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Sample records for 132sn ii variation

  1. Structure of neutron-rich nuclei around 132Sn

    Recent studies have provided new experimental information on neutron-rich nuclei around doubly magic 132Sn. We have performed shell-model calculations for the two- and three-proton N=82 isotones 134Te and 135I using a realistic effective interaction derived from the Bonn A nucleon-nucleon potential. The results are in remarkably good agreement with the experimental data evidencing the reliability of our realistic effective interaction. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  2. Structure of neutron-rich nuclei around {sup 132}Sn

    Andreozzi, F.; Coraggio, L.; Covello, A.; Gargano, A.; Porrino, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Mostra dOltremare, Pad. 20, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Kuo, T.T. [Department of Physics, SUNY, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Recent studies have provided new experimental information on neutron-rich nuclei around doubly magic {sup 132}Sn. We have performed shell-model calculations for the two- and three-proton N=82 isotones {sup 134}Te and {sup 135}I using a realistic effective interaction derived from the Bonn A nucleon-nucleon potential. The results are in remarkably good agreement with the experimental data evidencing the reliability of our realistic effective interaction. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Shell-model structure of exotic nuclei beyond 132Sn

    Covello, A; Coraggio, L.; Gargano, A.; Itaco, N.

    2007-01-01

    We report on a study of exotic nuclei around doubly magic 132Sn in terms of the shell model employing a realistic effective interaction derived from the CD-Bonn nucleon-nucleon potential. The short-range repulsion of the bare potential is renormalized by constructing a smooth low-momentum potential, V-low-k, that is used directly as input for the calculation of the effective interaction. In this paper we focus attention on the nuclei 134Sn and 135Sb which, with an N/Z ratio of 1.68 and 1.65, ...

  4. Shell model analysis of N = 82 isotones above 132Sn

    Nuclei with up to 6 protons added to 132Sn are described within a truncated shell model basis formed by the proton orbits 0g7/2, 1d5/2, 1d3/2, 2s1/2 and 0h11/2. Single-particle energies and two-body interaction matrix elements are determined from experimental excitation energies in 133Sb and 134Te. These parameters are then used for calculating levels in 135I, 136Xe, 137Cs and 138Ba. The calculated energies agree well with experimental values in these 4 nuclei. (author)

  5. Ultra Fast Timing Measurements at $^{78}$Ni and $^{132}$Sn

    2002-01-01

    We propose to measure level lifetimes in the exotic nuclei of $^{81}$Ga and $^{80}$Ga in the vicinity of $^{78}$Ni and of $^{135}$Sb and $^{134}$Sb above $^{132}$Sn by the time-delayed technique. These are relatively simple nuclear systems with a few particles and/or holes outside of the doubly-magic core thus can be treated rather precisely within the shell model. The anticipated new structure information on these nuclei, and in particular the lifetime results will put constraints on the model parameters and will serve to verify their predictions. The selected nuclei are some of the most exotic ones just above $^{78}$Ni or $^{132}$Sn, where the transition rates can be studied at present. Of the strongest interest is the nucleus of $^{81}$Ga, which has only 3 valence protons outside of $^{78}$Ni with the lowest proton orbits being $p_{3/2}$ and $f_{5/2}$. The Ml transition between these states, although allowed by the selection rules, should be $\\textit{l}$-forbidden thus very slow. This should give rise to a...

  6. Spectroscopy of few-particle nuclei around magic 132Sn from fission product γ-ray studies

    We are studying the yrast structure of very neutron-rich nuclei around doubly magic 132Sn by analyzing fission product γ-ray data from a 248Cm source at Eurogam II. Yrast cascades in several few-valence-particle nuclei have been identified through γγ cross coincidences with their complementary fission partners. Results for two-valence-particle nuclei 132Sb, 134Te, 134Sb and 134Sn provide empirical nucleon-nucleon interactions which, combined with single-particle energies already known in the one-particle nuclei, are essential for shell-model analysis in this region. Findings for the N = 82 nuclei 134Te and 135I have now been extended to the four-proton nucleus 136Xe. Results for the two-neutron nucleus 134Sn and the N = 83 isotones 134Sb, 135Te and 135I open up the spectroscopy of nuclei in the northeast quadrant above 132Sn

  7. Gyromagnetic ratios of excited states and nuclear structure near {sup 132}Sn

    Stuchbery, Andrew E. [Department of Nuclear Physics, RSPE, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2014-11-11

    Several g-factor measurements have been performed recently on nuclei near the neutron-rich, double-magic nucleus {sup 132}Sn. The focus here is on {sup 134}Te, the N = 82 isotone which has two protons added to {sup 132}Sn. The electromagnetic properties of {sup 134}Te are examined. Comparisons are made with other nuclei that have two protons outside a double-magic core. The extent to which {sup 132}Sn is an inert core is discussed based on these comparisons. The electromagnetic properties of the N = 82 isotones from {sup 132}Sn to {sup 146}Gd are also discussed.

  8. Are the nuclei beyond 132Sn very exotic?

    Lozeva, R.; Naïdja, H.; Nowacki, F.; Odahara, A.; Moon, C.-B.; NP1112-RIBF87 collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The term exotic nucleus is used for nuclei that have different from normal behavior. However, it turns out that the term normal is valid only for nuclei close to stability and more particularly for regions close to double-shell closures. As long as one drives away in the neutron-rich nuclei, especially at intermediate mass number, interplay between normal single-particle and many collective particle-hole excitations compete. In some cases with the addition of neutrons, these may turn to evolve as a skin, acting against the core nucleus that may also influence its shell evolution. Knowledge of these nuclear ingredients is especially interesting beyond the doubly-magic 132Sn, however a little is known on how the excitations modes develop with the addition of both protons and neutrons. Especially for the Sb nuclei, where one gradually increases these valence particles, the orbital evolution and its impact on exoticness is very intriguing. Experimental studies were conducted on several such isotopes using isomer and, β-decay spectroscopy at RIBF within EURICA. In particular, new data on 140Sb and 136Sb are examined and investigated in the framework of shell model calculations.

  9. Spectroscopy of few-particle nuclei around magic {sup 132}Sn from fission product {gamma}-ray studies.

    Zhang, C. T.

    1998-07-29

    We are studying the yrast structure of very neutron-rich nuclei around doubly magic {sup 132}Sn by analyzing fission product {gamma}-ray data from a {sup 248}Cm source at Eurogam II. Yrast cascades in several few-valence-particle nuclei have been identified through {gamma}{gamma} cross coincidences with their complementary fission partners. Results for two-valence-particle nuclei {sup 132}Sb, {sup 134}Te, {sup 134}Sb and {sup 134}Sn provide empirical nucleon-nucleon interactions which, combined with single-particle energies already known in the one-particle nuclei, are essential for shell-model analysis in this region. Findings for the N = 82 nuclei {sup 134}Te and {sup 135}I have now been extended to the four-proton nucleus {sup 136}Xe. Results for the two-neutron nucleus {sup 134}Sn and the N = 83 isotones {sup 134}Sb, {sup 135}Te and {sup 135}I open up the spectroscopy of nuclei in the northeast quadrant above {sup 132}Sn.

  10. Realistic nuclear shell theory and the doubly-magic 132Sn region

    After an introduction discussing the motivation and interest in results obtained with isotope separators, the fundamental problem in realistic nuclear shell theory is posed in the context of renormalization theory. Then some of the important developments that have occurred over the last fifteen years in the derivation of the effective Hamiltonian and application of realistic nuclear shell theory are briefly reviewed. Doubly magic regions of the periodic table and the unique advantages of the 132Sn region are described. Then results are shown for the ground-state properties of 132Sn as calculated from the density-dependent Hartree-Fock approach with the Skyrme Hamiltonian. A single theoretical Hamiltonian for all nuclei from doubly magic 132Sn to doubly magic 208Pb is presented; single-particle energies are graphed. Finally, predictions of shell-model level-density distributions obtained with spectral distribution methods are discussed; calculated level densities are shown for 136Xe. 10 figures

  11. Coulomb excitation of doubly magic $^{132}$Sn with MINIBALL at HIE-ISOLDE

    We propose to study the vibrational first 2$^{+}$ and 3$^{-}$ states of the doubly magic nucleus $^{132}$ Sn via Coulomb excitation using the HIE-ISOLDE facility coupled with the highly efficient MINIBALL array. The intense $^{132}$Sn beam at ISOLDE, the high beam energy of HIE-ISOLDE, the high energy resolution and good efficiency of the MINIBALL provide a unique combination and favourable advantages to master this demanding measurement. Reliable B(E2;0$^{+}\\rightarrow$ 2$^{+}$) values for neutron deficient $^{106,108,110}$Sn were obtained with the MINIBALL at REX-ISOLDE. These measurements can be extended up to and beyond the shell closure at the neutron-rich side with $^{132}$Sn. The results on excited collective states in $^{132}$Sn will provide crucial information on 2p-2h cross shell configurations which are expected to be dominated by a strong proton contribution. Predictions are made within various large scale shell model calculations and new mean field calculations within the framework of different a...

  12. Effects of phonon-phonon coupling on properties of pygmy resonance in 124-132Sn

    Voronov V. V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting from an effective Skyrme interaction we study effects of phonon-phonon coupling on the low-energy electric dipole response in 124-132Sn. The QRPA calculations are performed within a finite rank separable approximation. The inclusion of two-phonon configurations gives a considerable contribution to low-lying strength. Comparison with available experimental data shows a reasonable agreement for the low-energy E1 strength distribution.

  13. Cluster radioactivity leading to doubly magic 100Sn and 132Sn daughters

    K P Santhosh

    2011-03-01

    Decay of neutron-deficient 128−137Gd parents emitting 4He to 32S clusters are studied within the Coulomb and proximity potential model. The predicted half-lives are compared with other models and most of the values are well within the present experimental limit for measurements (1/2 < 1030} ). The lowest 1/2 value for 28Si emission from 128Gd indicates the role of doubly magic 100Sn daughter in cluster decay process. It is also found that neutron excess in the parent nuclei slows down the cluster decay process. Geiger–Nuttal plots for all clusters are found to be linear with different slopes and intercepts. The -decay half-lives of 148−152Gd parents are computed and are in agreement with experimental data. The role of doubly magic 132Sn daughter in cluster decay process is also examined for various neutron-rich Ba, Ce, Nd, Sm and Gd parents emitting clusters ranging from 4He to 32Si. Alpha-like structures are most probable in the decays leading to 100Sn, while non--like structures are probable in the decays leading to 132Sn. The neutron–proton asymmetry in parent and daughter nuclei is responsible for the reduced decay rate in the decay leading to 132Sn.

  14. THREE-VALENCE-PARTICE NUCLEI IN THE 132Sn and 208 Pb REGIONS

    Full text: Among the nuclei of the nuclear charter, the nuclei around closed shells play a key role in understanding the effective interaction properties between nucleons far from the valley of stability; particulary, the nuclei of a few valence nucleons around doubly magic 208 28Pb126 and 132 50Sn82 nuclei. The interest of both regions 208Pb and 132Sn lies in the fact that there is a great similarity between their nuclear spectroscopic properties. The single energy gaps in both cases are comparable and the orbitals above and below these gaps are similarly ordered. Each single state in the region of 132Sn has its counterpart in that of 208Pb. An interesting predictive consequence, the interactions of the Sn region, difficult region to reach experimentally, can be estimated from their corresponding ones constructed to describe the nuclei of the Pb region. Because of the importance of the similarity existing between the spectroscopy of these two regions, we are interested in nuclei with three valence nucleons in the lead and Tin regions on the basis of experimental data (spin, parity and energy states). In this context, the theoretical study is conducted within the shell model using the MSDI interaction for the energy spectra calculations of the studied nuclei. The calculated results are in good agreement with the available experimental data and show evidence that a close resemblance between the spectroscopy of these two regions persists when moving away from the immediate neighbours of doubly magic 132Sn and 208Pb.

  15. Delta excitation in compressed neutron-rich double magic spherical finite nucleus 132Sn

    The ground state properties of 132Sn at equilibrium and at large compression are investigated, within the framework of the radially constrained spherical Hartree-Fock (CSHF) approximation. The delta resonance effects on the properties of neutron-rich double magic spherical nucleus, 132Sn, in its ground state and the state under static compression are studied. The sensitivity of the nucleon size and Δ model spaces is investigated. At equilibrium,mixing between nucleon and Δ's in the largest model space of nine major nucleon shells plus 10 Δ orbitals was found. Expanding the nucleon model space has a larger effect on reducing the static compression modulus and softening the nuclear equation of state than increasing the number of Δ states. It was found that the most of the increase in the nuclear energy generated under compression is used to create the massive Δ particles. For 132Sn nucleus under compression at 12 times the normal nuclear density, the excited nucleons to Δ's increased sharply up to 13% of the total number of constituents. This result is consistent with the values extracted from relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The single particle energy levels calculated and their behaviors under compression are examined too. A good agreement between results with effective Hamiltonian and the phenomenological shell model for the low lying single-particle spectra is obtained. (authors)

  16. Studies of Nuclei Close to 132Sn Using Single-Neutron Transfer Reactions

    Neutron transfer reactions were performed in inverse kinematics using radioactive ion beams of 132Sn, 130Sn, and 134Te and deuterated polyethylene targets. Preliminary results are presented. The Q-value spectra for 133Sn, 131Sn and 135Te reveal a number of previously unobserved peaks. The angular distributions are compatible with the expected lf7/2 nature of the ground state of 133Sn, and 2p3/2 for the 3.4 MeV state in 131Sn.

  17. Comment on ``Structure of neutron-rich nuclei around 132Sn''

    Blomqvist, J.; Zhang, C. T.; Daly, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    Recent shell model calculations using a realistic interaction by Andreozzi et al. [Phys. Rev. C 56, R16 (1997)] have given excellent agreement with the experimental level spectra of 134Te and 135I. In addition, these authors call into question our contention that there is a serious inconsistency in the measured masses of N=82 isotones near 132Sn. In this Comment, we outline the shell model decomposition method and defend our conclusion that the accepted ground state masses of 134Te and/or 133Sb must be inaccurate by much more than their assigned errors.

  18. The magic nature of 132Sn explored through the single-particle states of 133Sn

    Atomic nuclei have a shell structure1 in which nuclei with magic numbers of neutrons and protons are analogous to the noble gases in atomic physics. Only ten nuclei with the standard magic numbers of both neutrons and protons have so far been observed. The nuclear shell model is founded on the precept that neutrons and protons can move as independent particles in orbitals with discrete quantum numbers, subject to a mean field generated by all the other nucleons. Knowledge of the properties of single-particle states outside nuclear shell closures in exotic nuclei is important2 5 for a fundamental understanding of nuclear structure and nucleosynthesis (for example the r-process, which is responsible for the production of about half of the heavy elements). However, as a result of their short lifetimes, there is a paucity of knowledge about the nature of single-particle states outside exotic doubly magic nuclei. Here we measure the single-particle character of the levels in 133Sn that lies outside the double shell closure present at the short-lived nucleus 132Sn. We use an inverse kinematics technique that involves the transfer of a single nucleon to the nucleus. The purity of the measured single-particle states clearly illustrates the magic nature of 132Sn.

  19. Monopole giant resonance in $^{100-132}$Sn, $^{144}$Sm and $^{208}$Pb

    Kvasil, J; Repko, A; Reinhard, P -G; Nesterenko, V O; Kleinig, W

    2014-01-01

    The isoscalar giant monopole resonance (GMR) in spherical nuclei $^{100-132}$Sn, $^{144}$Sm, and $^{208}$Pb is investigated within the Skyrme random-phase-approximation (RPA) for a variety of Skyrme forces and different pairing options. The calculated GMR strength functions are directly compared to the available experimental distributions. It is shown that, in accordance to results of other groups, description of GMR in Sn and heavier Sm/Pb nuclei needs different values of the nuclear incompressibilty, $K \\approx$ 200 or 230 MeV, respectively. Thus none from the used Skyrme forces is able to describe GMR in these nuclei simultaneously. The GMR peak energy in open-shell $^{120}$Sn is found to depend on the isoscalar effective mass, which might be partly used for a solution of the above problem. Some important aspects of the problem (discrepancies of available experimental data, proper treatment of the volume and surface compression in finite nuclei, etc) are briefly discussed.

  20. Approaching the r-process "waiting point" nuclei below $^{132}$Sn: quadrupole collectivity in $^{128}$Cd

    Reiter, P; Blazhev, A A; Nardelli, S; Voulot, D; Habs, D; Schwerdtfeger, W; Iwanicki, J S

    We propose to investigate the nucleus $^{128}$Cd neighbouring the r-process "waiting point" $^{130}$Cd. A possible explanation for the peak in the solar r-abundances at A $\\approx$ 130 is a quenching of the N = 82 shell closure for spherical nuclei below $^{132}$Sn. This explanation seems to be in agreement with recent $\\beta$-decay measurements performed at ISOLDE. In contrast to this picture, a beyond-mean-field approach would explain the anomaly in the excitation energy observed for $^{128}$Cd rather with a quite large quadrupole collectivity. Therefore, we propose to measure the reduced transition strengths B(E2) between ground state and first excited 2$^{+}$-state in $^{128}$Cd applying $\\gamma$-spectroscopy with MINIBALL after "safe" Coulomb excitation of a post-accelerated beam obtained from REX-ISOLDE. Such a measurement came into reach only because of the source developments made in 2006 for experiment IS411, in particular the use of a heated quartz transfer line. The result from the proposed measure...

  1. Probing Shell Correction at High Spin by Neutron Emission of Doubly Magic Nuclei 208pb and 132Sn

    YEWei

    2005-01-01

    Shell effects in particle emission for two doubly magic nuclei 132Sn and 208pb were studied in the framework of Smoluchowski equation taking into account temperature and spin-dependent shell correction. It is shown that the shelle ffects in the emission of pre-scission neutrons are sensitive to the spin dependence of the shell correction at a moderate excitation energy. Therefore, we propose to use neutron multiplicity as an observable to probe the shell correction at high spins.

  2. Probing Shell Correction at High Spin by Neutron Emission of Doubly Magic Nuclei 208pb and 132Sn

    YE Wei

    2005-01-01

    Shell effects in particle emission for two doubly magic nuclei 132 Sn and 208 Pb were studied in the framework of Smoluchowski equation taking into account temperature and spin-dependent shell correction. It is shown that the shell effects in the enission of pre-scission neutrons are sensitive to the spin dependence of the shell correction at a moderate excitation energy. Therefore, we propose to use neutron multiplicity as an observable to probe the shell correction at high spins.

  3. Double-magic nature of 132Sn and 208Pb through lifetime and cross-section measurements.

    Allmond, J M; Stuchbery, A E; Beene, J R; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Liang, J F; Padilla-Rodal, E; Radford, D C; Varner, R L; Ayres, A; Batchelder, J C; Bey, A; Bingham, C R; Howard, M E; Jones, K L; Manning, B; Mueller, P E; Nesaraja, C D; Pain, S D; Peters, W A; Ratkiewicz, A; Schmitt, K T; Shapira, D; Smith, M S; Stone, N J; Stracener, D W; Yu, C-H

    2014-05-01

    Single-neutron states in (133)Sn and (209)Pb, which are analogous to single-electron states outside of closed atomic shells in alkali metals, were populated by the ((9)Be, (8)Be) one-neutron transfer reaction in inverse kinematics using particle-γ coincidence spectroscopy. In addition, the s(1/2) single-neutron hole-state candidate in (131)Sn was populated by ((9)Be, (10)Be). Doubly closed-shell (132)Sn (radioactive) and (208)Pb (stable) beams were used at sub-Coulomb barrier energies of 3 MeV per nucleon. Level energies, γ-ray transitions, absolute cross sections, spectroscopic factors, asymptotic normalization coefficients, and excited-state lifetimes are reported and compared with shell-model expectations. The results include a new transition and precise level energy for the 3p(1/2) candidate in (133)Sn, new absolute cross sections for the 1h(9/2) candidate in (133)Sn and 3s(1/2) candidate in (131)Sn, and new lifetimes for excited states in (133)Sn and (209)Pb. This is the first report on excited-state lifetimes of (133)Sn, which allow for a unique test of the nuclear shell model and (132)Sn double-shell closure. PMID:24836240

  4. Evolution of the N=82 shell gap below {sup 132}Sn inferred from core excited states in {sup 131}In

    Gorska, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)], E-mail: m.gorska@gsi.de; Caceres, L. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Grawe, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Pfuetzner, M. [IEP, University of Warsaw, PL-00681 Warsaw (Poland); Jungclaus, A. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Estructuras de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano113bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Pietri, S. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Werner-Malento, E. [IEP, University of Warsaw, PL-00681 Warsaw (Poland); Podolyak, Z.; Regan, P.H. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Rudolph, D. [Department of Physics, Lund University, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Detistov, P. [Faculty of Physics, University of Sofia, BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Lalkovski, S. [Faculty of Physics, University of Sofia, BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); School of Enviroment and Technology, University of Brighton, Brighton, BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Modamio, V.; Walker, J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Beck, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bednarczyk, P. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, PL-31342 Krakow (Poland); Doornenbal, P. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Geissel, H.; Gerl, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)] (and others)

    2009-03-02

    The {gamma}-ray decay of an excited state in {sup 131}In, the one proton hole neighbor of the doubly magic {sup 132}Sn has been measured. A high-spin, core-excited isomer with T{sub 1/2}=630(60) ns was identified following production by both relativistic fragmentation of a {sup 136}Xe beam and fission of a {sup 238}U beam. This state deexcites by a single {gamma}-ray branch of 3782(2) keV from which direct evidence for the size of the N=82 shell gap is inferred. The results are discussed in comparison to a shell-model calculation including configurations across the closed shells at N=82 and Z=50.

  5. Comment on {open_quotes}Structure of neutron-rich nuclei around {sup 132}Sn{close_quotes}

    Blomqvist, J. [Department of Physics Frescati, Royal Institute of Technology, S-10405 Stockholm (Sweden); Zhang, C.T.; Daly, P.J. [Chemistry Department, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Recent shell model calculations using a realistic interaction by Andreozzi {ital et al.} [Phys. Rev. C {bold 56}, R16 (1997)] have given excellent agreement with the experimental level spectra of {sup 134}Te and {sup 135}I. In addition, these authors call into question our contention that there is a serious inconsistency in the measured masses of {ital N}=82 isotones near {sup 132}Sn. In this Comment, we outline the shell model decomposition method and defend our conclusion that the accepted ground state masses of {sup 134}Te and/or {sup 133}Sb must be inaccurate by much more than their assigned errors. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Isomerism in the "south-east" of $^{132}$Sn and a predicted neutron-decaying isomer in $^{129}$Pd

    Yuan, Cenxi; Xu, Furong; Walker, P M; Podolyak, Zs; Xu, C; Ren, Z Z; Ding, B; Liu, M L; Liu, X Y; Xu, H S; Zhou, X H; Zhang, Y H; Zuo, W

    2016-01-01

    Excited states in neutron-rich nuclei located south-east of $^{132}$Sn are investigated by shell-model calculations. A new shell-model Hamiltonian is constructed for the present study. The proton-proton and neutron-neutron interactions of the Hamiltonian are obtained through the existing CD-Bonn $G$ matrix results, while the proton-neutron interaction across two major shells is derived from the monopole based universal interaction plus the M3Y spin-orbit force. The present Hamiltonian can reproduce well the experimental data available in this region, including one-neutron separation energies, level energies and the experimental $B(E2)$ values of isomers in $^{134,136,138}$Sn, $^{130}$Cd, and $^{128}$Pd. New isomers are predicted in this region, $e.g.$ in $^{135}$Sn, $^{131}$Cd, $^{129}$Pd, $^{132,134}$In and $^{130}$Ag, in which almost no excited states are known experimentally yet. In the odd-odd $^{132,134}$In and $^{130}$Ag, the predicted very long $E2$ life-times of the low-lying $5^{-}$ states are discus...

  7. Evolution of quadrupole and octupole collectivity north-east of $^{132}$ Sn: the even Te and Xe isotopes

    We propose to study excited states in isotopes north-east of the doubly-magic $^{132}$Sn by $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy following "safe" Coulomb excitation. The experiment aims to the determine B(E2) and B(E3) values to follow the evolution of quadrupole and octupole collectivity when going away from the shell closures at Z = 50 and N = 82. The B(E2; 0$^+_{gs}$ $\\rightarrow$ 2$^+_{1}$) values in the even isotopes $^{138-144}$Xe have been measured at REX-ISOLDE and the systematic trend towards neutron-rich nuclei is well described even by an empirical Grodzins-type formula. An increasing dipole moment observed for $^{140,142}$Xe is interpreted as indirect signature of increasing octupole correlations peaking at N = 88. So far, no B(E3) values are known. In contrast to the Xe isotopes, the Te ones, in particular $^{136}$Te, are known for their notoriously irregular behaviour. In order to understand the nuclear structure also on a microscopic basis, the isotope $^{136}$Te with just one pair of protons and neutrons...

  8. Low-lying dipole response: isospin character and collectivity in ${}^{68}$Ni, ${}^{132}$Sn and ${}^{208}$Pb

    Roca-Maza, X; Brenna, M; Mizuyama, K; Colò, G

    2011-01-01

    The isospin character, the collective or single-particle nature, and the sensitivity to the slope of the nuclear symmetry energy of the low-energy isovector dipole response (known as pygmy dipole resonance) are nowadays under debate. In the present work we study, within the fully self-consistent non-relativistic mean field (MF) approach based on Skyrme Hartree-Fock plus Random Phase Approximation (RPA), the measured even-even nuclei ${}^{68}$Ni, ${}^{132}$Sn and ${}^{208}$Pb. To analyze the model dependence in the predictions of the pygmy dipole strength, we employ three different Skyrme parameter sets. We find that both the isoscalar and the isovector dipole responses of all three nuclei show a low-energy peak that increases in magnitude, and is shifted to larger excitation energies, with increasing values of the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation. We highlight the fact that the collectivity associated with the RPA state(s) contributing to this peak is different in the isoscalar and isovector case, o...

  9. Electromagnetic properties of the 2+ state in 134Te: Influence of core excitation on single-particle orbits beyond 132Sn

    Stuchbery, Andrew E [ORNL; Allmond, James M [ORNL; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM); Radford, David C [ORNL; Stone, N. J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Batchelder, J. C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Beene, James R [ORNL; Benczer-Koller, N. [Rutgers University; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Howard, Meredith E [ORNL; Kumbartzki, G. [Rutgers University; Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Manning, Brett M [ORNL; Stracener, Daniel W [ORNL; Yu, Chang-Hong [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The g factor and B (E2) of the first excited 2+ state have been measured following Coulomb excitation ofthe neutron-rich semimagic nuclide 134Te (two protons outside 132Sn) produced as a radioactive beam. The precision achieved matches related g-factor measurements on stable beams and distinguishes between alternative models. The B(E2) measurement exposes quadrupole strength in the 2+ state beyond that predicted by current large-basis shell-model calculations. This additional quadrupole strength can be attributed to coupling between the two valence protons and excitations of the 132Sn core. However, the wave functions of the low-excitation positive-parity states in 134Te up to 6+ remain dominated by the (g7/2)2 configuration.

  10. Spectroscopy of particle-phonon coupled states in $^{133}$Sb by the cluster transfer reaction of $^{132}$Sn on $^{7}$Li: an advanced test of nuclear interactions

    We propose to investigate, with MINIBALL coupled to T-REX, the one-valence-proton $^{133}$Sb nucleus by the cluster transfer reaction of $^{132}$Sn on $^{7}$Li. The excited 133Sb will be populated by transfer of a triton into $^{132}$Sn, followed by the emission of an $\\alpha$-particle (detected in T-REX) and 2 neutrons. The aim of the experiment is to locate states arising from the coupling of the valence proton of $^{133}$Sb to the collective low-lying phonon excitations of $^{132}$Sn (in particular the 3$^−$). According to calculations in the weak-coupling approach, these states lie in the 4$\\, - \\,$5 MeV excitation energy region and in the spin interval 1/2$\\, - \\,$ 19/2, i.e., in the region populated by the cluster transfer reaction. The results will be used to perform advanced tests of different types of nuclear interactions, usually employed in the description of particle-phonon coupled excitations. States arising from couplings of the proton with simpler core excitations, involving few nucleons only...

