan, Yalda; Simpson, Myrna; Arhonditsis, George; Schmidt, Sebastian; Heumann, Hermann; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Green algae and cyanobacteria are primary producers with profound impact on food web functioning. Both represent key carbon sources and sinks in the aquatic environment, helping modulate the dissolved organic matter balance and representing a potential biofuel source. Underlying the impact of algae and cyanobacteria on an ecosystem level is their molecular composition. Herein, intact (13)C-labelled whole cell suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis were studied using a variety of 1D and 2D (1)H/(13)C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy of whole cell suspensions is particularly relevant as it identifies species that are mobile (dissolved or dynamic gels), 'aquatically available' and directly contribute to the aquatic carbon pool upon lysis, death or become a readily available food source on consumption. In this study, a wide range of metabolites and structural components were identified within the whole cell suspensions. In addition, significant differences in the lipid/triacylglyceride (TAG) content of green algae and cyanobacteria were confirmed. Mobile species in algae are quite different from those in abundance in 'classic' dissolved organic matter (DOM) indicating that if algae are major contributors to DOM, considerable selective preservation of minor components (e.g. sterols) or biotransformation would have to occur. Identifying the metabolites and dissolved components within algal cells by NMR permits future studies of carbon transfer between species and through the food chain, whilst providing a foundation to better understand the role of algae in the formation of DOM and the sequestration/transformation of carbon in aquatic environments. PMID:27074782

  10. Thermogravimetric analysis of petroleum asphaltenes along with estimation of average chemical structure by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Combining with the 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) determinations, elemental analysis and molecular weight measurement, average molecular formula of the chemical unit for the asphaltenes from Chinese Daqing crude oil were calculated. Thermal pyrolysis kinetics of the asphaltenes had been studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The distributed activation energy model (DAEM) was used to analyze these complex systems. The results show that the peak activation energy for pyrolysis of the asphaltenes is 245 kJ mol-1 and the pre-exponential factor is 5.88 x 1014 s-1. The DAEM method presented reasonably good results of the prediction of the weight loss curves. A linear relationship can be found from the plots of logarithm of the pre-exponential factor against the activation energy at selected conversion values. This phenomenon known as the compensation effect was explained and it was in agreement with the estimated chemical structure determined by NMR

  11. Absolute Quantification of Lipophilic Shellfish Toxins by Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Using Removable Internal Reference Substance with SI Traceability.

    Kato, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Maki; Nagae, Mika; Fujita, Kazuhiro; Watai, Masatoshi; Igarashi, Tomoji; Yasumoto, Takeshi; Inagaki, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA), a lipophilic shellfish toxin, was accurately quantified using quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance with internal standards for the development of an authentic reference standard. Pyridine and the residual proton in methanol-d4 were used as removable internal standards to limit any contamination. They were calibrated based on a maleic acid certified reference material. Thus, the concentration of OA was traceable to the SI units through accurate quantitative NMR with an internal reference substance. Signals from the protons on the oxygenated and unsaturated carbons of OA were used for quantification. A reasonable accuracy was obtained by integrating between the lower and upper (13)C satellite signal range when more than 4 mg of OA was used. The best-determined purity was 97.4% (0.16% RSD) when 20 mg of OA was used. Dinophysistoxin-1, a methylated analog of OA having an almost identical spectrum, was also quantified by using the same methodology. PMID:27396652

  12. Molecular interactions between green tea catechins and cheese fat studied by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Rashidinejad, Ali; Birch, Edward J; Hindmarsh, Jason; Everett, David W

    2017-01-15

    Molecular integrations between green tea catechins and milk fat globules in a cheese matrix were investigated using solid-state magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Full-fat cheeses were manufactured containing free catechin or free green tea extract (GTE), and liposomal encapsulated catechin or liposomal encapsulated GTE. Molecular mobility of the carbon species in the cheeses was measured by a wide-line separation technique. The (1)H evolution frequency profile of the (13)C peak at 16ppm obtained for the control cheese and cheeses containing encapsulated polyphenols (catechin or GTE) were similar, however, the spectrum was narrower for cheeses containing free polyphenols. Differences in spectral width indicates changes in the molecular mobility of --CH3- or -C-C-PO4- species through hydrophobic and/or cation-π associations between green tea catechins and cheese fat components. However, the similar spectral profile suggests that encapsulation protects cheese fat from interaction with catechins. PMID:27542471

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging; Resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Thibierge, M.; Sevestre, L.; Slupecki, P. [Centre Hospitalier de Charleville-Mezieres, 08 (France)

    1998-06-01

    After many years of low profile business in the USA, MRI is back. Improvements are focused on high field magnets and on low field magnets. The former, are dedicated to high quality imaging. The new scanners are more and more efficient because of the spreading use of real time imaging. They can do now, procedures that just could not be imagined some years ago. Vascular imaging is done routinely. Abdominal imaging in apnea of EPI, perfusion and diffusion imaging, and, last not least, all the field of functional imaging are on the verge of coming out. The new magnets unveiled in 1997 are lighter, smaller, more, user friendly, less impressive for patients subject to claustrophobia. They also need less helium to operate and less space to be sited. The latter, are dedicated to interventional procedures. The new magnets are wide opened and a lot of companies show off. Though Picker unveiled a new light superconductive 0.5 Tesla magnet, it seems that this kind of machines are about to disappear. No significant progress was noticed in the field of dedicated MRI devices. Some features can be highlighted: the new Siemens short bore and its table integrates the Panoramic Array Coil Concept. It will allow simultaneous scanning with up to four coils; the excellent homogeneity of the new Picker magnet that will allow spectroscopy at 1 Tesla; the twin gradients of the Elscint Prisma that will open the field of microscopy MRI; the Philips `floppy gradients` that could speed up 4 or 6 times, the time needed for imaging; some new sequences sensitive to temperature are studied as WIP; a lot of work is achieved on 3 or 4 Tesla scanners etc. (author)

  14. In Vivo Phenotyping of Tumor Metabolism in a Canine Cancer Patient with Simultaneous 18F-FDG-PET and Hyperpolarized 13C-Pyruvate Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (hyperPET: Mismatch Demonstrates that FDG may not Always Reflect the Warburg Effect

    Henrik Gutte

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this communication the mismatch between simultaneous 18F-FDG-PET and a 13C-lactate imaging (hyperPET in a biopsy verified squamous cell carcinoma in the right tonsil of a canine cancer patient is shown. The results demonstrate that 18F-FDG-PET may not always reflect the Warburg effect in all tumors.

  15. Contribution to studies of magnetic nuclear dipolar order

    The magnetic nuclear dipolar order concept is first introduced. Two original studies on the 19F spin system of CaF2 are then presented; the first deals with the behavior of a dipolar nuclear antiferromagnetic material in the presence of an effective nonnull field and leads to the determination of the ''field-entropy'' phase diagram of the system; the second study reveals the existence of rotating transverse structures

  16. Single voxel localization for dynamic hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy

    Chen, Albert P.; Cunningham, Charles H.

    2015-09-01

    The PRESS technique has been widely used to achieve voxel localization for in vivo1H MRS acquisitions. However, for dynamic hyperpolarized 13C MRS experiments, the transition bands of the refocusing pulses may saturate the pre-polarized substrate spins flowing into the voxel. This limitation may be overcome by designing refocusing pulses that do not perturb the resonance of the hyperpolarized substrate, but selectively refocuses the spins of the metabolic products. In this study, a PRESS pulse sequence incorporating spectral-spatial refocusing pulses that have a stop band ('notch') at the substrate resonance is tested in vivo using hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate. Higher metabolite SNR was observed in experiments using the spectral-spatial refocusing pulses as compared to conventional refocusing pulses.

  17. Deconvolution of the tree ring based delta13C record

    We assumed that the tree-ring based 13C/12C record constructed by Freyer and Belacy (1983) to be representative of the fossil fuel and forest-soil induced 13C/12C change for atmospheric CO2. Through the use of a modification of the Oeschger et al. ocean model, we have computed the contribution of the combustion of coal, oil, and natural gas to this observed 13C/12C change. A large residual remains when the tree-ring-based record is corrected for the contribution of fossil fuel CO2. A deconvolution was performed on this residual to determine the time history and magnitude of the forest-soil reservoir changes over the past 150 years. Several important conclusions were reached. (1) The magnitude of the integrated CO2 input from these sources was about 1.6 times that from fossil fuels. (2) The forest-soil contribution reached a broad maximum centered at about 1900. (3) Over the 2 decade period covered by the Mauna Loa atmospheric CO2 content record, the input from forests and soils was about 30% that from fossil fuels. (4) The 13C/12C trend over the last 20 years was dominated by the input of fossil fuel CO2. (5) The forest-soil release did not contribute significantly to the secular increase in atmospheric CO2 observed over the last 20 years. (6) The pre-1850 atmospheric p2 values must have been in the range 245 to 270 x 10-6 atmospheres

  18. Galactose oxidation using 13C in healthy and galactosemic children

    D.R. Resende-Campanholi; Porta, G.; Ferrioli, E.; Pfrimer, K.; L.A. Del Ciampo; J.S. Camelo Junior

    2015-01-01

    Galactosemia is an inborn error of galactose metabolism that occurs mainly as the outcome of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) deficiency. The ability to assess galactose oxidation following administration of a galactose-labeled isotope (1-13C-galactose) allows the determination of galactose metabolism in a practical manner. We aimed to assess the level of galactose oxidation in both healthy and galactosemic Brazilian children. Twenty-one healthy children and seven children with ...

  19. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  20. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  1. Quantitative dosing by nuclear magnetic resonance

    The measurement of the absolute concentration of a heavy water reference containing approximately 99.8 per cent of D2O has been performed, by an original magnetic resonance method ('Adiabatic fast passage method') with a precision of 5.10-5 on the D2O concentration. (author)

  2. PEDOGENIC CARBONATE δ13C AND ENVIRONMENTAL PRECIPITATION CONDITIONS

    Marcella Catoni

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon isotopic analysis is a useful tool for investigating paleoenvironments, as the pedogenic carbonate δ13C is related to δ13CSOM and to the proportions of C3/C4 plants. In this work we interpreted the paleoenvironmental conditions at the time of carbonate precipitation in soils formed under different climates and during different geological ages. Samples were taken from a Bk (PR1, Holocene and from two Bkm horizons (PR2 and PR3, Pleistocene. When the mean δ13C plant values and the most plausible paleotemperatures were used in the evaluation, PR1 showed a lower percentage of C4 plants (48% than Pleistocene soils (~53%, in agreement with paleoclimate changes. When instead the δ13C values of current plants were used for PR1, C4 plants ranged from 59 (12°C to 66% (18°C, suggesting two possible interpretations: either plant species changed during the Holocene, or the plant mean values normally used in the literature are not suitable for Pleistocene reconstructions

  3. Galactose oxidation using 13C in healthy and galactosemic children

    Galactosemia is an inborn error of galactose metabolism that occurs mainly as the outcome of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) deficiency. The ability to assess galactose oxidation following administration of a galactose-labeled isotope (1-13C-galactose) allows the determination of galactose metabolism in a practical manner. We aimed to assess the level of galactose oxidation in both healthy and galactosemic Brazilian children. Twenty-one healthy children and seven children with galactosemia ranging from 1 to 7 years of age were studied. A breath test was used to quantitate 13CO2 enrichment in exhaled air before and at 30, 60, and 120 min after the oral administration of 7 mg/kg of an aqueous solution of 1-13C-galactose to all children. The molar ratios of 13CO2 and 12CO2 were quantified by the mass/charge ratio (m/z) of stable isotopes in each air sample by gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. In sick children, the cumulative percentage of 13C from labeled galactose (CUMPCD) in the exhaled air ranged from 0.03% at 30 min to 1.67% at 120 min. In contrast, healthy subjects showed a much broader range in CUMPCD, with values from 0.4% at 30 min to 5.58% at 120 min. The study found a significant difference in galactose oxidation between children with and without galactosemia, demonstrating that the breath test is useful in discriminating children with GALT deficiencies

  4. Nanocrystal Growth in Thermally Treated Fe75Ni2Si8B13C2 Amorphous Alloy

    Minić, Dragica M.; Blagojević, V.; Minić, Dušan M.; David, Bohumil; Pizúrová, Naděžda; Žák, Tomáš

    43A, č. 9 (2012), s. 3062-3069. ISSN 1073-5623 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0512 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Nanocrystal growth * Fe75Ni2Si8B13C2 * Amorphous alloy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.627, year: 2012

  5. Simultaneous hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate MRI and 18F-FDG-PET in cancer (hyperPET)

    Gutte, Henrik; Hansen, Adam E.; Henriksen, Sarah T.;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of a new imaging concept - combined hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and 18F-FDG-PET imaging. This procedure was performed in a clinical PET/MRI scanner with a canine cancer patient. We ha...

  6. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance: investigating the spins of nuclear related materials

    The author reviews his successive research works: his research thesis work on the Multiple Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (MQMAS) which is a quadric-polar nucleus multi-quanta correlation spectroscopy method, the modelling of NMR spectra of disordered materials, the application to materials of interest for the nuclear industry (notably the glasses used for nuclear waste containment). He presents the various research projects in which he is involved: storing glasses, nuclear magnetic resonance in paramagnetism, solid hydrogen storing matrices, methodological and instrument developments in high magnetic field and high resolution solid NMR, long range distance measurement by solid state Tritium NMR (observing the structure and dynamics of biological complex systems at work)

  7. CO{sub H}(N)CACB experiments for assigning backbone resonances in {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled proteins

    Astrof, Nathan; Bracken, Clay; Cavanagh, John; Palmer, Arthur G

    1998-05-15

    A triple resonance NMR experiment, denoted CO{sub H}(N)CACB, correlates{sup 1}H{sup N} and {sup 13}CO spins with the{sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} spins of adjacent amino acids. The pulse sequence is an 'out-and-back' design that starts with{sup 1}H{sup N} magnetization and transfers coherence via the {sup 15}N spin simultaneously to the {sup 13}CO and{sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} spins, followed by transfer to the{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} spin. Two versions of the sequence are presented: one in which the {sup 13}CO spins are frequency labeled during an incremented t{sub 1} evolution period prior to transfer of magnetization from the {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} to the{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} resonances, and one in which the{sup 13}CO spins are frequency labeled in a constant-time manner during the coherence transfer to and from the{sup 13}C{sup {beta}} resonances. Because {sup 13}COand {sup 15}N chemical shifts are largely uncorrelated, the technique will be especially useful when degeneracy in the{sup 1}H{sup N}-{sup 15}N chemical shifts hinders resonance assignment. The CO{sub H}(N)CACB experiment is demonstrated using uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled ubiquitin.

  8. Electron-nuclear magnetism of praseodymium and its compounds

    A consistent theory of electron-nuclear spin ordering in singlet magnetics is developed. The results of some recent experiments with PrNi5 are exlained. The effect of a magnetic field perpendicular to the basal plane on the phase transition is investigated. Depending on the magnitude of the exchange interaction, the magnetic field may either increase or decrease the transition temperature. An increase of the transition temperature on application of the field should occur, for example, in the hexagonal modification of praseodymium

  9. High Radiation Environment Nuclear Fragment Separator Magnet

    Kahn, Stephen [Muons, Inc., Batavia, IL (United States); Gupta, Ramesh [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-01-31

    Superconducting coils wound with HTS conductor can be used in magnets located in a high radiation environment. NbTi and Nb3Sn superconductors must operate at 4.5 K or below where removal of heat is less efficient. The HTS conductor can carry significant current at higher temperatures where the Carnot efficiency is significantly more favorable and where the coolant heat capacity is much larger. Using the HTS conductor the magnet can be operated at 40 K. This project examines the use of HTS conductor for the Michigan State University Facility For Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) fragment separator dipole magnet which bends the beam by 30° and is located in a high radiation region that will not be easily accessible. Two of these magnets are needed to select the chosen isotope. There are a number of technical challenges to be addressed in the design of this magnet. The separator dipole is 2 m long and subtends a large angle. The magnet should keep a constant transverse field profile along its beam reference path. Winding coils with a curved inner segment is difficult as the conductor will tend to unwind during the process. In the Phase I project two approaches to winding the conductor were examined. The first was to wind the coils with curved sections on the inner and outer segments with the inner segment wound with negative curvature. The alternate approach was to use a straight segment on the inner segment to avoid negative curvature. In Phase I coils with a limited number of turns were successfully wound and tested at 77 K for both coil configurations. The Phase II program concentrated on the design, coil winding procedures, structural analysis, prototyping and testing of an HTS curved dipole coil at 40 K with a heat load representative of the radiation environment. One of the key criteria of the design of this magnet is to avoid the use of organic materials that would degrade rapidly in radiation. The Lorentz forces expected from the coils interacting with the

  10. Optimization and Construction of Single-side Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Magnet

    Ji Yongliang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Single-sided NMR devices can operate under conditions inaccessible to conventional NMR while featuring portability and the ability to analyze arbitrary-sized objects. In this paper, a semi-elliptic Halbach magnet array was designed and built for single-side Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR. We present an easy-to-implement target field algorithm for single-side NMR magnet design based on Gram-Schmidt Orthogonal method. The creating magnetic field of designed magnet structure could achieve best flatness in the region of interesting for NMR applications. The optimizing result shows that the best magnet structure can generate magnetic fields which flatly distributed in the horizontal direction and the gradient was distributed in the vertical direction with gradient of 2mT/mm. The field strength and gradient were measured by a three dimensions Hall probe and agreed well with the simulations.  

  11. Further evidence for a dynamically generated secondary bow in $^{13}$C+$^{12}$C rainbow scattering

    Ohkubo, S; Ogloblin, A A

    2015-01-01

    The existence of a secondary bow is confirmed for 13C+12C nuclear rainbow scattering in addition to the 16O+12C system. This is found by studying the experimental angular distribution of 13C+12C scattering at the incident 13C energy $E_L$=250 MeV with an extended double folding (EDF) model that describes all the diagonal and off-diagonal coupling potentials derived from the microscopic wave functions for 12C using a density-dependent nucleon-nucleon force. The Airy minimum at \\theta$ $\\approx$70$^\\circ$, which is not reproduced by a conventional folding potential, is revealed to be a secondary bow generated dynamically by a coupling to the excited state 2+ (4.44 MeV) of 12C. The essential importance of the quadruple {\\it Y2} term (reorientation term) of potential of the excited state 2+ of 12C for the emergence of a secondary bow is found. The mechanism of the secondary bow is intuitively explained by showing how the trajectories are refracted dynamically into the classically forbidden angular region beyond t...

