WorldWideScience

Sample records for 120-to-200 ghz frequency

  1. Three MMIC Amplifiers for the 120-to-200 GHz Frequency Band

    Samoska, Lorene; Schmitz, Adele

    2009-01-01

    Closely following the development reported in the immediately preceding article, three new monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifiers that would operate in the 120-to-200-GHz frequency band have been designed and are under construction at this writing. The active devices in these amplifiers are InP high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs). These amplifiers (see figure) are denoted the LSLNA150, the LSA200, and the LSA185, respectively. Like the amplifiers reported in the immediately preceding article, the LSLNA150 (1) is intended to be a prototype of low-noise amplifiers (LNAs) to be incorporated into spaceborne instruments for sensing cosmic microwave background radiation and (2) has potential for terrestrial use in electronic test equipment, passive millimeter-wave imaging systems, radar receivers, communication receivers, and systems for detecting hidden weapons. The HEMTs in this amplifier were fabricated according to 0.08- m design rules of a commercial product line of InP HEMT MMICs at HRL Laboratories, LLC, with a gate geometry of 2 fingers, each 15 m wide. On the basis of computational simulations, this amplifier is designed to afford at least 15 dB of gain, with a noise figure of no more than about 6 dB, at frequencies from 120 to 160 GHz. The measured results of the amplifier are shown next to the chip photo, with a gain of 16 dB at 150 GHz. Noise figure work is ongoing. The LSA200 and the LSA185 are intended to be prototypes of transmitting power amplifiers for use at frequencies between about 180 and about 200 GHz. These amplifiers have also been fabricated according to rules of the aforesaid commercial product line of InP HEMT MMICs, except that the HEMTs in these amplifiers are characterized by a gate geometry of 4 fingers, each 37 m wide. The measured peak performance of the LSA200 is characterized by a gain of about 1.4 dB at a frequency of 190 GHz; the measured peak performance of the LSA185 is characterized by a gain of about 2

  2. Experimental Study of a Frequency Doubling, 70 GHz Gyroklystron

    Walter, Mark; Nusinovich, Gregory; Lawson, Wes; Granatstein, Victor; Miller, Thomas; Levush, Baruch; Danly, Bruce

    2000-10-01

    Interest is on the rise for frequency doubling designs for production of high power mm-waves in advanced radar applications. Initial experimental results will be presented for our frequency doubling, second harmonic, 70 GHz gyroklystron. The circuit has been designed based on the electron gun, input coupler, and input cavity used in previous experiments at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) performed at 35 GHz. The input cavity is driven by a 35 GHz driver and operates in the TE011 mode at the fundamental cyclotron resonance, while the buncher, penultimate, and output cavity operate in the TE021 mode at twice the signal frequency at the second cyclotron harmonic. The suite of codes developed at NRL - MAGYKL, CASCADE, and QPB were used to design the circuit. These codes predict an output power of 130 kW, with an efficiency of 23

  3. Long term variability of radio sources in the frequencies of 22 GHz and 44 GHz

    Botti, L.C.L.; Abraham, Z.

    1987-05-01

    The radio sources 3C273, OV236, Cen A and Sgr A were observed during a period of six years (1980-1986), in the frequencies of 22 GHz and 44 GHz, with the Itapetinga radiotelescope (Brazil). The objective of this work was the detection of variability in the intensity and in the shape of the spectra of the sources. All of them presented some variability, specially the quasar 3C273, which after a period of intense activity (1981-1985), returned to its quiescent level at the end of 1985. The increase of the flux density in these frequencies is associated to the ejection of new components by the central source in the quasar, as observed in the maps obtained by VLBI techniques. 17 references, 4 figures.

  4. Design of tunable GHz-frequency optomechanical crystal resonators

    Pfeifer, Hannes; Zang, Leyun; Painter, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    We present a silicon optomechanical nanobeam design with a dynamically tunable acoustic mode at 10.2 GHz. The resonance frequency can be shifted by 90 kHz/V^2 with an on-chip capacitor that was optimized to exert forces up to 1 $\\mu$N at 10 V operation voltage. Optical resonance frequencies around 190 THz with Q factors up to $2.2 \\times 10^6$ place the structure in the well-resolved sideband regime with vacuum optomechanical coupling rates up to $g_0/2\\pi = 353$ kHz. Tuning can be used, for instance, to overcome variation in the device-to-device acoustic resonance frequency due to fabrication errors, paving the way for optomechanical circuits consisting of arrays of optomechanical cavities.

  5. Design and modeling of inductors, capacitors and coplanar waveguides at tens of GHz frequencies

    Aryan, Naser Pour

    2015-01-01

    This book describes the basic principles of designing and modelling inductors, MIM capacitors and coplanar waveguides at frequencies of several tens of GHz. The author explains the design and modelling of key, passive elements, such as capacitors, inductors and transmission lines that enable high frequency MEMS operating at frequencies in the orders of tens of GHz.

  6. Molecular Bremsstrahlung Radiation at GHz Frequencies in Air

    Samarai, I Al; Deligny, O; Letessier-Selvon, A; Montanet, F; Settimo, M; Stassi, P

    2016-01-01

    A detection technique for ultra-high energy cosmic rays, complementary to the fluorescence technique, would be the use of the molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation emitted by low-energy ionization electrons left after the passage of the showers in the atmosphere. In this article, a detailed estimate of the spectral intensity of photons at ground level originating from this radiation is presented. The spectral intensity expected from the passage of the high-energy electrons of the cascade is also estimated. The absorption of the photons in the plasma of electrons/neutral molecules is shown to be negligible. The obtained spectral intensity is shown to be $2\\times10^{-21} $W cm$^{-2}$ GHz$^{-1}$ at 10 km from the shower core for a vertical shower induced by a proton of $10^{17.5}$ eV. In addition, a recent measurement of Bremsstrahlung radiation in air at gigahertz frequencies from a beam of electrons produced at 95 keV by an electron gun is also discussed and reasonably reproduced by the model.

  7. Molecular bremsstrahlung radiation at GHz frequencies in air

    Al Samarai, Imen; Bérat, Corinne; Deligny, Olivier; Letessier-Selvon, Antoine; Montanet, François; Settimo, Mariangela; Stassi, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    A detection technique for ultra-high-energy cosmic rays, complementary to the fluorescence technique, would be the use of the molecular bremsstrahlung radiation emitted by low-energy ionization electrons left after the passage of the showers in the atmosphere. In this article, a detailed estimate of the spectral intensity of photons at ground level originating from this radiation is presented. The spectral intensity expected from the passage of the high-energy electrons of the cascade is also estimated. The absorption of the photons in the plasma of electrons and neutral molecules is shown to be negligible. The obtained spectral intensity is shown to be 2 ×1 0-21 W cm-2 GHz-1 at 10 km from the shower core for a vertical shower induced by a proton of 1 017.5 eV . In addition, a recent measurement of bremsstrahlung radiation in air at gigahertz frequencies from a beam of electrons produced at 95 keV by an electron gun is also discussed and reasonably reproduced by the model.