  11. Yield estimation of neutron-rich rare isotopes induced by 200 MeV/u {sup 132}Sn beams by using GEANT4

    Shin, Jae Won [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Kyung Joo; Ham, Cheolmin [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Tae-Sun [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Seung-Woo, E-mail: swhong@skku.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    A so-called “two-step reaction scheme”, in which neutron-rich rare isotopes obtained from ISOL are post-accelerated and bombarded on a second target, is employed to estimate the production yields of exotic rare isotopes. The production yields of neutron-rich rare isotope fragments induced by 200 MeV/u {sup 132}Sn beams bombarded on a {sup 9}Be target are estimated with Monte Carlo code, GEANT4. To substantiate the use of GEANT4 for this study, benchmark calculations are done for 80 MeV/u {sup 59}Co, 95 MeV/u {sup 72}Zn, 500 MeV/u {sup 92}Mo, and 950 MeV/u {sup 132}Sn beams on the {sup 9}Be target. It is found that {sup 132}Sn beams can produce neutron-rich rare isotopes with 45 ⩽ Z ⩽ 50 more effectively than {sup 238}U beams at the same energy per nucleon.

  12. The evolution of B(E2) values around the doubly-magic nucleus {sup 132}Sn

    Behrens, Thomas

    2009-08-24

    In this work the evolution of B(E2) values in nuclei around the N=82 shell closure has been studied. The reduced transition strength between ground state and rst excited 2{sup +} state is a good indicator for the collectivity in even-even nuclei. Former experimental and theoretical investigations of the region above N=82 indicated that the B(E2) values might be systematically lower than expected and questioned the current understanding of collective excitations. Since the experimental data concerning the proposed N=82 shell quenching for nuclei below {sup 132}Sn is not yet conclusive, a systematic investigation of neutron-rich nuclei both below and above this shell closure has been performed at the Radioactive Ion Beam Facility REX-ISOLDE at CERN. The B(E2) values of {sup 122-126}Cd (N<82) and {sup 138-144}Xe (N>82) have been measured by Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics, applying the MINIBALL {gamma}-detector array. The values of {sup 124,126}Cd and {sup 138,142,144}Xe have been determined for the first time, whereas for {sup 140}Xe the ambiguity of the two contradicting published B(E2) values has been solved. The relative uncertainty of the B(E2) value of {sup 122}Cd could be reduced significantly. For {sup 140,142}Xe the Coulomb excitation cross section for the 2{sub 1}{sup +}{yields}4{sub 1}{sup +} transition has also been determined. Further, the deorientation e ect and the influence of the quadrupole deformation on the Coulomb excitation cross section have been taken into account for {sup 138-142}Xe. It could be shown that the latter plays an important role for the determination of the B(E2) values. Assuming only a small or even vanishing quadrupole moment, all measured B(E2) values agree with the expectations and no sign for a quenching of the N=82 gap could be seen. (orig.)

  13. Study of Gamow-Teller transitions from 132Sn via the (p,n reaction at 220 MeV/u in inverse kinematics

    Sasano M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The charge-exchange (p,n reaction at 220 MeV has been measured to extract the strength distribution of Gamow-Teller transitions from the doubly magic unstable nucleus 132Sn. A recently developed experimental technique of measuring the (p,n reaction in inverse kinematics has been applied to the study of unstable nuclei in the mass region around A∼100 for the first time. We have combined the low-energy neutron detector WINDS and the SAMURAI spectrometer at the RIKEN radioactive isotope beam factory (RIBF. The particle identification plot for the reaction residues obtained by the spectrometer provides the clear separation of the CE reaction channel from other background events, enabling us to identify kinematic curves corresponding the (p, n reaction. Further analysis to reconstruct the excitation energy spectrum is ongoing.

  14. Precise Coulomb excitation B(E2) measurements for first 2+states of projectile nuclei near the doubly magic nuclei 78Ni and 132Sn

    Coulomb excitation is a very precise tool to measure excitation probabilities and provide insight on the collectivity of nuclear excitations and in particular on nuclear shapes. In the last few years radioactive ion beam facilities such as HRIBF opened unique opportunities to explore the structure of nuclei in the regions near the doubly magic nuclei 78Ni (Z=28 and N=50) and 132Sn (Z=50 and N=82). For this purpose we have developed specialized methods and instrumentation to measure various observables. There is also the opportunity to perform precision experiments with stable beams using exactly the same state-of-the-art instrumentation and techniques as with their radioactive ion beam counterpart. I describe some of the recent efforts at HRIBF to do more precise measurements using particle-gamma techniques.

  15. Investigation of (3,3) resonance effects on the properties of neutron-rich double magic spherical finite nucleus, 132Sn, in the ground state and under compression

    Mohammed H E Abu-Sei'leek

    2011-04-01

    Within the framework of the radially constrained spherical Hartree–Fock (CSHF) approximation, the resonance effects of delta on the properties of neutron-rich double magic spherical nucleus 132Sn were studied. It was found that most of the increase in the nuclear energy generated under compression was used to create massive particles. For 132Sn nucleus under compression at 3.19 times density of the normal nuclear density, the excited nucleons to s were increased sharply up to 16% of the total number of constituents. This result is consistent with the values extracted from relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The single particle energy levels were calculated and their behaviours under compression were examined. A meaningful agreement was obtained between the results with effective Hamiltonian and that with the phenomenological shell model for the low-lying single-particle spectra. The results suggest considerable reduction in compressibility for the nucleus, and softening of the equation of state with the inclusion of s in the nuclear dynamics.

  16. Geometric constrained variational calculus. III: The second variation (Part II)

    Massa, Enrico; Luria, Gianvittorio; Pagani, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    The problem of minimality for constrained variational calculus is analyzed within the class of piecewise differentiable extremaloids. A fully covariant representation of the second variation of the action functional based on a family of local gauge transformations of the original Lagrangian is proposed. The necessity of pursuing a local adaptation process, rather than the global one described in [1] is seen to depend on the value of certain scalar attributes of the extremaloid, here called the corners’ strengths. On this basis, both the necessary and the sufficient conditions for minimality are worked out. In the discussion, a crucial role is played by an analysis of the prolongability of the Jacobi fields across the corners. Eventually, in the appendix, an alternative approach to the concept of strength of a corner, more closely related to Pontryagin’s maximum principle, is presented.

  17. Genetic variations in multiple myeloma II

    Vangsted, A.; Klausen, T.W.; Vogel, U.

    2012-01-01

    Association studies on genetic variation to treatment effect may serve as a predictive marker for effect of treatment and can also uncover biological pathways behind drug effect. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been studied in relation to high-dose treatment (HDT), thalidomide- and...... advantage because SNP analysis required large number of patients. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S....

  18. Invariant Higher-Order Variational Problems II

    Gay-Balmaz, François; Holm, Darryl D.; Meier, David M.; Ratiu, Tudor S.; Vialard, François-Xavier

    2012-08-01

    Motivated by applications in computational anatomy, we consider a second-order problem in the calculus of variations on object manifolds that are acted upon by Lie groups of smooth invertible transformations. This problem leads to solution curves known as Riemannian cubics on object manifolds that are endowed with normal metrics. The prime examples of such object manifolds are the symmetric spaces. We characterize the class of cubics on object manifolds that can be lifted horizontally to cubics on the group of transformations. Conversely, we show that certain types of non-horizontal geodesic on the group of transformations project to cubics. Finally, we apply second-order Lagrange-Poincaré reduction to the problem of Riemannian cubics on the group of transformations. This leads to a reduced form of the equations that reveals the obstruction for the projection of a cubic on a transformation group to again be a cubic on its object manifold.

  19. Nonterminals, homomorphisms and codings in different variations of OL-systems. II. Nondeterministic systems

    Nielsen, Mogens; Rozenberg, Grzegorz; Salomaa, Arto;

    1974-01-01

    Continuing the work begun in Part I of this paper, we consider now variations of nondeterministic OL-systems. The present Part II of the paper contains a systematic classification of the effect of nonterminals, codings, weak codings, nonerasing homomorphisms and homomorphisms for all basic variat...

  20. Search for cosmological variation of the fine-structure constant using relativistic energy shifts in Ge II, Sn II, and Pb II

    The sensitivity of atomic transition frequencies to variation of the fine structure constant α=e2/(ℎ/2π)c increases proportional to Z2 where Z is the nuclear charge. Recently several lines of heavy ions Ge II, Sn II, and Pb II have been detected in quasar absorption spectra. We have performed accurate many-body calculations of the α2 dependence of transition frequencies (q coefficients) for these atoms and found an order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity in comparison with atomic transitions which were previously used to search for temporal and spatial variation of α in quasar absorption systems. An interesting feature in Pb II is a highly nonlinear dependence on α2 due to the level pseudocrossings

  1. A case of recurrent acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus with carnitine palmitoyltransferase II variation.

    Sakai, Eiko; Yamanaka, Gaku; Kawashima, Hisashi; Morishima, Yasuyuki; Ishida, Yu; Oana, Shingo; Miyajima, Tasuku; Shinohara, Mayu; Saitoh, Makiko; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2013-08-01

    Acute encephalopathy with febrile convulsive status epilepticus (AEFCSE) is the most common type of acute encephalopathy in childhood in Japan, which develops with prolonged febrile convulsion, followed by mild unconsciousness. It is generally sporadic and nonrecurrent. In this report, a 1-year-old girl showed signs of AEFCSE triggered by respiratory syncytial virus infection. Two years later, she presented with AEFCSE triggered by influenza virus infection, resulting in severe neurologic sequelae. The patient had a thermolabile genotype of carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) variations consisting of three single nucleotide polymorphisms in exons 4 [1055T > G/F352C and 1102G > A/V368I] and 5 [1939A > G/M647V]. The polymorphism has been identified as a genetic predisposition for acute encephalopathy. This report presents the first case of recurrent encephalopathy with CPT II variations that may partially associate with pathogenesis of recurrent AEFCSE. PMID:23450341

  2. Variation in sulfide tolerance of photosystem II in phylogenetically diverse cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.

    2004-01-01

    Physiological and molecular phylogenetic approaches were used to investigate variation among 12 cyanobacterial strains in their tolerance of sulfide, an inhibitor of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats were found to be phylogenetically diverse and exhibited an approximately 50-fold variation in photosystem II performance in the presence of sulfide. Whereas the degree of tolerance was positively correlated with sulfide levels in the environment, a strain's phenotype could not be predicted from the tolerance of its closest relatives. These observations suggest that sulfide tolerance is a dynamic trait primarily shaped by environmental variation. Despite differences in absolute tolerance, similarities among strains in the effects of sulfide on chlorophyll fluorescence induction indicated a common mode of toxicity. Based on similarities with treatments known to disrupt the oxygen-evolving complex, it was concluded that sulfide toxicity resulted from inhibition of the donor side of photosystem II.

  3. Nuclear-spectroscopic studies in the 132Sn region

    In this work investigations on r-process nuclides around the N = 82 shell closure are done. The so far unknown half-lives and Pn-values of 137-139Sb and 139Te and their impact to r-process theory are given. Further the results of Shergur et. al. of neutron rich tin (137,138Sn) are verified and in some points improved. New data on γ-decay spectroscopy for 136Sn from single spectra is published. To improve beam quality and solve long known problems on ISOL-facilities with isobaric contamination, new techniques are discussed. A special focus is on molecular sidebands, which is first time adapted to a target/ion source unit in a mass separation facility. It was possible to create a strong SnS+ sideband and in this way to reduce isobaric background with good beam intensities. On the other hand, a target with temperature controlled transfer line was build and its characteristics are discussed. To improve selectivity of a given experiment on neutron rich nuclei a new detector system for nγ-coincidences was developed. Due to a special electronically setup of the new system it was possible to downsize the coincidence window compared to earlier attempts. (orig.)

  4. Nuclear-spectroscopic studies in the {sup 132}Sn region; Kernspektroskopische Untersuchungen in der {sup 132}Sn-Region

    Arndt, Oliver

    2007-10-15

    In this work investigations on r-process nuclides around the N = 82 shell closure are done. The so far unknown half-lives and P{sub n}-values of {sup 137-139}Sb and {sup 139}Te and their impact to r-process theory are given. Further the results of Shergur et. al. of neutron rich tin ({sup 137,138}Sn) are verified and in some points improved. New data on {gamma}-decay spectroscopy for {sup 136}Sn from single spectra is published. To improve beam quality and solve long known problems on ISOL-facilities with isobaric contamination, new techniques are discussed. A special focus is on molecular sidebands, which is first time adapted to a target/ion source unit in a mass separation facility. It was possible to create a strong SnS{sup +} sideband and in this way to reduce isobaric background with good beam intensities. On the other hand, a target with temperature controlled transfer line was build and its characteristics are discussed. To improve selectivity of a given experiment on neutron rich nuclei a new detector system for n{gamma}-coincidences was developed. Due to a special electronically setup of the new system it was possible to downsize the coincidence window compared to earlier attempts. (orig.)

  5. Dimensionality Variation in Dinuclear Cu(II Complexes of a Heterotritopic Pyrazolate Ligand

    Chris S. Hawes

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Two new Cu(II complexes of the ligand 3-carboxy-5-(2-pyridyl-1H-pyrazole, H2L1, have been prepared and structurally characterized and found to be comprised of a similar [M2L2] dimer motif. Subtle variation in the synthetic conditions allowed isolation of two metal complexes: [Cu2L12(MeOH2], 1, a discrete dimer linked by hydrogen bonding interactions in the solid state, and poly-[Cu2L12], 2, a polymeric material where the dimer motif is linked by carboxylate bridges to give an extended two-dimensional sheet. The selective isolation of each phase by careful synthetic control highlights the subtlety and importance of the underlying synthetic conditions.

  6. A Molecular Basis for Variation in Clinical Severity of Isolated Growth Hormone Deficiency Type II

    Hamid, Rizwan; Phillips, John A.; Holladay, Cindy; Cogan, Joy D.; Eric D Austin; Backeljauw, Philippe F.; Travers, Sharon H.; James G Patton

    2009-01-01

    Context: Dominant-negative GH1 mutations cause familial isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD II), which is characterized by GH deficiency, occasional multiple anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies, and anterior pituitary hypoplasia. The basis of the variable expression and progression of IGHD II among relatives who share the same GH1 mutation is poorly understood.

  7. THE ABUNDANCE SCATTER IN M33 FROM H II REGIONS: IS THERE ANY EVIDENCE FOR AZIMUTHAL METALLICITY VARIATIONS?

    Optical spectra of 25 H II regions in the inner 2 kpc of the M33 disk have been obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph at the Gemini North telescope. The oxygen abundance gradient measured from the detection of the [O III] λ4363 auroral line displays a scatter of approximately 0.06 dex, a much smaller value than recently reported by Rosolowsky and Simon in this galaxy. The analysis of the abundances for a large sample of H II regions derived from the R23 strong-line indicator confirms that the scatter is small over the full disk of M33, consistent with the measuring uncertainties, and comparable to what is observed in other spiral galaxies. No evidence is therefore found for significant azimuthal variations in the present-day metallicity of the interstellar medium in this galaxy on spatial scales from ∼100 pc to a few kpc. A considerable fraction of M33 H II regions with auroral line detections show spectral features revealing sources of hard ionizing radiation (such as He II emission and large [Ne III], [O III] line fluxes). Since R23 is shown to severely underestimate the oxygen abundances in such cases, care must be taken in chemical abundance studies of extragalactic H II regions based on this strong-line indicator.

  8. Synthesis of mixed-valence hexanuclear Mn(II/III) clusters from its Mn(II) precursor: variations of catecholase-like activity and magnetic coupling.

    Kar, Paramita; Ida, Yumi; Kanetomo, Takuya; Drew, Michael G B; Ishida, Takayuki; Ghosh, Ashutosh

    2015-06-01

    One Mn(II) coordination polymer, [Mn(o-(NO2)C6H4COO)2(pyz)(H2O)]n (1), has been synthesized and oxidized with n-Bu4NMnO4 in non-aqueous media to two mixed-valence hexanuclear Mn(II/III) complexes [MnIII2MnII4O2(pyz)0.61/(MeOH)0.39(o-(NO2)C6H4COO)10·(H2O)·{(CH3)2CO}2]·(CH3)2CO (2) and [MnIII2MnII4O2(pyz)0.28/(MeCN)3.72(o-(NO2)C6H4COO)10·(H2O)] (3) (where pyz = pyrazine). All three complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, and variable-temperature magnetic measurements. The structural analyses reveal that complex 1 is comprised of linear chains of pyz bridged Mn(II), which are further linked to one another by syn–anti carboxylate bridges, giving rise to a two-dimensional (2D) net. Complexes 2 and 3 feature mixed valence [MnIII2MnII4] units in which each of the six manganese centres reside in an octahedral environment. Apart from the variations in terminal ligands (acetone for 2 and acetonitrile for 3), the complexes are very similar. Using 3,5-di-tert-butyl catechol (3,5-DTBC) as the substrate, the catecholase-like activity of the complexes has been studied and it is found that the mixed valent Mn6 complexes (2 and 3) are much more active towards aerial oxidation of catechol compared to the Mn(II) complex (1). Variable-temperature (1.8–300 K) magnetic susceptibility measurements showed the presence of antiferromagnetic coupling in all three complexes. The magnetic data have been fitted with a 2D quadratic model derived by Lines, giving the exchange constant J/kB = −0.0788(5) K for 1. For 2 and 3, antiferromagnetic interactions within the Mn6 cluster have been fitted with models containing three exchange constants: JA/kB = −70 K, JB/kB = −0.5 K, JC/kB = −2.9 K for 2 and JA/kB = −60 K, JB/kB = −0.3 K, JC/kB = −2.8 K for 3. PMID:25928181

  9. Echogenicity variations from porcine blood II: the "bright ring" under oscillatory flow.

    Paeng, Dong-Guk; Chiao, Richard Y; Shung, K Kirk

    2004-06-01

    Echogenicity variations from porcine blood were observed in a mock flow loop under pulsatile flow in a series of experiments (Paeng et al. 2004). In this paper, oscillatory flow was generated to further investigate the cyclic and radial variation of blood echogenicity and its origin and mechanisms by several parameters, including stroke volume, stroke rate, mean steady flow and transducer angle, using a GE LOGIQ 700 Expert system. The echogenicity at the center of the tube was enhanced during acceleration and lower during deceleration, and the expansion and collapse of the "bright ring" was observed twice per cycle. The "black hole," a central echo-poor zone surrounded by a hyperechoic zone, was barely observable under oscillatory flow, and these patterns differed from those under pulsatile flow. The cyclic and radial variation of echogenicity under oscillatory flow was affected by such hemodynamic parameters as stroke volume, stroke rate and mean steady flow. It was suggested that rouleaux might be aligned at an angle of about 25 degrees relative to the tube axis during the acceleration phase, based on the experimental results reaching a maximum of the echogenicity variation at a transducer angle of 25 degrees. Radial distribution of rouleaux alignments was proposed to be another important factor to blood echogenicity variation, in addition to combined effects of shear rate and flow acceleration on erythrocyte aggregation and blood echogenicity. The weak cyclic variation of echogenicity was also observed from the porcine erythrocyte suspensions under pure oscillatory flow, but not under pulsatile flow. It is postulated that the echogenicity variations from erythrocyte suspensions are from red cell deformation. PMID:15219961

  10. Variation of beam emittance during the accelerator cycle of the synchrotron for INDUS-I and INDUS-II

    The variation of radial and vertical emittance with time is discussed for the synchrotron of INDUS-I and INDUS-II for the acceleration cycle of 1.5 Hz and 2.0 Hz. If adequate provision of time is made for radiation damping at the peak energy, the beam attains the equilibrium value of beam emittance at the extraction point for both the cases. Vertical emittance in both the cases is either less or equal to the natural value. (author). 3 tabs

  11. Estimation Of The Proportion Of Variation Accounted For By DNA Tests. II: Phenotypic Variance

    The proportion of phenotypic variation accounted for (Rp2) is an important characteristic of a DNA test. Therefore, several estimators of this quantity were evaluated by simulation of 500 replicates of a population of 1000 progeny of 100 sires (3 levels of narrow sense heritability and 4 levels of ...

  12. The optical variability of SDSS quasars from multi-epoch spectroscopy. II. color variation

    Guo, Hengxiao

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the optical/ultraviolet (UV) color variations for a sample of 2169 quasars based on multi-epoch spectroscopy in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release seven (DR7) and data release nine (DR9). To correct the systematic difference between DR7 and DR9 due to the different instrumental setup, we produced a correction spectrum by using a sample of F-stars observed both in DR7 and DR9. The correction spectrum was then applied to quasars when comparing the spectra of DR7 with DR9. In each object, the color variation was explored by comparing the spectral index of the continuum power-law fit on the brightest spectrum with the faintest one, and also by the shape of their difference spectrum. In 1876 quasars with consistent color variations from two methods, we found that most sources (1755, $\\sim 94\\%$) show bluer-when-brighter (BWB) trend, and the redder-when-brighter (RWB) trend is only detected in 121 objects ($\\sim 6\\%$). The common BWB trend is supported by the bluer composite spectrum c...

  13. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF THE EFFECT ON CHINESE REGIONAL CLIMATE DUE TO SEASONAL VARIATION OF LAND SURFACE PARAMETERS (PART II)

    孙健; 李维亮; 周秀骥

    2001-01-01

    The effect on climate due to seasonal variation of vegetation and roughness length was simulated in Part I of this essay. In Part II, the individual effect of albedo and the joint effect of all those factors (vegetation, roughness length and albedo) were calculated by numerical sensitivity experiments. The results showed that: (1) There is no significant effect on precipitation if the albedo of 4 seasons is used to replace the CRCM's climate average data, but the effect on land surface temperature can be seen clearly. And the effect also can be seen in adjacent regions. (2) If all these three factors are used to replace the CRCM's climate average data at the same time, the effect on precipitation is significant, the most variation value is 300 mm. And the effect on temperature is similar to what we can see if only one of these factors in CRCM is replaced by monthly or seasonal data. (3) Seasonal variation of land surface parameters has important effect not only on regional climate, but also on global environment.

  14. The Optical Variability of SDSS Quasars from Multi-epoch Spectroscopy. II. Color Variation

    Guo, Hengxiao; Gu, Minfeng

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the optical/ultraviolet (UV) color variations for a sample of 2169 quasars based on multi-epoch spectroscopy in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data releases seven (DR7) and nine (DR9). To correct the systematic difference between DR7 and DR9 due to the different instrumental setup, we produced a correction spectrum by using a sample of F-stars observed in both DR7 and DR9. The correction spectrum was then applied to quasars when comparing the spectra of DR7 with DR9. In each object, the color variation was explored by comparing the spectral index of the continuum power-law fit on the brightest spectrum with the faintest one, and also by the shape of their difference spectrum. In 1876 quasars with consistent color variations from two methods, we found that most sources (1755, ∼94%) show the bluer-when-brighter (BWB) trend, and the redder-when-brighter (RWB) trend is detected in only 121 objects (∼6%). The common BWB trend is supported by the composite spectrum constructed from bright spectra, which is bluer than that from faint spectra, and also by the blue composite difference spectrum. The correction spectrum is proven to be highly reliable by comparing the composite spectrum from corrected DR9 and original DR7 spectra. Assuming that the optical/UV variability is triggered by fluctuations, the RWB trend can likely be explained if the fluctuations occur first in the outer disk region, and the inner disk region has not yet fully responded when the fluctuations are being propagated inward. In contrast, the common BWB trend implies that the fluctuations likely more often happen first in the inner disk region.

  15. Particle diffusion and localized acceleration in inhomogeneous AGN jets - II. Stochastic variation

    Chen, Xuhui; Pohl, Martin; Böttcher, Markus; Gao, Shan

    2016-05-01

    We study the stochastic variation of blazar emission under a 2D spatially resolved leptonic jet model we previously developed. Random events of particle acceleration and injection in small zones within the emission region are assumed to be responsible for flux variations. In addition to producing spectral energy distributions that describe the observed flux of Mrk 421, we further analyse the timing properties of the simulated light curves, such as the power spectral density (PSD) at different bands, flux-flux correlations, as well as the cross-correlation function between X-rays and TeV γ-rays. We find spectral breaks in the PSD at a time-scale comparable to the dominant characteristic time-scale in the system, which is usually the pre-defined decay time-scale of an acceleration event. Cooling imposes a delay, and so PSDs taken at lower energy bands in each emission component (synchrotron or inverse Compton) generally break at longer time-scales. The flux-flux correlation between X-rays and TeV γ-rays can be either quadratic or linear, depending on whether or not there are large variation of the injection into the particle acceleration process. When the relationship is quadratic, the TeV flares lag the X-ray flares, and the optical and GeV flares are large enough to be comparable to the ones in X-ray. When the relationship is linear, the lags are insignificant, and the optical and GeV flares are small.

  16. Venus mesosphere and thermosphere. II - Global circulation, temperature, and density variations

    Bougher, S. W.; Dickinson, R. E.; Ridley, E. C.; Roble, R. G.; Nagy, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    The Dickinson and Ridley (1977) symmetric, two-dimensional hydrodynamical model framework is presently used as the basis of a reexamination of the circulation and structure of the Venus thermosphere recently revealed by Pioneer Venus observations. The observed day-to-night variation of composition and temperatures can largely be derived by a wave-drag parameterization yielding a weaker circulation system than that predicted prior to Pioneer Venus. It is also suggested that eddy diffusion is a minor contributor to the maintenance of observed day and nightside densities, and that eddy coefficients are smaller than than those of one-dimensional composition models previously employed.

  17. Glimpses of stellar surfaces. II. Origins of the photometric modulations and timing variations of KOI-1452

    Ioannidis, P

    2016-01-01

    The deviations of the mid-transit times of an exoplanet from a linear ephemeris are usually the result of gravitational interactions with other bodies in the system. However, these types of transit timing variations (TTV) can also be introduced by the influences of star spots on the shape of the transit profile. Here we use the method of unsharp masking to investigate the photometric light curves of planets with ambiguous TTV to compare the features in their O - C diagram with the occurrence and in-transit positions of spot-crossing events. This method seems to be particularly useful for the examination of transit light curves with only small numbers of in-transit data points, i.e., the long cadence light curves from Kepler satellite. As a proof of concept we apply this method to the light curve and the estimated eclipse timing variations of the eclipsing binary KOI-1452, for which we prove their non-gravitational nature. Furthermore, we use the method to study the rotation properties of the primary star of t...

  18. Interpreting broad emission-line variations II: Tensions between luminosity, characteristic size and responsivity

    Goad, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the variability behaviour of the broad Hb emission-line to driving continuum variations in the best-studied AGN NGC 5548. For a particular choice of BLR geometry, Hb surface emissivity based on photoionization models, and using a scaled version of the 13 yr optical continuum light curve as a proxy for the driving ionizing continuum, we explore several key factors that determine the broad emission line luminosity L, characteristic size R(RW), and variability amplitude (i.e., responsivity) eta, as well as the interplay between them. For fixed boundary models which extend as far as the hot-dust the predicted delays for Hb are on average too long. However, the predicted variability amplitude of Hb provides a remarkably good match to observations except during low continuum states. We suggest that the continuum flux variations which drive the redistribution in Hb surface emissivity F(r) do not on their own lead to large enough changes in R(RW) or eta(eff). We thus investigate dust-bounded BLRs for w...