  12. Acoustic nuclear magnetic resonance in easy-axis antiferromagnets

    Obtained and investigated is the dispersion equation which shows that in the rouge of the tipping field at low temperatures the study of effects conditioned by the bond between the oscillations of electron and nuclear spins depends upon the fact, whethe the interaction of the sound with a nuclear spin subsystem is taken into account. The same concerns the effects conditioned by a strong bond between the oscillations of the lattice and electron spins. Shown is the effect of anisotropy of magnitostriction relative part on the nature of orientation phase transitions and the value of the coefficient of strengthening nuclear magnetic resonance

  13. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    Abou-Hamad, E; Goze-Bac, C; Aznar, R [nanoNMRI group, UMR5587, Universite Montpellier II, Place E Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Nitze, F; Waagberg, T [Department of Physics, Umeaa University, 90187 Umeaa (Sweden); Schmid, M; Mehring, M, E-mail: Thomas.wagberg@physics.umu.se [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the {sup 13}C and {sup 133}Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The 'metallization' of Cs{sub x}C materials where x=0-0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(E{sub F}) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin-lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called {alpha} and {beta} and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 ({alpha}-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05{<=}x{<=}0.143 at high intercalation levels ({beta}-phase). The new {beta}-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp{sup 2}) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(E{sub F}), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  14. Electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    Abou-Hamad, E

    2011-05-24

    We report on the electronic properties of Cs-intercalated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). A detailed analysis of the 13C and 133Cs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra reveals an increased metallization of the pristine SWNTs under Cs intercalation. The \\'metallization\\' of CsxC materials where x=0–0.144 is evidenced from the increased local electronic density of states (DOS) n(EF) at the Fermi level of the SWNTs as determined from spin–lattice relaxation measurements. In particular, there are two distinct electronic phases called α and β and the transition between these occurs around x=0.05. The electronic DOS at the Fermi level increases monotonically at low intercalation levels x<0.05 (α-phase), whereas it reaches a plateau in the range 0.05≤x≤0.143 at high intercalation levels (β-phase). The new β-phase is accompanied by a hybridization of Cs(6s) orbitals with C(sp2) orbitals of the SWNTs. In both phases, two types of metallic nanotubes are found with a low and a high local n(EF), corresponding to different local electronic band structures of the SWNTs.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in brain tumors

    Full text: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive imaging method based on the detecting signal from hydrogen nuclei of water molecules and fat. Performances of MRI are continuously increasing, and its domains of investigation of the human body are growing in both morphological and functional study. MRI also allows It also performing advanced management of tumours especially in the brain, by combining anatomical information (morphological MRI), functional (diffusion, perfusion and BOLD contrast) and metabolic (tissue composition in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). The MRI techniques have an important role in cancerology. These techniques allow essential information for the diagnosis and answering therapist's questions before, during or after the treatment. The MR allows clarifying the localization of expanding processes, the differential diagnosis between brain tumour and a lesion confined by another structural aspect, the diagnosis of the tumoral aspect of a lesion, the histological ranking in case of glial tumour and the extension of its localization as well as the therapeutic follow-up (pre-therapeutic and post-therapeutics assessments). A better combination between the morphological, functional and metabolic studies, as well as integrating new technical developments, especially while using a multichannel bird cage coils the 3T magnet and suitable computing software, would allow significant improvements of the exploration strategies and management of brain tumors.

  16. Selection of planes in nuclear magnetic resonance tomography

    A prototype aiming to obtain images in nuclear magnetic resonance tomography was developed, by adjusting NMR spectrometer in the IFQSC Laboratory. The techniques for selecting planes were analysed by a set of computer codes, which were elaborated from Bloch equation solutions to simulate the spin system behaviour. Images were obtained using planes with thickness inferior to 1 cm. (M.C.K.)

  17. Nuclear magnetic response imaging of sap flow in plants

    Windt, C.W.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) imaging of long distance transport in plants. Long distance transport in plants is an enigmatic process. The theoretical framework that describes its basic properties has been in place for almost a century, yet at the same time only little is k

  18. Yeast Lipid Estimation by Enzymatic and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Methods

    Moreton, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    Low-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance and enzymatic glycerol estimation were compared with a solvent extraction method for estimating the intracellular lipid content of lipid-accumulating yeasts. Both methods correlated well with the solvent extraction procedure and were more convenient with large numbers of samples.

  19. Observation of the uranium 235 nuclear magnetic resonance signal

    Le Bail, H.; Chachaty, C.; Rigny, P.; Bougon, R.

    1983-01-01

    The first observation of the nuclear magnetic resonance of the uranium 235 is reported. It has been performed on pure liquid uranium hexafluoride at 380 K. The measured magnetogyric ratio is | γ(235U) | = 492.6 ± 0.2 rad.s-1 G-1.

  20. Design of a quadrature surface coil for hyperpolarized 13C MRS cardiac metabolism studies in pigs

    Giovannetti, G.; Frijia, F.; Hartwig, V.;

    2013-01-01

    coil performance evaluation in terms of coil resistance, sample-induced resistance and magnetic field pattern. Experimental SNR-vs.-depth profiles, extracted from the [1-13C]acetate phantom chemical shift image (CSI), showed good agreement with the theoretical SNR-vs.-depth profiles. Moreover, the...... performance of the quadrature coil was compared with the single TX/RX circular and TX/RX butterfly coil, in order to verify the advantage of the proposed configuration over the single coils throughout the volume of interest for cardiac imaging in pig. Finally, the quadrature surface coil was tested by...

  1. 13. Nuclear magnetic resonance users meeting. Extended abstracts book

    This annual meeting, held in Brazil from May 2 - 6, 2011 comprised seventeen lectures, given by invited speakers from Brazil and other countries, about the use of nuclear magnetic resonance for various analytical purposes; results from ninety five research works, most being carried out by scientific groups from various Brazilian R and D institutions, presented as congress panels/posters. A General Assembly meeting of AUREMN, the Brazilian Association of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Users, also took place during the event. Main topics of the research works presented at this meeting were thus distributed: 54% in analytical chemistry (mainly organic chemistry, both experimental and theoretical works), 18% in applied life sciences (agricultural and food sciences, biological sciences and medicine), 15% in materials science (including nanostructures, petroleum and alternative fuels), 10% in mathematical methods and computing for the interpretation of NMR data, and the remaining 3% in improvements in instrumentation interfaces or magnetic field configurations.

  2. 13. Nuclear magnetic resonance users meeting. Extended abstracts book

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This annual meeting, held in Brazil from May 2 - 6, 2011 comprised seventeen lectures, given by invited speakers from Brazil and other countries, about the use of nuclear magnetic resonance for various analytical purposes; results from ninety five research works, most being carried out by scientific groups from various Brazilian R and D institutions, presented as congress panels/posters. A General Assembly meeting of AUREMN, the Brazilian Association of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Users, also took place during the event. Main topics of the research works presented at this meeting were thus distributed: 54% in analytical chemistry (mainly organic chemistry, both experimental and theoretical works), 18% in applied life sciences (agricultural and food sciences, biological sciences and medicine), 15% in materials science (including nanostructures, petroleum and alternative fuels), 10% in mathematical methods and computing for the interpretation of NMR data, and the remaining 3% in improvements in instrumentation interfaces or magnetic field configurations.

  3. General anesthesia for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    The core of the MAGNETOM diagnostic device is a liquid helium-cooled cryogenic magnet, having the shape of a hollow cylinder about 2 m long, 50 to 60 cm i.d. Its inner space is designed to accommodate a bench with the patient, whose part examined, usually the head, is enclosed in a smaller coil and is located roughly in the center of the magnet. The examination takes 4 to 20 minutes, during which the patient must be fixed to prevent any motion. Inhalation anesthesia with spontaneous ventilation using the Jackson-Rees or Bain's system and a laryngeal mask is considered the safest way where no special equipment is employed. If artificial ventilation is necessary, balanced anesthesia with either manual ventilation using Bain's system or a fluidic type ventilator seems to be the best choice. The preparation of the patient prior to the examination, the premedication, and the monitoring equipment are described. (J.B.). 1 tab., 5 figs., 11 refs

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and prostatic cancer

    The diagnosis of prostatic cancer is histological. Apart from rectal examination, only imaging techniques allow evaluation of the extension of the cancer. Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) was performed with a Magniscan 5000 (Thomson C.G.R., France) apparatus. Three types of sequences were used: a short RT sequence (30/500, a multi-echo sequence with a long RT (40/2500) and echo gradient sequences (12 scans in less than 3 minutes). The MRI study of the pelvis is favoured by the abundance of fat which gives good contrast, spontaneous visualization of the vessels and the presence of the bladder with a high signal for urine in T2. This provides a very good anatomical study in three planes. In prostatic cancer, the study of the long sequence signal reveals heterogeneity of the prostatic signal on the second echo, but this is a non-specific variation. The staging of prostatic cancer is facilitated by scans in three planes. Different examples are presented in relation to various stages of the disease. Three clinical cases demonstrate that Magnetic Resonance may become an important element in the choice of treatment

  5. Galactose oxidation using (13)C in healthy and galactosemic children.

    Resende-Campanholi, D R; Porta, G; Ferrioli, E; Pfrimer, K; Ciampo, L A Del; Junior, J S Camelo

    2015-03-01

    Galactosemia is an inborn error of galactose metabolism that occurs mainly as the outcome of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) deficiency. The ability to assess galactose oxidation following administration of a galactose-labeled isotope (1-(13)C-galactose) allows the determination of galactose metabolism in a practical manner. We aimed to assess the level of galactose oxidation in both healthy and galactosemic Brazilian children. Twenty-one healthy children and seven children with galactosemia ranging from 1 to 7 years of age were studied. A breath test was used to quantitate (13)CO2 enrichment in exhaled air before and at 30, 60, and 120 min after the oral administration of 7 mg/kg of an aqueous solution of 1-(13)C-galactose to all children. The molar ratios of (13)CO2 and (12)CO2 were quantified by the mass/charge ratio (m/z) of stable isotopes in each air sample by gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. In sick children, the cumulative percentage of (13)C from labeled galactose (CUMPCD) in the exhaled air ranged from 0.03% at 30 min to 1.67% at 120 min. In contrast, healthy subjects showed a much broader range in CUMPCD, with values from 0.4% at 30 min to 5.58% at 120 min. The study found a significant difference in galactose oxidation between children with and without galactosemia, demonstrating that the breath test is useful in discriminating children with GALT deficiencies. PMID:25608239

  6. Galactose oxidation using 13C in healthy and galactosemic children

    D.R. Resende-Campanholi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Galactosemia is an inborn error of galactose metabolism that occurs mainly as the outcome of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT deficiency. The ability to assess galactose oxidation following administration of a galactose-labeled isotope (1-13C-galactose allows the determination of galactose metabolism in a practical manner. We aimed to assess the level of galactose oxidation in both healthy and galactosemic Brazilian children. Twenty-one healthy children and seven children with galactosemia ranging from 1 to 7 years of age were studied. A breath test was used to quantitate 13CO2 enrichment in exhaled air before and at 30, 60, and 120 min after the oral administration of 7 mg/kg of an aqueous solution of 1-13C-galactose to all children. The molar ratios of 13CO2 and 12CO2 were quantified by the mass/charge ratio (m/z of stable isotopes in each air sample by gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. In sick children, the cumulative percentage of 13C from labeled galactose (CUMPCD in the exhaled air ranged from 0.03% at 30 min to 1.67% at 120 min. In contrast, healthy subjects showed a much broader range in CUMPCD, with values from 0.4% at 30 min to 5.58% at 120 min. The study found a significant difference in galactose oxidation between children with and without galactosemia, demonstrating that the breath test is useful in discriminating children with GALT deficiencies.

  7. Compartmentation of glycogen metabolism revealed from 13C isotopologue distributions

    Marin de Mas Igor

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stable isotope tracers are used to assess metabolic flux profiles in living cells. The existing methods of measurement average out the isotopic isomer distribution in metabolites throughout the cell, whereas the knowledge of compartmental organization of analyzed pathways is crucial for the evaluation of true fluxes. That is why we accepted a challenge to create a software tool that allows deciphering the compartmentation of metabolites based on the analysis of average isotopic isomer distribution. Results The software Isodyn, which simulates the dynamics of isotopic isomer distribution in central metabolic pathways, was supplemented by algorithms facilitating the transition between various analyzed metabolic schemes, and by the tools for model discrimination. It simulated 13C isotope distributions in glucose, lactate, glutamate and glycogen, measured by mass spectrometry after incubation of hepatocytes in the presence of only labeled glucose or glucose and lactate together (with label either in glucose or lactate. The simulations assumed either a single intracellular hexose phosphate pool, or also channeling of hexose phosphates resulting in a different isotopic composition of glycogen. Model discrimination test was applied to check the consistency of both models with experimental data. Metabolic flux profiles, evaluated with the accepted model that assumes channeling, revealed the range of changes in metabolic fluxes in liver cells. Conclusions The analysis of compartmentation of metabolic networks based on the measured 13C distribution was included in Isodyn as a routine procedure. The advantage of this implementation is that, being a part of evaluation of metabolic fluxes, it does not require additional experiments to study metabolic compartmentation. The analysis of experimental data revealed that the distribution of measured 13C-labeled glucose metabolites is inconsistent with the idea of perfect mixing of hexose

  8. Synthesis of ring-13C-labelled and ring-demethylated retinals

    Efficient synthetic schemes are described for the preparation of the required mono- and di-13C labelled retinals based on simple 13C labelled starting materials. Results from solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopic studies of the various ring-13C labelled bacteriorhodopsins and rhodopsins are discussed. 404 refs.; 74 figs.; 16 tabs

  9. Cluster states and alpha particle condensation in 13C

    The structure of 13C is studied with the semi-microscopic cluster model, 3α+n orthogonality condition model (OCM). The energy spectra of four 1/2- states and three 1/2+ states up to Ex ~ 13 MeV are successfully reproduced, in particular, three monopole transition strengths are in fair agreement with the observed ones. We discuss the cluster states and alpha particle condensation in the 1/2± states appearing around the 12C+n, 9Be+α and 3α+n thresholds. (author)

  10. A (nearly) complete experimental linelist for 13C16O2, 16O13C18O, 16O13C17O, 13C18O2 and 17O13C18O by high-sensitivity CW-CRDS spectroscopy between 5851 and 7045 cm-1

    An experimental database for the 13C16O2, 16O13C18O, 16O13C17O, 13C18O2 and 17O13C18O isotopologues of carbon dioxide has been constructed on the basis of the high-sensitivity absorption spectrum of carbon dioxide with 99% enrichment in 13C recorded by CW-cavity ring down spectroscopy (CW-CRDS) between 5851 and 7045 cm-1. As a result of the achieved sensitivity (typical noise equivalent absorption αmin∼2-5x10-10 cm-1) combined with the high linearity and dynamics (more than four decades) of the CW-CRDS technique, the amount of spectroscopic information contained in these spectra was considerable. A total of 8639 transitions of the 13C16O2, 16O13C18O, 16O13C17O, 13C18O2 and 17O13C18O isotopologues with line strength as low as 5x10-29 cm/molecule were assigned. They belong to a total of 150 bands, while less than 20 bands were previously reported by Fourier transform spectroscopy. The excellent agreement between the predictions of the effective operators model and the observations has allowed using an automatic search program to assign the weaker lines observed in the congested spectrum. The spectroscopic parameters of the vibrational upper levels were obtained from a fit of the measured line positions. A number of resonance interactions were observed; in particular, several occurrences of interpolyad anharmonic couplings not included in the polyad model of effective Hamiltonian, were found to affect a few bands of the 16O13C18O and 16O13C17O isotopologues. In the list of 8639 transitions, which are provided as Supplementary material, line positions are experimental values (typical uncertainty in the order of 1x10-3 cm-1), while line strengths were calculated at 296 K by using the effective operators approach (typical uncertainty in the order of 5%). In the case of the 13C16O2 isotopologue, the reported transitions represent 99.65% of the total absorbance in the region considered

  11. Identification, synthesis and characterization of an unknown process related impurity in eslicarbazepine acetate active pharmaceutical ingredient by LC/ESI-IT/MS, 1H, 13C and 1H-1H COSY NMR

    Saji Thomas; Saroj Kumar Paul; Subhash Chandra Joshi; Vineet Kumar; Ashutosh Agarwal; Dharam Vir

    2014-01-01

    A new impurity was detected during high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of eslicarbazepine acetate active pharmaceutical ingredient. The structure of unknown impurity was postulated based on liquid chromatography mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization and ion trap analyzer (LC/ESI-IT/MS) analysis. Proposed structure of impurity was unambiguously confirmed by synthesis followed by characterization using 1H, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), 1H-1H correlation spectro-scopy (COSY) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). Based on the spectroscopic and spectrometric data, unknown impurity was characterized as 5-carbamoyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-10-yl propionate.

  12. Identification, synthesis and characterization of an unknown process related impurity in eslicarbazepine acetate active pharmaceutical ingredient by LC/ESI–IT/MS, 1H, 13C and 1H–1H COSY NMR

    Saji Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A new impurity was detected during high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC analysis of eslicarbazepine acetate active pharmaceutical ingredient. The structure of unknown impurity was postulated based on liquid chromatography mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization and ion trap analyzer (LC/ESI–IT/MS analysis. Proposed structure of impurity was unambiguously confirmed by synthesis followed by characterization using 1H, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR, 1H–1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY and infrared spectroscopy (IR. Based on the spectroscopic and spectrometric data, unknown impurity was characterized as 5-carbamoyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-10-yl propionate.

  13. Spectrally edited 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR spectra without diagonal ridge for characterizing 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials

    Johnson, Robert L.; Anderson, Jason M.; Shanks, Brent H.; Fang, Xiaowen; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Two robust combinations of spectral editing techniques with 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR have been developed for characterizing the aromatic components of 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials. One method (exchange with protonated and nonprotonated spectral editing, EXPANSE) selects cross peaks of protonated and nearby nonprotonated carbons, while the other technique, dipolar-dephased double-quantum/single-quantum (DQ/SQ) NMR, selects signals of bonded nonprotonated carbons. Both spectra are free of a diagonal ridge, which has many advantages: Cross peaks on the diagonal or of small intensity can be detected, and residual spinning sidebands or truncation artifacts associated with the diagonal ridge are avoided. In the DQ/SQ experiment, dipolar dephasing of the double-quantum coherence removes protonated-carbon signals; this approach also eliminates the need for high-power proton decoupling. The initial magnetization is generated with minimal fluctuation by combining direct polarization, cross polarization, and equilibration by 13C spin diffusion. The dipolar dephased DQ/SQ spectrum shows signals from all linkages between aromatic rings, including a distinctive peak from polycondensed aromatics. In EXPANSE NMR, signals of protonated carbons are selected in the first spectral dimension by short cross polarization combined with dipolar dephasing difference. This removes ambiguities of peak assignment to overlapping signals of nonprotonated and protonated aromatic carbons, e.g. near 125 ppm. Spin diffusion is enhanced by dipolar-assisted rotational resonance. Before detection, Csbnd H dipolar dephasing by gated decoupling is applied, which selects signals of nonprotonated carbons. Thus, only cross peaks due to magnetization originating from protonated C and ending on nearby nonprotonated C are retained. Combined with the chemical shifts deduced from the cross-peak position, this double spectral editing defines the bonding environment of aromatic, COO, and Cdbnd O carbons

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of biological systems

    The difference between intracellular and extracellular proton relaxation rates provides the basis for the determination of the mean hemoglobin concentration (MHC) in red blood cells. The observed water T1 relaxation data from red blood cell samples under various conditions were fit to the complete equation for the time-dependent decay of magnetization for a two-compartment system including chemical exchange. The MHC for each sample was calculated from the hematocrit and the intracellular water fraction as determined by NMR. The binding of the phosphorylcholine (PC) analogue, 2-(trimethylphosphonio)-ethylphosphate (phosphoryl-phosphocholine, PPC) to the PC binding myeloma proteins TEPC-15, McPC 603, and MOPC 167 was studied by 31P NMR

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at microscopic resolution

    Johnson, G. Allan; Thompson, Morrow B.; Gewalt, Sally L.; Hayes, Cecil E.

    Resolution limits in NMR imaging are imposed by bandwidth considerations, available magnetic gradients for spatial encoding, and signal to noise. This work reports modification of a clinical NMR imaging device with picture elements of 500 × 500 × 5000 μm to yield picture elements of 50 × 50 × 1000 μm. Resolution has been increased by using smaller gradient coils permitting gradient fields >0.4 mT/cm. Significant improvements in signal to noise are achieved with smaller rf coils, close attention to choice of bandwidth, and signal averaging. These improvements permit visualization of anatomical structures in the rat brain with an effective diameter of 1 cm with the same definition as is seen in human imaging. The techniques and instrumentation should open a number of basic sciences such as embryology, plant sciences, and teratology to the potentials of NMR imaging.