  8. Intrinsic current gain cutoff frequency of 30 GHz with carbon nanotube transistors

    Le Louarn, A.; Kapche, F.; Bethoux, J.-M.; Happy, H.; Dambrine, G.; Derycke, V.; Chenevier, P.; Izard, N.; Goffman, M. F.; Bourgoin, J.-P.

    2007-06-01

    High frequency capabilities of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) are investigated. Structures with a large number of single-walled carbon nanotubes were fabricated using dielecrophoresis to increase the density of nanotubes in the device channel. The authors obtained an intrinsic current gain cutoff frequency of 30GHz establishing state-of-the-art high frequency (hf) potentialities of CNTFETs. The device also showed a maximum stable gain above 10dB at 20GHz. Finally, the parameters of an equivalent circuit model of multitube CNTFET at 20GHz are determined, which open the route to the modeling of nanotubes-based hf electronics.

  9. Dual frequency 230/690 GHz interferometry at the Submillimeter Array

    Hunter, T R; Blundell, R; Christensen, R D; Kimberk, R S; Leiker, S P; Marrone, D P; Paine, S N; Papa, D C; Patel, N; Riddle, P; Smith, M J; Sridharan, T K; Tong, C Y E; Young, K H; Zhao, J H; Hunter, Todd R.; Barrett, John W.; Blundell, Raymond; Christensen, Robert D.; Kimberk, Robert S.; Leiker, Steven P.; Marrone, Daniel P.; Paine, Scott N.; Patel, Nimesh; Riddle, Patricia; Smith, Michael J.; Young, Ken H.; Zhao, Jun-Hui

    2005-01-01

    The Submillimeter Array (SMA), a collaboration between the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Academica Sinica Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Taiwan, is an eight-element radio-interferometer designed to operate throughout the major atmospheric windows from about 180 to 900 GHz. In an effort to mitigate the effects of atmospheric instabilities which limit the phase coherence of the array especially in the higher frequency bands, the array was designed to allow simultaneous operation of a low frequency receiver (330 GHz). The overlap region of 330-350 GHz was included to facilitate dual polarization measurements in the frequency range considered to offer the highest sensitivity for continuum observations with the array. So far, the array is equipped with working SIS receivers covering the frequency ranges 176-256 GHz, 260-350 GHz, and 600-700 GHz, and single frequency operation has been routine in the lower two frequency bands for the past year. More recently, with the completion of IF h...

  10. A 20 GHz Bright Sample for Delta > 72 deg - II. Multi-frequency Follow-up

    Ricci, R; Verma, R; Prandoni, I; Carretti, E; Mack, K -H; Massardi, M; Procopio, P; Zanichelli, A; Gregorini, L; Mantovani, F; Gawronski, M P; Peel, M W

    2013-01-01

    We present follow-up observations at 5, 8 and 30 GHz of the K-band Northern Wide Survey (KNoWS) 20 GHz Bright Sample, performed with the 32-m Medicina Radio Telescope and the 32-m Torun Radio Telescope. The KNoWS sources were selected in the Northern Polar Cap (Delta > 72 deg) and have a flux density limit S(20GHz) = 115 mJy. We include NVSS 1.4 GHz measurements to derive the source radio spectra between 1.4 and 30 GHz. Based on optical identifications, 68 per cent of the sources are QSOs, and 27 per cent are radio galaxies. A redshift measurement is available for 58 per cent of the sources. The radio spectral properties of the different source populations are found to be in agreement with those of other high-frequency selected samples.

  11. 60 GHz Antenna Diagnostics from Planar Near Field Antenna Measurement Without External Frequency Conversion

    Popa, Paula Irina; Pivnenko, Sergey; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2015-01-01

    antenna diagnostics and perform a detailed systematic study of the extreme near-field of a standard gain horn at 60GHz from planar and spherical near-field measurement data. The magnitude and phase of all three rectangular components of the electric and the magnetic aperture fields are calculated, as is......We previously demonstrated that 60 GHz planarnear-field antenna measurements without external frequency conversion can provide far-field radiation patterns in good agreement with spherical near-field antenna measurements in spite of thecable flexing and thermal drift effects [P.I.Popa, S. Pivnenko......,J.M. Nielsen, O. Breinbjerg, 60 GHz Antenna Measurement Setup using a VNA without External Frequency Conversion,36th Annual Symposium of the Antenna Measurement Technique Association ,October 12-17,Tucson, Arizona, 2014]. In this work we extend the validation of this 60 GHz planar near-field (PNF) set-up to...

  12. Frequency notched wide slot antenna for UWB/2.4 GHz WLAN applications

    L(U) Wen-jun; ZHU Hong-bo

    2007-01-01

    A compact frequency notched microstrip slot antenna for ultra-wideband (UWB) /2.4 GHz-band wireless local area network (WLAN) applications is proposed. The antenna is similar to a conventional microstrip slot antenna; however, by introducing a cross wide slot and a meandered-slotted stub, both compact size and frequency notched function can be achieved. It has been studied both numerically and experi- mentally for its impedance bandwidth, surface current distribution, radiation patterns, and gain. As will be seen, an operation bandwidth of over 4.6:1 ranging from 2.39 to 11.25 GHz for return loss lower than having a frequency notched band ranging from 4.75 to 5.85 GHz has been achieved, and good radiation performance over the entire frequency range has also been achieved.

  13. Array of planar waveguide lasers with 50 GHz frequency spacing

    Guldberg-Kjær, Søren Andreas; Laurent-Lund, Christian; Sckerl, Mads W.

    1999-01-01

    Waveguide laser arrays are demonstrated using planar silica-on-silicon technology. Excellent control over frequency separation is obtained with a single phase mask.......Waveguide laser arrays are demonstrated using planar silica-on-silicon technology. Excellent control over frequency separation is obtained with a single phase mask....

  14. The widest-frequency radio relic spectra: observations from 150 MHz to 30 GHz

    Stroe, Andra; Rumsey, Clare; van Weeren, Reinout; Kierdorf, Maja; Donnert, Julius; Jones, Thomas W; Röttgering, Huub J A; Hoeft, Matthias; Rodriguez-Gonzalvez, Carmen; Harwood, Jeremy J; Saunders, Richard D E

    2015-01-01

    Radio relics are patches of diffuse synchrotron radio emission that trace shock waves. Relics are thought to form when intra-cluster medium electrons are accelerated by cluster merger induced shock waves through the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. In this paper, we present observations spanning 150 MHz to 30 GHz of the `Sausage' and `Toothbrush' relics from the Giant Metrewave and Westerbork telescopes, the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, the Effelsberg telescope, the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We detect both relics at 30 GHz, where the previous highest frequency detection was at 16 GHz. The integrated radio spectra of both sources clearly steepen above 2 GHz, at the >6$\\sigma$ significance level, supports the spectral steepening previously found in the `Sausage' and the Abell 2256 relic. Our results challenge the widely adopted simple formation mechanism of radio relics and suggest more complicated models have to be developed that, for ...