  19. Particle diffusion and localized acceleration in inhomogeneous AGN jets - Part II: stochastic variation

    Chen, Xuhui; Böttcher, Markus; Gao, Shan

    2016-01-01

    We study the stochastic variation of blazar emission under a 2-D spatially resolved leptonic jet model we previously developed. Random events of particle acceleration and injection in small zones within the emission region are assumed to be responsible for flux variations. In addition to producing spectral energy distributions that describe the observed flux of Mrk 421, we further analyze the timing properties of the simulated light curves, such as the power spectral density (PSD) at different bands, flux-flux correlations, as well as the cross-correlation function between X-rays and TeV {\\gamma}-rays. We find spectral breaks in the PSD at a timescale comparable to the dominant characteristic time scale in the system, which is usually the pre-defined decay time scale of an acceleration event. Cooling imposes a delay, and so PSDs taken at lower energy bands in each emission component (synchrotron or inverse Compton) generally break at longer timescales. The flux-flux correlation between X-rays and TeV {\\gamma}...

  20. Annual and semiannual variations in the ionospheric F2-layer: II. Physical discussion

    H. Rishbeth

    Full Text Available The companion paper by Zou et al. shows that the annual and semiannual variations in the peak F2-layer electron density (NmF2 at midlatitudes can be reproduced by a coupled thermosphere-ionosphere computational model (CTIP, without recourse to external influences such as the solar wind, or waves and tides originating in the lower atmosphere. The present work discusses the physics in greater detail. It shows that noon NmF2 is closely related to the ambient atomic/molecular concentration ratio, and suggests that the variations of NmF2 with geographic and magnetic longitude are largely due to the geometry of the auroral ovals. It also concludes that electric fields play no important part in the dynamics of the midlatitude thermosphere. Our modelling leads to the following picture of the global three-dimensional thermospheric circulation which, as envisaged by Duncan, is the key to explaining the F2-layer variations. At solstice, the almost continuous solar input at high summer latitudes drives a prevailing summer-to-winter wind, with upwelling at low latitudes and throughout most of the summer hemisphere, and a zone of downwelling in the winter hemisphere, just equatorward of the auroral oval. These motions affect thermospheric composition more than do the alternating day/night (up-and-down motions at equinox. As a result, the thermosphere as a whole is more molecular at solstice than at equinox. Taken in conjunction with the well-known relation of F2-layer electron density to the atomic/molecular ratio in the neutral air, this explains the F2-layer semiannual effect in NmF2 that prevails at low and middle latitudes. At higher midlatitudes, the seasonal behaviour depends on the geographic latitude of the winter downwelling zone, though the effect of the composition changes is modified by the large solar zenith angle at midwinter. The zenith angle effect is especially important in longitudes far from the magnetic

  1. Stochastic Variational Method as a Quantization Scheme II: Quantization of Electromagnetic Fields

    Kodama, T Koide T

    2014-01-01

    Quantization of electromagnetic fields is investigated in the framework of stochastic variational method (SVM). Differently from the canonical quantization, this method does not require canonical form and quantization can be performed directly from the gauge invariant Lagrangian. The gauge condition is used to choose dynamically independent variables. We verify that, in the Coulomb gauge condition, SVM result is completely equivalent to the traditional result. On the other hand, in the Lorentz gauge condition, SVM quantization can be performed without introducing the indefinite metric. The temporal and longitudinal components of the gauge filed, then, behave as c-number functionals affected by quantum fluctuation through the interaction with charged matter fields. To see further the relation between SVM and the canonical quantization, we quantize the usual gauge Lagrangian with the Fermi term and argue a stochastic process with a negative second order correlation is introduced to reproduce the indefinite metr...

  2. Variational Bayes and a problem of reliable communication: II. Infinite systems

    We consider a family of estimation problems not admitting conventional analysis because of singularity and measurability issues. We define posterior distributions for the family by a variational technique analogous to that used to define Gibbs measures in statistical mechanics. The family of estimation problems, which arise in the asymptotic analysis of error-control codes, is parametrized by a code rate, R∈(0,∞); this is shown to be analogous to the absolute temperature of statistical mechanics. The family undergoes an (Ehrenfest) first-order phase transition at a critical code rate C (the channel capacity), where there is a convex set of posterior distributions. At all other code rates, there is only one posterior distribution; if R C it has infinite support. In a result reflecting the Dobrushin construction, we show that these posterior distributions are asymptotically consistent with those of families of finite-sequence error-control codes. (paper)

  3. Interpreting broad emission-line variations - II. Tensions between luminosity, characteristic size, and responsivity

    Goad, M. R.; Korista, K. T.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the variability behaviour of the broad H β emission-line to driving continuum variations in the best-studied AGN NGC 5548. For a particular choice of broad emission-line region (BLR) geometry, H β surface emissivity based on photoionization models, and using a scaled version of the 13-yr optical continuum light-curve as a proxy for the driving ionizing continuum, we explore several key factors that determine the broad emission-line luminosity L, characteristic size RRW, and variability amplitude (i.e. responsivity) η, as well as the interplay between them. For fixed boundary models which extend as far as the hot dust the predicted delays for H β are on average too long. However, the predicted variability amplitude of H β provides a remarkably good match to observations except during low-continuum states. We suggest that the continuum flux variations which drive the redistribution in H β surface emissivity F(r) do not on their own lead to large enough changes in RRW or ηeff. We thus investigate dust-bounded BLRs for which the location of the effective outer boundary is modulated by the continuum level and the dust-sublimation and dust-condensation time-scales. We find that in order to match the observed variability amplitude of broad H β in NGC 5548 a rather static outer boundary is preferred. Intriguingly, we show that the most effective way of reducing the H β delay, while preserving its responsivity and equivalent width, is to invoke a smaller value in the incident ionizing photon flux ΦH for a given ionizing source-cloud radial distance r, than is normally inferred from the observed UV continuum flux and typical models of the continuum spectral energy distribution.

  4. Insulin-like signaling (IIS) responses to temperature, genetic background, and growth variation in garter snakes with divergent life histories.

    Reding, Dawn M; Addis, Elizabeth A; Palacios, Maria G; Schwartz, Tonia S; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2016-07-01

    The insulin/insulin-like signaling pathway (IIS) has been shown to mediate life history trade-offs in mammalian model organisms, but the function of this pathway in wild and non-mammalian organisms is understudied. Populations of western terrestrial garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans) around Eagle Lake, California, have evolved variation in growth and maturation rates, mortality senescence rates, and annual reproductive output that partition into two ecotypes: "fast-living" and "slow-living". Thus, genes associated with the IIS network are good candidates for investigating the mechanisms underlying ecological divergence in this system. We reared neonates from each ecotype for 1.5years under two thermal treatments. We then used qPCR to compare mRNA expression levels in three tissue types (brain, liver, skeletal muscle) for four genes (igf1, igf2, igf1r, igf2r), and we used radioimmunoassay to measure plasma IGF-1 and IGF-2 protein levels. Our results show that, in contrast to most mammalian model systems, igf2 mRNA and protein levels exceed those of igf1 and suggest an important role for igf2 in postnatal growth in reptiles. Thermal rearing treatment and recent growth had greater impacts on IGF levels than genetic background (i.e., ecotype), and the two ecotypes responded similarly. This suggests that observed ecotypic differences in field measures of IGFs may more strongly reflect plastic responses in different environments than evolutionary divergence. Future analyses of additional components of the IIS pathway and sequence divergence between the ecotypes will further illuminate how environmental and genetic factors influence the endocrine system and its role in mediating life history trade-offs. PMID:27181752

  5. A new comprehensive set of elemental abundances in DLAs - II. Data analysis and chemical variation studies

    Dessauges-Zavadsky, M; D'Odorico, S; Calura, F; Matteucci, F

    2005-01-01

    We present new elemental abundance studies of seven damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs). Together with the four DLAs analyzed in Dessauges-Zavadsky et al. (2004), we have a sample of eleven DLA galaxies with uniquely comprehensive and homogeneous abundance measurements. These observations allow one to study the abundance patterns of 22 elements and the chemical variations in the interstellar medium of galaxies outside the Local Group. Comparing the gas-phase abundance ratios of these high redshift galaxies, we found that they show low RMS dispersions, reaching only up 2-3 times the statistical errors for the majority of elements. This uniformity is remarkable given that the quasar sightlines cross gaseous regions with HI column densities spanning over one order of magnitude and metallicities ranging from 1/55 to 1/5 solar. The gas-phase abundance patterns of interstellar medium clouds within the DLA galaxies detected along the velocity profiles show, on the other hand, a high dispersion in several abundance rat...

  6. The Massive Star Population in M101. II. Spatial Variations in the Recent Star Formation History

    Grammer, Skyler

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the star formation history (SFH) as a function of radius in M101 using archival HST/ACS photometry. We derive the SFH from the resolved stellar populations in five 2' wide annuli. Binning the SFH into time frames corresponding to stellar populations traced by H$\\alpha$, far ultraviolet (FUV), and near ultraviolet (NUV) emission, we find that the fraction of stellar populations young enough to contribute in H$\\alpha$ is 15%-35% in the inner regions, compared to less than 5% in the outer regions. This provides a sufficient explanation for the lack of H$\\alpha$ emission at large radii. We also model the blue to red supergiant ratio in our five annuli, examine the effects that a metallicity gradient and variable SFH have on the predicted ratios, and compare to the observed values. We find that the radial behavior of our modeled blue to red supergiant ratios is highly sensitive to both spatial variations in the SFH and metallicity. Incorporating the derived SFH into modeled ratios, we find that we a...

  7. The massive star population in M101. II. Spatial variations in the recent star formation history

    We investigate star formation history (SFH) as a function of radius in M101 using archival Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys photometry. We derive the SFH from the resolved stellar populations in five 2' wide annuli. Binning the SFH into time frames corresponding to stellar populations traced by Hα, far-ultraviolet, and near-ultraviolet emission, we find that the fraction of stellar populations young enough to contribute in Hα is 15%-35% in the inner regions, compared to less than 5% in the outer regions. This provides a sufficient explanation for the lack of Hα emission at large radii. We also model the blue to red supergiant ratio in our five annuli, examine the effects that a metallicity gradient and variable SFH have on the predicted ratios, and compare to the observed values. We find that the radial behavior of our modeled blue to red supergiant ratios is highly sensitive to both spatial variations in the SFH and metallicity. Incorporating the derived SFH into modeled ratios, we find that we are able to reproduce the observed values at large radii (low metallicity), but at small radii (high metallicity) the modeled and observed ratios are discrepant.

  8. Anthocyanins and Their Variation in Red Wines II. Anthocyanin Derived Pigments and Their Color Evolution

    Chang-Qing Duan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Originating in the grapes, anthocyanins and their derivatives are the crucial pigments responsible for the red wine color. During wine maturation and aging, the concentration of monomeric anthocyanins declines constantly, while numerous more complex and stable anthocyanin derived pigments are formed, mainly including pyranoanthocyanins, polymeric anthocyanins produced from condensation between anthocyanin and/or flavan-3-ols directly or mediated by aldehydes. Correspondingly, their structural modifications result in a characteristic variation of color, from purple-red color in young red wines to brick-red hue of the aged. Because of the extreme complexity of chemical compounds involved, many investigations have been made using model solutions of know composition rather than wine. Thus, there is a large amount of research still required to obtain an overall perspective of the anthocyanin composition and its change with time in red wines. Future findings may well greatly revise our current interpretation of the color in red wines. This paper summarizes the most recent advances in the studies of the anthocyanins derived pigments in red wines, as well as their color evolution.

  9. The variation in molecular gas depletion time: II the impact of galaxy internal structures

    Huang, Mei-Ling

    2014-01-01

    We use a data set of nearby galaxies drawn from the HERACLES, ATLAS3D, and COLD GASS surveys to study variations in molecular gas depletion time (Tdep) in galaxy structures such as bulges, grand-design spiral arms, bars and rings. Molecular gas is traced by CO line emission and star formation rate (SFR) is derived using the combination of far-ultraviolet and mid-infrared (MIR) data. The contribution of old stars to MIR emission for the ATLAS3D sample is corrected using 2MASS K-band images. We apply a two-dimensional image decomposition algorithm to decompose galaxies into bulges and discs. Spiral arms, bars and rings are identified in the residual maps, and molecular gas depletion times are derived on a square grid of 1 kpc^2 size. In previous work, we showed that Tdep correlates strongly with specific star formation rate (sSFR). We now find that at a given sSFR, the bulge has shorter Tdep than the disc. The shift to shorter depletion times is most pronounced in the inner bulge (R < 0.1Re). Grids from gala...

  10. Calcite and dolomite in intrusive carbonatites. II. Trace-element variations

    Chakhmouradian, Anton R.; Reguir, Ekaterina P.; Couëslan, Christopher; Yang, Panseok

    2016-04-01

    The composition of calcite and dolomite from several carbonatite complexes (including a large set of petrographically diverse samples from the Aley complex in Canada) was studied by electron-microprobe analysis and laser-ablation inductively-coupled-plasma mass-spectrometry to identify the extent of substitution of rare-earth and other trace elements in these minerals and the effects of different igneous and postmagmatic processes on their composition. Analysis of the newly acquired and published data shows that the contents of rare-earth elements (REE) and certain REE ratios in magmatic calcite and dolomite are controlled by crystal fractionation of fluorapatite, monazite and, possibly, other minerals. Enrichment in REE observed in some samples (up to ~2000 ppm in calcite) cannot be accounted for by coupled substitutions involving Na, P or As. At Aley, the REE abundances and chondrite-normalized (La/Yb)cn ratios in carbonates decrease with progressive fractionation. Sequestration of heavy REE from carbonatitic magma by calcic garnet may be responsible for a steeply sloping "exponential" pattern and lowered Ce/Ce* ratios of calcite from Magnet Cove (USA) and other localities. Alternatively, the low levels of Ce and Mn in these samples could result from preferential removal of these elements by Ce4+- and Mn3+-bearing minerals (such as cerianite and spinels) at increasing f(O2) in the magma. The distribution of large-ion lithophile elements (LILE = Sr, Ba and Pb) in rock-forming carbonates also shows trends indicative of crystal fractionation effects (e.g., concomitant depletion in Ba + Pb at Aley, or Sr + Ba at Kerimasi), although the phases responsible for these variations cannot be identified unambiguously at present. Overall, element ratios sensitive to the redox state of the magma and its complexing characteristics (Eu/Eu*, Ce/Ce* and Y/Ho) are least variable and in both primary calcite and dolomite, approach the average chondritic values. In consanguineous

  11. Circadian variation in serum free and total insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-II in untreated and treated acromegaly and growth hormone deficiency

    Skjaerbaek, Christian; Frystyk, Jan; Kaal, Andreas; Laursen, Torben; Møller, Jens; Weeke, Jørgen; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Ørskov, Hans

    2000-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE: It is generally accepted that there is no clinically significant circadian variation in total insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I or total IGF-II in healthy subjects. In contrast there is a significant nocturnal decrease in free IGF-I in healthy subjects, corresponding to the...... nocturnal increase in IGF binding protein-1. In this study we have investigated the circadian variation in circulating free IGF-I and IGF-II in patients with acromegaly and patients with adult onset growth hormone deficiency. PATIENTS: Seven acromegalic patients were studied with and without treatment with...... a slow-release formulation of octreotide. Seven GH-deficient patients were studied without GH replacement. In addition 5 of the GH-deficient patients were studied during GH replacement. DESIGN: Serum samples were obtained every hour for 24 h. Free IGF-I and IGF-II were measured every 2nd hour. Total...

  12. Mesoporous MCM-41 embeded with Ru(II)-based chemosensor: Preparation, characterization, and emission variation towards pH

    Jingxia, Wang, E-mail: wangjx279@163.com

    2014-07-01

    In this article, a pH sensing mesoporous MCM-41 material containing covalently bonded Ru(II) complex in the silicate network was prepared and named as Ru–MCM-41. The emission signal shows a tendency to decrease upon increasing pH values. The luminescent pH sensor can be explained by the protonation and deprotonation of the PIP ligand (PIP=2-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) and the fact that the mesoporousity of the MCM-41 matrix favors the –OH that diffused to the complex, resulting in quick emission quenching. It also shows a slight sensitivity towards dissolved molecular oxygen and varying temperatures, which, however, may not be too troublesome for actual applications. The sensing mechanism is also investigated. - Highlights: • An Ru complex was covalently grafted in mesoporous silicate network. • The emission signal decreased with increasing pH values. • The protonation and deprotonation of the ligand caused emission variation. • The emission was insensitive towards oxygen and temperature.

  13. Mesoporous MCM-41 embeded with Ru(II)-based chemosensor: Preparation, characterization, and emission variation towards pH

    In this article, a pH sensing mesoporous MCM-41 material containing covalently bonded Ru(II) complex in the silicate network was prepared and named as Ru–MCM-41. The emission signal shows a tendency to decrease upon increasing pH values. The luminescent pH sensor can be explained by the protonation and deprotonation of the PIP ligand (PIP=2-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) and the fact that the mesoporousity of the MCM-41 matrix favors the –OH that diffused to the complex, resulting in quick emission quenching. It also shows a slight sensitivity towards dissolved molecular oxygen and varying temperatures, which, however, may not be too troublesome for actual applications. The sensing mechanism is also investigated. - Highlights: • An Ru complex was covalently grafted in mesoporous silicate network. • The emission signal decreased with increasing pH values. • The protonation and deprotonation of the ligand caused emission variation. • The emission was insensitive towards oxygen and temperature

  14. A variational justification of the assumed natural strain formulation of finite elements. I - Variational principles. II - The C(0) four-node plate element

    Militello, Carmelo; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1990-01-01

    The assumed natural strain formulation of finite elements is interpreted from a variational standpoint. The approach is based on hybrid extensions of the Reissner-type functional which uses the strains and displacements as independent fields. Consideration is restricted to linear elasticity. The four-node C(0) plate-bending quadrilateral is used as a specific example to illustrate the application of the present interpretation. A key finding is that any change in the strain-displacement interpolation from the variationally consistent interpolation must be associated in some way to the addition of incompatible displacement modes.

  15. Evolution Inclusions and Variation Inequalities for Earth Data Processing II Differential-operator Inclusions and Evolution Variation Inequalities for Earth Data Processing

    Zgurovsky, Mikhail Z; Kasyanov, Pavlo O

    2011-01-01

    Here, the authors present modern mathematical methods to solve problems of differential-operator inclusions and evolution variation inequalities which may occur in fields such as geophysics, aerohydrodynamics, or fluid dynamics. For the first time, they describe the detailed generalization of various approaches to the analysis of fundamentally nonlinear models and provide a toolbox of mathematical equations. These new mathematical methods can be applied to a broad spectrum of problems. Examples of these are phase changes, diffusion of electromagnetic, acoustic, vibro-, hydro- and seismoacousti

  16. The Local Effects of Cosmological Variations in Physical 'Constants' and Scalar Fields II. Quasi-Spherical Spacetimes

    Shaw, D J; Barrow, John D.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the conditions under which cosmological variations in physical `constants' and scalar fields are detectable on the surface of local gravitationally-bound systems, such as planets, in non-spherically symmetric background spacetimes. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to deal with the large range of length scales that appear in the problem. We derive a sufficient condition for the local time variation of the scalar fields driving variations in 'constants' to track their large-scale cosmological variation and show that this is consistent with our earlier conjecture derived from the spherically symmetric problem. We perform our analysis with spacetime backgrounds that are of Szekeres-Szafron type. They are approximately Schwarzschild in some locality and free of gravitational waves everywhere. At large distances, we assume that the spacetime matches smoothly onto a Friedmann background universe. We conclude that, independent of the details of the scalar-field theory describing the ...

  17. Neutron-rich In and Cd isotopes close to the doubly-magic $^{132}Sn$

    Scherillo, A.; Genevey, J.; Pinston, J.A.; Covello, A; Faust, H.; Gargano, A.; R. Orlandi; Simpson, G.S.; Tsekhanovich, I.

    2005-01-01

    Microsecond isomers in the In and Cd isotopes, in the mass range A = 123 to 130, were investigated at the ILL reactor, Grenoble, using the LOHENGRIN mass spectrometer, through thermal-neutron induced fission reactions of Pu targets. The level schemes of the odd-mass $^{123-129}$In are reported. A shell-model study of the heaviest In and Cd nuclei was performed using a realistic interaction derived from the CD-Bonn nucleon-nucleon potential

  18. Isomer Spectroscopy and Shell Structure around Doubly-Magic 132Sn

    Isomeric decays in the heavy even-even Cd isotopes populated in the fragmentation of 136Xe as well as projectile fission of 238U have been studied within the RISING project at GSI. The new experimental results suggest an energy of 1325 keV for the first excited 2+ state in semi-magic 130Cd and confirm the previously established positions of this state in 126Cd and 128Cd (652 keV resp. 645 keV). The origin of the unexpectedly low 2+ excitation energies in the N = 78, 80 isotopes has been investigated in detail performing modern beyond mean field calculations employing the Gogny force. (author)

  19. Transport of radioactive ion beams and related safety issues: The 132Sn+ case study

    The transport of intense radioactive ion beam currents requires a careful design in order to limit the beam losses, the contamination and thus the dose rates. Some investigations based on numerical models and calculations have been performed in the framework of the SPIRAL 2 project to evaluate the performance of a low energy beam transport line located between the isotope separation on line (ISOL) production cell and the experiment areas. The paper presents the results of the transverse phase-space analysis, the beam losses assessment, the resulting contamination, and radioactivity levels. They show that reasonable beam transmission, emittance growth, and dose rates can be achieved considering the current standards

  20. The magic nature of 132Sn explored through the single-particle states of 133Sn

    Jones, K.L.; Adekola, A. S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; K.Y. Chae; Chipps, K.A.; Cizewski, J. A.; Erikson, L.; Harlin, C.; Hatarik, R.; Kapler, R.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J. F.; Livesay, R.; Ma, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Atomic nuclei have a shell structure where nuclei with 'magic numbers' of neutrons and protons are analogous to the noble gases in atomic physics. Only ten nuclei with the standard magic numbers of both neutrons and protons have so far been observed. The nuclear shell model is founded on the precept that neutrons and protons can move as independent particles in orbitals with discrete quantum numbers, subject to a mean field generated by all the other nucleons. Knowledge of the properties of s...

  1. Isomer and beta decay spectroscopy in the 132Sn region with EURICA

    The first EURICA campaign with high intensity Uranium beams took place at RIKEN in November/December 2012. Within this campaign experiment NP1112- RIBF85 was performed dedicated to the study of the isomeric and beta decays of neutron-rich Cd, In, Sn and Sb isotopes towards and beyond the N=82 neutron shell closure. In this contribution we present a first status report of the analysis of the extensive data set obtained in this experiment. Delayed γ rays were observed in coincidence with 136,138Sn and these constitute the first observation of the decay of excited states in these very neutron-rich, semi-magic nuclei. We found that the energies of the 2+, 4+ and 6+ levels remain fairly constant as the number of neutrons increases from N=84 to N=88. This agrees with the predictions of shell-model calculations performed using state-of-the-art interactions. In contrast calculations performed using empirical interactions (SMPN) deviate from the experimental data, despite the simple nature of these nuclei

  2. Genetic Variation at Exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB Locus in Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) from the Gulf of California.

    Moreno-Santillán, Diana D; Lacey, Eileen A; Gendron, Diane; Ortega, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) play an important role in the vertebrate immune response and are among the most polymorphic genes known in vertebrates. In some marine mammals, MHC genes have been shown to be characterized by low levels of polymorphism compared to terrestrial taxa; this reduction in variation is often explained as a result of lower pathogen pressures in marine habitats. To determine if this same reduction in variation applies to the migratory population of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) that occurs in the Gulf of California, we genotyped a 172 bp fragment of exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB locus for 80 members of this population. Twenty-two putatively functional DQB allotypes were identified, all of which were homologous with DQB sequences from other cetacean species. Up to 5 putative alleles per individual were identified, suggesting that gene duplication has occurred at this locus. Rates of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions (ω) and maximum likelihood analyses of models of nucleotide variation provided potential evidence of ongoing positive selection at this exon. Phylogenetic analyses of DQB alleles from B. musculus and 16 other species of cetaceans revealed trans-specific conservation of MHC variants, suggesting that selection has acted on this locus over prolonged periods of time. Collectively our findings reveal that immunogenic variation in blue whales is comparable to that in terrestrial mammals, thereby providing no evidence that marine taxa are subject to reduced pathogen-induced selective pressures. PMID:26761201

  3. Genetic Variation at Exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB Locus in Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus from the Gulf of California.

    Diana D Moreno-Santillán

    Full Text Available The genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC play an important role in the vertebrate immune response and are among the most polymorphic genes known in vertebrates. In some marine mammals, MHC genes have been shown to be characterized by low levels of polymorphism compared to terrestrial taxa; this reduction in variation is often explained as a result of lower pathogen pressures in marine habitats. To determine if this same reduction in variation applies to the migratory population of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus that occurs in the Gulf of California, we genotyped a 172 bp fragment of exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB locus for 80 members of this population. Twenty-two putatively functional DQB allotypes were identified, all of which were homologous with DQB sequences from other cetacean species. Up to 5 putative alleles per individual were identified, suggesting that gene duplication has occurred at this locus. Rates of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions (ω and maximum likelihood analyses of models of nucleotide variation provided potential evidence of ongoing positive selection at this exon. Phylogenetic analyses of DQB alleles from B. musculus and 16 other species of cetaceans revealed trans-specific conservation of MHC variants, suggesting that selection has acted on this locus over prolonged periods of time. Collectively our findings reveal that immunogenic variation in blue whales is comparable to that in terrestrial mammals, thereby providing no evidence that marine taxa are subject to reduced pathogen-induced selective pressures.

  4. Conformational variation of surface class II MHC proteins during myeloid dendritic cell differentiation accompanies structural changes in lysosomal MIIC

    Potolicchio, I.; Chitta, S.; Xu, X.; Fonseca, D.; Crisi, G.; Hořejší, Václav; Strominger, J. L.; Stern, L. J.; Raposo, G.; Santambrogio, L.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 175, č. 8 (2005), s. 4935-4947. ISSN 0022-1767 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : MHC II * HLA-DR * dendritic cell Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 6.387, year: 2005

  5. Recruitment of PfSET2 by RNA polymerase II to variant antigen encoding loci contributes to antigenic variation in P. falciparum.

    Uchechi E Ukaegbu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications are important regulators of gene expression in all eukaryotes. In Plasmodium falciparum, these epigenetic marks regulate expression of genes involved in several aspects of host-parasite interactions, including antigenic variation. While the identities and genomic positions of many histone modifications have now been cataloged, how they are targeted to defined genomic regions remains poorly understood. For example, how variant antigen encoding loci (var are targeted for deposition of unique histone marks is a mystery that continues to perplex the field. Here we describe the recruitment of an ortholog of the histone modifier SET2 to var genes through direct interactions with the C-terminal domain (CTD of RNA polymerase II. In higher eukaryotes, SET2 is a histone methyltransferase recruited by RNA pol II during mRNA transcription; however, the ortholog in P. falciparum (PfSET2 has an atypical architecture and its role in regulating transcription is unknown. Here we show that PfSET2 binds to the unphosphorylated form of the CTD, a property inconsistent with its recruitment during mRNA synthesis. Further, we show that H3K36me3, the epigenetic mark deposited by PfSET2, is enriched at both active and silent var gene loci, providing additional evidence that its recruitment is not associated with mRNA production. Over-expression of a dominant negative form of PfSET2 designed to disrupt binding to RNA pol II induced rapid var gene expression switching, confirming both the importance of PfSET2 in var gene regulation and a role for RNA pol II in its recruitment. RNA pol II is known to transcribe non-coding RNAs from both active and silent var genes, providing a possible mechanism by which it could recruit PfSET2 to var loci. This work unifies previous reports of histone modifications, the production of ncRNAs, and the promoter activity of var introns into a mechanism that contributes to antigenic variation by malaria parasites.