  16. Use of 13C NMR and ftir for elucidation of degradation pathways during natural litter decomposition and composting I. early stage leaf degradation

    Wershaw, R. L.; Leenheer, J.A.; Kennedy, K.R.; Noyes, T.I.

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative degradation of plant tissue leads to the formation of natural dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and humus. Infrared (IR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry have been used to elucidate the chemical reactions of the early stages of degradation that give rise to DOC derived from litter and compost. The results of this study indicate that oxidation of the lignin components of plant tissue follows the sequence of O-demethylation, and hydroxylation followed by ring-fission, chain-shortening, and oxidative removal of substituents. Oxidative ring-fission leads to the formation of carboxylic acid groups on the cleaved ends of the rings and, in the process, transforms phenolic groups into aliphatic alcoholic groups. The carbohydrate components are broken down into aliphatic hydroxy acids and aliphatic alcohols.

  17. Use of 13C NMR and FTIR for elucidation of degradation pathways during natural litter decomposition and composting. I. Early stage leaf degradation

    Oxidative degradation of plant tissue leads to the formation of natural dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and humus. Infrared (IR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry have been used to elucidate the chemical reactions of the early stages of degradation that give rise to DOC derived from litter and compost. The results of this study indicate that oxidation of the lignin components of plant tissue follows the sequence of O-demethylation, and hydroxylation followed by ring-fission, chain-shortening, and oxidative removal of substituents. Oxidative ring-fission leads to the formation of carboxylic acid groups on the cleaved ends of the rings and, in the process, transforms phenolic groups into aliphatic alcoholic groups. The carbohydrate components are broken down into aliphatic hydroxy acids and aliphatic alcohols. (author)

  18. Analysis of the mechanical properties and characterization by solid state {sup 13} C NMR of recycled EVA copolymer/silica composites

    Stael, Giovanni Chaves [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: stael@on.br; Rocha, Marisa Cristina Guimaraes [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Politecnico; Menezes, Sonia Maria Cabral de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Quimica; D' Almeida, Jose Roberto Morais; Ruiz, Naira Machado da Silva [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-15

    The incorporation of micrometer sized silica particles on poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) - EVA - residues from the footwear industry was evaluated. The effects of the processing parameters - temperature and mixing ratio - on the mechanical behavior of molded plates of neat recycled EVA and EVA/silica composites were also investigated. The mechanical properties measured by the tensile test, the fractographic analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the {sup 13} C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) showed a reduced EVA to silica compatibility. Therefore, incorporation of untreated silica to recycled EVA copolymer produced a slight decrease on the mechanical performance of EVA/silica composites in respect to neat EVA copolymer. The NMR analysis also shows that the crosslinking process on recycled EVA may be occurring at the carbonyl group. (author)

  19. DMS AND 13C NMR STUDIES ON THE COMPATIBILITY AND DYNAMICS OF LATEX BIDIRECTIONAL IPNS AND LATEX IPN OF PVA c/PBA

    YAN Xin; XU Xiaolong; ZHANG Baozhen; YAO Shuren; QIAN Baogong

    1993-01-01

    The compatibility and dynamics of latex bidirectional interpenetrating polymer networks (LBIPNs) and latex IPN(LIPN) of poly(vinyl acetate)(PVAc) and poly (butyl acrylate )(PBA) are investigated by means of dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. The results of DMS show that the compatibility of the LBIPNs is much better than that of the corresponding LIPN and depends to a large extent on the distribution of PVAc both in the core and in the shell. The results of NMR measurements indicate that the rotational correlation times of the side- groups of PBA in the LBIPN are longer than those in the LIPN. The relation between the 13C linewidths of PBA and temperature is also discussed.

  20. Enhanced Nuclear Magnetism: Some Novel Features and Prospective Experiments

    Abragam, A.; Bleaney, B.

    1983-06-01

    This review of enhanced nuclear magnetism discusses a number of features not previously considered, with special reference to new experiments that use dynamic methods to produce high nuclear polarization, followed by adiabatic demagnetization in the rotating frame (a.d.r.f.) to produce nuclear ordered states that may be investigated by the scattering of beams of neutrons. Section 2. The 'enhancement' of the nuclear moment arises from the electronic magnetization M_I induced through the hyperfine interaction. It is shown that the spatial distribution of M_I is the same as that of M_H, the Van Vleck magnetization induced by an external field, provided that J is a good quantum number. The spatial distributions are not in general the same in Russell-Saunders coupling, e.g. in the 3d group. Section 3. The Bloch equations are extended to include anisotropic nuclear moments. Section 4. The 'truncated' spin Hamiltonian is derived for spin-spin interaction between enhanced moments. Section 5. A general cancellation theorem for second-order processes in spin-lattice relaxation is derived, showing that the intrinsic direct process must be of third order. The relaxation rate obeys an equation similar to that for Kramers electronic ions, but reduced as the fifth power of the resonance frequencies. The relaxation rates observed experimentally (except in very high fields) are ascribed to paramagnetic impurities, so that these can be used to produce dynamic nuclear polarization (d.n.p.). Section 6. The interactions of neutrons with the true nuclear moment μ_I, the Van Vleck moment M_H, the 'pseudonuclear' moment M_I and the 'pseudomagnetic' nuclear moment μ *_I are discussed. It is shown that the four contributions can be observed separately by measurement of the form factor for neutron scattering as a function of temperature and direction of the applied magnetic field. Precession of the neutron spin in the 'pseudomagnetic' field H* is discussed with reference to the case of Ho

  1. Study of diabetes using naturally enriched 13C-glucose

    Following the work undertaken by Duchesne et al. since 1968, results from the use of a new method in the area of glucose metabolism are presented. Because of differences in their photosynthetic pathway, some vegetables, e.g., maize and sugarcane, are a little richer in 13C than most common foodstuffs. This weak, but significant, enrichment allows the use of maize glucose as a natural and nonradioactive tracer. In this procedure the variations of the 13C/12C ratio of exhaled CO2 are measured by mass spectrometry. By this method, we can follow, in man, the complete conversion of an oral glucose load into CO2 during a glucose tolerance test. At the same time, measurements of blood glucose and of respiratory quotient are made. They permit a useful comparison of the level of glucose in blood, the total amount of glucose consumed, and the fraction of exogenous glucose burned in the hours following oral administration. New information was obtained from these studies concerning glucose metabolism. The method was used in normal subjects and in obese and diabetic patients. Some of the diabetics were receiving an oral antidiabetic treatment. Significant differences were obtained in these cases, not only between them but also with the information given by the classical methods

  2. Isotopic separation of 13C by selective photodissociation of formaldehyde

    The aim of this work is to study the feasibility of the 13C isotopic separation by UV laser spectroscopy. The spectra of H212CO and H213CO have been recorded by a Fourier transform spectrometer between 28000 and 34000 cm-1. From these data has been carried out a systematic study of some lines by laser spectroscopy. The selectivity measurements have been compared with the obtained enrichment factors. Thus has been revealed in a quantitative way, the importance of the isotopic re-mixture phenomena and of the selectivity loss. The best enrichment factor has been measured at 29935,56 cm-1 (band: (2,14,1)). A final percentage of 42,1 % has been obtained in a reproducible way for 13C. The evolution of the enrichment factor has been characterized for a pressure range between 4,4 and 43 mbar. Above the radical dissociation threshold, it has not be possible to show a positive effect of NO on the enrichment factor. This negative result has been explained by a detailed kinetic study of the radical reactions (available literature). This experimental study has been completed by a bibliographic synthesis for understanding the formaldehyde photochemistry. All the processes able to influence the performance of this isotopic separation process have been gathered in this work in an exhaustive way. The radical dissociation threshold of H213CO have been calculated from molecular constants of the literature and from known thermodynamic data for H212CO. (O.M.)

  3. Investigating 13C +12C reaction by the activation method. Sensitivity tests

    Chesneanu, Daniela; Trache, L.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D.; Straticiuc, M.; Burducea, I.; Blebea-Apostu, A. M.; Gomoiu, C. M.; Tang, X.

    2015-02-01

    We have performed experiments to check the limits of sensitivity of the activation method using the new 3 MV Tandetron accelerator and the low and ultra-low background laboratories of the "Horia Hulubei" National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH). We have used the 12C +13C reaction at beam energies Elab= 6, 7 and 8 MeV. The knowledge of this fusion cross section at deep sub-barrier energies is of interest for astrophysical applications, as it provides an upper limit for the fusion cross section of 12C +12C over a wide energy range. A 13C beam with intensities 0.5-2 particleμA was provided by the accelerator and used to bombard graphite targets, resulting in activation with 24Na from the 12C (13C ,p) reaction. The 1369 and 2754 keV gamma-rays from 24Na de-activation were clearly observed in the spectra obtained in two different laboratories used for measurements at low and ultralow background: one at the surface and one located underground in the Unirea salt mine from Slanic Prahova, Romania. In the underground laboratory, for Elab = 6 MeV we have measured an activity of 0.085 ± 0.011 Bq, corresponding to cross sections of 1-3 nb. This demonstrates that it is possible to measure 12C targets irradiated at lower energies for at least 10 times lower cross sections than before β-γ coincidences will lead us another factor of 10 lower, proving that this installations can be successfully used for nuclear astrophysics measurements.

  4. Nature of organic carbon and nitrogen in physically protected organic matter of some Australian soils as revealed by solid-state 13 C and 15 N NMR spectroscopy

    The 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was applied for characterising the chemical nature of the remaining organic fraction. The 13C NMR spectroscopic comparison of the residues after UV photo-oxidation and the untreated bulk soils revealed a considerable increase in condensed aromatic structures in the residues for 4 of the 5 soils. This behaviour was recently shown to be typical for char-containing soils. In the sample where no char was detectable by NMR spectroscopy, the physically protected carbon consisted of functional groups similar to those observed for the organic matter of the bulk sample, although their relative proportions were altered. The solid-state 15N NMR spectrum from this sample revealed that some peptide structures were able to resist UV photo-oxidation, probably physically protected within the core of micro aggregates. Heterocyclic aromatic nitrogen was not detected in this spectrum, but pyrrolic nitrogen was found to comprise a major fraction of the residues after photo-oxidation of the <53 μm containing soils. Acid hydrolysis of these samples confirmed that some peptide-like material was still present. The identification of a considerable amount of aromatic carbon and nitrogen, assignable to charred material in 4 of the 5 investigated soils, supports previous observations that char largely comprises the inert or passive organic matter pool of many Australian soils. The influence of such material on the carbon and nitrogen dynamics in such soils, however, requires further research. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Australia

  5. Residue specific hydration of primary cell wall potato pectin identified by solid-state 13C single-pulse MAS and CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy.

    Larsen, Flemming H; Byg, Inge; Damager, Iben; Diaz, Jerome; Engelsen, Søren B; Ulvskov, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Hydration of rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) derived from potato cell wall was analyzed by (13)C single-pulse (SP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) and (13)C cross-polarization (CP) MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and supported by (2)H SP/MAS NMR experiments. The study shows that the arabinan side chains hydrate more readily than the galactan side chains and suggests that the overall hydration properties can be controlled by modifying the ratio of these side chains. Enzymatic modification of native (NA) RG-I provided samples with reduced content of arabinan (sample DA), galactan (sample DG), or both side chains (sample DB). Results of these samples suggested that hydration properties were determined by the length and character of the side chains. NA and DA exhibited similar hydration characteristics, whereas DG and DB were difficult to hydrate because of the less hydrophilic properties of the rhamnose-galacturonic acid (Rha-GalA) backbone in RG-I. Potential food ingredient uses of RG-I by tailoring of its structure are discussed. PMID:21462966

  6. Extraction of multiple pure component 1H and 13C NMR spectra from two mixtures: Novel solution obtained by sparse component analysis-based blind decomposition

    Sparse component analysis (SCA) is demonstrated for blind extraction of three pure component spectra from only two measured mixed spectra in 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This appears to be the first time to report such results and that is the first novelty of the paper. Presented concept is general and directly applicable to experimental scenarios that possibly would require use of more than two mixtures. However, it is important to emphasize that number of required mixtures is always less than number of components present in these mixtures. The second novelty is formulation of blind NMR spectra decomposition exploiting sparseness of the pure components in the wavelet basis defined by either Morlet or Mexican hat wavelet. This enabled accurate estimation of the concentration matrix and number of pure components by means of data clustering algorithm and pure components spectra by means of linear programming with constraints from both 1H and 13C NMR experimental data. The third novelty is capability of proposed method to estimate number of pure components in demanding underdetermined blind source separation (uBSS) scenario. This is in contrast to majority of the BSS algorithms that assume this information to be known in advance. Presented results are important for the NMR spectroscopy-associated data analysis in pharmaceutical industry, medicine diagnostics and natural products research.

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance in pulse radiolysis. Chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization

    Nuclear magnetic resonance and chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) were applied to the study of pulse radiolysis. Samples were irradiated with a 3-MeV electron beam from the Argonne Van de Graaff accelerator in an EPR magnet (approximately 4000 G) which had axial holes for beam access. A fast flow system transferred the irradiated solution to the rotating 5-mm NMR sample tube. The NMR spectra of mixtures of sodium acetate and methanol were presented to demonstrate the features of the CIDNP in pulse radiolysis

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance method for observation of ferromagnetic pulmonary contaminants

    A method is proposed for measurement of tissue concentration of asbestos and other contaminants containing magnetite. The method uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of protons as a means of detection of the magnetic particles present in the dust. Results of the study of the effect of concentration of iron particles and particle size on the NMR signal are presented. The NMR signal had linear relationship to the concentration particles. Experiments with different particle size indicated that the signal was proportional to the mass of particles rather than to their number. Quantitative detection of 7RF02 chrysotile asbestos in gel and in rat lungs was demonstrated

  9. Algorithmic cooling in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Atia, Yosi; Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2016-01-01

    Algorithmic cooling is a method that employs thermalization to increase qubit purification level; namely, it reduces the qubit system's entropy. We utilized gradient ascent pulse engineering, an optimal control algorithm, to implement algorithmic cooling in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. Various cooling algorithms were applied onto the three qubits of C132-trichloroethylene, cooling the system beyond Shannon's entropy bound in several different ways. In particular, in one experiment a carbon qubit was cooled by a factor of 4.61. This work is a step towards potentially integrating tools of NMR quantum computing into in vivo magnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance in environmental engineering: principles and applications.

    Lens, P N; Hemminga, M A

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in relation to applications in the field of environmental science and engineering. The underlying principles of high resolution solution and solid state NMR, relaxation time measurements and imaging are presented. Then, the use of NMR is illustrated and reviewed in studies of biodegradation and biotransformation of soluble and solid organic matter, removal of nutrients and xenobiotics, fate of heavy metal ions, and transport processes in bioreactor systems. PMID:10335581

  11. Properties of K,Rb-intercalated C60 encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes called peapods derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    We present a detailed experimental study on how magnetic and electronic properties of Rb,K-intercalated C60 encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes called peapods can be derived from 13C nuclear magnetic resonance investigations. Ring currents do play a basic role in those systems; in particular, the inner cavities of nanotubes offer an ideal environment to investigate the magnetism at the nanoscale. We report the largest diamagnetic shifts down to −68.3 ppm ever observed in carbon allotropes, which is connected to the enhancement of the aromaticity of the nanotube envelope upon intercalation. The metallization of intercalated peapods is evidenced from the chemical shift anisotropy and spin-lattice relaxation (T1) measurements. The observed relaxation curves signal a three-component model with two slow and one fast relaxing components. We assigned the fast component to the unpaired electrons charged C60 that show a phase transition near 100 K. The two slow components can be rationalized by the two types of charged C60 at two different positions with a linear regime following Korringa behavior, which is typical for metallic system and allow us to estimate the density of sate at Fermi level n(EF)

  12. Properties of K,Rb-intercalated C60 encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes called peapods derived from nuclear magnetic resonance

    Mahfouz, R.

    2015-09-18

    We present a detailed experimental study on how magnetic and electronic properties of Rb,K-intercalated C60 encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes called peapods can be derived from 13C nuclear magnetic resonance investigations. Ring currents do play a basic role in those systems; in particular, the inner cavities of nanotubes offer an ideal environment to investigate the magnetism at the nanoscale. We report the largest diamagnetic shifts down to −68.3 ppm ever observed in carbon allotropes, which is connected to the enhancement of the aromaticity of the nanotube envelope upon intercalation. The metallization of intercalated peapods is evidenced from the chemical shift anisotropy and spin-lattice relaxation (T1) measurements. The observed relaxation curves signal a three-component model with two slow and one fast relaxing components. We assigned the fast component to the unpaired electrons charged C60 that show a phase transition near 100 K. The two slow components can be rationalized by the two types of charged C60 at two different positions with a linear regime following Korringa behavior, which is typical for metallic system and allow us to estimate the density of sate at Fermi level n(EF).

  13. Coherent control of an NV− center with one adjacent 13C

    We investigate the theoretically achievable fidelities when coherently controlling an effective three-qubit system consisting of a negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (15NV−) center in diamond with an additional nearby carbon 13C spin IC=1/2 via square and two frequency component radio and microwave frequency pulses in different magnetic field regimes. Such a system has potentially interesting applications in quantum information-related tasks such as distributed quantum computation or quantum repeater schemes. We find that the best fidelities can be achieved in an intermediate magnetic field regime. However, with only square pulses it will be challenging to reach the fidelity threshold(s) predicted by current models of fault-tolerant quantum computing. (paper)

  14. Nuclear chiral and magnetic rotation in covariant density functional theory

    Meng, Jie; Zhao, Pengwei

    2016-05-01

    Excitations of chiral rotation observed in triaxial nuclei and magnetic and/or antimagnetic rotations (AMR) seen in near-spherical nuclei have attracted a lot of attention. Unlike conventional rotation in well-deformed or superdeformed nuclei, here the rotational axis is not necessary coinciding with any principal axis of the nuclear density distribution. Thus, tilted axis cranking (TAC) is mandatory to describe these excitations self-consistently in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). We will briefly introduce the formalism of TAC–CDFT and its application for magnetic and AMR phenomena. Configuration-fixed CDFT and its predictions for nuclear chiral configurations and for favorable triaxial deformation parameters are also presented, and the discoveries of the multiple chiral doublets in 133Ce and 103Rh are discussed.

  15. Nuclear chiral and magnetic rotation in covariant density functional theory

    Meng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Excitations of chiral rotation observed in triaxial nuclei and magnetic and/or antimagnetic rotations seen in near-spherical nuclei have attracted a lot of attention. Unlike conventional rotation in well-deformed or superdeformed nuclei, here the rotational axis is not necessary coinciding with any principal axis of the nuclear density distribution. Thus, tilted axis cranking is mandatory to describe these excitations self-consistently in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). We will briefly introduce the formalism of tilted axis cranking CDFT and its application for magnetic and antimagnetic rotation phenomena. Configuration-fixed CDFT and its predictions for nuclear chiral configurations and for favorable triaxial deformation parameters are also presented, and the discoveries of the multiple chiral doublets (M\\c{hi}D) in 133Ce and 103Rh are discussed.

  16. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin. (U.K.)

  17. Nuclear magnetic response imaging of sap flow in plants

    Windt, C.W.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) imaging of long distance transport in plants. Long distance transport in plants is an enigmatic process. The theoretical framework that describes its basic properties has been in place for almost a century, yet at the same time only little is known about the dynamics of long distance transport inside the living plant. The latter is caused by the fact that the two pathways in which transport takes place, the xylem and the phloem, are virt...