  15. Electro-mechanically induced GHz rate optical frequency modulation in silicon

    Tallur, Siddharth

    2012-01-01

    We present a monolithic silicon acousto-optic frequency modulator (AOFM) operating at 1.09GHz. Direct spectroscopy of the modulated laser power shows asymmetric sidebands which indicate coincident amplitude modulation and frequency modulation. Employing mechanical levers to enhance displacement of the optical resonator resulted in greater than 67X improvement in the opto-mechanical frequency modulation factor over earlier reported numbers for silicon nanobeams.

  16. Development of frequency step tunable 1 MW gyrotron at 131 to 146.5 GHz

    Samartsev, A.; Gantenbein, G.; Dammertz, G.; Illy, S.; Kern, S.; Leonhardt, W.; Schlaich, A.; Schmid, M.; Thumm, M., E-mail: andrey.samartsev@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Effective control of power absorption in tokamaks and stellarators could be achieved by the frequency tuning of ECH and CD power delivered by high-power gyrotrons. In this report some results of the development of a frequency tunable gyrotron with fused-silica Brewster window are presented. Excitation of several modes at 1 MW power level in the range of frequencies from 131 to 146.5 GHz is achieved. (author)

  17. 22.8 GHz Substrate Integrated Waveguide Analog Frequency Divide-by-3 Circuit

    Georgiadis, Apostolos; Collado, Ana; Niotaki, Kyriaki

    2015-01-01

    A 22.8 GHz analog frequency divide-by-3 circuit is presented based on an injection locked oscillator. Substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) technology is used to implement the input and output sections of the frequency divider circuit. The input SIW section at the gate of the active device permits the introduction of the injection signal at the third harmonic frequency of the oscillator, while the output section is designed to maximize the DC-RF conversion efficiency of the oscillator circuit....

  18. Frequency stability of InP HBT over 0.2 to 220 GHz

    Zhijiang, Zhou; Kun, Ren; Jun, Liu; Wei, Cheng; Haiyan, Lu; Lingling, Sun

    2015-02-01

    The frequency stabilities of InP DHBTs in a broadband over 1 to 220 GHz are investigated. A hybrid π-topology small-signal model is used to accurately capture the parasitics of devices. The model parameters are extracted from measurements analytically. The investigation results show that the excellent agreement between the measured and simulated data is obtained in the frequency range 200 MHz to 220 GHz. The dominant parameters of the π-topology model, bias conditions and emitter area have significant effects on the stability factor K. The HBT model can be unconditionally stable by reasonable selection of the proper bias condition and the physical layout of the device.

  19. A fully-differential phase-locked loop frequency synthesizer for 60-GHz wireless communication

    A 40-GHz phase-locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer for 60-GHz wireless communication applications is presented. The electrical characteristics of the passive components in the VCO and LO buffers are accurately extracted with an electromagnetic simulator HFSS. A differential tuning technique is utilized in the voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) to achieve higher common-mode noise rejection and better phase noise performance. The VCO and the divider chain are powered by a 1.0 V supply while the phase-frequency detector (PFD) and the charge pump (CP) are powered by a 2.5 V supply to improve the linearity. The measurement results show that the total frequency locking range of the frequency synthesizer is from 37 to 41 GHz, and the phase noise from a 40 GHz carrier is −97.2 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset. Implemented in 65 nm CMOS, the synthesizer consumes a DC power of 62 mW, including all the buffers. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  20. 60 GHz antenna measurement setup using a VNA without external frequency conversion

    Popa, Paula Irina; Pivnenko, Sergey; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund;

    2014-01-01

    alternative solution which makes use of a standard wideband VNA without external frequency conversion units. The operational capability of the Planar Near-Field (PNF) Antenna Measurement Facility at the Technical University of Denmark was recently extended to 60 GHz employing an Agilent E8361A VNA (up to 67...

  1. Design of Miniature Patch Antenna Around the Frequency 3.5 GHz for WIMAX Technology

    Adnane Latif

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to study a miniature rectangular patch antenna and#955; / 8 fed by coaxial probe with the transmission line method (TLM. The design and simulation of this antenna is around the frequency of 3.5GHz, for WIMAX technology. The results obtained (input impedance, reflection coefficient, VSWR and bandwidth are given by the program in the software MATLAB.

  2. Design of Miniature Patch Antenna Around the Frequency 3.5 GHz for WIMAX Technology

    Adnane Latif

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to study a miniature rectangular patch antenna and#955; / 8 fed by coaxial probe with the transmission line method (TLM). The design and simulation of this antenna is around the frequency of 3.5GHz, for WIMAX technology. The results obtained (input impedance, reflection coefficient, VSWR and bandwidth) are given by the program in the software MATLAB.

  3. Laser offset-frequency locking up to 20 GHz using a low-frequency electrical filter technique

    Schilt, Stephane; Matthey, Renaud; Kauffmann-Werner, Daniela; Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano; Thévenaz, Luc

    2008-01-01

    A simple, easy-to-implement, and robust technique is reported to offset lock two semiconductor lasers with a frequency difference easily adjustable up to a couple of tens of gigahertz (10 and 19 GHz experimentally demonstrated). The proposed scheme essentially makes use of low-frequency control electronics and may be implemented with any type of single mode semiconductor laser, without any requirement for the laser linewidth. The technique is shown to be very similar to the wavelength modulat...

  4. Wavelength-sized GaAs optomechanical resonators with GHz frequency

    Ding, Lu; Senellart, Pascale; Lemaitre, Aristide; Ducci, Sara; Leo, Giuseppe; Favero, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    We report on wavelength-sized GaAs optomechanical disk resonators showing ultra-strong optomechanical interaction. We observe optical transduction of a disk mechanical breathing mode with 1.4 GHz frequency and effective mass of ~ 2 pg. The measured vacuum optomechanical coupling rate reaches 0.8 MHz, with a related differential optomechanical coupling factor of 485 GHz/nm. The disk Brownian motion is optically resolved with a sensitivity of 10-17 m/{\\sqrt}Hz at room temperature and pressure.

  5. Experimental Demonstration and Theoretical Analysis of Slow Light in a Semiconductor Waveguide at GHz Frequencies

    Mørk, Jesper; Kjær, Rasmus; Poel, Mike van der;

    2005-01-01

    Experimental demonstration and theoretical analysis of slow light in a semiconductor waveguide at GHz frequencies slow-down of light by a factor of two in a semiconductor waveguide at room temperature with a bandwidth of 16.7 GHz using the effect of coherent pulsations of the carrier density. The...... achievable delay is shown to be limited by the short lifetime. The maximum time delay observed reflects an approximately two-fold increase of the group refractive index, corresponding to a time delay of approximately 20 % of the carrier (population) lifetime. The experimental observations are well-explained...