  6. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  7. Path optimization by a variational reaction coordinate method. II. Improved computational efficiency through internal coordinates and surface interpolation

    Birkholz, Adam B.; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    Reaction path optimization is being used more frequently as an alternative to the standard practice of locating a transition state and following the path downhill. The Variational Reaction Coordinate (VRC) method was proposed as an alternative to chain-of-states methods like nudged elastic band and string method. The VRC method represents the path using a linear expansion of continuous basis functions, allowing the path to be optimized variationally by updating the expansion coefficients to minimize the line integral of the potential energy gradient norm, referred to as the Variational Reaction Energy (VRE) of the path. When constraints are used to control the spacing of basis functions and to couple the minimization of the VRE with the optimization of one or more individual points along the path (representing transition states and intermediates), an approximate path as well as the converged geometries of transition states and intermediates along the path are determined in only a few iterations. This algorithmic efficiency comes at a high per-iteration cost due to numerical integration of the VRE derivatives. In the present work, methods for incorporating redundant internal coordinates and potential energy surface interpolation into the VRC method are described. With these methods, the per-iteration cost, in terms of the number of potential energy surface evaluations, of the VRC method is reduced while the high algorithmic efficiency is maintained.

  8. Path optimization by a variational reaction coordinate method. II. Improved computational efficiency through internal coordinates and surface interpolation.

    Birkholz, Adam B; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2016-05-14

    Reaction path optimization is being used more frequently as an alternative to the standard practice of locating a transition state and following the path downhill. The Variational Reaction Coordinate (VRC) method was proposed as an alternative to chain-of-states methods like nudged elastic band and string method. The VRC method represents the path using a linear expansion of continuous basis functions, allowing the path to be optimized variationally by updating the expansion coefficients to minimize the line integral of the potential energy gradient norm, referred to as the Variational Reaction Energy (VRE) of the path. When constraints are used to control the spacing of basis functions and to couple the minimization of the VRE with the optimization of one or more individual points along the path (representing transition states and intermediates), an approximate path as well as the converged geometries of transition states and intermediates along the path are determined in only a few iterations. This algorithmic efficiency comes at a high per-iteration cost due to numerical integration of the VRE derivatives. In the present work, methods for incorporating redundant internal coordinates and potential energy surface interpolation into the VRC method are described. With these methods, the per-iteration cost, in terms of the number of potential energy surface evaluations, of the VRC method is reduced while the high algorithmic efficiency is maintained. PMID:27179465

  9. Spatiotemporal Spectral Variations of AOT in India’s EEZ over Arabian Sea: Validation of OCM-II

    C. P. Simha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of sun-photometric measurements of Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT in India’s Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ over the Arabian Sea along with synchronous Ocean Color Monitor (OCM-II derived AOT estimates during December 12, 2009–January 10, 2010. Relatively higher values of Angstrom exponent (α around 1.2 near coast and 0.2–0.8 in the India’s EEZ, observed during the cruise period, indicate the presence of smaller particles near the coast due to anthropogenic activities; and larger particles in the India’s EEZ due to advection of pollutants from Indian subcontinent via long-range transport. Results related to α and its derivative reveal four different aerosol types (urban-industrial, desert-dust, clean-marine, and mixed-type with varying fraction during the study period. Surface radiative forcing due to aerosols is found to be 20 W/m2 over India’s EEZ. OCM-derived AOTs showed good corroboration with in situ measurements with a correlation coefficient of about 0.95. A reasonably good correlation was also observed between AOT and wind speed (R = 0.6; AOT and relative humidity (R = 0.58. The concurrent MODIS AOT data also agree well with those observed by the OCEANSAT (OCM-II satellite during the campaign period.

  10. Characteristics of annual laminae gray level variations in a stalagmite from Shihua Cave, Beijing and its climatic significance (II)

    2000-01-01

    The annual laminae gray level variations in the stalagmite TS9501 of Shihua Cave, Beijing are studied in detail. The environmental factors influencing the laminae gray level are also analyzed. The following conditions may be necessary to the study on the lamina gray level. A) The seasonal differences of climate in the studied area are strong. B) The cave has a rapid and simple hydrological connection with the surface, such that the gray level variation is great; therefore, climatic changes can be more clearly recorded in a stalagmite. C) No water from other sources due to lateral flow adds to the seepage over the cave. D) There are more organic impurities than inorganic ones, whose content changes distinctly with time in the sample. By comparison with the modern instrumental climate records, it was found that the gray level of laminae is mainly related to the air temperature, especially the summer mean temperature. Therefore, the gray level can be used as a proxy of the air temperature. The variation of the lamina gray level also represents the oscillation of Indian summer monsoon as identified in the modern climate records. The variability of the temperature in Beijing area over the last 1 ka is reconstructed. The results show that there are several cold periods corresponding to historical records. An important phenomenon is noticed that the climatic pattern before about 1400AD is different from that after about 1400AD. In Beijing area, before about 1400AD, low amplitude and high frequency temperature oscillations dominated the signal. The climate pattern is warm-dry and cold-wet. After about 1400AD, both the temperature and rainfall varied synchronously, temperature oscillated strongly and the Little Ice Age occurred. The climate pattern is cold-dry and warm-wet. This transition of the climate pattern is also observed in other worldwide paleoclimatic records, demonstrating that there was a global climate event at about 1400AD.

  11. Computerized system to measure interproximal alveolar bone levels in epidemiologic, radiographic investigations. II. Intra- and inter-examinar variation study

    Wouters, F.R.; Frithiof, L.; Soeder, P.Oe.; Hellden, L.; Lavstedt, S.; Salonen, L.

    1988-01-01

    The study was aimed at analyzing intra- and inter-examiner variations in computerized measurement and in non-measurability of alveolar bone level in a cross-sectional, epidemiologic material. At each interproximal tooth surface, alveolar bone height in percentage of root length (B/R) and tooth length (B/T) were determined twice by one examiner and once by a second examiner from X5-magnified periapical radiographs. The overall intra- and inter-examiner variations in measurement were 2.85% and 3.84% of root length and 1.97% and 2.82% of tooth length, respectively. The varations were different for different tooth groups and for different degrees of severity of marginal periodontitis. The overall proportions on non-measurable tooth surfaces varied with examiner from 32% to 39% and from 43% to 48% of the available interproximal tooth surfaces for B/R and B/T, respectively. With regard to the level of reliability, the computerized method reported is appropriate to cross-sectional, epidemiologic investigations from radiographs.

  12. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATION OF NEAR-RESONANCE PLANETARY PAIRS. II. CONFIRMATION OF 30 PLANETS IN 15 MULTIPLE-PLANET SYSTEMS

    Following on from Paper I in this series, I report the confirmation of a further 30 planets in 15 multiple-planet systems via transit timing variations (TTVs), using the publicly available Kepler light curves (Q0-Q16). All 15 pairs are near first-order mean motion resonances, showing sinusoidal TTVs consistent with theoretically predicted periods, which demonstrate they are orbiting and interacting in the same systems. Although individual masses cannot be accurately extracted based only on TTVs (because of the well known degeneracy between mass and eccentricity), the measured TTV phases and amplitudes can still place relatively tight constraints on their mass ratios and upper limits on their masses, which confirm their planetary nature. Some of these systems (KOI-274, KOI-285, KOI-370, and KOI-2672) are relatively bright and thus suitable for further follow-up observations

  13. Variational formulation of oscillating fluid clusters and oscillator-like classification. II. Numerical study of pinned liquid clusters

    Kurzeja, Patrick S.; Steeb, Holger

    2014-04-01

    A numerical study of pinned, oscillating water clusters is presented. Two main models represent a liquid bridge between the walls of two particles and a water column enclosed in a slender pore channel, respectively. Variations include material properties (density, viscosity, surface tension, contact angle) and geometric properties (volume, slenderness, winding, interfacial areas). They are initially based on water clusters in 1 mm pore-space, which are weakly damped at eigenfrequencies around a few hundred Hz. Stiffness and damping are characterized by eigenfrequency and damping coefficient of an equivalent 1-dim. harmonic-oscillator model. Finally, frequency dependence of the dynamical properties is demonstrated. The comprehensive quantitative analysis extends and explains relationships between geometric and material properties and the response to harmonic stimulation. Furthermore, interpolation functions of characteristic dynamic properties are provided for use in multiphase theories. The frequency dependence of cluster stiffness and damping was proven and of limited influence on the stimulation of two typical, weakly damped liquid clusters.

  14. Assembly of 4-, 6- and 8-connected Cd(II) pseudo-polymorphic coordination polymers: Synthesis, solvent-dependent structural variation and properties

    Li, Zhao-Hao; Xue, Li-Ping; Miao, Shao-Bin; Zhao, Bang-Tun

    2016-08-01

    The reaction of Cd(NO3)2·4H2O, 2,5-thiophenedicarboxylic acid (H2tdc) and 1,2-bis(imidazol-1‧-yl)methane (bimm) by modulating solvent systems yielded three highly connected pseudo-polymorphic coordination polymers based on different dinuclear [Cd2(CO2)2] subunits bridged by carboxylate groups. Single crystal structural analyses reveal structural variation from 4-connected 2D sql layer, 6-connected 2-fold interpenetrated 3D pcu to 8-connected 3D bcu-type network in compounds 1-3. The structural dissimilarity in the structures dependent on the coordination environments of Cd(II) ions and linking modes of mixed ligand influenced by different solvent systems during the synthesis process. Moreover, thermogravimetric and photoluminescence behaviors of 1-3 were also investigated for the first time, and all the complexes emit blue luminescence in the solid state.

  15. Association of variations in HLA class II and other loci with susceptibility to EGFR-mutated lung adenocarcinoma.

    Shiraishi, Kouya; Okada, Yukinori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Momozawa, Yukihide; Ashikawa, Kyota; Kunitoh, Hideo; Matsumoto, Shingo; Takano, Atsushi; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Goto, Akiteru; Tsuta, Koji; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Ohe, Yuichiro; Watanabe, Yukio; Goto, Yasushi; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Furuta, Koh; Yoshida, Akihiko; Goto, Koichi; Hishida, Tomoyuki; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Miyagi, Yohei; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Kazumi; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Ohtaki, Yoichi; Maeda, Daichi; Imai, Kazuhiro; Minamiya, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Saito, Akira; Shimada, Yoko; Sunami, Kuniko; Saito, Motonobu; Inazawa, Johji; Nakamura, Yusuke; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Yokota, Jun; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Matsuo, Keitaro; Daigo, Yataro; Kubo, Michiaki; Kohno, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma driven by somatic EGFR mutations is more prevalent in East Asians (30-50%) than in European/Americans (10-20%). Here we investigate genetic factors underlying the risk of this disease by conducting a genome-wide association study, followed by two validation studies, in 3,173 Japanese patients with EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma and 15,158 controls. Four loci, 5p15.33 (TERT), 6p21.3 (BTNL2), 3q28 (TP63) and 17q24.2 (BPTF), previously shown to be strongly associated with overall lung adenocarcinoma risk in East Asians, were re-discovered as loci associated with a higher susceptibility to EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, two additional loci, HLA class II at 6p21.32 (rs2179920; P =5.1 × 10(-17), per-allele OR=1.36) and 6p21.1 (FOXP4) (rs2495239; P=3.9 × 10(-9), per-allele OR=1.19) were newly identified as loci associated with EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma. This study indicates that multiple genetic factors underlie the risk of lung adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations. PMID:27501781

  16. Changes in variation at the MHC class II DQA locus during the final demise of the woolly mammoth.

    Pečnerová, Patrícia; Díez-Del-Molino, David; Vartanyan, Sergey; Dalén, Love

    2016-01-01

    According to the nearly-neutral theory of evolution, the relative strengths of selection and drift shift in favour of drift at small population sizes. Numerous studies have analysed the effect of bottlenecks and small population sizes on genetic diversity in the MHC, which plays a central role in pathogen recognition and immune defense and is thus considered a model example for the study of adaptive evolution. However, to understand changes in genetic diversity at loci under selection, it is necessary to compare the genetic diversity of a population before and after the bottleneck. In this study, we analyse three fragments of the MHC DQA gene in woolly mammoth samples radiocarbon dated to before and after a well-documented bottleneck that took place about ten thousand years ago. Our results indicate a decrease in observed heterozygosity and number of alleles, suggesting that genetic drift had an impact on the variation on MHC. Based on coalescent simulations, we found no evidence of balancing selection maintaining MHC diversity during the Holocene. However, strong trans-species polymorphism among mammoths and elephants points to historical effects of balancing selection on the woolly mammoth lineage. PMID:27143688

  17. Changes in variation at the MHC class II DQA locus during the final demise of the woolly mammoth

    Pečnerová, Patrícia; Díez-Del-Molino, David; Vartanyan, Sergey; Dalén, Love

    2016-05-01

    According to the nearly-neutral theory of evolution, the relative strengths of selection and drift shift in favour of drift at small population sizes. Numerous studies have analysed the effect of bottlenecks and small population sizes on genetic diversity in the MHC, which plays a central role in pathogen recognition and immune defense and is thus considered a model example for the study of adaptive evolution. However, to understand changes in genetic diversity at loci under selection, it is necessary to compare the genetic diversity of a population before and after the bottleneck. In this study, we analyse three fragments of the MHC DQA gene in woolly mammoth samples radiocarbon dated to before and after a well-documented bottleneck that took place about ten thousand years ago. Our results indicate a decrease in observed heterozygosity and number of alleles, suggesting that genetic drift had an impact on the variation on MHC. Based on coalescent simulations, we found no evidence of balancing selection maintaining MHC diversity during the Holocene. However, strong trans-species polymorphism among mammoths and elephants points to historical effects of balancing selection on the woolly mammoth lineage.

  18. Survey of Period Variations of Superhumps in SU UMa-Type Dwarf Novae. II: The Second Year (2009-2010)

    Kato, Taichi; Uemura, Makoto; Henden, Arne; de Miguel, Enrique; Miller, Ian; Dubovsky, Pavol A; Kudzej, Igor; Kiyota, Seiichiro; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Tanabe, Kenji; Imamura, Kazuyoshi; Kunitomi, Nanae; Takagi, Ryosuke; Nose, Mikiha; Akazawa, Hidehiko; Masi, Gianluca; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Iino, Eriko; Noguchi, Ryo; Matsumoto, Katsura; Fujii, Daichi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ogura, Kazuyuki; Ohtomo, Sachi; Yamashita, Kousei; Yanagisawa, Hirofumi; Itoh, Hiroshi; Bolt, Greg; Monard, Berto; Ohshima, Tomohito; Shears, Jeremy; Ruiz, Javier; Imada, Akira; Oksanen, Arto; Nelson, Peter; Gomez, Tomas L; Staels, Bart; Boyd, David; Voloshina, Irina B; Krajci, Thomas; Crawford, Tim; Stockdale, Chris; Richmond, Michael; Morelle, Etienne; Novak, Rudolf; Nogami, Daisaku; Ishioka, Ryoko; Brady, Steve; Simonsen, Mike; Pavlenko, Elena P; Kuramoto, Tetsuya; Miyashita, Atsushi; Pickard, Roger D; Hynek, Tomas; Dvorak, Shawn; Stubbings, Rod; Muyllaert, Eddy

    2010-01-01

    As an extension of the project in Kato et al. (2009, arXiv:0905.1757), we collected times of superhump maxima for 61 SU UMa-type dwarf novae mainly observed during the 2009-2010 season. The newly obtained data confirmed the basic findings reported in Kato et al. (2009): the presence of stages A-C, as well as the predominance of positive period derivatives during stage B in systems with superhump periods shorter than 0.07 d. There was a systematic difference in period derivatives for systems with superhump periods longer than 0.075 d between this study and Kato et al. (2009). We suggest that this difference is possibly caused by the relative lack of frequently outbursting SU UMa-type dwarf novae in this period regime in the present study. We recorded a strong beat phenomenon during the 2009 superoutburst of IY UMa. The close correlation between the beat period and superhump period suggests that the changing angular velocity of the apsidal motion of the elliptical disk is responsible for the variation of superh...

  19. Genetic drift vs. natural selection in a long-term small isolated population: major histocompatibility complex class II variation in the Gulf of California endemic porpoise (Phocoena sinus).

    Munguia-Vega, Adrian; Esquer-Garrigos, Yareli; Rojas-Bracho, Lorenzo; Vazquez-Juarez, Ricardo; Castro-Prieto, Aines; Flores-Ramirez, Sergio

    2007-10-01

    Although many studies confirm long-term small isolated populations (e.g. island endemics) commonly sustain low neutral genetic variation as a result of genetic drift, it is less clear how selection on adaptive or detrimental genes interplay with random forces. We investigated sequence variation at two major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II loci on a porpoise endemic to the upper Gulf of California, México (Phocoena sinus, or vaquita). Its unique declining population is estimated around 500 individuals. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis revealed one putative functional allele fixed at the locus DQB (n = 25). At the DRB locus, we found two presumed functional alleles (n = 29), differing by a single nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution that could increase the stability at the dimer interface of alphabeta-heterodimers on heterozygous individuals. Identical trans-specific DQB1 and DRB1 alleles were identified between P. sinus and its closest relative, the Burmeister's porpoise (Phocoena spinipinnis). Comparison with studies on four island endemic mammals suggests fixation of one allele, due to genetic drift, commonly occurs at the DQA or DQB loci (effectively neutral). Similarly, deleterious alleles of small effect are also effectively neutral and can become fixed; a high frequency of anatomical malformations on vaquita gave empirical support to this prediction. In contrast, retention of low but functional polymorphism at the DRB locus was consistent with higher selection intensity. These observations indicated natural selection could maintain (and likely also purge) some crucial alleles even in the face of strong and prolonged genetic drift and inbreeding, suggesting long-term small populations should display low inbreeding depression. Low levels of Mhc variation warn about a high susceptibility to novel pathogens and diseases in vaquita. PMID:17727623

  20. Variation of the pinning force with microstructure and with the Ginzburg-Landau parameter in Type II superconductors

    The variation of the pinning force with microstructure and with the Ginzburg-Landau parameter is studied for 53 vanadium and vanadium alloy specimens. Vanadium-carbide precipitates are used as pinning centers. The Ginzburg-Landau parameter is varied by alloying the vanadium with small quantities of gallium or niobium. Alloy compositions of V-0.20a/oGa, V-1.05a/oGa, V-2.96a/oGa, and V-4.01a/oNb are used. These yield a range of the Ginzburg-Landau parameter from less than 2 for the pure vanadium specimens, to more than 20 for the V-2.96a/oGa specimens. The pinning force is not described by a universal scaling law for all specimens. The pinning force for a specific reduced magnetic field is determined by the depinning mechanism active at that field. There are at least three depinning mechanisms. Two of these can be identified with the plastic-deformation mechanism and the line-pinning mechanism, which are predicted by Kramer. A previously unidentified depinning mechanism is the prevailing factor in specimens with large pinning centers. The empirical line-pinning force of the specimens varies with the individual precipitate volume cubed times the density of precipitates. The pinning force in the plastic-deformation region varies as the cube-root of the density of precipitates. A dependence on the Ginzburg-Landau parameter squared can be observed for the magnitude of the pinning force for most of the reduced field regions

  1. Benthic ecology of the northeastern Chukchi Sea. Part II. Spatial variation of megafaunal community structure, 2009-2010

    Blanchard, Arny L.; Parris, Carrie L.; Knowlton, Ann L.; Wade, Nicole R.

    2013-09-01

    Sources for spatial variability of benthic megafaunal communities in the northeastern Chukchi Sea are poorly documented and may include altered water circulation patterns, as noted for macrofauna. Spatial variability of megafauna was investigated by sampling with a plumb-staff beam trawl in three petroleum leases, the Klondike, Burger, and Statoil study areas, as part of a multi-disciplinary research program in the northeastern Chukchi Sea ecosystem. Trawling occurred during two sampling periods from 2009 and one in 2010 with a total of 81 trawls from 38 stations. A total of 99 discrete taxonomic categories were identified in 2009 and 2010 which were expanded to 239 taxa in the laboratory. Biomass in the three study areas ranged from ∼15,500 to ∼96,000 g 1000 m-2 and numerical density ranged from ∼8500 to ∼134,000 individuals 1000 m-2. Although the megabenthic species-assemblages in all three study areas were similar in composition, average biomass values were higher in Burger (ranging from ∼54,000 to ∼96,000 g 1000 m-2) where altered water circulation occurs, than in Klondike (ranging from ∼15,500 to ∼31,000 g 1000 m-2) or Statoil (∼15,000 g 1000 m-2). The brittle star Ophiura sarsi was the numerically dominant megafauna (70% of total biomass) followed by the snow crab Chionoecetes opilio (7% total biomass), as noted in prior investigations in the region. Biomass and density of benthic megafauna in this region reflected the high quantities of seasonal production reaching the benthos in the shallow waters of the Chukchi Sea. Differences in benthic communities among study areas were associated with variations in bottom-water temperature and latitude, and to a lesser extent, water depth and percent mud. We believe these associations arise from effects of topography on northward-flowing water, that create regions of slower currents, and consequently, higher organic deposition.

  2. Non-metric variation of the middle phalanges of the human toes (II-V): long/short types and their evolutionary significance.

    Le Minor, Jean-Marie; Mousson, Jean-François; de Mathelin, Pierre; Bierry, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    The human lateral toes are characterised by extreme reduction compared with other primates, and in particular other hominoids. Some phalangeal non-metric variants have been well identified in humans, in particular: triphalangeal/biphalangeal patterns, and the presence/absence of phalangeal secondary centres of ossification. The purpose of the present study was to describe and analyse an original non-metric variation of the middle phalanges of the lateral toes. The material consisted of 2541 foot radiographs that came from 2541 different European adult individuals. Two morphological types of the middle phalanx were defined as a simple binary trait: long type (L) and short type (S). In feet with a triphalangeal pattern in all lateral toes (1413 cases), a mediolateral increasing gradient was observed in the occurrence of type S: 8.1% in II; 30.7% in III; 68.4% in IV; and 99.1% in V. In feet with a biphalangeal pattern in one or more lateral toes (III-V; 1128 cases), type S occurred more frequently than in triphalangeal feet. Of the 30 theoretical arrangements of the L/S types in the lateral toes (II-V) in a complete foot, only 13 patterns were observed. Seven patterns represented 95.6% of the population: LLSS (20.9%), LLLS (17.1%), LSS (15.9%), SSS (14.5%), LSSS (12.7%), LLS (10.1%) and SSSS (4.4%). Type L can be interpreted as the primitive pattern (plesiomorphy), and type S as a derived pattern (apomorphy) that seems specific to the human species (i.e. autapomorphy). Within the specific evolution of the human foot in relation to the acquisition of constant erect posture and bipedalism, the short type of the middle phalanges can reasonably be considered as directly linked to the reduction of the lateral toes. PMID:27031825

  3. Natural variation for responsiveness to flg22, flgII-28, and csp22 and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in heirloom tomatoes.

    Selvakumar Veluchamy

    Full Text Available Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. is susceptible to many diseases including bacterial speck caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Bacterial speck disease is a serious problem worldwide in tomato production areas where moist conditions and cool temperatures occur. To enhance breeding of speck resistant fresh-market tomato cultivars we identified a race 0 field isolate, NC-C3, of P. s. pv. tomato in North Carolina and used it to screen a collection of heirloom tomato lines for speck resistance in the field. We observed statistically significant variation among the heirloom tomatoes for their response to P. s. pv. tomato NC-C3 with two lines showing resistance approaching a cultivar that expresses the Pto resistance gene, although none of the heirloom lines have Pto. Using an assay that measures microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, we investigated whether the heirloom lines showed differential responsiveness to three bacterial-derived peptide MAMPs: flg22 and flgII-28 (from flagellin and csp22 (from cold shock protein. Significant differences were observed for MAMP responsiveness among the lines, although these differences did not correlate strongly with resistance or susceptibility to bacterial speck disease. The identification of natural variation for MAMP responsiveness opens up the possibility of using a genetic approach to identify the underlying loci and to facilitate breeding of cultivars with enhanced disease resistance. Towards this goal, we discovered that responsiveness to csp22 segregates as a single locus in an F2 population of tomato.

  4. Salt-induced variation in some potential physiochemical attributes of two genetically diverse spring wheat (triticum aestivum L.) cultivars: photosynthesis and photosystem II efficiency

    Variation in salt tolerance potential of two contrasting wheat cultivars (salt tolerant S-24 and moderately salt sensitive MH-97) at different growth stages was observed when these wheat cultivars were exposed to salinity stress in hydroponic culture. Salinity caused a marked reduction in photosynthetic pigments, transpiration and photos synthetic rates, and stomatal conductance at early growth stages in both wheat cultivars, being more prominent in cv. MH-97. In addition, a marked salt-induced alteration was observed in different attributes of chlorophyll fluorescence. On the basis of physiological characterization of these two wheat cultivars at different growth stages, it was inferred that cv. S-24 exhibited higher salinity tolerance at all growth stages in terms of less salinity-induced degradation of photosynthetic pigments, higher photosynthetic rates, maintenance of photosystem II under salinity stress as compared to that in cv. MH-97. In view of the results presented here, it is evident that wheat plants were prone to adverse effects of salinity at early growth stages as compared to later growth stages. (author)

  5. Low Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Variation in the Endangered Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin (Sousa chinensis): Inferences About the Role of Balancing Selection.

    Zhang, Xiyang; Lin, Wenzhi; Zhou, Ruilian; Gui, Duan; Yu, Xinjian; Wu, Yuping

    2016-03-01

    It has been widely reported that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is under balancing selection due to its immune function across terrestrial and aquatic mammals. The comprehensive studies at MHC and other neutral loci could give us a synthetic evaluation about the major force determining genetic diversity of species. Previously, a low level of genetic diversity has been reported among the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) using both mitochondrial marker and microsatellite loci. Here, the expression and sequence polymorphism of 2 MHC class II genes (DQB and DRB) in 32 S. chinensis from PRE collected between 2003 and 2011 were investigated. High ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates, codon-based selection analysis, and trans-species polymorphism (TSP) support the hypothesis that balancing selection acted on S. chinensis MHC sequences. However, only 2 haplotypes were detected at either DQB or DRB loci. Moreover, the lack of deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg expectation at DRB locus combined with the relatively low heterozygosity at both DQB locus and microsatellite loci suggested that balancing selection might not be sufficient, which further suggested that genetic drift associated with historical bottlenecks was not mitigated by balancing selection in terms of the loss of MHC and neutral variation in S. chinensis. The combined results highlighted the importance of maintaining the genetic diversity of the endangered S. chinensis. PMID:26787544

  6. Nonchromophoric halide ligand variation in polyazine-bridged Ru(II),Rh(III) bimetallic supramolecules offering new insight into photocatalytic hydrogen production from water.