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance in LaNi/sub 5/

    Rubinstein, M.; Swartzendruber, L.J.; Bennett, L.H.

    1979-03-01

    Proton and La/sup 139/ nuclear magnetic resonance measurements have been performed on LaNi/sub 5/, LaNi/sub 5/ hydrides, and LaNi/sub 5/H/sub x/ with ternary additions. With ternary additions, the activation energy for proton diffusion remained unchanged, but the motionally narrowed linewidth broadened. The quadrupole interaction on the La site has been determined in LaNi/sub 5/ and LaNi/sub 5/H/sub x/.

  19. Experimental Implementation of Remote State Preparation by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Peng, Xinhua; Zhu, Xiwen; Fang, Ximing; Feng, Mang; Liu, Maili; Gao, Kelin

    2002-01-01

    We have experimentally implemented remote state preparation (RSP) of a qubit from a hydrogen to a carbon nucleus in molecules of carbon-13 labeled chloroform $^{13}$CHCl$_{3}$ over interatomic distances using liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. Full RSP of a special ensemble of qubits, i.e., a qubit chosen from equatorial and polar great circles on a Bloch sphere with Pati's scheme, was achieved with one cbit communication. Such a RSP scheme can be generalized to prepare ...

  20. Experimental implementation of remote state preparation by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Peng Xinhua; Zhu Xiwen; Fang Ximing; Feng Mang; Liu Maili; Gao Kelin

    2003-01-13

    We have experimentally implemented remote state preparation of a qubit from a hydrogen to a carbon nucleus in molecules of carbon-13 labeled chloroform {sup 13}CHCl{sub 3} over interatomic distances using liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Full RSP of a special ensemble of qubits, i.e., a qubit chosen from either an equatorial or a polar great circle on a Bloch sphere with Pati's scheme, was achieved with one cbit communication.

  1. PWM high frequency oscillator in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    In this article we propose a new architecture for pulsed oscillator, in the area of radio frequency (RF), which operates with pulses of few microseconds in spectrometers of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Pulsed. This new topology substitutes the classic amplifying systems with valves by field effect semiconductors of the type MOS-FET channel N, allowing a larger compacting and efficiency. This oscillator possibly reaching potencies of the order of 103 Watts at a low cost. (author)

  2. Optimal grouping for a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) scanner

    VANDAELE, Nico; VAN NIEUWENHUYSE, Inneke; CUPERS, Sascha

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we analyze how a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Scanner can be managed more efficiently, simultaneously improving patient comfort (in terms of total time spent in the system) and increasing availability in case of emergency calls. By means of a superposition approach, all relevant data on the arrival and service process of different patient types are transformed into a general single server, single class queueing model. The objective function consists of the weighted average patient...

  3. Nonadiabatic Geometric Angle in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Connection

    Cherbal, Omar; Maamache, Mustapha; Drir, Mahrez

    2005-01-01

    By using the Grassmannian invariant-angle coherents states approach, the classical analogue of the Aharonov-Anandan nonadiabatic geometrical phase is found for a spin one-half in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). In the adiabatic limit, the semi-classical relation between the adiabatic Berry’s phase and Hannay’s angle gives exactly the experimental result observed by Suter et al[12].

  4. 13C NMR spectra of trimethylene oxide and sulphide

    The 13C NMR spectra of trimethylene oxide and trimethylene sulphide have been recorded and analysed as second-order spectra. The values of all the C-H coupling constants with their signs are reported. The signs of the C-H coupling constants in trimethylene oxide were determined by selective irradiation experiments and theoretical calculations, while in trimethylene sulphide the signs were obtained directly from the analysis. The one-bond C-H coupling constants are approximately 3 Hz greater in trimethylene oxide than in trimethylene sulphide, while the absolute values of the two-bond and three-bond coupling constants, 2Jsub(cβH) and 3Jsub(CαH), are bout 1 Hz greater in the latter molecule. (orig.)

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Li-ion Battery

    D. Ohno

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR imaging has high sensitivity to proton (1H and lithium (7Li. It is a useful measurement for electrolyte in Li-ion battery. 1H NMR images of lithium ion battery which is composed of LiMn2O4 / LiClO4 + propylene carbonate (PC / Li-metal have been studied. 1H NMR images of electrolyte near cathode material (LiMn2O4 showed anomalous intensity distribution, which was quite inhomogeneous. From NMR images as a function of repetition time (TR, it was concluded that the anomalous intensity distribution was not due to change of relaxation time but an indirect (spatial para-magnetization effect from cathode material. The paramagnetization induced by high magnetic field distorts linearity of magnetic gradient field, leading to apparent intensity variance. This functional image is an easy diagnostic measurement for magnetization of cathode material, which allows the possibility to check uniformity of cathode material and change of magnetization under electrochemical process.

  6. Millimeter and submillimeter wave spectra of 13C-glycolaldehydes

    Haykal, I.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Huet, T. R.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO) is the simplest sugar and an important intermediate in the path toward forming more complex biologically relevant molecules. Astronomical surveys of interstellar molecules, such as those available with the very sensitive ALMA telescope, require preliminary laboratory investigations of the microwave and submillimeter-wave spectra of molecular species including new isotopologs - to identify these in the interstellar media. Aims: To achieve the detection of the 13C isotopologs of glycolaldehyde in the interstellar medium, their rotational spectra in the millimeter and submillimeter-wave regions were studied. Methods: The spectra of 13CH2OHCHO and CH2OH13CHO were recorded in the 150-945 GHz spectral range in the laboratory using a solid-state submillimeter-wave spectrometer in Lille. The observed line frequencies were measured with an accuracy of 30 kHz up to 700 GHz and of 50 kHz above 700 GHz. We analyzed the spectra with a standard Watson Hamiltonian. Results: About 10 000 new lines were identified for each isotopolog. The spectroscopic parameters were determined for the ground- and the three lowest vibrational states up to 945 and 630 GHz. Previous microwave assignments of 13CH2OHCHO were not confirmed. Conclusions: The provided line-lists and sets of molecular parameters meet the needs for a first astrophysical search of 13C-glycolaldehydes. Full Tables 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A96

  7. Magnetic Flux Compression Concept for Nuclear Pulse Propulsion and Power

    Litchford, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    The desire for fast, efficient interplanetary transport requires propulsion systems having short acceleration times and very high specific impulse attributes. Unfortunately, most highly efficient propulsion systems which are within the capabilities of present day technologies are either very heavy or yield very low impulse such that the acceleration time to final velocity is too long to be of lasting interest, One exception, the nuclear thermal thruster, could achieve the desired acceleration but it would require inordinately large mass ratios to reach the range of desired final velocities. An alternative approach, among several competing concepts that are beyond our modern technical capabilities, is a pulsed thermonuclear device utilizing microfusion detonations. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of an innovative magnetic flux compression concept for utilizing microfusion detonations, assuming that such low yield nuclear bursts can be realized in practice. In this concept, a magnetic field is compressed between an expanding detonation driven diamagnetic plasma and a stationary structure formed from a high temperature superconductor (HTSC). In general, we are interested in accomplishing two important functions: (1) collimation of a hot diamagnetic plasma for direct thrust production; and (2) pulse power generation for dense plasma ignition. For the purposes of this research, it is assumed that rnicrofusion detonation technology may become available within a few decades, and that this approach could capitalize on recent advances in inertial confinement fusion ICF) technologies including magnetized target concepts and antimatter initiated nuclear detonations. The charged particle expansion velocity in these detonations can be on the order of 10 (exp 6)- 10 (exp 7) meters per second, and, if effectively collimated by a magnetic nozzle, can yield the Isp and the acceleration levels needed for practical interplanetary spaceflight. The ability to ignite pure

  8. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  9. Imaging using long range dipolar field effects Nuclear magnetic resonance

    Gutteridge, S

    2002-01-01

    The work in this thesis has been undertaken by the except where indicated in reference, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre, at the University of Nottingham during the period from October 1998 to March 2001. This thesis details the different characteristics of the long range dipolar field and its application to magnetic resonance imaging. The long range dipolar field is usually neglected in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, as molecular tumbling decouples its effect at short distances. However, in highly polarised samples residual long range components have a significant effect on the evolution of the magnetisation, giving rise to multiple spin echoes and unexpected quantum coherences. Three applications utilising these dipolar field effects are documented in this thesis. The first demonstrates the spatial sensitivity of the signal generated via dipolar field effects in structured liquid state samples. The second utilises the signal produced by the dipolar field to create proton spin density maps. Thes...

  10. Static and dynamic interaction between π and d electrons in organic superconductor β″-(BEDT-TTF)4[(H3O ) Fe (C2O4)3] .C6H5Br studied by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Ihara, Y.; Futami, Y.; Kawamoto, A.; Matsui, K.; Goto, T.; Sasaki, T.; Benmansour, S.; Gómez-García, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of 13C NMR experiments in an organic superconductor with localized Fe spins β″-(BEDT-TTF) 4[(H3O ) Fe (C2O4)3] .C6H5Br . We reveal the antiferromagnetic coupling between Fe d spins and π spins, which creates an exchange field antiparallel to the external field direction at the π electrons. In addition to the static effects of Fe spins, we show from the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate measurement that the magnetic fluctuations generated by Fe spins are suppressed at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. These conditions are suitable to stabilize the field-induced superconductivity by the field compensation mechanism. After the suppression of Fe-spin dynamics by a magnetic field of 19 T, we observed the underlying π -electron contribution. We discuss a possible anomaly in the π -electron system.

  11. Design and construction of a nuclear magnetic resonator circuit

    It is described the operation of a feedback circuit that it using the nuclear resonance phenomena and that covers a broad sweeping interval in frequency with a minimum adjustment of the circuit elements and it produces an appropriate nuclear absorption for a sign relation at reasonable noise. The circuit is an oscillator amplifier modulated that it is based its sensibility and stability in an inductive-capacitive arrangement in parallel and always operate in resonant condition, in such a way that the quality factor of Q arrangement has been very elevated. Thus when the nuclear absorption occurs it is producing a fall of Q effective. The oscillation amplitude is controllable and it maintains in a convenient value over the operation interval using control by feedback. The circuit uses a configuration 'Auto dyne Hop kin' that it suffers as a follower of inductive charge, which have the main characteristic of to cause a negative resistance that it appears through the tuning circuit. It is introduced a control for feedback via two trajectories, the first by differential pair for to maintain the amplitude level in RF and the second for to stability a band wide interval in the modulation condition. It is necessary since the RF signal value must have a value to excite the specimen nucleus without to carry to saturate it and that the permanence in the absorption region was appropriate. Between applications of the nuclear magnetic resonance phenomena we have the magnetic fields measurements, physicochemical molecular properties studies, training and medical instrumentation. (Author)

  12. Differential cross section measurement of radiative capture of protons by nuclei 13C

    Full text: The reaction 13C(p,γ )14N is the important one for the astrophysics, not only for nuclear synthesis of CNO elements, but and for nuclear synthesis of elements participating in subsequent combustion of helium [1]. The predominant yield of the reaction occurs at protons energies of less than 1 MeV. However, the clearness of the capture mechanism in this energy region is made difficult because of the superposition of the contribution of the low - energetical part of the resonance 1320 keV onto the cross section. Last experimental data for more wide energy region, informed in the work [1], and results of previous works, mentioned in that work, give reason for further continuation of the study of the reaction 13C(p,γ )14N. Measured data of the work [1] in the region of Eρ = (320 † 900) keV at the angles of 0o and 90o are obviously insufficient. In the present work measurements of differential cross sections of the reaction were carried out at protons energies Ep = 991, 558 and 365 keV, the accuracy is not worse then 10%. There was studied the most (from the astrophysical point of view) important process of protons capture by 13C nuclei onto the ground state of the 14N nucleus. The 13C (99%) targets, used in the experiment, were sprayed onto copper base. The target thickness was determined by incident protons energy losses in the target. The energy losses were clearly reflected in the corresponding spreading of transitions of radiation capture. The statement about the gamma-lines spreading is valid in this case, because energy losses in the target are here significantly more, than the energetical resolution of the detector. The peak width of the radiation capture gamma-line at half-height corresponds to energy losses of incident protons in the target. From the Table of brake values for protons in carbon [2] there was determined that the thickness of the target was 140 ± 5% μg/cm2. The upper part of gamma-lines in the spectrum repeats the course of

  13. Nuclear magnetic and electric dipole moments of neon-19

    This thesis presents a detailed discussion of a series of experiments designed to measure the magnetic and electric dipole moments of the β-emitting nucleus 19Ne. The 19Ne is generated in the reaction 19F(p,n)19Ne and is polarized by a ''stern-Gerlach'' magnet in a rare gas atomic beams machine. The atoms are stored in a cell for many seconds without depolarizing. The parity violating asymmetry in the β angular distribution is used to monitor the nuclear polarization. The polarized atoms are stored in a cell in a uniform magnetic field. The β-asymmetry is monitored by a pair of β-detectors located on either side of the cell. Transitions between the M/sub J/ = +1/2 and M/sub J/ = -1/2 spin states are induced by an rf field generated by a small Helmholtz coil pair surrounding the cell. Nuclear magnetic resonance lines are observed and the magnetic moment of 19Ne measured to be μ(19Ne) = -1.88542(8)μ/sub N/. A new magnet, cell and detectors were designed to give narrow resonance lines. The equipment is described in detail and several resonance line shapes are discussed. The narrowest resonance line achieved with this system was 0.043 Hz FWHM. This width is primarily due to the 19Ne lifetime. Pulsed NMR lineshapes were also observed. The narrow NMR lines observed in the previous experiment were then used as a probe to look for an electric dipole moment (EDM) in 19Ne. Any shift in the resonance frequency correlated with changes in an externally applied electric field would be evidence for an EDM. The EDM of the 19Ne atom was measured to (7.2 +/- 6.2 X 10-22 e-cm. This experiment and possible improvements are discussed in detail

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of metallic scandium chlorides

    The 45Sc nuclear magnetic resonance was studied in samples having the general composition CsSc/sub x/Cl3 (0.67 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1.0) in the CsCl-ScCl3-Sc system. In particular the structure of CsScCl3 suggests that it may be a one-dimensional conductor, and an attempt was therefore made to detect the occurrence of a metal-insulator transition of the type characteristic of one-dimensional conductors. Conventional crossed-coil (nuclear induction) techniques were employed. The 45Sc resonance was studied over a wide frequency range (4 to 24 MHz) at 300K, these measurements yielding the Knight shift and nuclear electric quadrupole coupling parameters. No significant variation in the spectra occurred from 4.2K to 450K, indicating the absence of a metal-insulator transition in this temperature range

  15. Monitoring chemotherapeutic response by hyperpolarized 13C-fumarate MRS and diffusion MRI.

    Mignion, Lionel; Dutta, Prasanta; Martinez, Gary V; Foroutan, Parastou; Gillies, Robert J; Jordan, Bénédicte F

    2014-02-01

    Targeted chemotherapeutic agents often do not result in tumor shrinkage, so new biomarkers that correlate with clinical efficacy are needed. In this study, we investigated noninvasive imaging protocols to monitor responses to sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor approved for treatment of renal cell and hepatocellular carcinoma. Healthy cells are impermeable to fumarate, so conversion of this metabolite to malate as detected by (13)C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been suggested as one marker for cell death and treatment response in tumors. Diffusion MRI also has been suggested as a measure of therapy-induced cytotoxic edema because viable cells act as a diffusion barrier in tissue. For these reasons, we assessed sorafenib responses using hyperpolarized (13)C-fumarate, diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in a xenograft model of human breast cancer in which daily administration of sorafenib was sufficient to stabilize tumor growth. We detected signals from fumarate and malate following intravenous administration of hyperpolarized fumarate with a progressive increase in the malate-to-fumarate (MA/FA) ratio at days 2 to 5 after sorafenib infusion. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured by DW-MRI increased in the treated group consistent with cytotoxic edema. However, the MA/FA ratio was a more sensitive marker of therapeutic response than ADC, with 2.8-fold versus 1.3-fold changes, respectively, by day 5 of drug treatment. Histologic analyses confirmed cell death in the sorafenib-treated cohort. Notably, (13)C-pyruvate-to-lactate conversion was not affected by sorafenib in the breast cancer model examined. Our results illustrate how combining hyperpolarized substrates with DW-MRI can allow noninvasive monitoring of targeted therapeutic responses at relatively early times after drug administration. PMID:24285723

  16. 2H and 13C tracer studies of ethanol metabolism by Fourier transform 13C[2H, 1H] NMR difference spectroscopy

    A novel form of NMR difference spectroscopy has been developed to monitor low levels of deuterium incorporation in steroids resulting from ethanol metabolism. Ethanol specifically labeled with 13C and/or 2H was administered to bile fistula rats, and bile acids were collected, derivatized and separated. Subtracting 13C [1H] spectra from 13C[2H,1H] spectra of such samples, where the brackets imply complete noise decoupling of the indicated nuclei, results in difference spectra. These spectra display 13C resonances only from 13C spins which are J-coupled to 2H spins. Particular sites and extents of 2H incorporation along the steroid skeletons could thus be evaluated and compared with GC-MS analysis. A practical lower limit of approximately 20 nanomoles of 13C--2H couples could be observed using this technique, through use of sample microcells, quadrature detection and long-term signal averaging

  17. Analysis of ringing due to magnetic core materials used in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    Prabhu Gaunkar, Neelam; Nlebedim, Cajetan; Hadimani, Ravi; Bulu, Irfan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Mina, Mani; Jiles, David

    Oil-field well logging instruments employ pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques and use inductive sensors to detect and evaluate the presence of particular fluids in geological formations. Acting as both signal transmitters and receivers most inductive sensors employ magnetic cores to enhance the quality and amplitude of signals recorded during field measurements. It is observed that the magnetic core also responds to the applied input signal thereby generating a signal (`ringing') that interferes with the measurement of the signals from the target formations. This causes significant noise and receiver dead time and it is beneficial to eliminate/suppress the signals received from the magnetic core. In this work a detailed analysis of the magnetic core response and in particular loading of the sensor due to the presence of the magnetic core is presented. Pulsed NMR measurements over a frequency band of 100 kHz to 1MHz are used to determine the amplitude and linewidth of the signals acquired from different magnetic core materials. A lower signal amplitude and a higher linewidth are vital since these would correspond to minimal contributions from the magnetic core to the inductive sensor response and thus leading to minimized receiver dead time.

  18. IRMS detection of testosterone manipulated with {sup 13}C labeled standards in human urine by removing the labeled {sup 13}C

    Wang, Jingzhu, E-mail: wangjingzhu@chinada.cn [National Anti-Doping Laboratory, China Anti-Doping Agency, Beijing (China); Yang, Rui [Sport Science College, Beijing Sport University Beijing, Beijing (China); Yang, Wenning [School of Pharmacy, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing (China); Liu, Xin; Xing, Yanyi; Xu, Youxuan [National Anti-Doping Laboratory, China Anti-Doping Agency, Beijing (China)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • {sup 13}C labeled testosterone can be used to adjust the isotope ratio of testosterone. • The novel testosterone cannot be detected by the regular IRMS method in doping test. • A method was explored to remove the labeled {sup 13}C. • The established method can be used to detect the manipulated testosterone. - Abstract: Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is applied to confirm testosterone (T) abuse by determining the carbon isotope ratios (δ{sup 13}C value). However, {sup 13}C labeled standards can be used to control the δ{sup 13}C value and produce manipulated T which cannot be detected by the current method. A method was explored to remove the {sup 13}C labeled atom at C-3 from the molecule of androsterone (Andro), the metabolite of T in urine, to produce the resultant (A-nor-5α-androstane-2,17-dione, ANAD). The difference in δ{sup 13}C values between Andro and ANAD (Δδ{sup 13}C{sub Andro–ANAD}, ‰) would change significantly in case manipulated T is abused. Twenty-one volunteers administered T manipulated with different {sup 13}C labeled standards. The collected urine samples were analyzed with the established method, and the maximum value of Δδ{sup 13}C{sub Andro–ANAD} post ingestion ranged from 3.0‰ to 8.8‰. Based on the population reference, the cut-off value of Δδ{sup 13}C{sub Andro–ANAD} for positive result was suggested as 1.2‰. The developed method could be used to detect T manipulated with 3-{sup 13}C labeled standards.