  6. Sustaining GHz oscillation of carbon nanotube based oscillators via a MHz frequency excitation

    Motevalli, Benyamin; Taherifar, Neda; Zhe Liu, Jefferson

    2016-05-01

    There have been intensive studies to investigate the properties of gigahertz nano-oscillators based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Many of these studies, however, revealed that the unique telescopic translational oscillations in such devices would damp quickly due to various energy dissipation mechanisms. This challenge remains the primary obstacle against its practical applications. Herein, we propose a design concept in which a GHz oscillation could be re-excited by a MHz mechanical motion. This design involves a triple-walled CNT, in which sliding of the longer inner tube at a MHz frequency can re-excite and sustain a GHz oscillation of the shorter middle tube. Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulations prove this design concept at ∼10 nm scale. A mathematical model is developed to explore the feasibility at a larger size scale. As an example, in an oscillatory system with the CNT’s length above 100 nm, the high oscillatory frequency range of 1.8–3.3 GHz could be excited by moving the inner tube at a much lower frequency of 53.4 MHz. This design concept together with the mechanical model could energize the development of GHz nano-oscillators in miniaturized electro-mechanical devices.

  7. Effects of microwave frequency of fine tuning on the performance of JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS

    Measurements have been carried out to study the effects of microwave frequency fine tuning on the performance of JYFL 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source. The frequency was varied within an 85 MHz band around the normal operation frequency of 14.085 GHz. The radial Bremsstrahlung emission was measured for plasma diagnostics purposes and mass separated ion beam currents extracted from the ion source were recorded at the same time. Also, beam quality studies were conducted by measuring the ion beam emittance and shape with and without enhanced space charge compensation achieved by increased neutral gas pressure in the beam line. The studies presented in this article show that microwave frequency fine tuning does produce clear variations to many of the measurable quantities connected to the performance of the JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS. However, the varying input power makes it difficult to separate which effects are caused by the frequency variations and not the power fluctuations. This is the case especially with the beam currents. The beam emittance and profile exhibited clear variations which were further strengthened with the ESCC. These effects on the beam quality were clearly reflected as significant variations in the transmission efficiency. The paper is followed by the associated poster

  8. The functional correlation between rainfall rate and extinction coefficient for frequencies from 3 to 10 GHz

    Jameson, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the rainfall rate (R) obtained from radiometric brightness temperatures and the extinction coefficient (k sub e) is investigated by computing the values of k sub e over a wide range of rainfall rates, for frequencies from 3 to 25 GHz. The results show that the strength of the relation between the R and the k sub e values exhibits considerable variation for frequencies at this range. Practical suggestions are made concerning the selection of particular frequencies for rain measurements to minimize the error in R determinations.

  9. Frequency stability of InP HBT over 0.2 to 220 GHz

    The frequency stabilities of InP DHBTs in a broadband over 1 to 220 GHz are investigated. A hybrid π-topology small-signal model is used to accurately capture the parasitics of devices. The model parameters are extracted from measurements analytically. The investigation results show that the excellent agreement between the measured and simulated data is obtained in the frequency range 200 MHz to 220 GHz. The dominant parameters of the π-topology model, bias conditions and emitter area have significant effects on the stability factor K. The HBT model can be unconditionally stable by reasonable selection of the proper bias condition and the physical layout of the device. (semiconductor devices)

  10. RF and GIS: Field Strength Prediction for Frequencies between 900 MHz and 28 GHz.

    Baldassaro, Paige Marie

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents a model to predict signal strength for frequencies between 902 MHz and 28 GHz. The model approximates diffraction using the knife-edge concept and equations proposed by Lee (1985). LOS pathways are calculated using the Bresenham algorithm and the corresponding elevations are obtained from a 30m DEM base map. The base map was generated by the procedure outlined in Rose (2001) and includes building elevations. The effect of Fresnel zones on prediction accuracy is consid...

  11. The highest frequency detection of a radio relic: 16 GHz AMI observations of the `Sausage' cluster

    Stroe, Andra; Rumsey, Clare; Harwood, Jeremy J.; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Saunders, Richard D. E.; Sobral, David; Perrott, Yvette C.; Schammel, Michel P.

    2014-06-01

    We observed the cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301 with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager at 16 GHz and present the first high radio-frequency detection of diffuse, non-thermal cluster emission. This cluster hosts a variety of bright, extended, steep-spectrum synchrotron-emitting radio sources, associated with the intracluster medium, called radio relics. Most notably, the northern, Mpc-wide, narrow relic provides strong evidence for diffusive shock acceleration in clusters. We detect a puzzling, flat-spectrum, diffuse extension of the southern relic, which is not visible in the lower radio-frequency maps. The northern radio relic is unequivocally detected and measures an integrated flux of 1.2 ± 0.3 mJy. While the low-frequency (<2 GHz) spectrum of the northern relic is well represented by a power law, it clearly steepens towards 16 GHz. This result is inconsistent with diffusive shock acceleration predictions of ageing plasma behind a uniform shock front. The steepening could be caused by an inhomogeneous medium with temperature/density gradients or by lower acceleration efficiencies of high energy electrons. Further modelling is necessary to explain the observed spectrum.

  12. The widest frequency radio relic spectra: observations from 150 MHz to 30 GHz

    Stroe, Andra; Shimwell, Timothy; Rumsey, Clare; van Weeren, Reinout; Kierdorf, Maja; Donnert, Julius; Jones, Thomas W.; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Hoeft, Matthias; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Carmen; Harwood, Jeremy J.; Saunders, Richard D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Radio relics are patches of diffuse synchrotron radio emission that trace shock waves. Relics are thought to form when intracluster medium electrons are accelerated by cluster merger-induced shock waves through the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. In this paper, we present observations spanning 150 MHz to 30 GHz of the `Sausage' and `Toothbrush' relics from the Giant Metrewave and Westerbork telescopes, the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, the Effelsberg telescope, the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We detect both relics at 30 GHz, where the previous highest frequency detection was at 16 GHz. The integrated radio spectra of both sources clearly steepen above 2 GHz, at the ≳6σ significance level, supporting the spectral steepening previously found in the `Sausage' and the Abell 2256 relic. Our results challenge the widely adopted simple formation mechanism of radio relics and suggest more complicated models have to be developed that, for example, involve re-acceleration of aged seed electrons.

  13. Development of a dual frequency (110/138 GHz gyrotron for JT-60SA and its extension to an oscillation at 82 GHz

    Kobayashia Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dual-frequency gyrotron, which can generate 110 GHz and 138 GHz waves independently, is being developed in JAEA to enable electron cyclotron heating (ECH and current drive (ECCD in a wider range of plasma discharge conditions of JT-60SA. Conditioning operation of the gyrotron toward 1 MW for 100 s, which is the target output power and pulse length for JT-60SA, is in progress without significant problems. Oscillations of 1 MW for 10 s and 0.5 MW for 198 s were obtained, so far, at both frequencies. Cooling water temperatures in the gyrotron and matching optics unit were saturated in the 198 s oscillation, and the observed maximum water temperature is sufficiently low. In addition to the above activity on the dual-frequency gyrotron development, an oscillation (0.3 MW for 20 ms at 82 GHz was demonstrated as an additional frequency of the dual-frequency gyrotron. A possibility of the use of fundamental harmonic wave at 82 GHz in JT-60SA has been shown.