    Rogers, Hannah Mallalieu; White, Travis A; Stone, Brittany N; Arachchige, Shamindri M; Brewer, Karen J

    2015-04-01

    The new bimetallic complex [(Ph2phen)2Ru(dpp)RhBr2(Ph2phen)](PF6)3 (1) (Ph2phen = 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline; dpp = 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine) was synthesized and characterized to compare with the Cl(-) analogue [(Ph2phen)2Ru(dpp)RhCl2(Ph2phen)](PF6)3 (2) in an effort to better understand the role of halide coordination at the Rh metal center in solar H2 production schemes. Electrochemical properties of complex 1 display a reversible Ru(II/III) oxidation, and cathodic scans indicate multiple electrochemical mechanisms exist to reduce Rh(III) by two electrons to Rh(I) followed by a quasi-reversible dpp(0/-) ligand reduction. The weaker σ-donating ability of Br(-) vs Cl(-) impacts the cathodic electrochemistry and provides insight into photocatalytic function by these bimetallic supramolecules. Complexes 1 and 2 exhibit identical light-absorbing properties with UV absorption dominated by intraligand (IL) π → π* transitions and visible absorption by metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transitions to include a lowest energy Ru(dπ) → dpp(π*) (1)MLCT transition (λ(abs) = 514 nm; ε = 16 000 M(-1) cm(-1)). The relatively short-lived, weakly emissive Ru(dπ) → dpp(π*) (3)MLCT excited state (τ = 46 ns) for both bimetallic complexes is attributed to intramolecular electron transfer from the (3)MLCT excited state to populate a low-energy Ru(dπ) → Rh(dσ*) triplet metal-to-metal charge transfer ((3)MMCT) excited state that allows photoinitiated electron collection. Complex 1 outperforms the related Cl(-) bimetallic analogue 2 as a H2 photocatalyst despite identical light-absorbing and excited-state properties. Additional H2 experiments with added halide suggest ion pairing plays a role in catalyst deactivation and provides new insight into observed differences in H2 production upon halide variation in Ru(II),Rh(III) supramolecular architectures. PMID:25782053

  7. Comparative study cephalometric-radiographic of the cephalo-facio-dental patterns in patients who presented normal occlusion and class II, division 1 malocclusions, considering variations of the FMA angle

    The proposal of this job was to study cephalo-facio-dental patterns comparatively in patients who presented normal occlusion and Class II, division 1 malocclusions, considering variations of the FMA angle. The sample was composed of seventy-five telerradiographies on lateral pattern, obtained from Brazilian teenagers students of the ABC area (Santo Andre, Sao Bernardo do Campo and Sao Caetano do Sul), 'whites', who presented normal occlusion and Class II, division 1 malocclusions, without previous orthodontic treatment: their parents were Brazilian. (author)

  8. Geometrical Characteristics and Atomic Charge Variations of Pd(II) Complexes [Pd(L)Cl{sub 2}] with an Axial (Pd...O) Interaction

    Park, Jong Keun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yong Guk; Lee, Shim Sung; Kim, Bong Gon [Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-01-15

    Geometrical structures of [Pd(L)Cl{sub 2}] with oxathia macrocycles have been calculated using ab initio second order Moller-Plesset (MP2) and Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods with triple zeta plus polarization (TZP) basis set level. In optimized Pd(L)Cl{sub 2} complexes, Pd(II) locates at the center surrounded by a square planar array of two sulfurs on an oxathia macrocycle and two chlorides. The endo-Pd(II) complexes with an axial (Pd...O) interaction are more stable than the exo-Pd(II) complexes without the interaction. In the endo- Pd(II) complexes, the atomic charge of the oxygen atom moves to Pd(II) via the axial (Pd...O) interaction and then, the charge transfer from Pd(II) to the S-atoms occurs stepwise via {pi}-acceptors of the empty d-orbitals

  9. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Kokkola, Harri; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Gan; van Noije, Twan; Pringle, Kirsty J.; von Salzen, Knut; Schulz, Michael; Seland, Øyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2016-02-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3-UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. In HadGEM3-UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN > 3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e.g. CN > 100 nm) are controlled by the

  10. What Controls the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol? Relationships Between Process Sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and Inter-Model Variation from AeroCom Phase II

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3-UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. In HadGEM3-UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN >3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e.g. CN>100 nm) are controlled by the

  11. Asynchronous Variational Integrators

    Lew, A.; Marsden, J. E.; Ortiz, M.; West, M

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new class of asynchronous variational integrators (AVI) for nonlinear elastodynamics. The AVIs are distinguished by the following attributes: (i) The algorithms permit the selection of independent time steps in each element, and the local time steps need not bear an integral relation to each other; (ii) the algorithms derive from a spacetime form of a discrete version of Hamilton’s variational principle. As a consequence of this variational structure, the algorith...

  12. Effect of Particle-Core-Vibration Coupling Near the Double Closed $^{132}$Sn Nucleus from Precise Magnetic Moment Measurements

    Postma, H; Heyde, K; Walker, P; Grant, I; Veskovic, M; Stone, N; Stone, J

    2002-01-01

    % IS301 \\\\ \\\\ Low temperature nuclear orientation of isotope-separator implanted short-lived radioisotopes makes possible the measurements of nuclear magnetic dipole moments of oriented ground and excited states with half-lives longer than a few seconds. Coupling schemes characterizing the odd nucleons and ground-state deformations can be extracted from the nuclear moments. \\\\ We thus propose to measure the magnetic dipole moments of $^{127-133}$Sb to high precision using NMR/ON at the NICOLE facility. With (double magic +1) $^{133}$Sb as the reference, the main aim of this experiment is to examine whether the collective component in the 7/2$^+$ Sb ground state magnetic dipole moment varies as expected according to particle-core coupling calculations carried out for the Sb (Z=51) isotopes. Comparison of the 1-proton-particle excitations in Sb to 1-proton-hole states in In nuclei will shed light on differences between particle and hole excitations as understood within the present model. Comparison of r...

  13. Genetic Variation at Exon 2 of the MHC Class II DQB Locus in Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus) from the Gulf of California

    Moreno-Santillán, Diana D.; Eileen A Lacey; Gendron, Diane; Ortega, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) play an important role in the vertebrate immune response and are among the most polymorphic genes known in vertebrates. In some marine mammals, MHC genes have been shown to be characterized by low levels of polymorphism compared to terrestrial taxa; this reduction in variation is often explained as a result of lower pathogen pressures in marine habitats. To determine if this same reduction in variation applies to the migratory population...

  14. Syntheses, structural variations and fluorescence studies of two dinuclear zinc(II) complexes of a Schiff base ligand with an extended carboxylate side arm

    Shit, Shyamapada; Sasmal, Ashok; Dhal, Piu; Rizzoli, Corrado; Mitra, Samiran

    2016-03-01

    A potentially tetradentate Schiff base ligand containing carboxylic acid group, HL, (E)-2-((pyridin-2-yl)methyleneamino)-5-chlorobenzoic acid is synthesized and characterized. Reaction of HL with hydrated zinc(II) trichloroacetate and zinc(II) trifluoroacetate under similar reaction condition yields two discrete dinuclear complexes, [Zn(L)(Cl)]2 (1) and [Zn(L)(CF3COO)]2 (2) and characterized by different physicochemical methods. Single crystal X-ray structural characterization reveals different ligating properties of the coordinated anionic ligand (L-) in its zinc(II) complexes. The side arm carboxylate of L- shows μ1,3-carboxylato-bridging mode in 1 and connects zinc(II) atoms in syn-anti fashion while it exhibits a μ1,1-carboxylato-bridging mode in 2. The metal ions display distorted square pyramidal geometries in both the structures and associated with different degrees of distortions. The fluorescence spectra of HL and its zinc(II) complexes recorded in methanol at room temperature which reveal the enhancement of emission intensity for the complexes compared to that of the free ligand. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) reveal high thermal stabilities of the complexes.

  15. In Silico Prediction of Drug Dissolution and Absorption with variation in Intestinal pH for BCS Class II Weak Acid Drugs: Ibuprofen and Ketoprofen§

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Langguth, Peter; Garcia-Arieta, Alfredo; Amidon, Gordon L.

    2012-01-01

    The FDA Biopharmaceutical Classification System guidance allows waivers for in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for immediate-release solid oral dosage forms only for BCS class I. Extensions of the in vivo biowaiver for a number of drugs in BCS Class III and BCS class II have been proposed, particularly, BCS class II weak acids. However, a discrepancy between the in vivo- BE results and in vitro- dissolution results for a BCS class II acids was recently observed. The objectives of this study were to determine the oral absorption of BCS class II weak acids via simulation software and to determine if the in vitro dissolution test with various dissolution media could be sufficient for in vitro bioequivalence studies of ibuprofen and ketoprofen as models of carboxylic acid drugs. The oral absorption of these BCS class II acids from the gastrointestinal tract was predicted by GastroPlus™. Ibuprofen did not satisfy the bioequivalence criteria at lower settings of intestinal pH=6.0. Further the experimental dissolution of ibuprofen tablets in the low concentration phosphate buffer at pH 6.0 (the average buffer capacity 2.2 mmol L-1/pH) was dramatically reduced compared to the dissolution in SIF (the average buffer capacity 12.6 mmol L -1/pH). Thus these predictions for oral absorption of BCS class II acids indicate that the absorption patterns largely depend on the intestinal pH and buffer strength and must be carefully considered for a bioequivalence test. Simulation software may be very useful tool to aid the selection of dissolution media that may be useful in setting an in vitro bioequivalence dissolution standard. PMID:22815122

  16. In silico prediction of drug dissolution and absorption with variation in intestinal pH for BCS class II weak acid drugs: ibuprofen and ketoprofen.

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Langguth, Peter; Garcia-Arieta, Alfredo; Amidon, Gordon L

    2012-10-01

    The FDA Biopharmaceutical Classification System guidance allows waivers for in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence studies for immediate-release solid oral dosage forms only for BCS class I. Extensions of the in vivo biowaiver for a number of drugs in BCS class III and BCS class II have been proposed, in particular, BCS class II weak acids. However, a discrepancy between the in vivo BE results and in vitro dissolution results for BCS class II acids was recently observed. The objectives of this study were to determine the oral absorption of BCS class II weak acids via simulation software and to determine if the in vitro dissolution test with various dissolution media could be sufficient for in vitro bioequivalence studies of ibuprofen and ketoprofen as models of carboxylic acid drugs. The oral absorption of these BCS class II acids from the gastrointestinal tract was predicted by GastroPlus™. Ibuprofen did not satisfy the bioequivalence criteria at lower settings of intestinal pH of 6.0. Further the experimental dissolution of ibuprofen tablets in a low concentration phosphate buffer at pH 6.0 (the average buffer capacity 2.2 mmol l (-1) /pH) was dramatically reduced compared with the dissolution in SIF (the average buffer capacity 12.6 mmol l (-1) /pH). Thus these predictions for the oral absorption of BCS class II acids indicate that the absorption patterns depend largely on the intestinal pH and buffer strength and must be considered carefully for a bioequivalence test. Simulation software may be a very useful tool to aid the selection of dissolution media that may be useful in setting an in vitro bioequivalence dissolution standard. PMID:22815122

  17. Both qualitative and quantitative genetic variation of MHC class II molecules may influence susceptibility to autoimmune diseases: the case of endemic pemphigus foliaceus.

    Piovezan, Bruno Zagonel; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza

    2013-09-01

    The MHC class II transactivator (CIITA) is a key regulator in expression of the HLA class II genes. It is well known that HLA-DRB1 genotypes have a strong influence on the risk of multifactorial autoimmune diseases, but the effect of CIITA genotypes remains controversial. We tested in a case-control study whether CIITA polymorphisms influence the risk of developing endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF) and whether CIITA and HLA-DRB1 interact as regards susceptibility to the disease. The rs4774 SNP is not associated to EPF, while rs3087456 in the CIITA gene promoter is associated with susceptibility [odds ratio (OR) = 2.6, p EPF. PMID:23777927

  18. Temporal variation of the neutron flux in the carousel facility of the TRIGA Mark II reactor for different core set up

    In this work we focused on identifying quantitatively the effects on activation measurements due to temporal (time-dependent) variation of neutron flux. Irradiations in the carousel facility (CF) of TRIGA reactor at the Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI) for core No. 176 (April 2002) and current core No. 189, set up in June 2006, are discussed for illustrations. The measurements are based on neutron detectors (ionisation chambers), which surround the graphite reflector of the reactor core. In principle, the variations of the neutron flux produce a systematic error in the results obtained by absolute or 'quasi' absolute measuring techniques (such as neutron activation analysis (NAA) by the ko-standardization method), which assume constant conditions during irradiation. The results of our study show that for typical irradiation of 20 hours in channels of the CF aligned in the direction of the ionisation chamber (safety channel) the time-dependent variation of the neutron flux is about 6-8%. In the ko method, which we are using for routine work at the JSI, this variation introduced a systematic error in the results after long irradiation of 20 hours up to 5%, depending on the half-life of the investigated radionuclide

  19. Velocity resolved [C ii], [C i], and CO observations of the N159 star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud: a complex velocity structure and variation of the column densities

    Okada, Yoko; Requena-Torres, Miguel Angel; Güsten, Rolf; Stutzki, Jürgen; Wiesemeyer, Helmut; Pütz, Patrick; Ricken, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Context. The [C ii] 158 μm fine structure line is one of the dominant cooling lines in star-forming active regions. Together with models of photon-dominated regions, the data is used to constrain the physical properties of the emitting regions, such as the density and the radiation field strength. According to the modeling, the [C ii] 158 μm line integrated intensity compared to the CO emission is expected to be stronger in lower metallicity environments owing to lower dust shielding of the UV radiation, a trend that is also shown by spectral-unresolved observations. In the commonly assumed clumpy UV-penetrated cloud scenario, the models predict a [C ii] line profile similar to that of CO. However, recent spectral-resolved observations by Herschel/HIFI and SOFIA/GREAT (as well as the observations presented here) show that the velocity resolved line profile of the [C ii] emission is often very different from that of CO lines, indicating a more complex origin of the line emission including the dynamics of the source region. Aims: The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) provides an excellent opportunity to study in great detail the physics of the interstellar medium (ISM) in a low-metallicity environment by spatially resolving individual star-forming regions. The aim of our study is to investigate the physical properties of the star-forming ISM in the LMC by separating the origin of the emission lines spatially and spectrally. In this paper, we focus on the spectral characteristics and the origin of the emission lines, and the phases of carbon-bearing species in the N159 star-forming region in the LMC. Methods: We mapped a 4' × (3'-4') region in N159 in [C ii] 158 μm and [N ii] 205 μm with the GREAT instrument on board SOFIA. We also observed CO(3-2), (4-3), (6-5), 13CO(3-2), and [C i] 3P1-3P0 and 3P2-3P1 with APEX. All spectra are velocity resolved. Results: The emission of all transitions observed shows a large variation in the line profiles across the map and in

  20. 9/11, Act II: a fine-grained analysis of regional variations in traffic fatalities in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks.

    Gaissmaier, Wolfgang; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2012-12-01

    Terrorists can strike twice--first, by directly killing people, and second, through dangerous behaviors induced by fear in people's minds. Previous research identified a substantial increase in U.S. traffic fatalities subsequent to the September 11 terrorist attacks, which were accounted for as due to a substitution of driving for flying, induced by fear of dread risks. Here, we show that this increase in fatalities varied widely by region, a fact that was best explained by regional variations in increased driving. Two factors, in turn, explained these variations in increased driving. The weaker factor was proximity to New York City, where stress reactions to the attacks were previously shown to be greatest. The stronger factor was driving opportunity, which was operationalized both as number of highway miles and as number of car registrations per inhabitant. Thus, terrorists' second strike exploited both fear of dread risks and, paradoxically, an environmental structure conducive to generating increased driving, which ultimately increased fatalities. PMID:23160203

  1. Spatio-temporal Variations of Phytoplankton and Bio-optical Characteristics In Case Ii Waters: Example of The Eastern English Channel During Spring 2000

    Vantrepotte, V.; Brunet, C.; Mériaux, X.; Lécuyer, E.; Vellucci, V.

    In the aim to use remote sensing technique to estimate algal biomass concentrations in surface coastal waters, it is necessary to obtain in situ information on the mesoscale phytoplankton dynamics, as well as on bio-optical properties of water masses. This step is useful to regionally validate and interpret the satellite-derived data and for lo- cal primary production modelisation. Five mesoscale cruises (BiopTel cruises) were realized in the eastern English Channel between February and October 2000, in order to study phytoplankton dynamics and bio-optical characteristics, as well as the factors controlling their seasonal variations. From the measurements realized at two depths in the water column (phytoplankton pigments by HPLC, nutrient concentrations, phyto- plankton productivity by Phyto-Pam technique, yellow substance concentrations, phy- toplankton absorption spectrum), we can define several biological provinces and their temporal succession. Fv/Fm ratio and ETR measurements (as a proxy for primary productivity) show variations according to space (different ecosystems and coastal- offshore transects) and time (season) in relation with phytoplankton quantity and quality, light and nutrient availability. Significant mesoscale relationships are found between ETR and some hydrobiological parameters. Moreover, spatio-temporal vari- ations of IOPs are highlighted. Yellow substances present their higher concentrations near the Seine and the Somme estuaries, and follow a seasonal variation characterized by two phases. From winter to early spring, they decrease in relation with the decrease of rivers runoff and then they significantly increase from early spring to summer, in relation with the increase of water temperature. Phytoplankton absorption spectrum results show a high variability in space and time, and these results are discussed in relationship with phytoplankton community composition and physiological state. Re- gional relationships between bio

  2. Variational assimilation in combination with a regularization method for sea level pressure retrieval from QuikSCAT scatterometer data II: simulation experiment and actual case study

    The sea level pressure field can be computed from sea surface winds retrieved from satellite microwave scatterometer measurements, based on variational assimilation in combination with a regularization method given in part I of this paper. First, the validity of the new method is proved with a simulation experiment. Then, a new processing procedure for the sea level pressure retrieval is built by combining the geostrophic wind, which is computed from the scatterometer 10-meter wind using the University of Washington planetary boundary layer model using this method. Finally, the feasibility of the method is proved using an actual case study. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  3. Time series of high resolution photospheric spectra in a quiet region of the Sun. II. Analysis of the variation of physical quantities of granular structures

    Puschmann, K G; Vazquez, M; Bonet, J A; Hanslmeier, A; 10.1051/0004-6361:20047193

    2012-01-01

    From the inversion of a time series of high resolution slit spectrograms obtained from the quiet sun, the spatial and temporal distribution of the thermodynamical quantities and the vertical flow velocity is derived as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Spatial coherence and phase shift analyzes between temperature and vertical velocity depict the height variation of these physical quantities for structures of different size. An average granular cell model is presented, showing the granule-intergranular lane stratification of temperature, vertical velocity, gas pressure and density as a function of logarithmic optical depth and geometrical height. Studies of a specific small and a specific large granular cell complement these results. A strong decay of the temperature fluctuations with increasing height together with a less efficient penetration of smaller cells is revealed. The T -T coherence at all granular scales is broken already at log tau =-1 or z~170 km. At the layers beyon...

  4. On the Evidence for Cosmic Variation of the Fine Structure Constant (II): A Semi-Parametric Bayesian Model Selection Analysis of the Quasar Dataset

    Cameron, Ewan

    2013-01-01

    In the second paper of this series we extend our Bayesian reanalysis of the evidence for a cosmic variation of the fine structure constant to the semi-parametric modelling regime. By adopting a mixture of Dirichlet processes prior for the unexplained errors in each instrumental subgroup of the benchmark quasar dataset we go some way towards freeing our model selection procedure from the apparent subjectivity of a fixed distributional form. Despite the infinite-dimensional domain of the error hierarchy so constructed we are able to demonstrate a recursive scheme for marginal likelihood estimation with prior-sensitivity analysis directly analogous to that presented in Paper I, thereby allowing the robustness of our posterior Bayes factors to hyper-parameter choice and model specification to be readily verified. In the course of this work we elucidate various similarities between unexplained error problems in the seemingly disparate fields of astronomy and clinical meta-analysis, and we highlight a number of sop...

  5. Late Pleistocene variations in Antarctica sea ice. I - Effect of orbital isolation changes. II - Effect of interhemispheric deep-ocean heat exchange

    Crowley, Thomas J.; Parkinson, Claire L.

    1988-01-01

    A dynamic-thermodynamic sea-ice model is presently used to ascertain the effects of orbitally-induced insolation changes on Antarctic sea-ice cover; the results thus obtained are compared with modified CLIMAP reconstructions of sea-ice 18,000 years ago. The minor influence exerted by insolation on Pleistocene sea-ice distributions is attributable to a number of factors. In the second part of this investigation, variations in the production of warm North Atlantic Deep Water are proposed as a mechanism constituting the linkage between climate fluctuations in the Northern and Southern hemispheres during the Pleistocene; this hypothesis is tested by examining the sensitivity of the dynamic-thermodynamic model for Antarctic sea-ice changes in vertical ocean heat flux, and comparing the simulations with modified CLIMAP sea-ice maps for 18,000 years ago.

  6. Genetic variation of the MHC class II DRB genes in the Japanese weasel, Mustela itatsi, endemic to Japan, compared with the Siberian weasel, Mustela sibirica.

    Nishita, Y; Abramov, A V; Kosintsev, P A; Lin, L-K; Watanabe, S; Yamazaki, K; Kaneko, Y; Masuda, R

    2015-12-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode proteins that play a critical role in vertebrate immune system and are highly polymorphic. To further understand the molecular evolution of the MHC genes, we compared MHC class II DRB genes between the Japanese weasel (Mustela itatsi), a species endemic to Japan, and the Siberian weasel (Mustela sibirica), a closely related species on the continent. We sequenced a 242-bp region of DRB exon 2, which encodes antigen-binding sites (ABS), and found 24 alleles from 31 M. itatsi individuals and 17 alleles from 21 M. sibirica individuals, including broadly distributed, species-specific and/or geographically restricted alleles. Our results suggest that pathogen-driven balancing selection have acted to maintain the diversity in the DRB genes. For predicted ABS, nonsynonymous substitutions exceeded synonymous substitutions, also indicating positive selection, which was not seen at non-ABS. In a Bayesian phylogenetic tree, two M. sibirica DRB alleles were basal to the rest of the sequences from mustelid species and may represent ancestral alleles. Trans-species polymorphism was evident between many mustelid DRB alleles, especially between M. itatsi and M. sibirica. These two Mustela species divided about 1.7 million years ago, but still share many MHC alleles, indicative of their close phylogenetic relationship. PMID:26593752

  7. Evolution of long-lived globular cluster stars. II. Sodium abundance variations on the asymptotic giant branch as a function of globular cluster age and metallicity

    Charbonnel, Corinne; Chantereau, William

    2016-02-01

    evolution phases on the Na cut on the AGB: the higher the mass loss, the stronger the trends with age and metallicity. Conclusions: The theoretical trends we obtain provide, in principle, an elegant qualitative explanation to the different sodium spreads that are observed along the AGB in the Galactic globular clusters of different ages and [Fe/H] values. Although it is real, the slope with both age and metallicity is relatively flat, although it steepens when accounting for mass loss variations. Therefore, additional parameters may play a role in inducing cluster to cluster variations, that are difficult to disentangle from existing data.

  8. Dust and Gas in the Magellanic Clouds from the HERITAGE Herschel Key Project. II. Gas-to-Dust Ratio Variations across ISM Phases

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Meixner, Margaret; Bot, Caroline; Bolatto, Alberto D; Hughes, Annie; Wong, Tony; Babler, Brian; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Clayton, Geoffrey; Fukui, Yasuo; Galametz, Maud; Galliano, Frederic; Glover, Simon C O; Hony, Sacha; Israel, Frank; Jameson, Katherine; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Lee, Min-Young; Li, Aigen; Madden, Suzanne C; Misselt, Karl; Montiel, Edward; Okumura, K; Onishi, Toshikazu; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Reach, William; Remy-Ruyer, A; Robitaille, Thomas; Rubio, Monica; Sauvage, Marc; Seale, Jonathan; Sewilo, Marta; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Zhukovska, Svitlana

    2014-01-01

    The spatial variations of the gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) provide constraints on the chemical evolution and lifecycle of dust in galaxies. We examine the relation between dust and gas at 10-50 pc resolution in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) based on Herschel far-infrared (FIR), H I 21 cm, CO, and Halpha observations. In the diffuse atomic ISM, we derive the gas-to-dust ratio as the slope of the dust-gas relation and find gas-to-dust ratios of 380+250-130 in the LMC, and 1200+1600-420 in the SMC, not including helium. The atomic-to-molecular transition is located at dust surface densities of 0.05 Mo pc-2 in the LMC and 0.03 Mo pc-2 in the SMC, corresponding to AV ~ 0.4 and 0.2, respectively. We investigate the range of CO-to-H2 conversion factor to best account for all the molecular gas in the beam of the observations, and find upper limits on XCO to be 6x1020 cm-2 K-1 km-1 s in the LMC (Z=0.5Zo) at 15 pc resolution, and 4x 1021 cm-2 K-1 km-1 s in the SMC (Z=0.2Zo) at 45 pc resolution. In the ...

  9. Time variation of Kepler transits induced by stellar rotating spots - a way to distinguish between prograde and retrograde motion. II. Application to KOIs

    Holczer, Tomer; Mazeh, Tsevi; Fabrycky, Dan; Nachmani, Gil; McQuillan, Amy; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Orosz, Jerome A; Welsh, William F; Ford, Eric B; Jontof-Hutter, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Mazeh, Holczer, and Shporer (2015) have presented an approach that can, in principle, use the derived transit timing variation (TTV) of some transiting planets observed by the Kepler mission to distinguish between prograde and retrograde motion of their orbits with respect to the rotation of their parent stars. The approach utilizes TTVs induced by spot-crossing events that occur when the transiting planet moves across a spot on the stellar surface, by looking for a correlation between the derived TTVs and the stellar brightness derivatives at the corresponding transits, even in data that can not resolve the spot-crossing events themselves. We present here the application of this approach to the Kepler KOIs, identifying nine systems where the photometric spot modulation is large enough and the transit timing accurate enough to allow detection of a TTV-brightness-slope correlation. Excluding KOI-1546, which has been found recently to be a stellar binary, we are left with eight hot-Jupiter systems with high sen...

  10. De novo genetic variation revealed in somatic sectors of single Arabidopsis plants [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1ii

    Marianne T Hopkins

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Concern over the tremendous loss of genetic diversity among many of our most important crops has prompted major efforts to preserve seed stocks derived from cultivated species and their wild relatives. Arabidopsis thaliana propagates mainly by self-fertilizing, and therefore, like many crop plants, theoretically has a limited potential for producing genetically diverse offspring. Despite this, inbreeding has persisted in Arabidopsis for over a million years suggesting that some underlying adaptive mechanism buffers the deleterious consequences of this reproductive strategy. Using presence-absence molecular markers we demonstrate that single Arabidopsis plants can have multiple genotypes. Sequence analyses reveal single nucleotide changes, loss of sequences and, surprisingly, acquisition of unique genomic insertions. Estimates based on quantitative analyses suggest that these genetically discordant sectors are very small but can have a complex genetic makeup. In ruling out more trivial explanations for these data, our findings raise the possibility that intrinsic drivers of genetic variation are responsible for the targeted sequence changes we detect. Given the evolutionary advantage afforded to populations with greater genetic diversity, we hypothesize that organisms that primarily self-fertilize or propagate clonally counteract the genetic cost of such reproductive strategies by leveraging a cryptic reserve of extra-genomic information.