  19. Transformation of Symmetrization Order to Nuclear-Spin Magnetization by Chemical Reaction and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Bowers, C. Russell; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    1986-01-01

    A method of obtaining very large nuclear-spin polarizations is proposed and illustrated by density-operator calculations. The prediction is that chemical reaction and rf irradiation can convert the scalar parahydrogen state into polarization of order unity on the nuclear spins of the products of molecular-hydrogen addition reactions. A means of extending the resultant sensitivity enhancement to other spins is proposed in which the transfer of order occurs through population differences not as...

  20. Metabolic-flux analysis of continuously cultured hybridoma cells using 13CO2 mass spectrometry in combination with 13C-lactate nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolic balancing

    Bonarius, H.P.J.; Ozemre, A.; Timmerarends, B.; Skrabal, P.; Tramper, J.; Schmid, G.; Heinzle, E.

    2001-01-01

    Protein production of mammalian-cell culture is limited due to accumulation of waste products such as lactate, CO2, and ammonia. In this study, the intracellular fluxes of hybridoma cells are measured to determine the amount by which various metabolic pathways contribute to the secretion of waste pr

  1. Nitrite fixation by humic substances: Nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance evidence for potential intermediates in chemodenitrification

    Thorn, K.A.; Mikita, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Studies have suggested that NO2/-, produced during nitrification and denitrification, can become incorporated into soil organic matter and, in one of the processes associated with chemodenitrification, react with organic matter to form trace N gases, including N2O. To gain an understanding of the nitrosation chemistry on a molecular level, soil and aquatic humic substances were reacted with 15N-labeled NaNO2, and analyzed by liquid phase 15N and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) Pahokee peat and peat humic acid were also reacted with Na15NO2 and analyzed by solid-state 15N NMR. In Suwannee River, Armadale, and Laurentian fulvic acids, phenolic rings and activated methylene groups underwent nitrosation to form nitrosophenols (quinone monoximes) and ketoximes, respectively. The oximes underwent Beckmann rearrangements to 2??amides, and Beckmann fragmentations to nitriles. The nitriles in turn underwent hydrolysis to 1??amides. Peaks tentatively identified as imine, indophenol, or azoxybenzene nitrogens were clearly present in spectra of samples nitrosated at pH 6 but diminished at pH 3. The 15N NMR spectrum of the peat humic acid exhibited peaks corresponding with N-nitroso groups in addition to nitrosophenols, ketoximes, and secondary Beckmann reaction products. Formation of N-nitroso groups was more significant in the whole peat compared with the peat humic acid. Carbon-13 NMR analyses also indicated the occurrence of nitrosative demethoxylation in peat and soil humic acids. Reaction of 15N-NH3 fixated fulvic acid with unlabeled NO2/- resulted in nitrosative deamination of aminohydroquinone N, suggesting a previously unrecognized pathway for production of N2 gas in soils fertilized with NH3.Studies have suggested that NO2-, produced during nitrification and denitrification, can become incorporated into soil organic matter and, in one of the processes associated with chemodenitrification, react with organic

  2. Sequence-specific assignment of histidine and tryptophan ring 1H, 13C and 15N resonances in 13C/15N- and 2H/13C/15N-labelled proteins

    Methods are described to correlate aromatic 1Hδ2/13Cδ2 or 1Hε1/15Nε1 with aliphatic 13Cβ chemical shifts of histidine and tryptophan residues, respectively. The pulse sequences exclusively rely on magnetization transfers via one-bond scalar couplings and employ [15N, 1H]- and/or [13C, 1H]-TROSY schemes to enhance sensitivity. In the case of histidine imidazole rings exhibiting slow HN-exchange with the solvent, connectivities of these proton resonances with β-carbons can be established as well. In addition, their correlations to ring carbons can be detected in a simple [15N, 1H]-TROSY-H(N)Car experiment, revealing the tautomeric state of the neutral ring system. The novel methods are demonstrated with the 23-kDa protein xylanase and the 35-kDa protein diisopropylfluorophosphatase, providing nearly complete sequence-specific resonance assignments of their histidine δ-CH and tryptophan ε-NH groups

  3. Alpha resonances excited in13C and 16O by the (6Li,d) reaction

    The investigation of a cluster correlations is the main purpose of the research program in progress, focusing on xα and xα + ν nuclei. The reactions 9Be(6Li,d)13C and 12C(6Li,d)16O measured at the bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV, employing the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion technique, were used to enhance a resonant states in 13C and 16O. An energy resolution of 20-40 keV was obtained and up to 15.5 MeV of excitation, in both nuclei, several resonances not previously measured, revealing a quasi-bound behavior, were detected. Focusing on 13C, the experimental angular distributions associated with the resonances just above the 9Be + α and 3α + ν thresholds[2] were compared with DWBA predictions. Seen at the 9Be + α threshold, a pure L = 4 transfer is indicated for each transition to the known 7/2- and (5/2-) states instead of L = 2 obtained in the former fit[3] to the integrated contribution. The narrow resonance detected at 12.3 MeV of excitation, close to the 3α + ν threshold and populated by an L = 2 transfer, reveals a 9Be(G.S.) + α component for the 1/2- cluster state candidate, 12C(Hoyle) + ν, at this threshold. Considering the 16O, states were revealed around the 4α threshold (14.44 MeV) and the upper limit resonant widths were obtained. The resonance at 14.670 MeV was reached by an L = 5 direct transfer in agreement with the 5- attribution. The upper limit width obtained, near the experimental resolution, is inconsistent with the usual experimental[4,5] and theoretical[6-7] interpretations of the 5- state revealed as a broad resonance in the same excitation energy region and considered to be a member of the Kπ = 0- band with the 12C(G.S.) + α structure. In the same excitation energy range, a narrow 5- resonance decaying to 12C(2+ 1), was predicted by Suzuki using a comprehensive semi-microscopic alpha cluster calculation, in agreement with the present findings. Haigh et al., in the investigation of the 12C

  4. Rotor Design for High Pressure Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    High pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a sample spinning rate exceeding 2.1 kHz and pressure greater than 165 bar has never been realized. In this work, a new sample cell design is reported, suitable for constructing cells of different sizes. Using a 7.5 mm high pressure MAS rotor as an example, internal pressure as high as 200 bar at a sample spinning rate of 6 kHz is achieved. The new high pressure MAS rotor is re-usable and compatible with most commercial NMR set-ups, exhibiting low 1H and 13C NMR background and offering maximal NMR sensitivity. As an example of its many possible applications, this new capability is applied to determine reaction products associated with the carbonation reaction of a natural mineral, antigorite ((Mg,Fe2+)3Si2O5(OH)4), in contact with liquid water in water-saturated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at 150 bar and 50 deg C. This mineral is relevant to the deep geologic disposal of CO2, but its iron content results in too many sample spinning sidebands at low spinning rate. Hence, this chemical system is a good case study to demonstrate the utility of the higher sample spinning rates that can be achieved by our new rotor design. We expect this new capability will be useful for exploring solid-state, including interfacial, chemistry at new levels of high-pressure in a wide variety of fields.

  5. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5–7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T2 relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T2 relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 107 cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy

  6. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    Rümenapp, Christine, E-mail: ruemenapp@tum.de [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Gleich, Bernhard [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany); Mannherz, Hans Georg [Abteilung für Anatomie und Molekulare Embryologie, Ruhr Universität Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Haase, Axel [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Garching (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5–7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T{sub 2} relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T{sub 2} relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 10{sup 7} cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy.

  7. The synthesis of [2-13C]2-nitropropane at room temperature and at atmospheric pressure

    Jacquemijns M; Zomer G

    1990-01-01

    In this report the synthesis of [2-13C]2-nitropropane at room temperature is described. [2-13C]Acetone was converted into the oxime with hydroxy hydrochloridelamine and sodium carbonate. Treatment with hypobromic acid resulted in 2-13C]2-bromo-2-nitropropane. Hydrogenation with sodium borohydride gave [2-13C]2-nitropropane in 14,3% overall yield.

  8. 13C CPMAS NMR Studies of Anthocyanidins and their Glucosides

    Anthocyanins are responsible for red, purple or blue colours of flower petals and can be found in red or black fruits and berries. Many foods, especially red grapes and wines, aronia or blueberries contain large amounts of anthocyanins. Their health beneficial effects are related to antioxidant and radical scavenging properties. Structural analysis of anthocyanins by NMR are few, owing to the difficulty in obtaining analysable spectra for unstable, interconverting compounds, available in small amounts. Compounds studied by us were isolated from fruits and berries. 13C CPMAS NMR spectra were recorded on a Bruker DSX-400 spectrometer for solid chlorides of: cyanidin, cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, cyanidin 3,5-O-diglucoside, pelargonidin and pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside. Dipolar dephased and short contact pulse sequences were used as an aid in the assignment of resonances in CPMAS spectra of solids. Inspection of the spectra indicates that anthocyanidins are in the form of flavylium (cationic) and not in form of the chalcone.: the resonance of C2 appears at ca. 160 ppm and C3 at ca. 135 ppm, whereas C ring opening produces C2 = O, for which chemical shift of ca. 180 ppm can be expected. A comparison of experimental (CPMAS) and predicted (GIAO DFT) shielding constants for cyanidin provided information about the orientation of OH groups, twist angle of aromatic ring B and the localization of the chloride anion.(author)

  9. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  10. NMR Assignment of Polymerase β labeled with 2H, 13C, and 15N in complex with substrate DNA

    Mueller, Geoffrey A.; DeRose, Eugene F.; Kirby, Thomas W.; London, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    DNA Polymerase β is a multifunctional enzyme involved in base excision repair of nuclear DNA in vertebrate cells. It has been extensively studied as a model for mechanistic studies of the nucleotidyl transferase reaction, DNA synthesis fidelity, and protein-DNA interactions. Previous studies of 13C-methyl-methionine labeled Rat pol β revealed extensive dynamics in response to various DNA repair substrates (Bose-Basu et. al, 2004). We present here the first assignments of the full-length prote...

  11. The use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to characterize and evaluate rubber degradation

    Somers, A. E.; Bastow, T. J.; Burgar, M. I.; Forsyth, M.; Hill, A. J.

    1999-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a characterization technique in which the (non-zero spin) nuclei of the constituent elements in the material can be excited to resonance in an applied magnetic field around a frequency specific to each NMR active nucleus. The power of this technique stems from its ability to distinguish between like atoms in magnetically/chemically unique environments. For 1H NMR in natural and synthetic rubbers designed for industrial use, the transverse (or spin-spin) relaxation time, T2, of the resonance can be used to determine the degree of sulfur (or other) cross-linking between the polymer chains. In this work, NMR is used to monitor the degradation of natural rubber due to oxidation and/or ozonolysis. This degradation causes bond cleavage and increases the cross-link density within the material. These processes lead to a rubber becoming brittle, to the point where it can no longer withstand the operating conditions. These structural/chemical changes in a degraded rubber liner used in service are characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Although the work here is laboratory based and has been performed on relatively sophisticated NMR equipment, another less accurate, but potentially more useful NMR method is also being investigated for in-service, non-destructive testing. For this work low powered NMR equipment was used to follow the changes in 1H T2 as a function of degradation time in rubber samples placed aged at 100 °C. This latter technique measures the average (over all similar nuclei) relaxation times, and hence loses its specificity. However our work has shown that even this simpler method is sensitive to structural changes in the rubber. As rubber degrades it becomes stiffer and this overall bond relaxation time decreases. This type of equipment is simple enough to be made portable to be used in the field. This monitoring of degradation could then lead to using NMR to determine the performance of a part in service. The residual life

  12. The synthesis of [2-13C]2-nitropropane at room temperature and at atmospheric pressure

    Jacquemijns M; Zomer G

    1990-01-01

    In this report the synthesis of [2-13C]2-nitropropane at room temperature is described. [2-13C]Acetone was converted into the oxime with hydroxy hydrochloridelamine and sodium carbonate. Treatment with hypobromic acid resulted in 2-13C]2-bromo-2-nitropropane. Hydrogenation with sodium borohydride

  13. Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu Stable Isotope (delta 18O, delta 13C) Data for 1806 to 1979

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Site: Espiritu Santo Island, Vanuatu, 15S, 167E. 173 year record of d18O and d13C. Variable names: QSR Age, QSR 13C, QSR 18O, GRL Age, GRL Qtrly 13C, GRL Qtrly 18O,...

  14. 40 CFR 721.6505 - Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6505 Polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates. (a) Chemical substance... polymers of C13C15 oxoalcohol ethoxolates (PMNs P-96-950/951) are subject to reporting under this...

  15. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    Rasly, Mahmoud; Lin, Zhichao; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Uemura, Tetsuya

    2016-05-01

    As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of 75As, 69Ga and 71Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  16. Characterization of pyrogenic organic matter by 2-dimenstional HETeronucleus CORelation solid-state 13C NMR (HETCOR) spectroscopy

    Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    During the last years, increasing evidences are provided that the common view of charcoal as a polyaromatic network is too much simplified. Experiments with model compounds indicated that it represents a heterogeneous mixture of thermally altered biomacromolecules with N, O and likely also S substitutions as common features. If produced from a N-rich feedstock, the so called black nitrogen (BN) has to be considered as an integral part of the aromatic charcoal network. In order to study this network one-dimensional (1D) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is often applied. However, this technique suffers from broad resonance lines and low resolution. Applying 2D techniques can help but until recently, this was unfeasible for natural organic matter (NOM) due to sensitivity problems and the high complexity of the material. On the other hand, during the last decade, the development of stronger magnetic field instruments and advanced pulse sequences has put them into reach for NOM research. Although 2D NMR spectroscopy has many different applications, all pulse sequences are based on the introduction of a preparation time during which the magnetization of a spin system is adjusted into a state appropriate to whatever properties are to be detected in the indirect dimension. Then, the spins are allowed to evolve with the given conditions and after their additional manipulation during a mixing period the modulated magnetization is detected. Assembling several 1D spectra with incrementing evolution time creates a data set which is two-dimensional in time (t1, t2). Fourier transformation of both dimensions leads to a 2D contour plot correlating the interactions detected in the indirect dimension t1 with the signals detected in the direct dimension t2. The so called solid-state heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR spectroscopy represents a 2D technique allows the determination which protons are interacting with which carbons. In the present work this

  17. Nuclear spin relaxation in systems of magnetic spheres

    A new approach to the NMR relaxation theory for a system of magnetic spheres (sufficiently big spherical molecules) is presented. In this paper the NMR spin-lattice relaxation time T1 and spin-spin relaxation time T2 are calculated for nuclear spins I→j, taking into account intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions between the spins I→j, and spins S→k in the magnetic spheres. By an expansion of the dipole-dipole interaction in a series of spherical harmonics, it is possible to separate spatial variables of the interacting spins in a laboratory frame. A simultaneous effect of isotropic rotational and translation diffusion of the spins and relaxation rate of spins S→k is also taken into account

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance force microscopy with a microwire rf source

    The authors use a 1.0 μm wide patterned Cu wire with an integrated nanomagnetic tip to measure the statistical nuclear polarization of 19F in CaF2 by magnetic resonance force microscopy. With less than 350 μW of dissipated power, the authors achieve rf magnetic fields over 4 mT at 115 MHz for a sample positioned within 100 nm of the 'microwire' rf source. A 200 nm diameter FeCo tip integrated onto the wire produces field gradients greater than 105 T/m at the same position. The large rf fields from the broadband microwire enable long rotating-frame spin lifetimes of up to 15 s at 4 K

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance with the Distant Dipolar Field

    Corum, C A

    2005-01-01

    Distant dipolar field (DDF)-based nuclear magnetic resonance is an active research area with many fundamental properties still not well understood. Already several intriguing applications have developed, like HOMOGENIZED and IDEAL spectroscopy, that allow high resolution spectra to be obtained in inhomogeneous fields, such as in-vivo. The theoretical and experimental research in this thesis concentrates on the fundamental signal properties of DDF-based sequences in the presence of relaxation (T1 and T2) and diffusion. A general introduction to magnetic resonance phenomenon is followed by a more in depth introduction to the DDF and its effects. A novel analytical signal equation has been developed to describe the effects of T2 relaxation and diffusing spatially modulated longitudinal spins during the signal build period of an HOMOGENIZED cross peak. Diffusion of the longitudinal spins results in a lengthening of the effective dipolar demagnetization time, delaying the re-phasing of coupled anti-phase states in...

  20. 2.3 Tomography using nuclear magnetic resonance

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) not only allows the tomographic imaging of tissues but also the identification of the biochemical structure of tissues. The principles of the method are described as is a NMR examination unit based on a giant magnet with a central opening in which is placed the patient. The application of the said method allows to distinguish in the skull structures 2 mm in size, in the trunk 3 mm in size. The morphological image may be obtained in 2 mins, data on chemical composition in 7 mins. The method may be applied for diagnosing edemas of the brain, hematomas, for distinguishing benign and malignant tumours, for measuring blood vessel flow and for monitoring biochemical processes. The advantage of the method is that it does not load the patient with radioactive radiation. (J.P.)

  1. A personal computer-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    Job, Constantin; Pearson, Robert M.; Brown, Michael F.

    1994-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy using personal computer-based hardware has the potential of enabling the application of NMR methods to fields where conventional state of the art equipment is either impractical or too costly. With such a strategy for data acquisition and processing, disciplines including civil engineering, agriculture, geology, archaeology, and others have the possibility of utilizing magnetic resonance techniques within the laboratory or conducting applications directly in the field. Another aspect is the possibility of utilizing existing NMR magnets which may be in good condition but unused because of outdated or nonrepairable electronics. Moreover, NMR applications based on personal computer technology may open up teaching possibilities at the college or even secondary school level. The goal of developing such a personal computer (PC)-based NMR standard is facilitated by existing technologies including logic cell arrays, direct digital frequency synthesis, use of PC-based electrical engineering software tools to fabricate electronic circuits, and the use of permanent magnets based on neodymium-iron-boron alloy. Utilizing such an approach, we have been able to place essentially an entire NMR spectrometer console on two printed circuit boards, with the exception of the receiver and radio frequency power amplifier. Future upgrades to include the deuterium lock and the decoupler unit are readily envisioned. The continued development of such PC-based NMR spectrometers is expected to benefit from the fast growing, practical, and low cost personal computer market.