  14. A 23.75-GHz frequency comb with two low-finesse filtering cavities in series for high resolution spectroscopy

    A laser frequency comb with several tens GHz level is demonstrated, based on a Yb-doped femtosecond fiber laser and two low-finesse Fabry–Pérot cavities (FPCs) in series. The original 250-MHz mode-line-spacing of the source comb is filtered to 4.75 GHz and 23.75 GHz, respectively. According to the multi-beam interferences theory of FPC, the side-mode suppression rate of FPC schemes is in good agreement with our own theoretical results from 27 dB of a single FPC to 43 dB of paired FPCs. To maintain long-term stable operation and determine the absolute frequency mode number in the 23.75-GHz comb, the Pound–Drever–Hall (PDH) locking technology is utilized. Such stable tens GHz frequency combs have important applications in calibrating astronomical spectrographs with high resolution. (paper)

  15. A 23.75-GHz frequency comb with two low-finesse filtering cavities in series for high resolution spectroscopy

    侯磊; 韩海年; 王薇; 张龙; 庞利辉; 李德华; 魏志义

    2015-01-01

    A laser frequency comb with several tens GHz level is demonstrated, based on an Yb-doped femtosecond fiber laser and two low-finesse Fabry–P´erot cavities (FPCs) in series. The original 250-MHz mode-line-spacing of the source comb is filtered to 4.75 GHz and 23.75 GHz, respectively. According to the multi-beam interferences theory of FPC, the side-mode suppression rate of FPC schemes is in good agreement with our own theoretical results from 27 dB of a single FPC to 43 dB of paired FPCs. To maintain long-term stable operation and determine the absolute frequency mode number in the 23.75-GHz comb, the Pound–Drever–Hall (PDH) locking technology is utilized. Such stable tens GHz frequency combs have important applications in calibrating astronomical spectrographs with high resolution.

  16. High-Frequency Wireless Communications System: 2.45-GHz Front-End Circuit and System Integration

    Chen, M.-H.; Huang, M.-C.; Ting, Y.-C.; Chen, H.-H.; Li, T.-L.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a course on high-frequency wireless communications systems is presented. With the 145-MHz baseband subsystem available from a prerequisite course, the present course emphasizes the design and implementation of the 2.45-GHz front-end subsystem as well as system integration issues. In this curriculum, the 2.45-GHz front-end…

  17. Mechanically robust 39 GHz cut-off frequency graphene field effect transistors on flexible substrates.

    Wei, Wei; Pallecchi, Emiliano; Haque, Samiul; Borini, Stefano; Avramovic, Vanessa; Centeno, Alba; Amaia, Zurutuza; Happy, Henri

    2016-08-01

    Graphene has been regarded as a promising candidate channel material for flexible devices operating at radio-frequency (RF). In this work we fabricated and fully characterized double bottom-gate graphene field effect transistors on flexible polymer substrates for high frequency applications. We report a record high as-measured current gain cut-off frequency (ft) of 39 GHz. The corresponding maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) is 13.5 GHz. These state of the art high frequency performances are stable against bending, with a typical variation of around 10%, for a bending radius of up to 12 mm. To demonstrate the reliability of our devices, we performed a fatigue stress test for RF-GFETs which were dynamically bend tested 1000 times at 1 Hz. The devices are mechanically robust, and performances are stable with typical variations of 15%. Finally we investigate thermal dissipation, which is a critical parameter for flexible electronics. We show that at the optimum polarization the normalized power dissipated by the GFETs is about 0.35 mW μm(-2) and that the substrate temperature is around 200 degree centigrade. At a higher power, irreversible degradations of the performances are observed. Our study on state of the art flexible GFETs demonstrates mechanical robustness and stability upon heating, two important elements to assess the potential of GFETs for flexible electronics. PMID:27396243

  18. Underwater Wireless Sensor Communications in the 2.4 GHz ISM Frequency Band

    Joel J. P. C. Rodrigues

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems in underwater communications is the low data rate available due to the use of low frequencies. Moreover, there are many problems inherent to the medium such as reflections, refraction, energy dispersion, etc., that greatly degrade communication between devices. In some cases, wireless sensors must be placed quite close to each other in order to take more accurate measurements from the water while having high communication bandwidth. In these cases, while most researchers focus their efforts on increasing the data rate for low frequencies, we propose the use of the 2.4 GHz ISM frequency band in these special cases. In this paper, we show our wireless sensor node deployment and its performance obtained from a real scenario and measures taken for different frequencies, modulations and data transfer rates. The performed tests show the maximum distance between sensors, the number of lost packets and the average round trip time. Based on our measurements, we provide some experimental models of underwater communication in fresh water using EM waves in the 2.4 GHz ISM frequency band. Finally, we compare our communication system proposal with the existing systems. Although our proposal provides short communication distances, it provides high data transfer rates. It can be used for precision monitoring in applications such as contaminated ecosystems or for device communicate at high depth.

  19. Underwater wireless sensor communications in the 2.4 GHz ISM frequency band.

    Lloret, Jaime; Sendra, Sandra; Ardid, Miguel; Rodrigues, Joel J P C

    2012-01-01

    One of the main problems in underwater communications is the low data rate available due to the use of low frequencies. Moreover, there are many problems inherent to the medium such as reflections, refraction, energy dispersion, etc., that greatly degrade communication between devices. In some cases, wireless sensors must be placed quite close to each other in order to take more accurate measurements from the water while having high communication bandwidth. In these cases, while most researchers focus their efforts on increasing the data rate for low frequencies, we propose the use of the 2.4 GHz ISM frequency band in these special cases. In this paper, we show our wireless sensor node deployment and its performance obtained from a real scenario and measures taken for different frequencies, modulations and data transfer rates. The performed tests show the maximum distance between sensors, the number of lost packets and the average round trip time. Based on our measurements, we provide some experimental models of underwater communication in fresh water using EM waves in the 2.4 GHz ISM frequency band. Finally, we compare our communication system proposal with the existing systems. Although our proposal provides short communication distances, it provides high data transfer rates. It can be used for precision monitoring in applications such as contaminated ecosystems or for device communicate at high depth. PMID:22666029

  20. Development of a dual frequency (110/138 GHz) gyrotron for JT-60SA and its extension to an oscillation at 82 GHz

    Kobayashia Takayuki; Moriyama Shinichi; Isayama Akihiko; Sawahata Masayuki; Terakado Masayuki; Hiranai Shinichi; Wada Kenji; Sato Yoshikatsu; Hinata Jun; Yokokura Kenji; Hoshino Katsumichi; Sakamoto Keishi

    2015-01-01

    A dual-frequency gyrotron, which can generate 110 GHz and 138 GHz waves independently, is being developed in JAEA to enable electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) in a wider range of plasma discharge conditions of JT-60SA. Conditioning operation of the gyrotron toward 1 MW for 100 s, which is the target output power and pulse length for JT-60SA, is in progress without significant problems. Oscillations of 1 MW for 10 s and 0.5 MW for 198 s were obtained, so far, at both fre...

  1. a New Broadband Cavity Enhanced Frequency Comb Spectroscopy Technique Using GHz Vernier Filtering.