  11. Detection of genetic variation with radioactive ligands. II. Genetic variants of vitamin D-labeled group-specific component (Gc) proteins

    A novel technique for detecting electrophoretic and quantitative variants of group-specific component (Gc) proteins is described. The technique, in vitro labeling with radioactive vitamin D followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography (PAGE autoradiography), permits sensitive, high resolution detection of Gc variants by virtue of a physiologically significant property: the ability of Gc to bind vitamin D and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Using this procedure, anodal Gc variants, with mobility similar to Gc Aborigine and Gc Eskimo, were observed in Chinese, Japanese, African Pygmies, and American Blacks. The gene frequency of these variants ranges from 2.6% to 15%; they were not previously known to be polymorphic in these populations. In addition to qualitative variants, individual variation in Gc band density ratios is documented and discussed. These studies not only illustrate the utility of PAGE autoradiography in screening Gc, but also confirm that a major functional role of Gc in man and other animals is the transport of vitamin D and vitamin D metabolites

  12. DUST AND GAS IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS FROM THE HERITAGE HERSCHEL KEY PROJECT. II. GAS-TO-DUST RATIO VARIATIONS ACROSS INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM PHASES

    The spatial variations of the gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) provide constraints on the chemical evolution and lifecycle of dust in galaxies. We examine the relation between dust and gas at 10-50 pc resolution in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) based on Herschel far-infrared (FIR), H I 21 cm, CO, and Hα observations. In the diffuse atomic interstellar medium (ISM), we derive the GDR as the slope of the dust-gas relation and find GDRs of 380−130+250 ± 3 in the LMC, and 1200−420+1600 ± 120 in the SMC, not including helium. The atomic-to-molecular transition is located at dust surface densities of 0.05 M ☉ pc–2 in the LMC and 0.03 M ☉ pc–2 in the SMC, corresponding to A V ∼ 0.4 and 0.2, respectively. We investigate the range of CO-to-H2 conversion factor to best account for all the molecular gas in the beam of the observations, and find upper limits on X CO to be 6 × 1020 cm–2 K–1 km–1 s in the LMC (Z = 0.5 Z ☉) at 15 pc resolution, and 4 × 1021 cm–2 K–1 km–1 s in the SMC (Z = 0.2 Z ☉) at 45 pc resolution. In the LMC, the slope of the dust-gas relation in the dense ISM is lower than in the diffuse ISM by a factor ∼2, even after accounting for the effects of CO-dark H2 in the translucent envelopes of molecular clouds. Coagulation of dust grains and the subsequent dust emissivity increase in molecular clouds, and/or accretion of gas-phase metals onto dust grains, and the subsequent dust abundance (dust-to-gas ratio) increase in molecular clouds could explain the observations. In the SMC, variations in the dust-gas slope caused by coagulation or accretion are degenerate with the effects of CO-dark H2. Within the expected 5-20 times Galactic X CO range, the dust-gas slope can be either constant or decrease by a factor of several across ISM phases. Further modeling and observations are required to break the degeneracy between dust grain coagulation, accretion, and CO-dark H2. Our analysis demonstrates that

  13. DUST AND GAS IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS FROM THE HERITAGE HERSCHEL KEY PROJECT. II. GAS-TO-DUST RATIO VARIATIONS ACROSS INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM PHASES

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bot, Caroline [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Bolatto, Alberto; Jameson, Katherine [Department of Astronomy, Lab for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Hughes, Annie; Hony, Sacha [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Wong, Tony [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bernard, Jean-Philippe [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Clayton, Geoffrey C. [Louisiana State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 233-A Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Galametz, Maud [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Galliano, Frederic; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Lee, Min-Young [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Glover, Simon [Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Israel, Frank [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Li, Aigen, E-mail: duval@stsci.edu [314 Physics Building, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); and others

    2014-12-20

    The spatial variations of the gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) provide constraints on the chemical evolution and lifecycle of dust in galaxies. We examine the relation between dust and gas at 10-50 pc resolution in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) based on Herschel far-infrared (FIR), H I 21 cm, CO, and Hα observations. In the diffuse atomic interstellar medium (ISM), we derive the GDR as the slope of the dust-gas relation and find GDRs of 380{sub −130}{sup +250} ± 3 in the LMC, and 1200{sub −420}{sup +1600} ± 120 in the SMC, not including helium. The atomic-to-molecular transition is located at dust surface densities of 0.05 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2} in the LMC and 0.03 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2} in the SMC, corresponding to A {sub V} ∼ 0.4 and 0.2, respectively. We investigate the range of CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor to best account for all the molecular gas in the beam of the observations, and find upper limits on X {sub CO} to be 6 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2} K{sup –1} km{sup –1} s in the LMC (Z = 0.5 Z {sub ☉}) at 15 pc resolution, and 4 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2} K{sup –1} km{sup –1} s in the SMC (Z = 0.2 Z {sub ☉}) at 45 pc resolution. In the LMC, the slope of the dust-gas relation in the dense ISM is lower than in the diffuse ISM by a factor ∼2, even after accounting for the effects of CO-dark H{sub 2} in the translucent envelopes of molecular clouds. Coagulation of dust grains and the subsequent dust emissivity increase in molecular clouds, and/or accretion of gas-phase metals onto dust grains, and the subsequent dust abundance (dust-to-gas ratio) increase in molecular clouds could explain the observations. In the SMC, variations in the dust-gas slope caused by coagulation or accretion are degenerate with the effects of CO-dark H{sub 2}. Within the expected 5-20 times Galactic X {sub CO} range, the dust-gas slope can be either constant or decrease by a factor of several across ISM phases. Further modeling

  14. Extraction of weak PcP phases using the slant-stacklet transform - II: constraints on lateral variations of structure near the core-mantle boundary

    Ventosa, Sergi; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Resolving the topography of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and the structure and composition of the D″ region is key to improving our understanding of the interaction between the Earth's mantle and core. Observations of traveltimes and amplitudes of short-period teleseismic body waves sensitive to lowermost mantle provide essential constraints on the properties of this region. Major challenges are low signal-to-noise ratio of the target phases and interference with other mantle phases. In a previous paper (Part I), we introduced the slant-stacklet transform to enhance the signal of the core-reflected (PcP) phase and to isolate it from stronger signals in the coda of the P wave. Then we minimized a linear misfit between P and PcP waveforms to improve the quality of PcP-P traveltime difference measurements as compared to standard cross-correlation methods. This method significantly increases the quantity and the quality of PcP-P traveltime observations available for the modelling of structure near the CMB. Here we illustrate our approach in a series of regional studies of the CMB and D″ using PcP-P observations with unprecedented resolution from high-quality dense arrays located in North America and Japan for events with magnitude Mw>5.4 and distances up to 80°. In this process, we carefully analyse various sources of errors and show that mantle heterogeneity is the most significant. We find and correct bias due to mantle heterogeneities that is as large as 1 s in traveltime, comparable to the largest lateral PcP-P traveltime variations observed. We illustrate the importance of accurate mantle corrections and the need for higher resolution mantle models for future studies. After optimal mantle corrections, the main signal left is relatively long wavelength in the regions sampled, except at the border of the Pacific large-low shear velocity province (LLSVP). We detect the northwest border of the Pacific LLSVP in the western Pacific from array observations in

  15. Mediterranean sea level variations.

    Vigo, I.; Sánchez Reales, J. M.; García, D.; Chao, B. F.

    2009-04-01

    In this work we report an updated study of the sea level variations for the Mediterranean sea for the period from October 1992 to January 2008. The study addresses two mayor issues: (i)The analysis of the spatial and temporal variability of sea surface height (SSH) from radar altimetry measurements (from TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) + Jason-1, etc.). We use EOF analysis to explain most of its interannual variation, and how the different basins interact. (ii) The analysis of dynamics and balance of water mass transport for the whole period. We estimate the steric SSH by combining the steric SSH estimated from temperature and salt profiles simulated by the ECCO model with time-variable gravity (TVG) data (from GRACE) for the Mediterranean Sea. The estimated steric SSH together with the SSH obtained from altimetry allow for a more realistic estimation of the water mass variations in the Mediterranean for the whole period.

  16. Variational MCMC

    De Freitas, Nando; Hojen-Sorensen, Pedro; Jordan, Michael I.; Russell, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new class of learning algorithms that combines variational approximation and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation. Naive algorithms that use the variational approximation as proposal distribution can perform poorly because this approximation tends to underestimate the true variance and other features of the data. We solve this problem by introducing more sophisticated MCMC algorithms. One of these algorithms is a mixture of two MCMC kernels: a random walk Metropolis kernel ...

  17. Variational analysis

    Rockafellar, R Tyrrell

    1998-01-01

    From its origins in the minimization of integral functionals, the notion of 'variations' has evolved greatly in connection with applications in optimization, equilibrium, and control. It refers not only to constrained movement away from a point, but also to modes of perturbation and approximation that are best describable by 'set convergence', variational convergence of functions and the like. This book develops a unified framework and, in finite dimension, provides a detailed exposition of variational geometry and subdifferential calculus in their current forms beyond classical and convex analysis. Also covered are set-convergence, set-valued mappings, epi-convergence, duality, maximal monotone mappings, second-order subderivatives, measurable selections and normal integrands. The changes in this 3rd printing mainly concern various typographical corrections, and reference omissions that came to light in the previous printings. Many of these reached the authors' notice through their own re-reading, that of th...

  18. Variational principles

    Moiseiwitsch, B L

    2004-01-01

    This graduate-level text's primary objective is to demonstrate the expression of the equations of the various branches of mathematical physics in the succinct and elegant form of variational principles (and thereby illuminate their interrelationship). Its related intentions are to show how variational principles may be employed to determine the discrete eigenvalues for stationary state problems and to illustrate how to find the values of quantities (such as the phase shifts) that arise in the theory of scattering. Chapter-by-chapter treatment consists of analytical dynamics; optics, wave mecha

  19. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3–UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    Z. Kipling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors, we investigate the effects of individual processes in one particular model (HadGEM3–UKCA, and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global mean profile and zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. Convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulphate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter. The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea-salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number, while the profiles of larger particles are controlled by the same processes as the component mass profiles, plus the size

  20. Some Variational Principles for Coupled Thermoelasticity

    Francesco Marotti de Sciarra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear thermoelasticity of type II proposed by Green and Naghdi is considered. The thermoelastic structural model is formulated in a quasistatic range, and the related thermoelastic variational formulation in the complete set of state variables is recovered. Hence a consistent framework to derive all the variational formulations with different combinations of the state variables is provided, and a family of mixed variational formulations, with different combinations of state variables, is provided starting from the general variational formulation. A uniqueness condition is provided on the basis of a suitable variational formulation.

  1. Variational Inequalities in Critical-State Problems

    Prigozhin, Leonid

    2004-01-01

    Similar evolutionary variational inequalities appear as convenient formulations for continuous quasistationary models for sandpile growth, formation of a network of lakes and rivers, magnetization of type-II superconductors, and elastoplastic deformations. We outline the main steps of such models derivation and try to clarify the origin of this similarity. New dual variational formulations, analogous to mixed variational inequalities in plasticity, are derived for sandpiles and superconductors.

  2. About APPLE II Operation

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-01

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180° requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  3. About APPLE II Operation

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180 deg. requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented

  4. Formation of Mixed Ligand Complexes of Ni(II), Pd(II), and Pt(II)

    The stability constants of binary and ternary Ni(II), Pd(II), and Pt(II)complexes containing salicylidine-3-amino-1,2,4 triazole schiff base (L1) and a second ligand, cysteine (L2) in a 1:1:1 molar ratio were determined pH-metrically at different temperatures (25C, 30C, 35C, 40C) in 50% (v/v) aqueous EtOH at an ionic strength I=0.1M (NaCl). The stability constants of the mono and mixed ligand complexes of Ni(II), Pd(II), and Pt(II) have been evaluated. The difference in stability constants, M(Schiffbase) M logK logK-logK M M(Schiffbase)(Cys)M(Cys) is found to be positive, showing a cooperative behavior of the ligands. Thermodynamic parameters H and S are calculated for systems controlled by variation in temperatures. (author)

  5. Molecular indicators for palaeoenvironmental change in a Messinian evaporitic sequence (Vena del Gesso, Italy). II: High-resolution variations in abundances and 13C contents of free and sulphur-bound carbon skeletons in a single marl bed

    Kenig, F.; Damste, J. S.; Frewin, N. L.; Hayes, J. M.; De Leeuw, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    The extractable organic matter of 10 immature samples from a marl bed of one evaporitic cycle of the Vena del Gesso sediments (Gessoso-solfifera Fm., Messinian, Italy) was analyzed quantitatively for free hydrocarbons and organic sulphur compounds. Nickel boride was used as a desulphurizing agent to recover sulphur-bound lipids from the polar and asphaltene fractions. Carbon isotopic compositions (delta vs PDB) of free hydrocarbons and of S-bound hydrocarbons were also measured. Relationships between these carbon skeletons, precursor biolipids, and the organisms producing them could then be examined. Concentrations of S-bound lipids and free hydrocarbons and their delta values were plotted vs depth in the marl bed and the profiles were interpreted in terms of variations in source organisms, 13 C contents of the carbon source, and environmentally induced changes in isotopic fractionation. The overall range of delta values measured was 24.7%, from -11.6% for a component derived from green sulphur bacteria (Chlorobiaceae) to -36.3% for a lipid derived from purple sulphur bacteria (Chromatiaceae). Deconvolution of mixtures of components deriving from multiple sources (green and purple sulphur bacteria, coccolithophorids, microalgae and higher plants) was sometimes possible because both quantitative and isotopic data were available and because either the free or S-bound pool sometimes appeared to contain material from a single source. Several free n-alkanes and S-bound lipids appeared to be specific products of upper-water-column primary producers (i.e. algae and cyanobacteria). Others derived from anaerobic photoautotrophs and from heterotrophic protozoa (ciliates), which apparently fed partly on Chlorobiaceae. Four groups of n-alkanes produced by algae or cyanobacteria were also recognized based on systematic variations of abundance and isotopic composition with depth. For hydrocarbons probably derived from microalgae, isotopic variations are well correlated with

  6. Juno II

    1959-01-01

    The Juno II launch vehicle, shown here, was a modified Jupiter Intermediate-Range Ballistic missionile, developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the rocket team at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. Between December 1958 and April 1961, the Juno II launched space probes Pioneer III and IV, as well as Explorer satellites VII, VIII and XI.

  7. Variation in the Vitreous Phenotype of Stickler Syndrome Can Be Caused by Different Amino Acid Substitutions in the X Position of the Type II Collagen Gly-X-Y Triple Helix

    Richards, Allan J; Baguley, David M.; Yates, John R W; Lane, Carol; Nicol, Mary; Harper, Peter S; Scott, John D.; Snead, Martin P

    2000-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by arthropathy, midline clefting, hearing loss, midfacial hypoplasia, myopia, and retinal detachment. These features are highly variable both between and within families. Mutations causing the disorder have been found in the COL2A1 and COL11A1 genes. Premature termination codons in COL2A1 that result in haploinsufficiency of type II collagen are a common finding. These produce a characteristic congenital “membranous” anomaly o...

  8. Genetic variation in candidate obesity genes ADRB2, ADRB3, GHRL, HSD11B1, IRS1, IRS2, and SHC1 and risk for breast cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study II

    Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Teras, Lauren R.; Diver, W Ryan; Tang, Weining; Patel, Alpa V.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Calle, Eugenia E; Michael J Thun; Bouzyk, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Obesity has consistently been associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Proteins that are secreted by adipose tissue or are involved in regulating body mass may play a role in breast tumor development. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study among postmenopausal women from the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort to determine whether genes associated with obesity increase risk for breast cancer. Tagging single nucleotide polymorphi...

  9. Risk considerations for a long-term open-state of the radioactive waste storage facility Schacht Asse II. Variation of the parameter sets for radio-ecological modeling using the Monte Carlo method

    The risk considerations for a long-term open-state of the radioactive waste storage facility Schacht Asse II include the following issues: description of radio-ecological models for the radionuclide transport in the covering rock formations and determination of the radiation exposure, parameters of the radio-ecological and their variability, Monte-Carlo method application. The results of the modeling calculations include the group short-living radionuclides, long-living radionuclides, radionuclides in the frame of decay chains and sensitivity analyses with respect to the correlation of input data and results.

  10. Surface forcing of the infrared cooling profile over the Tibetan Plateau. I - Influence of relative longwave radiative heating at high altitude. II - Cooling-rate variation over large-scale plateau domain during summer monsoon transition

    Smith, Eric A.; Shi, Lei

    1992-01-01

    The role of the Tibetan Plateau on the behavior of the surface longwave radiation budget is investigated, and the behavior of the vertical profile of longwave cooling over the plateau, including its diurnal variation, is quantified. A medium spectral-resolution IR radiative transfer model utilizing a simple modification for applications in idealized complex (valley) terrain is developed for the investigation. An understanding of how surface and elevation biophysical factors, which are highly variable over the large-scale plateau domain, regulate the spatial distribution of clear-sky IR cooling during the transition phase of the summer monsoon, is described.

  11. LAMPF II

    We present a plan for two rapid-cycling synchrotrons - a 45 GeV, 40 μA proton synchrotron with a 9 GeV, 200 μA booster. These machines can provide simultaneously 45 GeV slow-extracted beam for the production of kaons, antiprotons, and other secondary particles, and 9 GeV fast-extracted beam for neutrino and pulsed muon physics. The LAMPF II machines are compared with existing and proposed kaon factories. Relative to the Brookhaven AGS as it exists today, LAMPF II will provide 90 times as many neutrino events per year and 300 times as many kaons per year. Some design features of the LAMPF II accelerators that are important for reducing beam losses and increasing beam availability are discussed. Because of the large rf power and voltage required, an innovative design of the ferrite-tuned cavities is necessary. A commercially available Mg-Mn ferrite with perpendicular bias has been shown to raise the available ferrite Q by more than a factor of 10 when compared with materials now in use at other accelerators. The 45 GeV LAMPF II synchrotron would produce far more neutrinos, kaons, and antiprotons per unit cost than an upgraded conventional machine. The LAMPF II booster by itself, which can provide 100 μA at 12 GeV, is a very interesting option at moderate cost. (orig.)

  12. Temporal and spatial variations in the Io torus

    Morgan, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of lines from both forbidden S II and forbidden O II in the Io torus taken on 15 nights spread over four months in 1981 are presented and discussed. An east-west asymmetry was observed in the optical emissions, showing larger western intensities and a more diffuse and radially extensive nebula to the east. Two configurations of forbidden S II longitudinal asymmetry were stable over at least four days. Longitudinal structure was not detected in either the forbidden O II intensity or the plasma density as measured by the forbidden O II and S II doublet ratios. A radial variation in the ratio of O II/S II was observed, with the ratio being largest near Io's orbit. Monthly variability was detected in both the intensity and density of the torus.

  13. LAMPF II

    We present a plan for a 45-GeV 40-μA proton synchrotron with a 200-μA 9-GeV booster. These machines can provide simultaneously 45-GeV slow-extracted beam for production of kaons, antiprotons, and other secondary particles, and 9-GeV fast-extracted beam for neutrino and pulsed muon physics. The LAMPF II machines are compared with existing and proposed kaon factories. Relative to the Brookhaven AGS as it exists today, LAMPF II will provide 90 times as many neutrino events per year and 300 times as many kaons per year. A number of experiments requiring vastly increased beam current are examined. Two programs, the search for quark-gluon plasma using high-energy antiproton annihilation in nuclei, and the measurement of nuclear quark structure functions using the Drell-Yan process, address the highest priority problems of the NSAC long-range plan. Some of the design features of the LAMPF II accelerators are shown to be important for reducing beam losses and increasing beam availability. Because of the large rf power and voltage required, innovation on ferrite-tuned cavities is required. A commercially available Mg-Mn ferrite with perpendicular bias has been shown to raise the available ferrite Q by more than a factor of 10 compared with the materials now in use at other accelerators. A preliminary cost estimate is discussed. The cost of the LAMPF II machine is compared with estimates of several other proposed machines made with the same set of costing algorithms. The 45-GeV LAMPF II proposal produces far more neutrinos, kaons, and antiprotons per unit cost than an upgraded conventional machine. The LAMPF II booster alone, which can provide 100 μA at 12 GeV, is shown to be a very interesting option at moderate cost

  14. Morfologia e funcionalidade do pneumócito tipo II e sua relação e variação com a idade gestacional em bovinos Morphology and functionality of the type II pneumocytes and their variation in relation to bovine gestational age

    Rita de Cássia Toquetti; Ricardo Romão Guerra; Carlos Eduardo Ambrosio; José Manoel Santos; Phelipe Oliveira Favaron; André Luiz Rezende Franciolli; Miryan Vilia Alberto; Flávio Vieira Meirelles; Maria Angelica Miglino

    2009-01-01

    Este estudo objetivou caracterizar a presença de pneumócitos tipo II e o início da produção de lipoproteína surfactante em bovinos, correlacionando a idade gestacional com a síntese de surfactante durante o desenvolvimento fetal. Pulmões de fetos com quatro meses de idade gestacional estavam na fase canalicular de desenvolvimento, sem a presença de pneumócitos tipo II ou bandas eletroforéticas compatíveis com a presença de proteínas surfactante. No 5° mês gestacional, os pulmões dos fetos...

  15. Morfologia e funcionalidade do pneumócito tipo II e sua relação e variação com a idade gestacional em bovinos Morphology and functionality of the type II pneumocytes and their variation in relation to bovine gestational age

    Rita de Cássia Toquetti

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetivou caracterizar a presença de pneumócitos tipo II e o início da produção de lipoproteína surfactante em bovinos, correlacionando a idade gestacional com a síntese de surfactante durante o desenvolvimento fetal. Pulmões de fetos com quatro meses de idade gestacional estavam na fase canalicular de desenvolvimento, sem a presença de pneumócitos tipo II ou bandas eletroforéticas compatíveis com a presença de proteínas surfactante. No 5° mês gestacional, os pulmões dos fetos encontravam-se em fase de saculação terminal, com a presença de alvéolos por epitélio cúbico, com áreas formadas por pneumócitos I e II. Nesse período ainda não foi possível identificar proteína surfactante nos pulmões. Esses órgãos em fetos com seis meses de idade gestacional estavam em fase de saco terminal, com presença de pneumócitos tipo I e II. Nessa fase a análise para determinação protéica do surfactante de feto bovino (SDS - PAGE demonstrou presença de bandas entre 26 e 36kDa, confirmando produção de SP - A, proteína surfactante encontrada em maior quantidade. A partir do 7° mês gestacional, a fase de saco terminal é mais evidente e complexa, com desenvolvimento de intensa vascularização. O pneumócito tipo I apresentava aspecto mais pavimentoso, e o tipo II apresentava aspecto mais globoso. Na análise SDS - PAGE do lavado bronco - alveolar, bandas de proteína surfactante com aspecto similar ao de animais recém-nascidos foram encontradas. Em recém-nascidos, pulmões na fase alveolar foram observados com pneumócitos tipo I e II característicos. O perfil das bandas do lavado bronco-alveolar dos recém-nascidos foi igual ao de animais adultos. Esses achados sugerem que um animal nascido precocemente, a partir dos sete meses de gestação, teria sua sobrevivência garantida devido a uma possível funcionalidade do sistema respiratório do feto, pois o pulmão possuiria as características necess

  16. Reduced dimension rovibrational variational calculations of the S{sub 1} state of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. II. The S{sub 1} rovibrational manifold and the effects of isomerization

    Changala, P. Bryan, E-mail: bryan.changala@colorado.edu; Baraban, Joshua H.; Field, Robert W. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Stanton, John F. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Merer, Anthony J. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan and Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2014-01-14

    Reduced dimension variational calculations have been performed for the rovibrational level structure of the S{sub 1} state of acetylene. The state exhibits an unusually complicated level structure, for various reasons. First, the potential energy surface has two accessible conformers, trans and cis. The cis conformer lies about 2700 cm{sup −1} above the trans, and the barrier to cis-trans isomerization lies about 5000 cm{sup −1} above the trans minimum. The trans vibrations ν{sub 4} (torsion) and ν{sub 6} (asym. bend) interact very strongly by Darling-Dennison and Coriolis resonances, such that their combination levels and overtones form polyads with unexpected structures. Both conformers exhibit very large x{sub 36} cross-anharmonicity since the pathway to isomerization is a combination of ν{sub 6} and ν{sub 3} (sym. bend). Near the isomerization barrier, the vibrational levels show an even-odd K-staggering of their rotational levels as a result of quantum mechanical tunneling through the barrier. The present calculations address all of these complications, and reproduce the observed K-structures of the bending and C–C stretching levels with good qualitative accuracy. It is expected that they will assist with the assignment of the irregular patterns near the isomerization barrier.

  17. Calculus of variations

    Elsgolc, L E; Stark, M

    1961-01-01

    Calculus of Variations aims to provide an understanding of the basic notions and standard methods of the calculus of variations, including the direct methods of solution of the variational problems. The wide variety of applications of variational methods to different fields of mechanics and technology has made it essential for engineers to learn the fundamentals of the calculus of variations. The book begins with a discussion of the method of variation in problems with fixed boundaries. Subsequent chapters cover variational problems with movable boundaries and some other problems; sufficiency

  18. Necessary optimality conditions for the calculus of variations on time scales

    Ferreira, Rui A. C.; Torres, Delfim F. M.

    2007-01-01

    We study more general variational problems on time scales. Previous results are generalized by proving necessary optimality conditions for (i) variational problems involving delta derivatives of more than the first order, and (ii) problems of the calculus of variations with delta-differential side conditions (Lagrange problem of the calculus of variations on time scales).

  19. PORT II

    Muniz, Beau

    2009-01-01

    One unique project that the Prototype lab worked on was PORT I (Post-landing Orion Recovery Test). PORT is designed to test and develop the system and components needed to recover the Orion capsule once it splashes down in the ocean. PORT II is designated as a follow up to PORT I that will utilize a mock up pressure vessel that is spatially compar able to the final Orion capsule.

  20. Probing Outflows in z= 1~2 Galaxies through FeII/FeII* Multiplets

    Tang, Yuping; Guo, Yicheng; Kurk, Jaron

    2014-01-01

    We report on a study of the 2300-2600\\AA FeII/FeII* multiplets in the rest-UV spectra of star-forming galaxies at 1.01.5 \\AA and of the FeII* emission lines to W_r>0.5 \\AA. Whenever we can measure the systemic redshift of the galaxies from the [OII] emission line, we find that both the FeII and MgII absorption lines are blueshifted, indicative that both species trace gaseous outflows. We also find, however, that the FeII gas has generally lower outflow velocity relative to that of MgII. We investigate the variation of FeII line profiles as a function of the radiative transfer properties of the lines, and find that transitions with higher oscillator strengths are more blueshifted in terms of both line centroids and line wings. We discuss the possibility that FeII lines are suppressed by stellar absorptions. The lower velocities of the FeII lines relative to the MgII doublet, as well as the absence of spatially extended FeII* emission in 2D stacked spectra, suggest that most clouds responsible for the FeII abso...

  1. Studying Variation in Tunes

    Janssen, B.; van Kranenburg, P.

    2014-01-01

    Variation in music can be caused by different phenomena: conscious, creative manipulation of musical ideas; but also unconscious variation during music recall. It is the latter phenomenon that we wish to study: variation which occurs in oral transmission, in which a melody is taught without the help

  2. Group II Intron Self-Splicing.

    Pyle, Anna Marie

    2016-07-01

    Group II introns are large, autocatalytic ribozymes that catalyze RNA splicing and retrotransposition. Splicing by group II introns plays a major role in the metabolism of plants, fungi, and yeast and contributes to genetic variation in many bacteria. Group II introns have played a major role in genome evolution, as they are likely progenitors of spliceosomal introns, retroelements, and other machinery that controls genetic variation and stability. The structure and catalytic mechanism of group II introns have recently been elucidated through a combination of genetics, chemical biology, solution biochemistry, and crystallography. These studies reveal a dynamic machine that cycles progressively through multiple conformations as it stimulates the various stages of splicing. A central active site, containing a reactive metal ion cluster, catalyzes both steps of self-splicing. These studies provide insights into RNA structure, folding, and catalysis, as they raise new questions about the behavior of RNA machines. PMID:27391926

  3. Excitonic molecules in type-II superlattices

    Tsuchiya, T.; Katayama, S.; Ando, T.

    1998-01-01

    Excitonic molecules in GaAs/AlAs type-II superlattices are numerically investigated. In spite of large difference of electronic structures between type-II and type-I superlattices, variational calculations show that the configuration of particles is similar to that in type-I superlattices. This is because the layer width is smaller than the extent of excitonic wavefunctions in the direction parallel to the layers in the present superlattices.

  4. Plant responses to climatic extremes: within-species variation equals among-species variation

    Malyshev, Andrey; Arfin Kahn, Mohammed A.S.; Beierkuhnlein, Carl;

    2016-01-01

    biodiversity change and to project future species distributions using models. We present a direct comparison of among- versus within-species variation in response to three of the main stresses anticipated with climate change: drought, warming, and frost. Two earlier experiments had experimentally induced (i......) summer drought and (ii) spring frost for four common European grass species and their ecotypes from across Europe. To supplement existing data, a third experiment was carried out, to compare variation among species from different functional groups to within-species variation. Here, we simulated (iii......) winter warming plus frost for four grasses, two nonleguminous, and two leguminous forbs, in addition to eleven European ecotypes of the widespread grass Arrhenatherum elatius. For each experiment, we measured: (i) C/N ratio and biomass, (ii) chlorophyll content and biomass, and (iii) plant greenness...

  5. Variation of fundamental constants

    Flambaum, V V

    2006-01-01

    We present a review of recent works devoted to the variation of the fine structure constant alpha, strong interaction and fundamental masses. There are some hints for the variation in quasar absorption spectra, Big Bang nucleosynthesis, and Oklo natural nuclear reactor data. A very promising method to search for the variation of the fundamental constants consists in comparison of different atomic clocks. Huge enhancement of the variation effects happens in transition between accidentally degenerate atomic and molecular energy levels. A new idea is to build a ``nuclear'' clock based on the ultraviolet transition between very low excited state and ground state in Thorium nucleus. This may allow to improve sensitivity to the variation up to 10 orders of magnitude! Huge enhancement of the variation effects is also possible in cold atomic and molecular collisions near Feschbach resonance.