  2. Multichannel receiver coils for improved coverage in cardiac metabolic imaging using prepolarized 13C substrates.

    Dominguez-Viqueira, William; Lau, Angus Z; Chen, Albert P; Cunningham, Charles H

    2013-07-01

    MR imaging using hyperpolarized (13)C substrates has become a promising tool to study real-time cardiac-metabolism in vivo. For such fast imaging of nonrecoverable prepolarized magnetization it is important to optimize the RF-coils to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio possible, given the required coverage. In this work, three different receiver-coil configurations were computed in pig and human models. The sensitivity maps were demonstrated in phantoms and in vivo experiments performed in pigs. Signal-to-noise ratio in the posterior heart was increased up to 80% with the best multichannel coil as expected. These new coil configurations will allow imaging of the different metabolite signals even in the posterior regions of the myocardium, which is not possible with a single-channel surface-coil. PMID:22907595

  3. Coal structure at reactive sites by sup 1 H- sup 13 C- sup 19 F double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    Hagaman, E.W.; Woody, M.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The solid state NMR technique, {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C-{sup 31}P double cross polarization (DCP)/MAS {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy, uses the direct dipolar interaction between {sup 13}C-{sup 31}P spin pairs in organophosphorus substances to identify the subset of carbons within a spherical volume element of 0.4 nm radius centered on the {sup 31}P atom. In combination with chemical manipulation of coals designed to introduce phosphorus containing functionality into the organic matrix, the NMR experiment becomes a method to examine selectively the carbon bonding network at the reactive sites in the coal. This approach generates a statistical structure description of the coal at the reaction centers in contrast to bulk carbon characterization using conventional {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. 3 refs.

  4. On the quantumness of correlations in nuclear magnetic resonance

    Soares-Pinto, D O; Maziero, J; Gavini-Viana, A; Serra, R M; Céleri, L C

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was successfully employed to test several protocols and ideas in Quantum Information Science. In most of these implementations the existence of entanglement was ruled out. This fact introduced concerns and questions about the quantum nature of such bench tests. In this article we address some issues related to the non-classical aspects of NMR systems. We discuss some experiments where the quantum aspects of this system are supported by quantum correlations of separable states. Such quantumness, beyond the entanglement-separability paradigm, is revealed via a departure between the quantum and the classical versions of information theory. In this scenario, the concept of quantum discord seems to play an important role. We also present an experimental implementation of an analogous of the single-photon Mach-Zehnder interferometer employing two nuclear spins to encode the interferometric paths. This experiment illustrate how non-classical correlations of separable states may be us...

  5. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to certifiable food colors

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was found suitable for the identification of individual colours, for distinguishing individual colours from colour mixtures, for the identification and semi-quantitative determination of the individual colours in mixtures and for proofs of the adulteration of certified colours adding noncertified colours. The method is well suited for observing the purity of colours and may also be used as the control method in the manufacture of colours and in assessing their stability and their resistance to increased temperature and light. (M.K.)

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the posterior fossa disorders

    Ikeda, Toshiaki; Fukaya, Takashi; Nomura, Yasuya; Yoshikawa, Kouki

    1985-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance scans (NMR-CT) were performed on patients with posterior fossa disorders such as acoustic neurinoma, cerebellar tumour (gangliocytoma), epidermoid tumour and spinocerebellar degeneration, and compared with X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. The advantages of NMR-CT include lack of bone artifact, variety of image planes, transverse, sagital and coronal imaging, and high ability to differentiate tissues. The disadvantages include prolonged data accumulation time, lack of bone detail and calcification, limited spatial resolution and suitability of patients. (author).

  7. Thermo-magnetic systems for space nuclear reactors an introduction

    Maidana, Carlos O

    2014-01-01

    Introduces the reader to engineering magnetohydrodynamics applications and presents a comprehensive guide of how to approach different problems found in this multidisciplinary field. An introduction to engineering magnetohydrodynamics, this brief focuses heavily on the design of thermo-magnetic systems for liquid metals, with emphasis on the design of electromagnetic annular linear induction pumps for space nuclear reactors. Alloy systems that are liquid at room temperature have a high degree of thermal conductivity far superior to ordinary non-metallic liquids. This results in their use for

  8. Experimental Implementation of Remote State Preparation by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Peng, X; Fang, X; Feng, M; Liu, M; Gao, K; Peng, Xinhua; Zhu, Xiwen; Fang, Ximing; Feng, Mang; Liu, Maili; Gao, Kelin

    2003-01-01

    We have experimentally implemented remote state preparation (RSP) of a qubit from a hydrogen to a carbon nucleus in molecules of carbon-13 labeled chloroform $^{13}$CHCl$_{3}$ over interatomic distances using liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. Full RSP of a special ensemble of qubits, i.e., a qubit chosen from equatorial and polar great circles on a Bloch sphere with Pati's scheme, was achieved with one cbit communication. Such a RSP scheme can be generalized to prepare a large number of qubit states and may be used in other quantum information processing and quantum computing.

  9. Neutron studies of nuclear magnetism at ultralow temperature

    Siemensmeyer, K.; Clausen, K.N.; Lefmann, K.;

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic order in copper and silver has been investigated by neutron diffraction. Antiferromagnetic order is observed in these simple, diamagnetic metals at temperatures below 50 nK and 560 pK, respectively. Both crystallize in the FCC-symmetry which is fully frustrated for nearest...... phase diagram in applied fields. The low-and the high-field structures are of type I, while in intermediate fields the unconventional ordering vector q = 2 pi(1,1/3,1/3) is observed. Strong hysteresis effects indicate first-order phase boundaries in copper. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights...

  10. Implementation of Quantum Private Queries Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    WANG Chuan; HAO Liang; ZHAO Lian-Jie

    2011-01-01

    @@ We present a modified protocol for the realization of a quantum private query process on a classical database.Using one-qubit query and CNOT operation,the query process can be realized in a two-mode database.In the query process,the data privacy is preserved as the sender would not reveal any information about the database besides her query information,and the database provider cannot retain any information about the query.We implement the quantum private query protocol in a nuclear magnetic resonance system.The density matrix of the memory registers are constructed.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance characterization of apple juice containing enzyme preparations

    In this work, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) was employed to evaluate changes in apple juice in response to the addition of Panzym Yieldmash and Ultrazym AFP-L enzymatic complexes and compare it with premium apple juice. The juice was processed at different temperatures and concentrations of enzymatic complexes. The differences in the results were attributed mainly to the enzyme concentrations, since temperature did not cause any variation. A quantitative analysis indicated that the concentration of fructose increased while the concentrations of sucrose and glucose decreased in response to increasing concentrations of the enzymatic complexes. (author)

  12. Implementation of Quantum Private Queries Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    We present a modified protocol for the realization of a quantum private query process on a classical database. Using one-qubit query and CNOT operation, the query process can be realized in a two-mode database. In the query process, the data privacy is preserved as the sender would not reveal any information about the database besides her query information, and the database provider cannot retain any information about the query. We implement the quantum private query protocol in a nuclear magnetic resonance system. The density matrix of the memory registers are constructed. (general)

  13. Development of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    Bates, Cameron Russell [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-03-11

    Many nuclear safeguards applications could benefit from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy achievable with metallic magnetic calorimeters. This dissertation covers the development of a system for these applications based on gamma-ray detectors developed at the University of Heidelberg. It demonstrates new calorimeters of this type, which achieved an energy resolution of 45.5 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV, roughly ten times better than current state of the art high purity germanium detectors. This is the best energy resolution achieved with a gamma-ray metallic magnetic calorimeter at this energy to date. In addition to demonstrating a new benchmark in energy resolution, an experimental system for measuring samples with metallic magnetic calorimeters was constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system achieved an energy resolution of 91.3 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV under optimal conditions. Using this system it was possible to characterize the linearity of the response, the count-rate limitations, and the energy resolution as a function of temperature of the new calorimeter. With this characterization it was determined that it would be feasible to measure 242Pu in a mixed isotope plutonium sample. A measurement of a mixed isotope plutonium sample was performed over the course of 12 days with a single two-pixel metallic magnetic calorimeter. The relative concentration of 242Pu in comparison to other plutonium isotopes was determined by direct measurement to less than half a percent accuracy. This is comparable with the accuracy of the best-case scenario using traditional indirect methods. The ability to directly measure the relative concentration of 242Pu in a sample could enable more accurate accounting and detection of indications of undeclared activities in nuclear safeguards, a better constraint on source material in forensic samples containing plutonium, and improvements in verification in a future plutonium

  14. Quantitative solid-state 13C NMR with signal enhancement by multiple cross polarization

    Johnson, Robert L.; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    A simple new method is presented that yields quantitative solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) 13C NMR spectra of organic materials with good signal-to-noise ratios. It achieves long (>10 ms) cross polarization (CP) from 1H without significant magnetization losses due to relaxation and with a moderate duty cycle of the radio-frequency irradiation, by multiple 1-ms CP periods alternating with 1H spin-lattice relaxation periods that repolarize the protons. The new method incorporates previous techniques that yield less distorted CP/MAS spectra, such as a linear variation (“ramp”) of the radio-frequency field strength, and it overcomes their main limitation, which is T1ρ relaxation of the spin-locked 1H magnetization. The ramp of the radio-frequency field strength and the asymptotic limit of cross polarization makes the spectral intensity quite insensitive to the exact field strengths used. The new multiCP pulse sequence is a “drop-in” replacement for previous CP methods and produces no additional data-processing burden. Compared to the only reliable quantitative 13C NMR method for unlabeled solids previously available, namely direct-polarization NMR, the measuring time is reduced by more than a factor of 50, enabling higher-throughput quantitative NMR studies. The new multiCP technique is validated with 14-kHz MAS on amino-acid derivatives, plant matter, a highly aromatic humic acid, and carbon materials made by low-temperature pyrolysis.

  15. Glucose transport in human erythrocytes measured using 13C NMR spin transfer

    The authors present the results of a new NMR-based procedure for measuring the fast transmembrane exchange of D-[1-13C]glucose in human erythrocytes. The method relies on different rates of exchange between the α- and β-anomers of glucose inside and outside the cells; the rate outside the cells is greatly increased by the addition of mutarotase to the suspension. Theory is developed to describe nuclear-spin transfer in the present system and is used to analyse the data to yield estimates of transmembrane-exchange rate constants and their statistical uncertainties. For a total glucose concentration of 25.5 mmol/l at 400C the first order efflux rate constants for the α- and β-anomers were 1.20 ± 0.40 s-1 and 0.71 ± 0.30 s-1, respectively. 17 refs.; 4 figs

  16. Determination of fructose metabolic pathways in normal and fructose-intolerant children: A 13C NMR study using [U-13C]fructose

    An inborn deficiency in the ability of aldolase B to split fructose 1-phosphate is found in humans with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). A stable isotope procedure to elucidate the mechanism of conversion of fructose to glucose in normal children and in HFI children has been developed. A constant infusion of D-[U-13C]fructose was given nasogastrically to control and to HFI children. Hepatic fructose conversion to glucose was estimated by examination of 13C NMR spectra of plasma glucose. Significantly lower values (∼3-fold) for fructose conversion to glucose were obtained for the HFI patients as compared to the controls. A quantitative determination of the metabolic pathways of fructose conversion to glucose was derived from 13C NMR measurement of plasma [13C]glucose isotopomer populations. The finding of isotopomer populations of three adjacent 13C atoms at glucose C-4 (13C3-13C4-13C5) suggests that there is a direct pathway from fructose, by-passing fructose-1-phosphate aldolase, to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The metabolism of fructose by fructose-1-phosphate aldolase activity accounts for only ∼50% of the total amount of hepatic fructose conversion to glucose. In view of the marked decline by 67% in synthesis of glucose from fructose in HFI subjects found in this study, the extent of [13C]glucose formation from a trace amount of [U-13C]fructose infused into the patient can be used as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic test for inherent faulty fructose metabolism

  17. Enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance in a non-magnetic cubic doublet

    In this thesis two lanthanide compounds are studied which show enhanced nuclear magnetism at low temperatures: Rb2NaHoF6 and CsNaHoF6. Chapter II gives a description of the 4He-circulating refrigerator, which was built to provide the low temperatures required for the polarization of the enhanced nuclear moments. This type of dilution refrigerator was chosen because of its simple design and large cooling power. Chapter III is devoted to a comparison of the different types of dilution refrigerators. A theoretical discussion is given of their performance, starting from the differential equations, which govern the temperature distribution in the refrigerator. In chapter IV the actual performance of the refrigerator, described in chapter II is discussed. In chapter V a description of the NMR-apparatus, developed for very-low-temperature NMR experiments is given. In chapter VI experimental results on the compound Rb2NaHoF6 are presented. The CEF-ground state of this compound is probably the non-magnetic doublet GAMMA3, but at a temperature of 170 K a structural phase transition lowers the crystal symmetry from cubic to tetragonal and the doublet is split into two singlets. In chapter VII specific heat, (enhanced) nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetization measurements on the compound Cs2NaHoF6 are presented which also has a GAMMA3-doublet ground state. In zero magnetic field the degeneracy of the doublet is removed at a temperature of 393 mK, where a phase transition is induced by quadrupolar interactions. (Auth.)

  18. Measurement of magnetic field strengths in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    The production of the proper magnetic field profile is fundamental to plasma confinement in magnetic mirror systems. The knowledge of this profile is important for the control of a variety of physical processes which affect particle confinement, including thermal barrier and potential well formation. A system of probes using the nuclear magnetic resonance of protons in magnetic fields is used to measure the field strengths at various points in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B). The system operates at high fields (1-12 T) with significant nonuniformity (≤ 1.5 T/m) by taking advantage of the phenomenon of spin echo. In addition, the probes can operate in the MFTF-B environment where low temperature capability and remote operation is necessary. These probes have been tested with laboratory magnets to develop an engineering model which relates probe signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio to probe parameters and magnetic field strengths and gradients. Engineering design formula and techniques are presented as well as data from laboratory test stands

  19. Saturation properties of nuclear matter in the presence of strong magnetic field

    Rezaei, Z

    2016-01-01

    Different saturation properties of cold symmetric nuclear matter in the strong magnetic field have been considered. We have seen that for magnetic fields about $B> 3 \\times 10 ^ {17}\\ G$, {for both cases with and without nucleon anomalous magnetic moments}, the saturation density and saturation energy grow by increasing the magnetic field. It is indicated that the magnetic susceptibility of symmetric nuclear matter becomes negative showing the diamagnetic response especially at $B 3 \\times 10 ^ {17}\\ G$, {the softening of equation of state caused by Landau quantization is overwhelmed by stiffening due to the magnetization of nuclear matter.} We have shown that the effects of strong magnetic field on nuclear matter may affect the constraints on the equation of state of symmetric nuclear matter obtained applying the experimental observable.

  20. Proton-detected 3D 1H/13C/1H correlation experiment for structural analysis in rigid solids under ultrafast-MAS above 60 kHz

    Zhang, Rongchun; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-01

    A proton-detected 3D 1H/13C/1H chemical shift correlation experiment is proposed for the assignment of chemical shift resonances, identification of 13C-1H connectivities, and proximities of 13C-1H and 1H-1H nuclei under ultrafast magic-angle-spinning (ultrafast-MAS) conditions. Ultrafast-MAS is used to suppress all anisotropic interactions including 1H-1H dipolar couplings, while the finite-pulse radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence is used to recouple dipolar couplings among protons and the insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer technique is used to transfer magnetization between heteronuclear spins. The 3D experiment eliminates signals from non-carbon-bonded protons and non-proton-bonded carbons to enhance spectral resolution. The 2D (F1/F3) 1H/1H and 2D 13C/1H (F2/F3) chemical shift correlation spectra extracted from the 3D spectrum enable the identification of 1H-1H proximity and 13C-1H connectivity. In addition, the 2D (F1/F2) 1H/13C chemical shift correlation spectrum, incorporated with proton magnetization exchange via the fp-RFDR recoupling of 1H-1H dipolar couplings, enables the measurement of proximities between 13C and even the remote non-carbon-bonded protons. The 3D experiment also gives three-spin proximities of 1H-1H-13C chains. Experimental results obtained from powder samples of L-alanine and L-histidine ṡ H2O ṡ HCl demonstrate the efficiency of the 3D experiment.

  1. Topological Constraints on Chain-Folding Structure of Semicrystalline Polymer as Studied by 13C-13C Double Quantum NMR

    Hong, Youlee; Miyoshi, Toshikazu

    Chain-folding process is a prominent feature of long polymer chains during crystallization. Over the last half century, much effort has been paid to reveal the chain trajectory. Even though various chain-folding models as well as theories of crystallization at molecule levels have been proposed, they could be not reconciled due to the limited experimental evidences. Recent development of double quantum NMR with selective isotope labeling identified the chain-trajectory of 13C labeled isotactic poly(1-butene). The systematic experiments covered a wide range of parameters, i.e. kinetics, concentration, and molecular weight (Mw) . It was demonstrated that i) adjacent re-entry site was invariant as a function of crystallization temperature (Tc) , concentration, andMw, ii) long-range order of adjacent re-entry sequence is independence of kinetics at a given concentration while it decreased with increasing the polymer concentration at a given Tc due to the increased interruption between the chains, and iii) high Mw chains led to the multilayer folded structures in single crystals, but the melt state induced the identical short adjacent sequences of long and short polymer over a wide range of Tc due to the entanglements. The behaviors indicated that the topological restriction plays significant roles in the chain-folding process rather than the kinetics. The proposed framework to control the chain-folding structure presents a new perspective into the chain organization by either the intra- or inter-chain interaction. National Science Foundation Grants DMR-1105829 and 1408855.

  2. Geochemical Approach to Archaeal Ecology: δ13C of GDGTs

    Lichtin, S.; Warren, C.; Pearson, A.; Pagani, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade and a half, glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) have increasingly been used to reconstruct environmental temperatures; proxies like TEX86 that correlate the relative abundance of these archaeal cell membrane lipids to sea surface temperature are omnipresent in paleoclimatology literature. While it has become common to make claims about past temperatures using GDGTs, our present understanding of the organisms that synthesize the compounds is still quite limited. The generally accepted theory states that microorganisms like the Thaumarchaeota modify the structure of membrane lipids to increase intermolecular interactions, strengthening the membrane at higher temperatures. Yet to date, culture experiments have been largely restricted to a single species, Nitrosopumilus maritimes, and recent studies on oceanic archaeal rRNA have revealed that these biomarkers are produced in diverse, heterogeneous, and site-specific communities. This brings up questions as to whether different subclasses of GDGTs, and all subsequent proxies, represent adaptation within a single organismal group or a shift in community composition. To investigate whether GDGTs with different chain structures, from the simple isoprenoidal GDGT-0 to Crenarchaeol with its many cyclopentane groups, are sourced from archaea with similar or disparate metabolic pathways—and if that information is inherited in GDGTs trapped in marine sediments—this study examines the stable carbon isotope values (δ13C) of GDGTs extracted from the uppermost meters of sediment in the Orca Basin, Gulf of Mexico, using spooling-wire microcombustion isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (SWiM-IRMS), tackling a fundamental assumption of the TEX86 proxy that influences the way we perceive the veracity of existing temperature records.

  3. Structural properties of carbon nanotubes derived from 13C NMR

    Abou-Hamad, E.

    2011-10-10

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on how structural properties of carbon nanotubes can be derived from 13C NMR investigations. Magic angle spinning solid state NMR experiments have been performed on single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range from 0.7 to 100 nm and with number of walls from 1 to 90. We provide models on how diameter and the number of nanotube walls influence NMR linewidth and line position. Both models are supported by theoretical calculations. Increasing the diameter D, from the smallest investigated nanotube, which in our study corresponds to the inner nanotube of a double-walled tube to the largest studied diameter, corresponding to large multiwalled nanotubes, leads to a 23.5 ppm diamagnetic shift of the isotropic NMR line position δ. We show that the isotropic line follows the relation δ = 18.3/D + 102.5 ppm, where D is the diameter of the tube and NMR line position δ is relative to tetramethylsilane. The relation asymptotically tends to approach the line position expected in graphene. A characteristic broadening of the line shape is observed with the increasing number of walls. This feature can be rationalized by an isotropic shift distribution originating from different diamagnetic shielding of the encapsulated nanotubes together with a heterogeneity of the samples. Based on our results, NMR is shown to be a nondestructive spectroscopic method that can be used as a complementary method to, for example, transmission electron microscopy to obtain structural information for carbon nanotubes, especially bulk samples.