    Morville, Jérôme; Rutkowski, Lucile; Dobrev, Georgi; Crozet, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    We present a new approach to Cavity Enhanced - Direct Frequency Comb Spectroscopy where the full emission bandwidth of a Titanium:Sapphire laser is exploited at GHz resolution. The technique is based on a low-resolution Vernier filtering obtained with an appreciable -actively stabilized- mismatch between the cavity Free Spectral Range and the laser repetition rate, using a diffraction grating and a split-photodiode. This particular approach provides an immunity to frequency-amplitude noise conversion, reaching an absorption baseline noise in the 10-9 cm-1 range with a cavity finesse of only 3000. Spectra covering 1800 cm-1 (˜ 55 THz) are acquired in recording times of about 1 second, providing an absorption figure of merit of a few 10-11 cm-1/√{Hz}. Initially tested with ambient air, we report progress in using the Vernier frequency comb method with a discharge source of small radicals. Rutkowski et al, Opt. Lett., 39(23)2014

  2. 64 Gbit/s Transmission over 850 m Fixed Wireless Link at 240 GHz Carrier Frequency

    Kallfass, Ingmar; Boes, Florian; Messinger, Tobias; Antes, Jochen; Inam, Anns; Lewark, Ulrich; Tessmann, Axel; Henneberger, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    A directive fixed wireless link operating at a center frequency of 240 GHz achieves a data rate of 64 Gbit/s over a transmission distance of 850 m using QPSK and 8PSK modulation, in a single-channel approach without the use of spatial diversity concepts. The analog transmit and receive frontend consists of active monolithic integrated circuits including broadband RF amplification and quadrature subharmonic mixer channels. The analog frontend is addressed by 64 GSa/s ADC and DAC boards, which are amenable to real-time data transmission. A link budget calculation allows for the estimation of the performance under adverse weather conditions.

  3. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of composite carbon nanotube macro-film at a high frequency range of 40 GHz to 60 GHz

    Zi Ping Wu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding effectiveness (SE of carbon nanotube (CNT macro-film that is adhered to common cloth to maintain the light weight, silk-like quality, and smooth surface of the material for EMI shielding is investigated. The results show that a high and stable EMI SE of 48 dB to 57 dB at 40 GHz to 60 GHz was obtained by the macro-film with a thickness of only ∼4 μm. The composite CNT macro-film is easily manipulated, and its EMI property is significantly different from that of traditional electromagnetic shielding materials that show a lower EMI SE with increasing frequency. For example, the EMI SE of Cu foils decrease from 75 dB to 35 dB as frequency increases from 25 GHz to 60 GHz. Considering their stable and outstanding EMI SE and easy manipulation, the composite CNT macro-films are expected to have potential applications in shielding against millimeter waves.

  4. Mechanically robust 39 GHz cut-off frequency graphene field effect transistors on flexible substrates

    Wei, Wei; Pallecchi, Emiliano; Haque, Samiul; Borini, Stefano; Avramovic, Vanessa; Centeno, Alba; Amaia, Zurutuza; Happy, Henri

    2016-07-01

    Graphene has been regarded as a promising candidate channel material for flexible devices operating at radio-frequency (RF). In this work we fabricated and fully characterized double bottom-gate graphene field effect transistors on flexible polymer substrates for high frequency applications. We report a record high as-measured current gain cut-off frequency (ft) of 39 GHz. The corresponding maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) is 13.5 GHz. These state of the art high frequency performances are stable against bending, with a typical variation of around 10%, for a bending radius of up to 12 mm. To demonstrate the reliability of our devices, we performed a fatigue stress test for RF-GFETs which were dynamically bend tested 1000 times at 1 Hz. The devices are mechanically robust, and performances are stable with typical variations of 15%. Finally we investigate thermal dissipation, which is a critical parameter for flexible electronics. We show that at the optimum polarization the normalized power dissipated by the GFETs is about 0.35 mW μm-2 and that the substrate temperature is around 200 degree centigrade. At a higher power, irreversible degradations of the performances are observed. Our study on state of the art flexible GFETs demonstrates mechanical robustness and stability upon heating, two important elements to assess the potential of GFETs for flexible electronics.Graphene has been regarded as a promising candidate channel material for flexible devices operating at radio-frequency (RF). In this work we fabricated and fully characterized double bottom-gate graphene field effect transistors on flexible polymer substrates for high frequency applications. We report a record high as-measured current gain cut-off frequency (ft) of 39 GHz. The corresponding maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) is 13.5 GHz. These state of the art high frequency performances are stable against bending, with a typical variation of around 10%, for a bending radius of up to 12 mm. To

  5. Design and Characterization of a 5.2 GHz/2.4 GHz ΣΔ Fractional- N Frequency Synthesizer for Low-Phase Noise Performance

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a complete noise analysis of a ΣΔ -based fractional- N phase-locked loop (PLL based frequency synthesizer. Rigorous analytical and empirical formulas have been given to model various phase noise sources and spurious components and to predict their impact on the overall synthesizer noise performance. These formulas have been applied to an integrated multiband WLAN frequency synthesizer RFIC to demonstrate noise minimization through judicious choice of loop parameters. Finally, predicted and measured phase jitter showed good agreement. For an LO frequency of 4.3 GHz, predicted and measured phase noise was 0.50 ° rms and 0.535 ° rms, respectively.

  6. Performance Analysis of Multiple Access 60 GHz System Using Frequency-shifted Gaussian Pulse and Non-carrier PSWF Pulse

    Hao Zhang; Wei Shi; Tingting Lu; Jingjing Wang; Xinjie Wang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a kind of impulse radio (IR) 60 GHz pulse based on Prolate Spheroidal Wave Functions (PSWF) is proposed. The capacity and performance for multiple access 60 GHz communication system based on carrier pulse and impulse radio pulse are analyzed separately. Both frequency-shifted Gaussian pulse and Prolate Spheroidal Wave Functions (PSWF) pulse are considered and devised according to the federal communication commission (FCC) power constraints. Pulse position modulation (PPM) with ...

  7. Design of a 2.4-GHz CMOS monolithic fractional-N frequency synthesizer

    Shu, Keliu

    The wireless communication technology and market have been growing rapidly since a decade ago. The high demand market is a driving need for higher integration in the wireless transceivers. The trend is to achieve low-cost, small form factor and low power consumption. With the ever-reducing feature size, it is becoming feasible to integrate the RF front-end together with the baseband in the low-cost CMOS technology. The frequency synthesizer is a key building block in the RF front-end of the transceivers. It is used as a local oscillator for frequency translation and channel selection. The design of a 2.4-GHz low-power frequency synthesizer in 0.35mum CMOS is a challenging task mainly due to the high-speed prescaler. In this dissertation, a brief review of conventional PLL and frequency synthesizers is provided. Design techniques of a 2.4-GHz monolithic SigmaDelta fractional-N frequency synthesizer are investigated. Novel techniques are proposed to tackle the speed and integration bottlenecks of high-frequency PLL. A low-power and inherently glitch-free phase-switching prescaler and an on-chip loop filter with capacitance multiplier are developed. Compared with the existing and popular dual-path topology, the proposed loop filter reduces circuit complexity and its power consumption and noise are negligible. Furthermore, a third-order three-level digital SigmaDelta modulator topology is employed to reduce the phase noise generated by the modulator. Suitable PFD and charge-pump designs are employed to reduce their nonlinearity effects and thus minimize the folding of the SigmaDelta modulator-shaped phase noise. A prototype of the fractional-N synthesizer together with some standalone building blocks is designed and fabricated in TSMC 0.35mum CMOS through MOSIS. The prototype frequency synthesizer and standalone prescaler and loop filter are characterized. The feasibility and practicality of the proposed prescaler and loop filter are experimentally verified.