  6. Calculus of variations

    Gelfand, I M

    2000-01-01

    Based on a series of lectures given by I. M. Gelfand at Moscow State University, this book actually goes considerably beyond the material presented in the lectures. The aim is to give a treatment of the elements of the calculus of variations in a form both easily understandable and sufficiently modern. Considerable attention is devoted to physical applications of variational methods, e.g., canonical equations, variational principles of mechanics, and conservation laws.The reader who merely wishes to become familiar with the most basic concepts and methods of the calculus of variations need on

  7. Elizabeth II uus kunstigalerii

    1999-01-01

    Tähistamaks oma troonile asumise 50. aastapäeva, avab Elizabeth II 6. II 2002 Buckinghami palees uue kunstigalerii, mis ehitatakse palee tiibhoonena. Arhitekt John Simpson. Elizabeth II kunstikogust

  8. The Variational Fair Autoencoder

    C. Louizos; K. Swersky; Y. Li; M. Welling; R. Zemel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the problem of learning representations that are invariant to certain nuisance or sensitive factors of variation in the data while retaining as much of the remaining information as possible. Our model is based on a variational autoencoding architecture with priors that encourage indep

  9. HYDRODYNAMICAL MODELS OF TYPE II-P SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVES

    M. C. Bersten

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present progress in light curve models of type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P obtained using a newly devel- oped, one-dimensional hydrodynamic code. Using simple initial models (polytropes, we reproduced the global behavior of the observed light curves and we analyzed the sensitivity of the light curves to the variation of free parameters.

  10. Ensembl variation resources

    Marin-Garcia Pablo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maturing field of genomics is rapidly increasing the number of sequenced genomes and producing more information from those previously sequenced. Much of this additional information is variation data derived from sampling multiple individuals of a given species with the goal of discovering new variants and characterising the population frequencies of the variants that are already known. These data have immense value for many studies, including those designed to understand evolution and connect genotype to phenotype. Maximising the utility of the data requires that it be stored in an accessible manner that facilitates the integration of variation data with other genome resources such as gene annotation and comparative genomics. Description The Ensembl project provides comprehensive and integrated variation resources for a wide variety of chordate genomes. This paper provides a detailed description of the sources of data and the methods for creating the Ensembl variation databases. It also explores the utility of the information by explaining the range of query options available, from using interactive web displays, to online data mining tools and connecting directly to the data servers programmatically. It gives a good overview of the variation resources and future plans for expanding the variation data within Ensembl. Conclusions Variation data is an important key to understanding the functional and phenotypic differences between individuals. The development of new sequencing and genotyping technologies is greatly increasing the amount of variation data known for almost all genomes. The Ensembl variation resources are integrated into the Ensembl genome browser and provide a comprehensive way to access this data in the context of a widely used genome bioinformatics system. All Ensembl data is freely available at http://www.ensembl.org and from the public MySQL database server at ensembldb.ensembl.org.

  11. Theory of conjectural variations

    Jean-Marie, Alain

    2004-01-01

    We have witnessed in recent years a revival of Conjectural Variations in Game Theory. This reincarnation of an old idea, using a dynamic point of view, aims at combining the adequacy with facts to the requirements of a firmly grounded theory. This book presents, for the first time, a comprehensive account of conjectural variations equilibria in their static inceptions, featuring new comparative results of equilibria with regard to efficiency. It then describes several advances in Dynamic Game Theory, allowing to understand Conjectural Variations Equilibria as dynamic equilibria. The question o

  12. Non-commuting variations in mathematics and physics a survey

    Preston, Serge

    2016-01-01

    This text presents and studies the method of so –called noncommuting variations in Variational Calculus. This method was pioneered by Vito Volterra who noticed that the conventional Euler-Lagrange (EL-) equations are not applicable in Non-Holonomic Mechanics and suggested to modify the basic rule used in Variational Calculus. This book presents a survey of Variational Calculus with non-commutative variations and shows that most basic properties of conventional Euler-Lagrange Equations are, with some modifications, preserved for EL-equations with K-twisted (defined by K)-variations. Most of the book can be understood by readers without strong mathematical preparation (some knowledge of Differential Geometry is necessary). In order to make the text more accessible the definitions and several necessary results in Geometry are presented separately in Appendices I and II Furthermore in Appendix III a short presentation of the Noether Theorem describing the relation between the symmetries of the differential equa...

  13. Quantum variational calculus

    Malinowska, Agnieszka B

    2014-01-01

    This Brief puts together two subjects, quantum and variational calculi by considering variational problems involving Hahn quantum operators. The main advantage of its results is that they are able to deal with nondifferentiable (even discontinuous) functions, which are important in applications. Possible applications in economics are discussed. Economists model time as continuous or discrete. Although individual economic decisions are generally made at discrete time intervals, they may well be less than perfectly synchronized in ways discrete models postulate. On the other hand, the usual assumption that economic activity takes place continuously, is nothing else than a convenient abstraction that in many applications is far from reality. The Hahn quantum calculus helps to bridge the gap between the two families of models: continuous and discrete. Quantum Variational Calculus is self-contained and unified in presentation. It provides an opportunity for an introduction to the quantum calculus of variations fo...

  14. Variational Inequalities with Applications

    Sofonea, Mircea

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by stimulating problems in contact mechanics, emphasizing antiplane frictional contact with linearly elastic and viscoelastic materials, this book focuses on the essentials with respect to the qualitative aspects of several classes of variational inequalities (VIs)

  15. Variational principles in physics

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis

    2007-01-01

    Optimization under constraints is an essential part of everyday life. Indeed, we routinely solve problems by striking a balance between contradictory interests, individual desires and material contingencies. This notion of equilibrium was dear to thinkers of the enlightenment, as illustrated by Montesquieu’s famous formulation: "In all magistracies, the greatness of the power must be compensated by the brevity of the duration." Astonishingly, natural laws are guided by a similar principle. Variational principles have proven to be surprisingly fertile. For example, Fermat used variational methods to demonstrate that light follows the fastest route from one point to another, an idea which came to be known as Fermat’s principle, a cornerstone of geometrical optics. Variational Principles in Physics explains variational principles and charts their use throughout modern physics. The heart of the book is devoted to the analytical mechanics of Lagrange and Hamilton, the basic tools of any physicist. Prof. Basdev...

  16. Variational time integrators

    Lew, A.; Marsden, J. E.; Ortiz, M.; West, M

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review and further develop the subject of variational integration algorithms as it applies to mechanical systems of engineering interest. In particular, the conservation properties of both synchronous and asynchronous variational integrators (AVIs) are discussed in detail. We present selected numerical examples which demonstrate the excellent accuracy, conservation and convergence characteristics of AVIs. In these tests, AVIs are found to result in substantial ...

  17. Generalized quasi variational inequalities

    Noor, M.A. [King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we establish the equivalence between the generalized quasi variational inequalities and the generalized implicit Wiener-Hopf equations using essentially the projection technique. This equivalence is used to suggest and analyze a number of new iterative algorithms for solving generalized quasi variational inequalities and the related complementarity problems. The convergence criteria is also considered. The results proved in this paper represent a significant improvement and refinement of the previously known results.

  18. Chromatic variations suppress suprathreshold brightness variations.

    Kingdom, Frederick A A; Bell, Jason; Gheorghiu, Elena; Malkoc, Gokhan

    2010-01-01

    Most objects in natural scenes are suprathreshold in both color (chromatic) and luminance contrast. How salient is each dimension? We have developed a novel method employing a stimulus similar to that used by B. C. Regan and J. D. Mollon (1997) who studied the relative saliencies of the two chromatic cardinal directions. Our stimuli consist of left- and right-oblique modulations of color and/or luminance defined within a lattice of circles. In the "separated" condition, the two modulations were presented separately as forced-choice pairs, and the task was to indicate which was more salient. In the "combined" condition, the two orthogonal-in-orientation modulations were added, and the task was to indicate the more salient orientation. The ratio of color to luminance contrast at the PSE was calculated for both conditions. Across color directions, 48% more luminance contrast relative to color contrast was required to achieve a PSE in the "combined" compared to the "separated" condition. A second experiment showed that the PSE difference was due to the luminance being masked by the color, rather than due to superior color grouping. We conclude that suprathreshold brightness variations are masked by suprathreshold color variations. PMID:20884478

  19. Variation in Metaphor Variation in Metaphor

    Zóltan Kövecses

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Cognitive linguists have so far paid a great deal of attention to the emarkable universality of many conceptual metaphors. However, their theories fail to account for the equally impressive diversity of metaphorical conceptualization both across and within cultures. The present paper is an attempt to lay down the foundations of a theory of metaphor that is capable of simultaneously accounting for both universality and variation in metaphor.

     

    Cognitive linguists have so far paid a great deal of attention to the emarkable universality of many conceptual metaphors. However, their theories fail to account for the equally impressive diversity of metaphorical conceptualization both across and within cultures. The present paper is an attempt to lay down the foundations of a theory of metaphor that is capable of simultaneously accounting for both universality and variation in metaphor.

  20. Radioimmunologic determination of plasmapepsinogen II

    Within the frame of this study the pepsinogen II concentration could be determined for the first time with a radioimmunoassay in the plasma. In our normal study group the mean value was 13.91 ng/ml with a variation between 4.08 and 36.19 ng/ml. With increasing patient age a continuous increase of this concentration could be observed. The mean value of 14.99 ng/ml for male patients was by 4.75 ng/ml higher than the mean value of 10.24 ng/ml for female patients. The 24 hour profiles represented for the pepsinogen plasma concentration daily physiologic fluctuations and a stabilisation at night. The effects of meals could not be defined unambiguously. In stimulation tests Pentagastrin provoked in 4 of 9 test persons an increase of the concentration of up to 70% of the basic value. In short-term stress-tests the Pg II concentrations found in the test subjects presented an increase or a decrease. In investigations before or after the same patient underwent an operative procedure, an expressive Pg II decrease (up to 33.74 ng/ml) could be detected. Patients with a total resection of the stomach had only a very low Pg II concentration (less than 3.1 ng/ml). In patients with gastric pathologies a significant difference of the confidence limits was found for the Pg II concentration between superficial gastritis (m = 16.04 ng/ml) and atrophic gastritis (m = 27.38 ng/ml). Compared with various gastric diseases the normal patient group presents a significant difference with reference to the atrophic gastritis or the cancerous stomach. The mean values found in atrophic gastritis or the cancerous stomach. The mean values found in atrophic gastritis and in gastric carcinoma are close to each other and are increased, compared to those measured in the normal patient group. (orig./MG)

  1. Cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II) and dioxouranium(II) complexes of thiophene-2-aldehyde-4-phenyl-thiosemicarbazone

    The present paper describes the synthesis and characterisation of thiophene-2-aldehyde-4-phenylthiosemicarbazone (TAPTSC) and its metal complexes with Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and UO(II). (author). 30 refs., 1 table

  2. Variation and Synthetic Speech

    Miller, C; Massey, N; Miller, Corey; Karaali, Orhan; Massey, Noel

    1997-01-01

    We describe the approach to linguistic variation taken by the Motorola speech synthesizer. A pan-dialectal pronunciation dictionary is described, which serves as the training data for a neural network based letter-to-sound converter. Subsequent to dictionary retrieval or letter-to-sound generation, pronunciations are submitted a neural network based postlexical module. The postlexical module has been trained on aligned dictionary pronunciations and hand-labeled narrow phonetic transcriptions. This architecture permits the learning of individual postlexical variation, and can be retrained for each speaker whose voice is being modeled for synthesis. Learning variation in this way can result in greater naturalness for the synthetic speech that is produced by the system.

  3. Essential Variational Poisson Cohomology

    De Sole, Alberto; Kac, Victor G.

    2012-08-01

    In our recent paper "The variational Poisson cohomology" (2011) we computed the dimension of the variational Poisson cohomology {{{H}^bullet_K({V})}} for any quasiconstant coefficient ℓ × ℓ matrix differential operator K of order N with invertible leading coefficient, provided that {{{V}}} is a normal algebra of differential functions over a linearly closed differential field. In the present paper we show that, for K skewadjoint, the {{{Z}}} -graded Lie superalgebra {{{H}^bullet_K({V})}} is isomorphic to the finite dimensional Lie superalgebra {{widetilde{H}(Nell,S)}} . We also prove that the subalgebra of "essential" variational Poisson cohomology, consisting of classes vanishing on the Casimirs of K, is zero. This vanishing result has applications to the theory of bi-Hamiltonian structures and their deformations. At the end of the paper we consider also the translation invariant case.

  4. Asynchronous Variational Contact Mechanics

    Vouga, Etienne; Tamstorf, Rasmus; Grinspun, Eitan

    2010-01-01

    An asynchronous, variational method for simulating elastica in complex contact and impact scenarios is developed. Asynchronous Variational Integrators (AVIs) are extended to handle contact forces by associating different time steps to forces instead of to spatial elements. By discretizing a barrier potential by an infinite sum of nested quadratic potentials, these extended AVIs are used to resolve contact while obeying momentum- and energy-conservation laws. A series of two- and three-dimensional examples illustrate the robustness and good energy behavior of the method.

  5. Juno II (AM-14)

    1959-01-01

    Juno II (AM-14) on the launch pad just prior to launch, March 3, 1959. The payload of AM-14 was Pioneer IV, America's first successful lunar mission. The Juno II was a modification of Jupiter ballistic missile

  6. Bounded variation and around

    Appell, Jürgen; Merentes Díaz, Nelson José

    2013-01-01

    This monographis a self-contained exposition of the definition and properties of functionsof bounded variation and their various generalizations; the analytical properties of nonlinear composition operators in spaces of such functions; applications to Fourier analysis, nonlinear integral equations, and boundary value problems. The book is written for non-specialists. Every chapter closes with a list of exercises and open problems.

  7. Variational transition state theory

    Truhlar, D.G. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program involves the development of variational transition state theory (VTST) and semiclassical tunneling methods for the calculation of gas-phase reaction rates and selected applications. The applications are selected for their fundamental interest and/or their relevance to combustion.

  8. Seasonal Variation in Epidemiology

    Marrero, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Seasonality analyses are important in medical research. If the incidence of a disease shows a seasonal pattern, then an environmental factor must be considered in its etiology. We discuss a method for the simultaneous analysis of seasonal variation in multiple groups. The nuts and bolts are explained using simple trigonometry, an elementary…

  9. Natural 14C variations

    This thesis deals with the natural variations in the atmospheric 14C activity, their geophysical origin and their impact on radiocarbon dating. Studies confirm the idea that one is dealing with a mechanism of a certain regularity. The correlation between a 14C variation during the Little Ice Age and the absence of sunspots on the solar surface suggest the sun to be responsible for some kind of modulation of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum. The background of a changing natural 14C level is relevant when studying the antropogenic perturbation of the atmospheric 14C concentration by the addition of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion. The results presented point to a Suess effect over the past 150 years of about 20 per thousand, but also show a local dilution effect. If this local effect is present over large continental parts of the Northern Hemisphere this will put limits to the use of tree ring 14C measurements for testing carbon reservoir models. Finally the influence of 14C variations upon the interpretations of 14C dates for archaeological and geological purposes has been investigated. It is shown that care must be taken especially in the interpretation of highly accurate 14C data of material only covering a few years of growth. One geological example illustrates that 14C variations can easily be interpretated as alternating fast and slow rises of the sea level. (Auth.)

  10. Variation and Linguistic Theory.

    Bailey, Charles-James N.

    This volume presents principles and models for describing language variation, and introduces a time-based, dynamic framework for linguistic description. The book first summarizes some of the problems of grammatical description encountered from Saussure through the present and then outlines possibilities for new descriptions of language which take…

  11. Diurnal variations of Titan

    Cui, J.; Galand, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lavvas, P. P.; Mueller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Waite, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    We present our analysis of the diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere (between 1,000 and 1,400 km) based on a sample of Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements in the Open Source Ion (OSI) mode obtained from 8 close encounters of the Cassini spacecraft with Titan. Though there is an overall ion depletion well beyond the terminator, the ion content on Titan's nightside is still appreciable, with a density plateau of ~700 cm-3 below ~1,300 km. Such a plateau is associated with the combination of distinct diurnal variations of light and heavy ions. Light ions (e.g. CH5+, HCNH+, C2H5+) show strong diurnal variation, with clear bite-outs in their nightside distributions. In contrast, heavy ions (e.g. c-C3H3+, C2H3CNH+, C6H7+) present modest diurnal variation, with significant densities observed on the nightside. We propose that the distinctions between light and heavy ions are associated with their different chemical loss pathways, with the former primarily through "fast" ion-neutral chemistry and the latter through "slow" electron dissociative recombination. The INMS data suggest day-to-night transport as an important source of ions on Titan's nightside, to be distinguished from the conventional scenario of auroral ionization by magnetospheric particles as the only ionizing source on the nightside. This is supported by the strong correlation between the observed night-to-day ion density ratios and the associated ion lifetimes. We construct a time-dependent ion chemistry model to investigate the effects of day-to-night transport on the ionospheric structures of Titan. The predicted diurnal variation has similar general characteristics to those observed, with some apparent discrepancies which could be reconciled by imposing fast horizontal thermal winds in Titan's upper atmosphere.

  12. Classifying Measures of Biological Variation

    Gregorius, Hans-Rolf; Gillet, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    Biological variation is commonly measured at two basic levels: variation within individual communities, and the distribution of variation over communities or within a metacommunity. We develop a classification for the measurement of biological variation on both levels: Within communities into the categories of dispersion and diversity, and within metacommunities into the categories of compositional differentiation and partitioning of variation. There are essentially two approaches to characte...

  13. The variational Poisson cohomolgy

    De Sole, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the validity of the so called Lenard-Magri scheme of integrability of a bi-Hamiltonian PDE can be established if one has some precise information on the corresponding 1st variational Poisson cohomology for one of the two Hamiltonian operators. In the first part of the paper we explain how to introduce various cohomology complexes, including Lie superalgebra and Poisson cohomology complexes, and basic and reduced Lie conformal algebra and Poisson vertex algebra cohomology complexes, by making use of the corresponding universal Lie superalebra or Lie conformal superalgebra. The most relevant are certain subcomplexes of the basic and reduced Poisson vertex algebra cohomology complexes, which we identify (non-canonically) with the generalized de Rham complex and the generalized variational complex. In the second part of the paper we compute the cohomology of the generalized de Rham complex, and, via a detailed study of the long exact sequence, we compute the cohomology of the generalized var...

  14. Automatic Differentiation Variational Inference

    Kucukelbir, Alp; Tran, Dustin; Ranganath, Rajesh; Gelman, Andrew; Blei, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Probabilistic modeling is iterative. A scientist posits a simple model, fits it to her data, refines it according to her analysis, and repeats. However, fitting complex models to large data is a bottleneck in this process. Deriving algorithms for new models can be both mathematically and computationally challenging, which makes it difficult to efficiently cycle through the steps. To this end, we develop automatic differentiation variational inference (ADVI). Using our method, the scientist on...

  15. Planar theory made variational

    Jackson, A.D.; Lande, A.; Smith, R.A.

    1985-04-08

    Within the framework of boson parquet-diagram summations in perturbation theory, we show analytically that several simple approximations lead inevitably to the radial distribution function g(r) which would be obtained with the Jastrow hypernetted-chain variational method. This is the first derivation of the Jastrow result from perturbation theory. Without mentioning pair correlation functions, we have a clear interpretation of g(r) and the structure function, S(k), in terms of diagram sums.

  16. Planar theory made variational

    Within the framework of boson parquet-diagram summations in perturbation theory, we show analytically that several simple approximations lead inevitably to the radial distribution function g(r) which would be obtained with the Jastrow hypernetted-chain variational method. This is the first derivation of the Jastrow result from perturbation theory. Without mentioning pair correlation functions, we have a clear interpretation of g(r) and the structure function, S(k), in terms of diagram sums

  17. Canonical variate regression.

    Luo, Chongliang; Liu, Jin; Dey, Dipak K; Chen, Kun

    2016-07-01

    In many fields, multi-view datasets, measuring multiple distinct but interrelated sets of characteristics on the same set of subjects, together with data on certain outcomes or phenotypes, are routinely collected. The objective in such a problem is often two-fold: both to explore the association structures of multiple sets of measurements and to develop a parsimonious model for predicting the future outcomes. We study a unified canonical variate regression framework to tackle the two problems simultaneously. The proposed criterion integrates multiple canonical correlation analysis with predictive modeling, balancing between the association strength of the canonical variates and their joint predictive power on the outcomes. Moreover, the proposed criterion seeks multiple sets of canonical variates simultaneously to enable the examination of their joint effects on the outcomes, and is able to handle multivariate and non-Gaussian outcomes. An efficient algorithm based on variable splitting and Lagrangian multipliers is proposed. Simulation studies show the superior performance of the proposed approach. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in an [Formula: see text] intercross mice study and an alcohol dependence study. PMID:26861909

  18. Spectrophotometric study of Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II, Pd(II and Hg(II complexes with isatin- β-thiosemicarbazone

    SANDRA S. KONSTANTINOVIC

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The composition and stability of the complexes of isatin-b-thiosemicarba­zone with Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II, Pd(II and Hg(II have been investigated us­ing spectrophotometric method at 30 °C and constant ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm-3 (KNO3 in 70 % ethanol. Experimental results indicate the formation of MeL and MeL2 complexes for Ni(II and Co(II, and MeL for Cu(II, Zn(II, Pd(II and Hg(II complexes, whose stability constants, bn, have been calculated using a com­puteri­zed iterative method of successive approximation.

  19. Operation Everest II

    Wagner, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Wagner, Peter D. Operation Everest II. High Alt. Med. Biol. 11:111–119, 2010.—In October 1985, 25 years ago, 8 subjects and 27 investigators met at the United States Army Research Institute for Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) altitude chambers in Natick, Massachusetts, to study human responses to a simulated 40-day ascent of Mt. Everest, termed Operation Everest II (OE II). Led by Charlie Houston, John Sutton, and Allen Cymerman, these investigators conducted a large number of investigations...

  20. Type II universal spacetimes

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  1. Burkina Faso - BRIGHT II

    Millenium Challenge Corporation — Millennium Challenge Corporation hired Mathematica Policy Research to conduct an independent evaluation of the BRIGHT II program. The three main research questions...

  2. Variational bounds for a dyadic model of the bilinear Hilbert transform

    Do, Yen; Palsson, Eyvindur Ari

    2012-01-01

    We prove variation-norm estimates for the Walsh model of the truncated bilinear Hilbert transform, extending related results of Lacey, Thiele, and Demeter. The proof uses analysis on the Walsh phase plane and two new ingredients: (i) a variational extension of a lemma of Bourgain by Nazarov-Oberlin-Thiele, and (ii) a variation-norm Rademacher-Menshov theorem of Lewko-Lewko.

  3. Introduction to global variational geometry

    Krupka, Demeter

    2015-01-01

    The book is devoted to recent research in the global variational theory on smooth manifolds. Its main objective is an extension of the classical variational calculus on Euclidean spaces to (topologically nontrivial) finite-dimensional smooth manifolds; to this purpose the methods of global analysis of differential forms are used. Emphasis is placed on the foundations of the theory of variational functionals on fibered manifolds - relevant geometric structures for variational principles in geometry, physical field theory and higher-order fibered mechanics. The book chapters include: - foundations of jet bundles and analysis of differential forms and vector fields on jet bundles, - the theory of higher-order integral variational functionals for sections of a fibred space, the (global) first variational formula in infinitesimal and integral forms- extremal conditions and the discussion of Noether symmetries and generalizations,- the inverse problems of the calculus of variations of Helmholtz type- variational se...

  4. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs

  5. Bis(thiosemicarbazonato) chelates of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Singh, R.

    1985-01-01

    Bis chelates of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) with the enolic form of diethyl ketone and methyl n-propyl thiosemicarbazones were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, magnetic moments, i.r. and electronic and electron spin resonance spectral studies. All the complexes were found to have the composition ML 2 [where M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Pd(ii) and Pt(II) and L = thiosemicarbazones of diethyl ketone and methyl n-propyl ketone]. Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes are paramagnetic and may have polymeric six-coordinate octahedral and square planar geometries, respectively. The Ni(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II) complexes are diamagnetic and may have square planar geometries. Pyridine adducts (ML 2·2Py) of Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes were also prepared and characterized.

  6. Nuclear physics II

    This script consisting of two parts contains the matter of the courses Nuclear Pyhsics I and II, as they were presented in the winter term 1987/88 and summer term 1988 for students of physics at Frankfurt University. In the present part II the matter of the summer term is summarized. (orig.)

  7. World War II Homefront.

    Garcia, Rachel

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography that provides Web sites focusing on the U.S. homefront during World War II. Covers various topics such as the homefront, Japanese Americans, women during World War II, posters, and African Americans. Includes lesson plan sources and a list of additional resources. (CMK)

  8. Phase ii Wage Controls

    Mitchell, Daniel J. B.

    1974-01-01

    This study summarizes Phase ii Pay Board standards, assessing their effectiveness, and concluding that they had a significant impact on wage increases in new union agreements, less effect on deferred increases and nonunion wages, and little effect on aggregate income shares. The Phase ii experience can provide guidance for future control programs.…

  9. Variations in meniscofemoral ligaments at anatomical study and MR imaging

    Cho, J.M.; Suh, J.S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Na, J.B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kyungsang National University, College of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, J.H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Ajou University College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.; Yoo, W.K. [Department of Rehabilitation, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H.Y.; Chung, I.H. [Department of Anatomy, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    Purpose To demonstrate variations in the meniscofemoral ligaments (ligaments of Wrisberg and Humphrey) at anatomical study and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Design Twenty-eight cadaveric knees were partially dissected for the examination of the meniscofemoral ligaments. One hundred knee MR examinations were reviewed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Proximal variations in the meniscofemoral ligaments at MR imaging were classified into three types according to the attachment site: type I, medial femoral condyle; type II, proximal half of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL); type III, distal half of the PCL. Distal variations were classified into vertical or oblique types according to the orientation of the intermediate signal at the interface of the ligament and lateral meniscus. Results At anatomical study, six cases showed variations in the proximal insertion site of the meniscofemoral ligaments. At MR imaging 93 cases had one or more meniscofemoral ligaments, giving a total of 107 ligaments: 90 ligaments of Wrisberg and 17 ligaments of Humphrey. Forty-one ligaments of Wrisberg were type I, 28 type II, 19 type III, and with two indeterminate type, while 6 ligaments of Humphrey were type I and the remaining 11 were indeterminate. Seven cases showed no meniscofemoral ligament. Of the 107 meniscofemoral ligaments, the distal insertion orientation was of vertical type in 10 ligaments, oblique type in 70 and unidentified in 27. Conclusion An understanding of the high incidence of meniscofemoral ligament variations may help in the interpretation of knee MR studies. (orig.) With 7 figs., 1 tab., 16 refs.

  10. Dynamics of nonholonomic systems from variational principles embedded variation identity

    Nondeterminacy of dynamics, i.e., the nonholonomic or the vakonomic, fundamental variational principles, e.g., the Lagrange-d'Alembert or Hamiltonian, and variational operators, etc., of nonholonomic mechanical systems can be attributed to the non-uniqueness of ways how to realize nonholonomic constraints. Making use of a variation identity of nonholonomic constraints embedded into the Hamilton's principle with the method of Lagrange undetermined multipliers, three kinds of dynamics for the nonholonomic systems including the vakonomic and nonholonomic ones and a new one are obtained if the variation is respectively reduced to three conditional variations: vakonomic variation, Hoelder's variation and Suslov's variation, defined by the identity. Therefore, different dynamics of nonholonomic systems can be derived from an integral variational principle, utilizing one way of embedding constraints into the principle, with different variations. It is verified that the similar embedding of the identity into the Lagrange-d'Alembert principle gives rise to the nonholonomic dynamics but fails to give the vakonomic one unless the constraints are integrable.