  4. Synthesis of [8,9,10,11-13C4]leukotriene C4

    A ''one pot'' reduction of ethyl [1,2-13C2]bromoacetate with diisobutylaluminium hydride in dichloromethane, followed by reaction with triphenylphosphine, then triethylamine, yields [1,2-13C2]formylmethylenetriphenylphosphorane. Consecutive Wittig reactions of [1,2-13C2]formylmethylenetriphenylphosphorane with methyl 5(S),6(R)-epoxy-6-formylhexanoate and subsequent Wittig reactions with Z-3-nonen-1-triphenylphosphorane yields [8,9,10,11-13C4]LTA4 methyl ester, which is readily converted to [8,9,10,11-13C4]LTC4. (author)

  5. Modified 13C-urea breath test and the detection of helicobacter pylori

    The 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) is one of the most important non-invasive methods for detecting Helicobacter pylori infection. This examination is innocuous, simple, highly accurate. While the major drawback of 13C-UBT is the higher cost compared with other methods which hold back its widely using. The author review focuses on the most recent advances in the machines used to measure the 13C isotope and on the most important improvements about the UBT, such as the use of lower dose 13C-urea tablet or capsule, the modification of test meal, a shortened collection time of exhalation sample and so on

  6. Analysis of ringing effects due to magnetic core materials in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance circuits

    Prabhu Gaunkar, N., E-mail: neelampg@iastate.edu; Bouda, N. R. Y.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Hadimani, R. L.; Mina, M.; Jiles, D. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Bulu, I.; Ganesan, K.; Song, Y. Q. [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    This work presents investigations and detailed analysis of ringing in a non-resonant pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) circuit. Ringing is a commonly observed phenomenon in high power switching circuits. The oscillations described as ringing impede measurements in pulsed NMR systems. It is therefore desirable that those oscillations decay fast. It is often assumed that one of the causes behind ringing is the role of the magnetic core used in the antenna (acting as an inductive load). We will demonstrate that an LRC subcircuit is also set-up due to the inductive load and needs to be considered due to its parasitic effects. It is observed that the parasitics associated with the inductive load become important at certain frequencies. The output response can be related to the response of an under-damped circuit and to the magnetic core material. This research work demonstrates and discusses ways of controlling ringing by considering interrelationships between different contributing factors.

  7. COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RELAXATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SUNFLOWER AND RAPESEED LECITHIN

    Lisovaya E. V.; Victorova E. P.; Agafonov O. S.; Kornen N. N.; Shahray T. A.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a comparative assessment and peculiarities of nuclear magnetic relaxation characteristics of rapeseed and sunflower lecithin. It was established, that lecithin’s nuclear magnetic relaxation characteristics, namely, protons’ spin-spin relaxation time and amplitudes of nuclear magnetic relaxation signals of lecithin components, depend on content of oil’s fat acids and phospholipids, contained in the lecithin. Comparative assessment of protons’ spin-spin relaxation time of r...

  8. Sc3CH@C80: selective (13)C enrichment of the central carbon atom.

    Junghans, Katrin; Rosenkranz, Marco; Popov, Alexey A

    2016-05-01

    Sc3CH@C80 is synthesized and characterized by (1)H, (13)C, and (45)Sc NMR. A large negative chemical shift of the proton, -11.73 ppm in the Ih and -8.79 ppm in the D5h C80 cage isomers, is found. (13)C satellites in the (1)H NMR spectrum enabled indirect determination of the (13)C chemical shift for the central carbon at 173 ± 1 ppm. Intensity of the satellites allowed determination of the (13)C content for the central carbon atom. This unique possibility is applied to analyze the cluster/cage (13)C distribution in mechanistic studies employing either (13)CH4 or (13)C powder to enrich Sc3CH@C80 with (13)C. PMID:27109443

  9. Local deposition of {sup 13}C tracer in the JET MKII-HD divertor

    Likonen, Jari, E-mail: jari.likonen@vtt.fi [Association EURATOM-TEKES, VTT, PO Box 1000, 02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); Airila, M.I.; Coad, J.P.; Hakola, A.; Koivuranta, S.; Ahonen, E. [Association EURATOM-TEKES, VTT, PO Box 1000, 02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); Alves, E.; Barradas, N. [Instituto Tecnológico e Nuclear, Sacavém 2686-953 (Portugal); Widdowson, A. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rubel, M. [Alfvén Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-VR, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Brezinsek, S. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Groth, M. [Association EURATOM-TEKES, Aalto University, 02015 Espoo (Finland)

    2013-07-15

    Migration and deposition of {sup 13}C have been investigated at JET by injecting {sup 13}C-labelled methane at the outer divertor base at the end of the 2009 campaign. The {sup 13}C deposition profile was measured with enhanced proton scattering (EPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) techniques. A strong toroidal deposition band for {sup 13}C was observed experimentally on each of the analysed four outer divertor floor tiles. In addition, {sup 13}C was also found on the vertical edge of load bearing tile (LBT) and at the bottom of the LBT tile facing the puffing hole. Local {sup 13}C migration in the vicinity of the injection location was modelled by the ERO code. The ERO simulations also produced the strong toroidal {sup 13}C deposition band but there is strong deposition also on the vertical edge of the LBT tile and elsewhere on the horizontal part of the outer divertor floor tile.

  10. Characterization of polymers by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

    After having recalled some generalities which are necessary for the obtention of a spectrum and the method to be chosen, the author considers the use of the hydrogen 1 and carbon 13 high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (in liquid and solid phase) on some examples in the field of polymers. In the case of the polymers in solution, this technology seems to be limited to liquid or soluble polymers and to insoluble polymers which are inflatable in some solvents. The other polymers (infusible and non-inflatable) require the use of the CP-MAS solid phase NMR (cross polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance). For liquids, the NMR allows to better know the microstructure of these compounds and to better understand the reaction mechanisms (in the case of poly-condensation, polymerization, degradation..) which can control the polymerization. The CP-MAS solid phase NMR is a particularly interesting method for the determination of insoluble three-dimensional polymers structures and for the study of the conformations and configurations of the chain carbonated skeleton. (O.M.). 46 refs., 18 figs

  11. Nuclear magnetic relaxation of liquids in porous media

    Nuclear magnetic relaxation is useful for probing physical and chemical properties of liquids in porous media. Examples are given on high surface area porous materials including calibrated porous silica glasses, granular packings, plaster pastes, cement-based materials and natural porous materials, such as sandstone and carbonate rocks. Here, we outline our recent NMR relaxation work for these very different porous materials. For instance, low field NMR relaxation of water in calibrated granular packings leads to striking different pore-size dependencies of the relaxation times T1 and T2 when changing the amount of surface paramagnetic impurities. This allows separation of the diffusion and surface limited regimes of relaxation in these macroporous media. The magnetic field dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1(ω0) is also a rich source of dynamical information for characterizing the molecular dynamics of liquids in porous media. This allows a continuous characterization of the evolving microstructure of various cementitious materials. Our recent applications of two-dimensional (2D) T1-T2 and T2-z-store-T2 correlation experiments have evidenced the water exchange in connected micropores of cement pastes. The direct probing of water adsorption time on a solid surface gives access to an original characterization of the surface nano-wettability of porous plaster pastes. We show that such a parameter depends directly on the physical chemistry of the pore surfaces. Lastly, we outline our recent measurements of wettability in oil/brine/reservoir carbonate rocks.

  12. Characterizing nitrilimines with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A theoretical study.

    Mawhinney, Robert C; Peslherbe, Gilles H; Muchall, Heidi M

    2008-01-17

    The 13C chemical shifts in selected nitrilimines, nitriles, acetylenes, allenes, and singlet carbenes have been calculated using density-functional theory [PBE0/6-311++G(2df,pd)] and the gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The effects of substitution on the 13C chemical shifts in nitrilimines, R1-CNN-R2, have been examined. The carbon nucleus is generally found to be deshielded by substituents in the order CH3 effect is related to the presence of the cumulated functionality, C=N=N. Terminal N-substitution is found to have a larger effect than C-substitution due to a large increase in chemical shielding anisotropy. The electronic structure of nitrilimines has recently been shown to possess a carbene component whose resonance contribution varies widely with substitution, and, as previously reported, insight into the electronic structure can be gained by an analysis of the shielding tensor, especially for carbenes. Accordingly, the components of the diagonalized 13C shielding tensor for nitrilimines and stable singlet carbenes have been examined. This analysis suggests that diaminonitrilimine, H2N-CNN-NH2, may be a stable carbene, and, to the best of our knowledge, it would be the first acyclic, unsaturated stable carbene ever reported. Finally, a detailed analysis of the 13C chemical shifts shows that an increase in the dipolar character of nitrilimines induces a shielding at the carbon nucleus, while an increase in allenic or carbenic character tends to cause a deshielding. PMID:18062684

  13. 1H and 13C NMR and electrical conductivity studies on new ionic plastic crystals of tetraalkylammonium tetraethylborate

    Eight plastic crystals of the types NEtxMe(4-x)BEt4 and NEtyPr(4-y)BEt4 (x = 0-4, y = 1-3) were found in a new region of ionic plastic crystals. In this area, globular cations and anions are assembled by weak interactions. Based on the results of solid-state 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements, it was revealed that the ions performed isotropic reorientations in the NEtxMe(4-x)BEt4 crystals (x = 0-4). Additionally, X-ray diffraction (XRD) of these compounds was able to identify the CsCl-type cubic structure. In contrast, the XRD reflections of NEtyPr(4-y)BEt4 (y = 1-3) could be successfully fitted by distorted cubic lattices (trigonal symmetry). The NMR line shapes observed in these compounds were explained by overall molecular motions with large amplitudes (pseudo-isotropic reorientations). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) spectra of NEtyPr(4-y)BEt4 (y = 1-3) showed a low entropy change (ΔSmp) of 6-8 J K-1 mol-1 at the melting point. Ionic diffusion was identified by electrical conductivity measurements of NEtxMe(4-x)BEt4 and NEtyPr(4-y)BEt4 (x = 0-4, y = 1-3). In the case of NPr4BEt4 crystals, ionic diffusion was also detected, although complex powder patterns and large ΔSmp values were observed by XRD and DSC measurements, respectively.

  14. Alkaline Hydrolysis/Polymerization of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: Characterization of Products by 13C and 15N NMR

    Thorn, K.A.; Thorne, P.G.; Cox, L.G.

    2004-01-01

    Alkaline hydrolysis has been investigated as a nonbiological procedure for the destruction of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in explosives contaminated soils and munitions scrap. Nucleophilic substitutions of the nitro and methyl groups of TNT by hydroxide ion are the initial steps in the alkaline degradation of TNT. Potential applications of the technique include both in situ surface liming and ex situ alkaline treatment of contaminated soils. A number of laboratory studies have reported the formation of an uncharacterized polymeric material upon prolonged treatment of TNT in base. As part of an overall assessment of alkaline hydrolysis as a remediation technique, and to gain a better understanding of the chemical reactions underlying the hydrolysis/polymerization process, the soluble and precipitate fractions of polymeric material produced from the calcium hydroxide hydrolysis of unlabeled and 15N-labeled TNT were analyzed by elemental analysis and 13C and 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectra indicated that reactions leading to polymerization included nucleophilic displacement of nitro groups by hydroxide ion, formation of ketone, carboxyl, alcohol, ether, and other aliphatic carbons, conversion of methyl groups to diphenyl methylene carbons, and recondensation of aromatic amines and reduced forms of nitrite, including ammonia and possibly hydroxylamine, into the polymer. Compared to the distribution of carbons in TNT as 14% sp 3- and 86% sp2-hybridized, the precipitate fraction from hydrolysis of unlabeled TNT contained 33% sp3- and 67% sp 2-hybridized carbons. The concentration of nitrogen in the precipitate was 64% of that in TNT. The 15N NMR spectra showed that, in addition to residual nitro groups, forms of nitrogen present in the filtrate and precipitate fractions include aminohydroquinone, primary amide, indole, imine, and azoxy, among others. Unreacted nitrite was recovered in the filtrate fraction. The toxicities and susceptibilities to

  15. Nuclear orientation with combined electric and magnetic interactions

    The combined interaction of a static electric field gradient and a static magnetic field with the electromagnetic moments of a nucleus is considered for the case of nuclear orientation at low temperature. The general expression of the angular distribution of a radiation emitted from the oriented state is developed for polycrystalline samples, where the principal axis of the electric field gradients are randomly distributed with respect to a fixed magnetic direction. Due to axial symmetry of the ensemble the effect of the quadrupole interaction is reduced to an attenuation factor on the usual Bsub(K) coefficients. Numerical calculations of these attenuation factors, for K=1, 2, 4 have been performed in the case of symmetric electric field gradient for a wide range of the electric to magnetic interactions ratio and spin values I=1/2, 1, 3/2, ...8. Typical attenuation curves for spin 5/2 and 9/2 are presented. Comparing the experimental anisotropies with the tabulated values, one can extract the quadrupole interaction value hωsub(Q)

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance in atomic-scale superconductor/magnet multilayered systems

    Kanegae, Y

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in atomic-scale superconductor/magnet multilayered systems and discuss the discrepancy between two recent (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 experiments on Ru in RuSr sub 2 YCu sub 2 O sub 8. When the magnetic layers is are in the antiferromagnetic state, (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in the magnetic layers is shown to decrease with decreasing due to the excitation gap associated with the magnetic ordering. The proximity effect of superconductivity on (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 in the magnetic layer is negligibly small. Our result indicates that the temperature dependence of (T sub 1 T) sup - sup 1 on Ru in RuSr sub 2 YCu sub 2 O sub 8 likely originates from the antiferromagnetism in the RuO sub 2 layers, but not from the superconductivity in the CuO sub 2 layers. (author)

  17. HCCCH Experiment for Through-Bond Correlation of Thymine Resonances in 13C-Labeled DNA Oligonucleotides

    Sklenář, Vladimír.; Masse, James E.; Feigon, Juli

    1999-04-01

    Application of heteronuclear magnetic resonance pulse methods to13C,15N-labeled nucleic acids is important for the accurate structure determination of larger RNA and DNA oligonucleotides and protein-nucleic acid complexes. These methods have been applied primarily to RNA, due to the availability of labeled samples. The two major differences between DNA and RNA are at the C2‧ of the ribose and deoxyribose and the additional methyl group on thymine versus uracil. We have enzymatically synthesized a13C,15N-labeled 32 base DNA oligonucleotide that folds to form an intramolecular triplex. We present two- and three-dimensional versions of a new HCCCH-TOCSY experiment that provides intraresidue correlation between the thymine H6 and methyl resonances via the intervening carbons (H6-C6-C5-Cme-Hme).

  18. Characterization of oil shale, isolated kerogen, and post-pyrolysis residues using advanced 13 solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Birdwell, Justin E.; Chappell, Mark A.; Li, Yuan; Pignatello, Joseph J.; Mao, Jingdong

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of oil shale kerogen and organic residues remaining in postpyrolysis spent shale is critical to the understanding of the oil generation process and approaches to dealing with issues related to spent shale. The chemical structure of organic matter in raw oil shale and spent shale samples was examined in this study using advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Oil shale was collected from Mahogany zone outcrops in the Piceance Basin. Five samples were analyzed: (1) raw oil shale, (2) isolated kerogen, (3) oil shale extracted with chloroform, (4) oil shale retorted in an open system at 500°C to mimic surface retorting, and (5) oil shale retorted in a closed system at 360°C to simulate in-situ retorting. The NMR methods applied included quantitative direct polarization with magic-angle spinning at 13 kHz, cross polarization with total sideband suppression, dipolar dephasing, CHn selection, 13C chemical shift anisotropy filtering, and 1H-13C long-range recoupled dipolar dephasing. The NMR results showed that, relative to the raw oil shale, (1) bitumen extraction and kerogen isolation by demineralization removed some oxygen-containing and alkyl moieties; (2) unpyrolyzed samples had low aromatic condensation; (3) oil shale pyrolysis removed aliphatic moieties, leaving behind residues enriched in aromatic carbon; and (4) oil shale retorted in an open system at 500°C contained larger aromatic clusters and more protonated aromatic moieties than oil shale retorted in a closed system at 360°C, which contained more total aromatic carbon with a wide range of cluster sizes.

  19. Transport, compartmentation, and metabolism of homoserine in higher plant cells. Carbon-13- and phosphorus-31-nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    The transport, compartmentation, and metabolism of homoserine was characterized in two strains of meristematic higher plant cells, the dicotyledonous sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) and the monocotyledonous weed Echinochloa colonum. Homoserine is an intermediate in the synthesis of the aspartate-derived amino acids methionine, threonine (Thr), and isoleucine. Using 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, we showed that homoserine actively entered the cells via a high-affinity proton-symport carrier (K(m) approximately 50-60 micromolar) at the maximum rate of 8 +/- 0.5 micromol h-1 g-1 cell wet weight, and in competition with serine or Thr. We could visualize the compartmentation of homoserine, and observed that it accumulated at a concentration 4 to 5 times higher in the cytoplasm than in the large vacuolar compartment. 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance permitted us to analyze the phosphorylation of homoserine. When sycamore cells were incubated with 100 micromolar homoserine, phosphohomoserine steadily accumulated in the cytoplasmic compartment over 24 h at the constant rate of 0.7 micromol h-1 g-1 cell wet weight, indicating that homoserine kinase was not inhibited in vivo by its product, phosphohomoserine. The rate of metabolism of phosphohomoserine was much lower (0.06 micromol h-1 g-1 cell wet weight) and essentially sustained Thr accumulation. Similarly, homoserine was actively incorporated by E. colonum cells. However, in contrast to what was seen in sycamore cells, large accumulations of Thr were observed, whereas the intracellular concentration of homoserine remained low, and phosphohomoserine did not accumulate. These differences with sycamore cells were attributed to the presence of a higher Thr synthase activity in this strain of monocot cells

  20. Biosynthetically directed fractional 13C labeling facilitates identification of Phe and Tyr aromatic signals in proteins

    Analysis of 2D [13C,1H]-HSQC spectra of biosynthetic fractionally 13C labeled proteins is a reliable, straightforward means to obtain stereospecific assignments of Val and Leu methyl sites in proteins. Herein we show that the same fractionally labeled protein sample facilitates observation and identification of Phe and Tyr aromatic signals. This is the case, in part, because the fractional 13C labeling yields aromatic rings in which some of the 13C-13C J-couplings, present in uniformly labeled samples, are absent. Also, the number of homonuclear J-coupling partners differs for the δ-, ε- and ζ-carbons. This enabled us to vary their signal intensities in distinctly different ways by appropriately setting the 13C constant-time period in 2D [13C,1H]-HSQC spectra. We illustrate the application of this approach to an 18 kDa protein, c-VIAF, a modulator of apoptosis. In addition, we show that cancellation of the aromatic 13C CSA and 13C-1H dipolar interactions can be fruitfully utilized in the case of the fractionally labeled sample to obtain high resolution 13C constant-time spectra with good sensitivity

  1. High temperature spin dynamics in linear magnetic chains, molecular rings, and segments by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Adelnia, Fatemeh; Lascialfari, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano and INSTM, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, Pavia (Italy); Mariani, Manuel [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Ammannato, Luca; Caneschi, Andrea; Rovai, Donella [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Firenze and INSTM, Firenze (Italy); Winpenny, Richard; Timco, Grigore [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Corti, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.corti@unipv.it; Borsa, Ferdinando [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia and INSTM, Pavia (Italy)

    2015-05-07

    We present the room temperature proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) results in two 1D spin chains: the Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (AFM) Eu(hfac){sub 3}NITEt and the magnetically frustrated Gd(hfac){sub 3}NITEt. The NSLR as a function of external magnetic field can be interpreted very well in terms of high temperature spin dynamics dominated by a long time persistence of the decay of the two-spin correlation function due to the conservation of the total spin value for isotropic Heisenberg chains. The high temperature spin dynamics are also investigated in Heisenberg AFM molecular rings. In both Cr{sub 8} closed ring and in Cr{sub 7}Cd and Cr{sub 8}Zn open rings, i.e., model systems for a finite spin segment, an enhancement of the low frequency spectral density is found consistent with spin diffusion but the high cut-off frequency due to intermolecular anisotropic interactions prevents a detailed analysis of the spin diffusion regime.