  8. Time-Resolved SQUID Sensor with a Nyquist Frequency up to 25 GHz

    Cui, Z.; Wang, Y. H.; Kratz, P.; Rosenberg, A. J.; Watson, C. A.; Sochnikov, I.; Fung, Y.-K.-K.; Gibson, G.; Kirtley, J. R.; Ketchen, M. B.; Moler, K. A.

    We demonstrate a time-resolved scanning Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) sensor with an expected maximum sampling rate of 50 GHz. The time-resolved SQUID sampler is operated by a pump-probe pulse sequence and will be particularly useful in studying high-frequency magnetic devices and the transient behavior of magnetic materials. The high sampling rate is achieved through a Josephson-interferometry technique developed at IBM. We tested our sampler with flux signals of order 10 mΦ0 (where Φ0 is the magnetic flux quantum), which corresponds to 25 million Bohr magnetons located 1 micron directly below the pickup loop. Operating in this regime, our sampler will have much higher sensitivity than bulk sensors like conventional SQUIDs and much larger spatial scanning range than single-spin sensors like NV centers. The SQUID sampler will thus be well-suited to characterize individual mesoscopic samples as well as bulk samples with mesoscopic features.

  9. A 0.8–4.2 GHz monolithic all-digital PLL based frequency synthesizer for wireless communications

    A 0.8–4.2 GHz monolithic all-digital PLL based frequency synthesizer for wireless communications is successfully realized by the 130 nm CMOS process. A series of novel methods are proposed in this paper. Two band DCOs with high frequency resolution are utilized to cover the frequency band of interest, which is as wide as 2.5 to 5 GHz. An overflow counter is proposed to prevent the “pulse-swallowing” phenomenon so as to significantly reduce the locking time. A NTW-clamp digital module is also proposed to prevent the overflow of the loop control word. A modified programmable divider is presented to prevent the failure operation at the boundary. The measurement results show that the output frequency range of this frequency synthesizer is 0.8–4.2 GHz. The locking time achieves a reduction of 84% at 2.68 GHz. The best in-band and out-band phase noise performances have reached −100 dBc/Hz, and −125 dBc/Hz respectively. The lowest reference spur is −58 dBc. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  10. Digital coherent detection of multi-gigabit 40 GHz carrier frequency radio-over-fibre signals using photonic downconversion

    Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Zibar, Darko; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2010-01-01

    Detection of high-speed radio signals is a challenge for next generation radio-over-fibre links, requiring high bandwidth and linearity in the receiver. By using photonic downconversion in a coherent receiver, detection of high bit-rate 16-QAM signals, up to 4 Gbit/s, at a 40 GHz carrier frequency...

  11. Design, development, and verification of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument 70 GHz Front-End and Back-End Modules

    70 GHz radiometer front-end and back-end modules for the Low Frequency Instrument of the European Space Agency's Planck Mission were built and tested. The operating principles and the design details of the mechanical structures are described along with the key InP MMIC low noise amplifiers and phase switches of the units. The units were tested in specially designed cryogenic vacuum chambers capable of producing the operating conditions required for Planck radiometers, specifically, a physical temperature of 20 K for the front-end modules, 300 K for the back-end modules and 4 K for the reference signal sources. Test results of the low noise amplifiers and phase switches, the front and back-end modules, and the combined results of both modules are discussed. At 70 GHz frequency, the system noise temperature of the front and back end is 28 K; the effective bandwidth 16 GHz, and the 1/f spectrum knee frequency is 38 mHz.The test results indicate state-of-the-art performance at 70 GHz frequency and fulfil the Planck performance requirements.

  12. Design, development, and verification of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument 70 GHz Front-End and Back-End Modules

    Varis, J; Laaninen, M; Kilpia, V -H; Jukkala, P; Tuovinen, J; Ovaska, S; Sjoman, P; Kangaslahti, P; Gaier, T; Hoyland, R; Meinhold, P; Mennella, A; Bersanelli, M; Butler, R C; Cuttaia, F; Franceschi, E; Leonardi, R; Leutenegger, P; Malaspina, M; Mandolesi, N; Miccolis, M; Poutanen, T; Kurki-Suonio, H; Sandri, M; Stringhetti, L; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Valenziano, L; 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12001

    2010-01-01

    70 GHz radiometer front-end and back-end modules for the Low Frequency Instrument of the European Space Agencys Planck Mission were built and tested. The operating principles and the design details of the mechanical structures are described along with the key InP MMIC low noise amplifiers and phase switches of the units. The units were tested in specially designed cryogenic vacuum chambers capable of producing the operating conditions required for Planck radiometers, specifically, a physical temperature of 20 K for the front-end modules, 300 K for the back-end modules and 4 K for the reference signal sources. Test results of the low noise amplifiers and phase switches, the front and back-end modules, and the combined results of both modules are discussed. At 70 GHz frequency, the system noise temperature of the front and back end is 28 K; the effective bandwidth 16 GHz, and the 1/f spectrum knee frequency is 38 mHz. The test results indicate state-of-the-art performance at 70 GHz frequency and fulfil the Plan...

  13. Frequency and Path Length Scaling of Rain Attenuation from 38 GHz, 58 GHz and 93 GHz Data Obtained on Terrestrial Paths

    Kvičera, V.; Grábner, M.; Fišer, Ondřej

    New York: IEEE, 2009, s. 2546-2550. ISBN 978-1-4244-4753-4. [European Conference on Antennas and Propagation /3./. Berlin (DE), 22.03.2009-27.03.2009] Grant ostatní: GA Mšk(CZ) OC 093 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : rain attenuation * frequency scaling * path scaling * HAPs Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  14. A 4 GHz 32 bit direct digital frequency synthesizer based on a novel architecture

    This paper presents a novel direct digital frequency synthesizer (DDFS) architecture based on nonlinear DAC coarse quantization and the ROM-based piecewise approximation method, which has the advantages of high speed, low power and low hardware resources. By subdividing the sinusoid into a collection of phase segments, the same initial value of each segment is realized by a nonlinear DAC. The ROM is decomposed with a coarse ROM and fine ROM using the piecewise approximation method. Then, the coarse ROM stores the offsets between the initial value of the common segment and the initial value of each line in the same segment. Meanwhile, the fine ROM stores the differences between the line values and the initial value of each line. A ROM compression ratio of 32 can be achieved in the case of 11 bit phase and 9 bit amplitude. Based on the above method, a prototype chip was fabricated using 1.4 μm GaAs HBT technology. The measurement shows an average spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) of 45 dBc, with the worst SFDR only 40.07 dBc at a 4.0 GHz clock. The chip area is 4.6 × 3.7 mm2 and it consumes 7 W from a −4.9 V power supply. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  15. A 4 GHz 32 bit direct digital frequency synthesizer based on a novel architecture