  11. Biologically active new Fe(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II and Cd(II complexes of N-(2-thienylmethylenemethanamine

    C. SPÎNU

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron(II, cobalt(II, nickel (II, copper (II, zinc(II and cadmium(II complexes of the type ML2Cl2, where M is a metal and L is the Schiff base N-(2-thienylmethylenemethanamine (TNAM formed by the condensation of 2-thiophenecarboxaldehyde and methylamine, were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis as well as magnetic and spectroscopic measurements. The elemental analyses suggest the stoichiometry to be 1:2 (metal:ligand. Magnetic susceptibility data coupled with electronic, ESR and Mössbauer spectra suggest a distorted octahedral structure for the Fe(II, Co(II and Ni(II complexes, a square-planar geometry for the Cu(II compound and a tetrahedral geometry for the Zn(II and Cd(II complexes. The infrared and NMR spectra of the complexes agree with co-ordination to the central metal atom through nitrogen and sulphur atoms. Conductance measurements suggest the non-electrolytic nature of the complexes, except for the Cu(II, Zn(II and Cd(II complexes, which are 1:2 electrolytes. The Schiff base and its metal chelates were screened for their biological activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the metal chelates were found to possess better antibacterial activity than that of the uncomplexed Schiff base.

  12. Standardization of radioimmunoassay for dosage of angiotensin II (ang-II) and its methodological evaluation; Padronizacao do radioimunoensaio para dosagem de angiotensina II (ang-II) e sua validacao metodologica

    Mantovani, Milene; Mecawi, Andre S.; Elias, Lucila L.K.; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose, E-mail: llelias@fmrp.usp.b, E-mail: antunes@fmrp.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2011-10-26

    This paper standardizes the radioimmunoassay (RIA) for dosage of ANG-II of rats, after experimental conditions of saline hypertonic (2%), treating with losartan (antagonist of ANG-II), hydric privation, and acute hemorrhage (25%). After that, the plasmatic ANG-II was extracted for dosage of RIA, whose sensitiveness was of 1.95 pg/m L, with detection of 1.95 to 1000 pg/m L. The treatment with saline reduced the concentration of ANG-II, while the administration pf losartan, the hydric administration and the hemorrhage increase the values, related to the control group. Those results indicate variations in the plasmatic concentration of ANG-II according to the experimental protocols, validating the method for evaluation of activity renin-angiotensin

  13. Belle II production system

    Miyake, Hideki; Grzymkowski, Rafal; Ludacka, Radek; Schram, Malachi

    2015-12-01

    The Belle II experiment will record a similar quantity of data to LHC experiments and will acquire it at similar rates. This requires considerable computing, storage and network resources to handle not only data created by the experiment but also considerable amounts of simulated data. Consequently Belle II employs a distributed computing system to provide the resources coordinated by the the DIRAC interware. DIRAC is a general software framework that provides a unified interface among heterogeneous computing resources. In addition to the well proven DIRAC software stack, Belle II is developing its own extension called BelleDIRAC. BelleDIRAC provides a transparent user experience for the Belle II analysis framework (basf2) on various environments and gives access to file information managed by LFC and AMGA metadata catalog. By unifying DIRAC and BelleDIRAC functionalities, Belle II plans to operate an automated mass data processing framework named a “production system”. The Belle II production system enables large-scale raw data transfer from experimental site to raw data centers, followed by massive data processing, and smart data delivery to each remote site. The production system is also utilized for simulated data production and data analysis. Although development of the production system is still on-going, recently Belle II has prepared prototype version and evaluated it with a large scale simulated data production. In this presentation we will report the evaluation of the prototype system and future development plans.

  14. On the Variational Problems without Having Desired Variational Symmetries

    Mehdi Nadjafikhah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We will have an attempt to present a method for constructing variational problems without having a desired one-parameter transformation group as a variational symmetry. For this, we use the notation of μ-symmetry which was introduced by Giuseppe Gaeta and Paola Morando in 2004. Moreover, our given method enabled us to solve those constructed variational problems using μ-symmetries.

  15. FROG - Fingerprinting Genomic Variation Ontology.

    E Abinaya

    Full Text Available Genetic variations play a crucial role in differential phenotypic outcomes. Given the complexity in establishing this correlation and the enormous data available today, it is imperative to design machine-readable, efficient methods to store, label, search and analyze this data. A semantic approach, FROG: "FingeRprinting Ontology of Genomic variations" is implemented to label variation data, based on its location, function and interactions. FROG has six levels to describe the variation annotation, namely, chromosome, DNA, RNA, protein, variations and interactions. Each level is a conceptual aggregation of logically connected attributes each of which comprises of various properties for the variant. For example, in chromosome level, one of the attributes is location of variation and which has two properties, allosomes or autosomes. Another attribute is variation kind which has four properties, namely, indel, deletion, insertion, substitution. Likewise, there are 48 attributes and 278 properties to capture the variation annotation across six levels. Each property is then assigned a bit score which in turn leads to generation of a binary fingerprint based on the combination of these properties (mostly taken from existing variation ontologies. FROG is a novel and unique method designed for the purpose of labeling the entire variation data generated till date for efficient storage, search and analysis. A web-based platform is designed as a test case for users to navigate sample datasets and generate fingerprints. The platform is available at http://ab-openlab.csir.res.in/frog.

  16. Polarizer reflectivity variations

    On Shiva the beam energy along the chain is monitored using available reflections and/or transmission through beam steering, splitting, and polarizing optics without the intrusion of any additional glass for diagnostics. On the preamp table the diagnostic signal is obtained from the signal transmitted through turning mirrors. At the input of each chain the signal is obtained from the transmission through one of the mirrors used for the chain input alignment sensor (CHIP). At the chain output the transmission through the final turning mirror is used. These diagnostics have proved stable and reliable. However, one of the prime diagnostic locations is at the output of the beta rod. The energy at this location is measured by collecting small reflections from the last polarizer surface of the beta Pockels cell polarizer package. Unfortunately, calibration of this diagnostic has varied randomly, seldom remaining stable for a week or more. The cause of this fluctuation has been investigated for the past year and'it has been discovered that polarizer reflectivity varies with humidity. This report will deal with the possible causes that were investigated, the evidence that humidity is causing the variation, and the associated mechanism

  17. Dissecting Phenotypic Variation in Pigmentation using Forward and Reverse Genetics

    Hellström, Anders R.

    2010-01-01

    Coat color and patterning phenotypes have been extensively studied as a model for advancing our understanding of the relationship between genetic and phenotypic variation. In this thesis, genes of relevance for pigment cell biology were investigated. The dissertation is divided in two parts. Forward genetics was used in the first part (Paper I and II) to identify the genes controlling the Silver and Sex-linked barring loci in chicken. In the second part, reverse genetics was employed to creat...

  18. Properties of H II Regions in the Centers of Nearby Galaxies

    Ho, L C; Sargent, W L W; Ho, Luis C.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Sargent, Wallace L. W.

    1997-01-01

    As part of an optical spectroscopic survey of nearby, bright galaxies, we have identified a sample of over 200 emission-line nuclei having optical spectra resembling those of giant extragalactic H II regions. Such "H II nuclei," powered by young, massive stars, are found in a substantial fraction of nearby galaxies, especially those of late Hubble type. This paper summarizes the observational characteristics of H II nuclei, contrasts the variation of their properties with Hubble type, and compares the nuclear H II regions with those found in galaxy disks. Similarities and differences between H II nuclei and luminous starburst nuclei are additionally noted.

  19. Gamble II Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Gamble II produces a high-voltage (2 MV), high-current (1 MA), short (100 ns) pulse of energy of either positive or negative polarity. This terawatt power...

  20. Mercury(II) Acetate

    Dejmek, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 19 (2012), s. 2867-2868. ISSN 0936-5214 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : mercury(II) acetate * oxymercuration Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.655, year: 2012

  1. Workshop on TARN II

    This note is a collection of the reports at the workshop on TARN II which was held on 23-24 March, 1990 at INS, University of Tokyo. The workshop was meant to understand the status of the synchrotron-cooler ring TARN II and to study on the possibilities of its applications to the physics research. Many interesting talks were presented for the acceleration and the physics. Despite a progress of R and D for the TARN II, there is still a large gap between the present performance and the physics requirement for the TARN II. It is a important problem in future how to solve this discrepancy. The 17 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  2. Leo II PC

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — LEO II is a second-generation software system developed for use on the PC, which is designed to convert location references accurately between legal descriptions...

  3. Diurnal variation of mountain waves

    R. M. Worthington

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Mountain waves could be modified as the boundary layer varies between stable and convective. However case studies show mountain waves day and night, and above e.g. convective rolls with precipitation lines over mountains. VHF radar measurements of vertical wind (1990–2006 confirm a seasonal variation of mountain-wave amplitude, yet there is little diurnal variation of amplitude. Mountain-wave azimuth shows possible diurnal variation compared to wind rotation across the boundary layer.

  4. Apunts de Cartografia II

    Membrado Tena, Joan Carles

    2013-01-01

    Aquest material docent ha rebut l’ajut del Servei de Política Lingüística de la Universitat de València Guia de l'assignatura Cartografia II per a alumnes de segon de grau de Geografia. Apunts sobre cartografia històrica i temàtica. Exercicis per a l'assignatura. Guide of the course "Cartography II" for second grade students.Notes on historical and thematic mapping. Exercises for the course.

  5. Milord II. Language description.

    Puyol-Gruart, Josep; Sierra, Carles

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe the language Milord II. The description is made in terms of computer language concepts and not in terms of the logical semantics underlying it. In this sense the paper complements others in which the focus of the description has been either the object level multi-valued language description, or the reflective component of the architecture, or even the several applications built using it. All the necessary elements to understand how a system programmed in Milord II ex...

  6. Ecuaciones Diferenciales II

    Mañas Baena, Manuel; Martínez Alonso, Luis

    2015-01-01

    En este manual se revisan diferentes aspectos sobre las ecuaciones diferenciales en derivadas parciales de utilidad para los físicos. Se elaboraron como notas de clase de la asignatura Ecuaciones II, del plan 1993 de la Licenciatura de Física de la UCM. Actualmente cubre un 75% de la asignatura Métodos Matemáticos II del Grado de Física de la UCM.

  7. ASTRID II satellit projekt

    Jørgensen, John Leif; Primdahl, Fritz

    1997-01-01

    The report describes the instruments developed for the Swedish micro satellite "ASTRID II". Specifications of the two instruments realized under this contract, a Stellar Compass and a CSC magnetometer are given follwed by a description of the project status and plan.......The report describes the instruments developed for the Swedish micro satellite "ASTRID II". Specifications of the two instruments realized under this contract, a Stellar Compass and a CSC magnetometer are given follwed by a description of the project status and plan....

  8. DUMAND II status report

    The scientific goals, design, capabilities, and status of the DUMAND II detector system are described. In June, 1989, the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel recommended support for construction of DUMAND II to the U.S. Department of Energy. Funding began in 1990, and prototype development for various detector subsystems is under way. Current plans include deployment of the shore cable, junction box and three strings of optical detector modules in 1992, and expansion to the full 9-string configuration in 1993

  9. II Infused Mice

    Justin L. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory properties of PPAR-α plays an important role in attenuating hypertension. The current study determines the anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory role of PPAR-α agonist during a slow-pressor dose of Ang II (400 ng/kg/min. Ten to twelve week old male PPAR-α KO mice and their WT controls were implanted with telemetry devices and infused with Ang II for 12 days. On day 12 of Ang II infusion, MAP was elevated in PPAR-α KO mice compared to WT (161±4 mmHg versus 145±4 mmHg and fenofibrate (145 mg/kg/day reduced MAP in WT + Ang II mice (134±7 mmHg. Plasma IL-6 levels were higher in PPAR-α KO mice on day 12 of Ang II infusion (30±4 versus 8±2 pg/mL and fenofibrate reduced plasma IL-6 in Ang II-treated WT mice (10±3 pg/mL. Fenofibrate increased renal expression of CYP4A, restored renal CYP2J expression, reduced the elevation in renal ICAM-1, MCP-1 and COX-2 in WT + Ang II mice. Our results demonstrate that activation of PPAR-α attenuates Ang II-induced hypertension through up-regulation of CYP4A and CYP2J and an attenuation of inflammatory markers such as plasma IL-6, renal MCP-1, renal expression of ICAM-1 and COX-2.

  10. 畜粪蚯蚓处理后DOM变化及其与Cu( II)的配合特性%Variation of fluorescence spectrum of DOM and the behavior change of DOM complexed with Cu (Ⅱ) before and after vermicomposting of livestock excrement

    张志; 朱维琴; 单监利; 胡安; 魏佳晋

    2012-01-01

    Livestock excrement amended with sawdusts was vermicomposted and investigated for alterations of molecular weight and fluorescence spectrum of dissolved organic matter (DOM) before and after vermicomposting. The results demonstrated after earthworm treatment, the molecular weight of DOM decreased in general, and its distribution range became larger while its molecular weight was still higher than the treatment without earthworm. The content as well as the scale of molecular structure aromatization of fulvic acid in DOM after vermicomposting was significantly increased. The analysis of fluorescence spectrum in terms of DOM complexed with Cu( Ⅱ )further revealed the effect that fluorescence quenching of Cu (Ⅱ) on DOM was remarkable, and DOM from vermicompost was more likely to complex with Cu (Ⅱ) and could lead to a shortening of its straight chain or the pyrolysis of aromatic group. Groups such as -OH and -NH2 in DOM engaged in the complexation with Cu (Ⅱ). Moreover, fulvic acid in DOM after vermicomposting was more conducive to the complexation with Cu (Ⅱ).%研究了畜粪、木屑混合物经蚯蚓处理后水溶性有机物(DOM)分子量及荧光光谱变化.结果表明,经蚯蚓处理后畜粪、木屑混合物中DOM分子量呈整体降低趋势,分子量分布范围变宽,但其DOM分子量仍高于无蚯蚓处理;蚯蚓处理后混合物DOM中的富里酸含量及分子结构芳香化程度增加明显.进一步就蚯蚓处理前后DOM与Cu( II)配合后的荧光光谱分析表明,蚯蚓处理后DOM更易与Cu( II)产生配合反应并导致其直链变短或芳香基团的裂解;DOM中与Cu(II)配合的基团主要包括-OH和-NH2等;且蚯蚓处理后DOM中的富里酸类物质更易与Cu(II)发生配合反应.

  11. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency

    Roe, C R.; Yang, B-Z; Brunengraber, H; Roe, D S.; Wallace, M; Garritson, B K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an important cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis in children and adults. Current treatment includes dietary fat restriction, with increased carbohydrate intake and exercise restriction to avoid muscle pain and rhabdomyolysis. Methods: CPT II enzyme assay, DNA mutation analysis, quantitative analysis of acylcarnitines in blood and cultured fibroblasts, urinary organic acids, the standardized 36-item Short-Form Health Status survey (SF-36) version 2, and bioelectric impedance for body fat composition. Diet treatment with triheptanoin at 30% to 35% of total daily caloric intake was used for all patients. Results: Seven patients with CPT II deficiency were studied from 7 to 61 months on the triheptanoin (anaplerotic) diet. Five had previous episodes of rhabdomyolysis requiring hospitalizations and muscle pain on exertion prior to the diet (two younger patients had not had rhabdomyolysis). While on the diet, only two patients experienced mild muscle pain with exercise. During short periods of noncompliance, two patients experienced rhabdomyolysis with exercise. None experienced rhabdomyolysis or hospitalizations while on the diet. All patients returned to normal physical activities including strenuous sports. Exercise restriction was eliminated. Previously abnormal SF-36 physical composite scores returned to normal levels that persisted for the duration of the therapy in all five symptomatic patients. Conclusions: The triheptanoin diet seems to be an effective therapy for adult-onset carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency. GLOSSARY ALT = alanine aminotransferase; AST = aspartate aminotransferase; ATP = adenosine triphosphate; BHP = β-hydroxypentanoate; BKP = β-ketopentanoate; BKP-CoA = β-ketopentanoyl–coenzyme A; BUN = blood urea nitrogen; CAC = citric acid cycle; CoA = coenzyme A; CPK = creatine phosphokinase; CPT II = carnitine palmitoyltransferase II; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; MCT

  12. Big Data Analysis of Human Genome Variations

    Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-01-25

    Since the human genome draft sequence was in public for the first time in 2000, genomic analyses have been intensively extended to the population level. The following three international projects are good examples for large-scale studies of human genome variations: 1) HapMap Data (1,417 individuals) (http://hapmap.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/downloads/genotypes/2010-08_phaseII+III/forward/), 2) HGDP (Human Genome Diversity Project) Data (940 individuals) (http://www.hagsc.org/hgdp/files.html), 3) 1000 genomes Data (2,504 individuals) http://ftp.1000genomes.ebi.ac.uk/vol1/ftp/release/20130502/ If we can integrate all three data into a single volume of data, we should be able to conduct a more detailed analysis of human genome variations for a total number of 4,861 individuals (= 1,417+940+2,504 individuals). In fact, we successfully integrated these three data sets by use of information on the reference human genome sequence, and we conducted the big data analysis. In particular, we constructed a phylogenetic tree of about 5,000 human individuals at the genome level. As a result, we were able to identify clusters of ethnic groups, with detectable admixture, that were not possible by an analysis of each of the three data sets. Here, we report the outcome of this kind of big data analyses and discuss evolutionary significance of human genomic variations. Note that the present study was conducted in collaboration with Katsuhiko Mineta and Kosuke Goto at KAUST.

  13. A Theory of Harmonic Variations

    de Piro, Tristram

    2014-01-01

    We consider a class of "harmonic variations" for nonsingular curves, obtained as asymptotic degenerations along bitangents. On a geometric level, we obtain an attractive relationship between the class and the genus of $C$. The distribution of class points in pairs across nonsingular curves with such variations, further suggests applications to understanding covalent bonding in terms of shared electrons.

  14. Colony Variation in Staphylococcus lugdunensis

    Leung, Michael J.; Nuttall, Nichalas; Pryce, Todd M.; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Pearman, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is being increasingly reported as a pathogen with an outcome resembling that of S. aureus rather than coagulase-negative staphylococci. Recent local isolates exhibited colonial variation that delayed identification and interpretation of clinical significance. Until now previous descriptions have not emphasized colonial variation as an important identifying characteristic of S. lugdunensis.

  15. Generalised geometry and type II supergravity

    Ten-dimensional type II supergravity can be reformulated as a generalised geometrical analogue of Einstein gravity, defined by an O(9,1) x O(1,9) is contained in O(10,10) x R + structure on the generalised tangent space. To leading order in the fermion fields, this allow one to rewrite the action, equations of motion and supersymmetry variations in a simple, manifestly Spin(9,1) x Spin(1,9)-covariant form. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. II-VI semiconductor compounds

    1993-01-01

    For condensed matter physicists and electronic engineers, this volume deals with aspects of II-VI semiconductor compounds. Areas covered include devices and applications of II-VI compounds; Co-based II-IV semi-magnetic semiconductors; and electronic structure of strained II-VI superlattices.

  17. Accommodating environmental variation in population models: metaphysiological biomass loss accounting.

    Owen-Smith, Norman

    2011-07-01

    1. There is a pressing need for population models that can reliably predict responses to changing environmental conditions and diagnose the causes of variation in abundance in space as well as through time. In this 'how to' article, it is outlined how standard population models can be modified to accommodate environmental variation in a heuristically conducive way. This approach is based on metaphysiological modelling concepts linking populations within food web contexts and underlying behaviour governing resource selection. Using population biomass as the currency, population changes can be considered at fine temporal scales taking into account seasonal variation. Density feedbacks are generated through the seasonal depression of resources even in the absence of interference competition. 2. Examples described include (i) metaphysiological modifications of Lotka-Volterra equations for coupled consumer-resource dynamics, accommodating seasonal variation in resource quality as well as availability, resource-dependent mortality and additive predation, (ii) spatial variation in habitat suitability evident from the population abundance attained, taking into account resource heterogeneity and consumer choice using empirical data, (iii) accommodating population structure through the variable sensitivity of life-history stages to resource deficiencies, affecting susceptibility to oscillatory dynamics and (iv) expansion of density-dependent equations to accommodate various biomass losses reducing population growth rate below its potential, including reductions in reproductive outputs. Supporting computational code and parameter values are provided. 3. The essential features of metaphysiological population models include (i) the biomass currency enabling within-year dynamics to be represented appropriately, (ii) distinguishing various processes reducing population growth below its potential, (iii) structural consistency in the representation of interacting populations and

  18. Fe(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II, Cd(II and Hg(II Complexes of 4'-Nitrobenzylidene-2-Hydroxyl-3,5 Dinitroaniline

    R. S. Srivastava

    1982-07-01

    Full Text Available Complexes of Fe(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II Zn(II, Cd(II, and Hg(II with 4'-nitrobenzylidene-2-hydroxy-3,5-dinitroaniline (hereafter abbreviated as nhd have been prepared and characterized by their microanalyses, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility, electronic and IR spectra. The donor sites of the ligand have been derived from the results of infrared spectra.

  19. Patterns of photometric and chromospheric variation among Sun-like stars: A 20-year perspective

    Lockwood, G W; Henry, G W; Henry, S; Radick, R R; Baliunas, S L; Donahue, R A; Soon, W; Henry, Gregory W.; Henry, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    We examine patterns of variation of 32 primarily main sequence stars, extending our previous 7-12 year time series to 13-20 years by combining b, y data from Lowell Observatory with similar data from Fairborn Observatory. Parallel chromospheric Ca II H and K emission data from the Mount Wilson Observatory span the entire interval. The extended data strengthen the relationship between chromospheric and photometric variation derived previously. Twenty-seven stars are deemed variable. On a year-to-year timescale young active stars become fainter when their Ca II emission increases while older less active stars such as the Sun become brighter when their Ca II emission increases. The Sun's total irradiance variation, scaled to the b and y filter photometry, still appears to be somewhat smaller than stars in our limited sample with similar mean chromospheric activity, but we now regard this discrepancy as probably due mainly to our limited stellar sample

  20. Variational and quasi-variational inequalities in mechanics

    Kravchuk, Alexander S

    2007-01-01

    The essential aim of the present book is to consider a wide set of problems arising in the mathematical modelling of mechanical systems under unilateral constraints. In these investigations elastic and non-elastic deformations, friction and adhesion phenomena are taken into account. All the necessary mathematical tools are given: local boundary value problem formulations, construction of variational equations and inequalities, and the transition to minimization problems, existence and uniqueness theorems, and variational transformations (Friedrichs and Young-Fenchel-Moreau) to dual and saddle-point search problems. Important new results concern contact problems with friction. The Coulomb friction law and some others are considered, in which relative sliding velocities appear. The corresponding quasi-variational inequality is constructed, as well as the appropriate iterative method for its solution. Outlines of the variational approach to non-stationary and dissipative systems and to the construction of the go...

  1. Type-II Leptogenesis

    Kim, Jihn E

    2016-01-01

    I will talk on our new theory on baryogenesis through type-II leptogenesis which is different from the well-known type-I leptogenesis. I will comment on the Jarlskog phases, $\\delta_{\\rm CKM}$ and $\\delta_{\\rm PMNS}$, in the CKM and PMNS matrices. In the type-II leptogenesis, the PMNS phase is used for Sakharov's condition on the global quantum number generation in the Universe. For this to be effective, the SU(2)$\\times$U(1) gauge symmetry must be broken during the leptogenesis epoch.

  2. Experiment Tgv II

    Čermák, P.; Štekl, I.; Beneš, P.; Brudanin, V. B.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Egorov, V. G.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalík, A.; Salamatin, A. V.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Briancon, Ch.; Šimkovic, F.

    2004-07-01

    The project aims at the measurement of very rare processes of double-beta decay of 106Cd and 48Ca. The experimental facility TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) makes use of 32 HPGe planar detectors mounted in one common cryostat. The detectors are interleaved with thin foils containing ββ sources. Besides passive shielding against background radiation made of pure copper, lead and boron dopped polyethylene additional techniques for background suppression based on digital pulse shape analysis are used. The experimental setup is located in Modane underground laboratory (France). A review of the TGV II facility, its performance parameters and capabilities are presented.

  3. SAGE II Ozone Analysis

    Cunnold, Derek; Wang, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Publications from 1999-2002 describing research funded by the SAGE II contract to Dr. Cunnold and Dr. Wang are listed below. Our most recent accomplishments include a detailed analysis of the quality of SAGE II, v6.1, ozone measurements below 20 km altitude (Wang et al., 2002 and Kar et al., 2002) and an analysis of the consistency between SAGE upper stratospheric ozone trends and model predictions with emphasis on hemispheric asymmetry (Li et al., 2001). Abstracts of the 11 papers are attached.

  4. Results from SAGE II

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first nine runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 66-13+18 (stat) -7+5 (sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result of 73-16+18 (stat) -75 (sys) SNU, the capture rate is 69-11+11 (stat) -7+5 (sys) SNU. This represents only 52%--56% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models

  5. Information on Asse II

    The brochure published by BfS describes the actual situation of Asse II with respect to the debate on an interim storage and the status of the realization of a final repository search law. During the visit of the new environment minister Hendricks in the underground facility repository Asse II the issue interim storage site and the retrieval of the corroded casks with radioactive waste were discussed. The challenges for BFS include the acceleration of the retrieval process and the safety of the procedure.

  6. Galaxy S II

    Gralla, Preston

    2011-01-01

    Unlock the potential of Samsung's outstanding smartphone with this jargon-free guide from technology guru Preston Gralla. You'll quickly learn how to shoot high-res photos and HD video, keep your schedule, stay in touch, and enjoy your favorite media. Every page is packed with illustrations and valuable advice to help you get the most from the smartest phone in town. The important stuff you need to know: Get dialed in. Learn your way around the Galaxy S II's calling and texting features.Go online. Browse the Web, manage email, and download apps with Galaxy S II's 3G/4G network (or create you

  7. TOPAZ II system description

    The TOPAZ II single-cell thermionic space reactor power system was designed, built and tested by the former Soviet Union (Russia). It has been purchased by the United (US) for technology transfer, testing, and the possible integration and launch with a US satellite. To support the program, ground facilities consisting primarily of Russian hardware, have been built in Albuquerque, New Mexico to perform non-nuclear ground testing of the system. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the Russian TOPAZ II system

  8. Measurements of Narrow Mg II Associated Absorption Doublets with Two Observations

    Zhi-Fu Chen; Cai-Juan Pan; Guo-Qiang Li; Wei-Rong Huang; Mu-Sheng Li

    2013-12-01

    The measurement of the variations of absorption lines over time is a good method to study the physical conditions of absorbers. In this paper, we measure the variations of the line strength of 36 narrow Mg II2796, 2803 associated absorption doublets, which are imprinted on 31 quasar spectra with two observations of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The timescales of these quasar span 1.1–5.5 years at the quasar rest-frame. On these timescales, we find that these narrow Mg II associated absorption doublets are stable, with no one 2796 line showing strength variation beyond 2 times error (2).

  9. Statistics, Uncertainty, and Transmitted Variation

    Wendelberger, Joanne Roth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-05

    The field of Statistics provides methods for modeling and understanding data and making decisions in the presence of uncertainty. When examining response functions, variation present in the input variables will be transmitted via the response function to the output variables. This phenomenon can potentially have significant impacts on the uncertainty associated with results from subsequent analysis. This presentation will examine the concept of transmitted variation, its impact on designed experiments, and a method for identifying and estimating sources of transmitted variation in certain settings.

  10. Copper(II), nickel(II), cobalt(II), manganese(II), iron(II), zinc(II), chromium(III), oxovanadium(II) and dioxouranium(II) complexes of 4-benzoylsemicarbazone-1-phenyl-3-methyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one

    There is an extensive and interesting study on the extraction of metal complexes of 4-benzoyl-1-phenyl-3-methyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one. However, there is no report on the study of metal complexes of the 4-benzoylsemicarbazone-1-phenyl-3-methyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one (BscPMPO) and therefore, the preparation and characterisation of its complexes with CuII, NiII, CoII, MnII, FeII, ZnII, CrIII, VIVO and UVIO2 is reported. (author)