  2. 13C metabolic flux analysis at a genome-scale.

    Gopalakrishnan, Saratram; Maranas, Costas D

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic models used in 13C metabolic flux analysis generally include a limited number of reactions primarily from central metabolism. They typically omit degradation pathways, complete cofactor balances, and atom transition contributions for reactions outside central metabolism. This study addresses the impact on prediction fidelity of scaling-up mapping models to a genome-scale. The core mapping model employed in this study accounts for (75 reactions and 65 metabolites) primarily from central metabolism. The genome-scale metabolic mapping model (GSMM) (697 reaction and 595 metabolites) is constructed using as a basis the iAF1260 model upon eliminating reactions guaranteed not to carry flux based on growth and fermentation data for a minimal glucose growth medium. Labeling data for 17 amino acid fragments obtained from cells fed with glucose labeled at the second carbon was used to obtain fluxes and ranges. Metabolic fluxes and confidence intervals are estimated, for both core and genome-scale mapping models, by minimizing the sum of square of differences between predicted and experimentally measured labeling patterns using the EMU decomposition algorithm. Overall, we find that both topology and estimated values of the metabolic fluxes remain largely consistent between core and GSM model. Stepping up to a genome-scale mapping model leads to wider flux inference ranges for 20 key reactions present in the core model. The glycolysis flux range doubles due to the possibility of active gluconeogenesis, the TCA flux range expanded by 80% due to the availability of a bypass through arginine consistent with labeling data, and the transhydrogenase reaction flux was essentially unresolved due to the presence of as many as five routes for the inter-conversion of NADPH to NADH afforded by the genome-scale model. By globally accounting for ATP demands in the GSMM model the unused ATP decreased drastically with the lower bound matching the maintenance ATP requirement. A non

  3. 13C NMR Quantitative Study-Part 1: Relationships between the Conformation of Amino Acids, Peptide, Carboxylic Acids and Integration Intensity of 13C NMR

    2001-01-01

    @@ In proton broad band decoupling 13C NMR, carbon atoms have different integration intensity because of NOE effects and their different relaxation time(T1), thus it makes a 13C NMR quantitative analyses very difficult. To acquire a 3C NMR quantitative analyses, a gated decoupling with suppressed NOE technology, i.e., an inversed gated decoupling pulse (IGDP), must be used. In IGDP relay time (tR) between two acquisition cycles must be more than 5T1, the time needed for a acquisition cycles is so long that makes the total 13C NMR quantitative analyses time much longer. For this reason, the 13C NMR quantitative analyses is paid less attention.

  4. 13C NMR Quantitative Study-Part 1: Relationships between the Conformation of Amino Acids, Peptide, Carboxylic Acids and Integration Intensity of 13C NMR

    TIAN; JinPing

    2001-01-01

    In proton broad band decoupling 13C NMR, carbon atoms have different integration intensity because of NOE effects and their different relaxation time(T1), thus it makes a 13C NMR quantitative analyses very difficult. To acquire a 3C NMR quantitative analyses, a gated decoupling with suppressed NOE technology, i.e., an inversed gated decoupling pulse (IGDP), must be used. In IGDP relay time (tR) between two acquisition cycles must be more than 5T1, the time needed for a acquisition cycles is so long that makes the total 13C NMR quantitative analyses time much longer. For this reason, the 13C NMR quantitative analyses is paid less attention.  ……

  5. Structure of UC{sub 2} and U{sub 2}C{sub 3}:XRD, {sup 13}C NMR and EXAFS study

    Carvajal Nuñez, U. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Eloirdi, R., E-mail: rachel.eloirdi@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Prieur, D.; Martel, L. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); López Honorato, E. [Centro de Investigatión y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (CINVESTAV), Unidad Saltillo, Av. Industria Metalúrgica 1062, Ramos Arizpe, Coahuila 25900 (Mexico); Farnan, I. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1TN (United Kingdom); Vitova, T. [Institut für Nukleare Entsorgung (INE), P.O. Box 3640, D- 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Somers, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • A structural investigation of UC{sub 2} and U{sub 2}C{sub 3} phases was made with XRD, NMR and EXAFS. • Heat treatment of a pulverised UC{sub 2} ingot, repressed into a pellet yields a U{sub 2}C{sub 3} phase coexisting with UC{sub 2−z}. • Heat treatment of UC{sub 2} as cast ingots results in a partial decomposition to UC. • EXAFS data confirmed the CaC{sub 2} and Pu{sub 2}C{sub 3} type structure for UC{sub 2} and U{sub 2}C{sub 3} respectively. • {sup 13}C MAS NMR identified a contribution of a well and less ordered phases in UC{sub 2}. -- Abstract: In this study, uranium dicarbide (UC{sub 2}) has been prepared by arc melting and heat treated under vacuum to form uranium sequicarbide (U{sub 2}C{sub 3}) in the presence of a second phase UC{sub 2−z}. Both samples, as cast and heat treated, have been characterised by chemical analyses, X-ray diffraction (XRD), {sup 13}C magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) and by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The composition, the purity, the various environments of both U and C atoms as well as the bonds length with the coordination number have been determined. By combining a long-range order method (XRD) and short-range order spectroscopy techniques (EXAFS and NMR), a unique view on the microstructure of UC{sub 2}, before and after heat treatment, and of U{sub 2}C{sub 3} phase has been achieved.

  6. Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods

    Keating, Kristina [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Slater, Lee [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitris [Rutgers Univ., Newark, NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences; Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Division

    2015-02-24

    This documents contains the final report for the project "Integrated Geophysical Measurements for Bioremediation Monitoring: Combining Spectral Induced Polarization, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Methods" (DE-SC0007049) Executive Summary: Our research aimed to develop borehole measurement techniques capable of monitoring subsurface processes, such as changes in pore geometry and iron/sulfur geochemistry, associated with remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Previous work has demonstrated that geophysical method spectral induced polarization (SIP) can be used to assess subsurface contaminant remediation; however, SIP signals can be generated from multiple sources limiting their interpretation value. Integrating multiple geophysical methods, such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic susceptibility (MS), with SIP, could reduce the ambiguity of interpretation that might result from a single method. Our research efforts entails combining measurements from these methods, each sensitive to different mineral forms and/or mineral-fluid interfaces, providing better constraints on changes in subsurface biogeochemical processes and pore geometries significantly improving our understanding of processes impacting contaminant remediation. The Rifle Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site was used as a test location for our measurements. The Rifle IFRC site is located at a former uranium ore-processing facility in Rifle, Colorado. Leachate from spent mill tailings has resulted in residual uranium contamination of both groundwater and sediments within the local aquifer. Studies at the site include an ongoing acetate amendment strategy, native microbial populations are stimulated by introduction of carbon intended to alter redox conditions and immobilize uranium. To test the geophysical methods in the field, NMR and MS logging measurements were collected before, during, and after acetate amendment. Next, laboratory NMR, MS, and SIP measurements

  7. Applications of pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance to chemistry: multiple-pulse NMR, cross polarization, magic-angle spinning annd instrumental design

    Murphy, P.D.

    1979-07-01

    Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been applied to: (1) Measurements of the prinicpal components of the proton shielding tensors of the hydrides of zirconium chloride and zirconium bromide. Multiple-Pulse techniques have been used to remove static homonuclear dipolar coupling. The anisotropies and isotropic shifts of these tensors have been used to infer the possible locations of the hydrogen within the sandwich-like layers of these unusual compounds. (2) Studies of the oscillatory transfer of magnetic polarization between /sup 1/H and /sup 29/Si in substituted silanes. The technique of J Cross Polarization has been used to enhance sensitivity. The /sup 29/Si NMR shifts of -Si-O- model compounds have been investigated as a possible probe for future studies of the environment of bound oxygen in coal-derived liquids. (3) Measurements of the aromatic fraction of /sup 13/C in whole coals. The techniques of /sup 1/H-/sup 13/C Cross Polarization and Magic-Angle Spinning have been used to enhance sensitivity and remove shift anisotropy. Additional topics described are: (4) Calculation and properties of the broadened lineshape of the shileding Powder Pattern. (5) Calculation of the oscillatory transfer of magnetic polarization for an I-S system. (6) Numerical convolution and its uses. (7) The technique of digital filtering applied in the frequency domain. (8) The designs and properties of four NMR probe-circuits. (9) The design of a single-coil double-resonance probe for combined Magic-Angle Spinning and Cross Polarization. (10) The designs of low Q and high Q rf power amplifiers with emphasis on the rf matching circuitry.

  8. Estimation of glucose carbon recycling in children with glycogen storage disease: A 13C NMR study using [U-13C]glucose

    A stable isotope procedure to estimate hepatic glucose carbon recycling and thereby elucidate the mechanism by which glucose is produced in patients lacking glucose 6-phosphatase is described. A total of 10 studies was performed in children with glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) and type III (GSD-III) and control subjects. A primed dose-constant nasogastric infusion of D-[U-13C]glucose or an infusion diluted with nonlabeled glucose solution was administered following different periods of fasting. Hepatic glucose carbon recycling was estimated from 13C NMR spectra. The values obtained for GSD-I patients coincided with the standard [U-13C]glucose dilution curve. These results indicate that the plasma glucose of GSD-I subjects comprises only a mixture of 99% 13C-enriched D-[U-13C]glucose and unlabeled glucose but lacks any recycled glucose. Significantly different glucose carbon recycling values were obtained for two GSD-III patients in comparison to GSD-I patients. The results eliminate a mechanism for glucose production in GSD-I children involving gluconeogenesis. However, glucose release by amylo-1,6-glucosidase activity would result in endogenous glucose production of non-13C-labeled and nonrecycled glucose carbon, as was found in this study. In GSD-III patients gluconeogenesis is suggested as the major route for endogenous glucose synthesis. The contribution of the triose-phosphate pathway in these patients has been determined

  9. Compartmentalised cerebral metabolism of [1,6-13C]glucose determined by in vivo 13C NMR spectroscopy at 14.1 T

    João M.N. Duarte

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral metabolism is compartmentalised between neurons and glia. Although glial glycolysis is thought to largely sustain the energetic requirements of neurotransmission while oxidative metabolism takes place mainly in neurons, this hypothesis is matter of debate. The compartmentalization of cerebral metabolic fluxes can be determined by 13C NMR spectroscopy upon infusion of 13C-enriched compounds, especially glucose. Rats under light α-chloralose anaesthesia were infused with [1,6-13C]glucose and 13C enrichment in the brain metabolites was measured by 13C NMR spectroscopy with high sensitivity and spectral resolution at 14.1 T. This allowed determining 13C enrichment curves of amino acid carbons with high reproducibility and to reliably estimate cerebral metabolic fluxes (mean error of 8%. We further found that TCA cycle intermediates are not required for flux determination in mathematical models of brain metabolism. Neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle rate (VTCA and neurotransmission rate (VNT were 0.45±0.01 and 0.11±0.01 µmol/g/min, respectively. Glial VTCA was found to be for 38±3% of total cerebral oxidative metabolism, accounting for more than half of neuronal oxidative metabolism. Furthermore, glial anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation rate (VPC was 0.069±0.004 µmol/g/min, i.e. 25±1% of the glial TCA cycle rate. These results support a role of glial cells as active partners of neurons during synaptic transmission beyond glycolytic metabolism.

  10. LOW DOSE CAPSULE BASED 13C-UREA BREATH TEST COMPARED WITH THE CONVENTIONAL 13C-UREA BREATH TEST AND INVASIVE TESTS

    Rejane MATTAR

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context One of the limitations of 13C-urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori infection diagnosis in Brazil is the substrate acquisition in capsule presentation. Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate a capsule-based 13C-urea, manipulated by the Pharmacy Division, for the clinical practice. Methods Fifty patients underwent the conventional and the capsule breath test. Samples were collected at the baseline and after 10, 20 and 30 minutes of 13C-urea ingestion. Urease and histology were used as gold standard in 83 patients. Results In a total of 50 patients, 17 were positive with the conventional 13C-urea (75 mg breath test at 10, 20 and 30 minutes. When these patients repeated breath test with capsule (50 mg, 17 were positive at 20 minutes and 15 at 10 and 30 minutes. The relative sensitivity of 13C-urea with capsule was 100% at 20 minutes and 88.24% at 10 and at 30 minutes. The relative specificity was 100% at all time intervals. Among 83 patients that underwent capsule breath test and endoscopy the capsule breath test presented 100% of sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions Capsule based breath test with 50 mg 13C-urea at twenty minutes was found highly sensitive and specific for the clinical setting. HEADINGS- Helicobacter pylori. Breath Test. Urea, analysis.

  11. Magnetism and superconductivity in iron-based superconductors as probed by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Hammerath, Franziska

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been a fundamental player in the studies of superconducting materials for many decades. This local probe technique allows for the study of the static electronic properties as well as of the low energy excitations of the electrons in the normal and the superconducting state. On that account it has also been widely applied to Fe-based superconductors from the very beginning of their discovery in February 2008. This dissertation comprises some of these very first NMR results, reflecting the unconventional nature of superconductivity and its strong link to magnetism in the investigated compounds LaO{sub 1-x}F{sub x}FeAs and LiFeAs.

  12. Magnetism and Superconductivity in Iron-based Superconductors as Probed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Hammerath, Franziska

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been a fundamental player in the studies of superconducting materials for many decades. This local probe technique allows for the study of the static electronic properties as well as of the low energy excitations of the electrons in the normal and the superconducting state. On that account it has also been widely applied to Fe-based superconductors from the very beginning of their discovery in February 2008. This dissertation comprises some of these very first NMR results, reflecting the unconventional nature of superconductivity and its strong link to magnetism in the investigated compounds LaO1–xFxFeAs and LiFeAs.

  13. Assignment of the side-chain 1H and 13C resonances of interleukin-1β using double- and triple-resonance heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    The assignment of the aliphatic 1H and 13C resonances of IL-1β, a protein of 153 residues and molecular mass 17.4 kDa, is presented by use of a number of novel three-dimensional (3D) heteronuclear NMR experiments which rely on large heteronuclear one-bond J couplings to transfer magnetization and establish through-bond connectivities. These 3D NMR experiments circumvent problems traditionally associated with the application of conventional 2D 1H-1H correlation experiments to proteins of this size, in particular the extensive chemical shift overlap which precludes the interpretation of the spectra and the reduced sensitivity arising from 1H line widths that are often significantly larger than the 1H-1H J couplings. The assignment proceeds in two stages. In the first step the 13Cα chemical shifts are correlated with the NH and 15N chemical shifts by a 3D triple-resonance NH-15N-13Cα (HNCA) correlation experiment which reveals both intraresidue NH(i)-15N(i)-13Cα(i) and some weaker interresidue NH(i)-15N(i)-Cα(i-1) correlations, the former via intraresidue one-bond 1JNCα and the latter via interresidue two-bond 2HNCα couplings. The second step involves the identification of side-chain spin systems by 3D 1H-13C-13C-1H correlated (HCCH-COSY) and 3D 1H-13C-13C-1H total correlated (HCCH-TOCSY) spectroscopy, the latter making use of isotropic mixing of 13C magnetization to obtain relayed connectivities along the side chains. The authors were able to obtain complete 1H and 13C side-chain assignments for all residues, with the exception of 4 (out of a total of 15) lysine residues for which partial assignments were obtained

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Present results and its application to renal pathology. Experimental study of hydronephrosis

    Results of proton nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and relaxation time measurement of experimental hydronephrosis in mice are presented. The study is preceded by a description of the physical principles underlying the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and of its biomedical applications and with a review of the clinical use of NMR imaging in renal pathology

  15. Nuclear magnetic shielding in molecules. The application of GIAO's in LCAO-Xα-calculations

    A nonempirical method for the calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding based on the four current density functional formalism is presented. Using SCF-LCAO-Xα-calculations with application of GIAO's effective one particle equations are solved. The results for nuclear magnetic shielding in diatomic molecules are of good quality, compared with other theoretical and experimental data. (orig.)

  16. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31P, 13C, 1H (and possibly 19F and 23Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  17. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in process engineering

    Gladden, Lynn F.; Alexander, Paul

    1996-03-01

    During the past decade, the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging techniques to problems of relevance to the process industries has been identified. The particular strengths of NMR techniques are their ability to distinguish between different chemical species and to yield information simultaneously on the structure, concentration distribution and flow processes occurring within a given process unit. In this paper, examples of specific applications in the areas of materials and food processing, transport in reactors and two-phase flow are discussed. One specific study, that of the internal structure of a packed column, is considered in detail. This example is reported to illustrate the extent of new, quantitative information of generic importance to many processing operations that can be obtained using NMR imaging in combination with image analysis.

  18. Serum metabonomics of acute leukemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Shamsi, Tahir; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-ur

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a critical neoplasm of white blood cells. In order to differentiate between the metabolic alterations associated with two subtypes of acute leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the serum of ALL and AML patients and compared with two controls (healthy and aplastic anemia) using 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Thirty-seven putative metabolites were identified using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The use of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA models gave results with 84.38% and 90.63% classification rate, respectively. The metabolites responsible for classification are mainly lipids, lactate and glucose. Compared with controls, ALL and AML patients showed serum metabonomic differences involving aberrant metabolism pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipoprotein changes, choline and fatty acid metabolisms. PMID:27480133

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of Nanoscale Ionic Materials

    Oommen, Joanna Mary

    2010-08-13

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are a new class of nanomaterials that exhibit interesting properties including negligible vapor pressures and tunable physical states, among others. In this study, we analyzed the temperature-wise performance of NIMs using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NIMs are relatively stable over a temperature range from 300 to 383 K, rendering them usable in high temperature applications. We confirmed the presence of covalent bonds between the SiO2 core and the sulfonate group and determined relative concentrations of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings serve as first hand proof-of-concept for the usefulness of NMR analyses in further studies on the diffusive properties of NIMs. © 2010 The Electrochemical Society.

  20. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of photosynthesizing Chlorella

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of intact Chlorella cells under light and dark conditions are described. Psub(i), ATP, NAD, UDP-glucose and polyphosphate were observed in the cell. The presence of two compartments was postulated from two intracellular Psub(i) signals, whose chemical shift values were dependent on illumination. These two Psub(i) signals were assigned to those in the stroma of chloroplasts and in the cytoplasm based on their response to the light and dark cycle, and to the treatment of cells with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea. In the light the chloroplastic pH became more alkaline, while the cytoplasmic pH became more acidic. An increase in ATP was also observed upon illumination. (orig.)