    Jin, Wu; Jianwu, Chen; Danyu, Wu; Lei, Zhou; Fan, Jiang; Zhi, Jin; Xinyu, Liu

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a novel direct digital frequency synthesizer (DDFS) architecture based on nonlinear DAC coarse quantization and the ROM-based piecewise approximation method, which has the advantages of high speed, low power and low hardware resources. By subdividing the sinusoid into a collection of phase segments, the same initial value of each segment is realized by a nonlinear DAC. The ROM is decomposed with a coarse ROM and fine ROM using the piecewise approximation method. Then, the coarse ROM stores the offsets between the initial value of the common segment and the initial value of each line in the same segment. Meanwhile, the fine ROM stores the differences between the line values and the initial value of each line. A ROM compression ratio of 32 can be achieved in the case of 11 bit phase and 9 bit amplitude. Based on the above method, a prototype chip was fabricated using 1.4 μm GaAs HBT technology. The measurement shows an average spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) of 45 dBc, with the worst SFDR only 40.07 dBc at a 4.0 GHz clock. The chip area is 4.6 × 3.7 mm2 and it consumes 7 W from a -4.9 V power supply.

  16. Fine resolution calculations of SAR in the human body for frequencies up to 3 GHz

    Dimbylow, P. J.

    2002-08-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) have been performed from 100 MHz to 3 GHz at the basic 2 mm resolution of the voxel (volume pixel) model NORMAN without any rescaling to larger cell sizes. The reduction in the voxel size from previous work allows SAR to be calculated at higher frequencies. Additionally, the calculations have been extended down to 10 MHz, covering the whole-body resonance regions at a resolution of 4 mm. As well as for the adult phantom, SAR values are calculated for scaled versions representing 10-, 5- and 1-year-old children for both grounded and isolated conditions. External electric field levels are derived from limits of whole-body averaged SAR and localized SAR in the ankle, and compared with NRPB investigation levels and ICNIRP reference levels. The ICNIRP field reference levels alone would not provide a conservative estimate of the localized SAR exposure in the leg for grounded conditions. It would be necessary to invoke the secondary reference level on limb current to provide compliance with basic restrictions on localized SAR averaged over 10 g.

  17. Experimental investigation of a novel microchip laser producing synchronized dual-frequency laser pulse with an 85 GHz interval

    A novel self-Q-switched microchip laser is introduced, which can produce synchronized dual-frequency laser pulse trains. By adopting a prepump mechanism, as well as shifting the gain curve and resonance wavelengths, the relative gains of π and σ polarization modes are adjusted, which offers an effective way to finely synchronize the laser pulses. By employing a 0.9 mm length monolithic cavity, a pair of synchronized pulse trains with a frequency separation of 85 GHz (0.32 nm) is achieved, which nearly approaches the gain bandwidth of the laser medium. Another separated cavity with a length of 2.8 mm operates in the same way for further investigation of microwave generation. A radiofrequency signal with frequency of 26.565 GHz is achieved by beat-noting of the synchronized laser pulse trains with 0.1 nm wavelength separation. (letter)

  18. Coherent continuous-wave dual-frequency high-Q external-cavity semiconductor laser for GHz-THz applications.

    Paquet, Romain; Blin, Stéphane; Myara, Mikhaël; Gratiet, Luc Le; Sellahi, Mohamed; Chomet, Baptiste; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Sagnes, Isabelle; Garnache, Arnaud

    2016-08-15

    We report a continuous-wave highly-coherent and tunable dual-frequency laser emitting at two frequencies separated by 30 GHz to 3 THz, based on compact III-V diode-pumped quantum-well surface-emitting semiconductor laser technology. The concept is based on the stable simultaneous operation of two Laguerre-Gauss transverse modes in a single-axis short cavity, using an integrated sub-wavelength-thick metallic mask. Simultaneous operation is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally by recording intensity noises and beat frequency, and time-resolved optical spectra. We demonstrated a >80  mW output power, diffraction-limited beam, narrow linewidth of 45  dB), and low intensity noise class-A dynamics of <0.3% rms, thus opening the path to a compact low-cost coherent GHz to THz source development. PMID:27519080

  19. The Power of Simultaneous Multi-Frequency Observations for mm-VLBI: Astrometry up to 130 GHz with the KVN

    Rioja, Maria J; Jung, Taehyun; Sohn, Bong Won

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous observations at multiple frequencies have the potential to overcome the fundamental limitation imposed by the atmospheric propagation in mm-VLBI observations. The propagation effects place a severe limit in the sensitivity achievable in mm-VLBI, reducing the time over which the signals can be coherently combined, and preventing the use of phase referencing and astrometric measurements. We carried out simultaneous observations at 22, 43, 87 and 130\\,GHz of a group of five AGNs, the weakest of which is $\\sim$200\\,mJy at 130\\,GHz, with angular separations ranging from 3.6 to 11 degrees, with the KVN. We analysed this data using the Frequency Phase Transfer (FPT) and the Source Frequency Phase Referencing (SFPR) techniques, which use the observations at a lower frequency to correct those at a higher frequency. The results of the analysis provide an empirical demonstration of the increase in the coherence times at 130\\,GHz from a few tens of seconds to about twenty minutes, with FPT, and up to many ho...

  20. Forward and inverse dielectric modeling of oven-dried cement paste specimens in the frequency range of 1.02 GHz to 4.50 GHz

    Owusu Twumasi, Jones; Yu, Tzuyang

    2015-04-01

    The use of radar non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for condition assessment of deteriorated civil infrastructure systems is an effective approach for preserving the sustainability of these systems. Radar NDE utilizes the interaction between radar signals (electromagnetic waves) and construction materials for surface and subsurface sensing based on dielectric properties and geometry. In the success of radar inspection, it is imperative to develop models capable of predicting the dielectric properties of the materials under investigation. The dielectric properties (dielectric constant and loss factor) of oven-dried cement paste specimens with water-to-cement (w/c) ratios (0.35, 0.40, 0.45, 0.50, 0.55) in the frequency range of 1.02 GHz to 4.50 GHz were studied and modeled using modified Debye's models. An open-ended coaxial probe and a network analyzer were used to measure dielectric properties. Forward models are proposed and inversed for predicting the w/c ratio of a given oven-dried cement paste specimen. Modeling results agreed with the experimental data. The proposed models can be used for predicting the dielectric properties of oven-dried cement paste specimens. Also, the modeling approach can be applied to other cementitious materials (e.g., concrete) with additional modification.

  1. Atmospheric absorption model for dry air and water vapor at microwave frequencies below 100 GHz derived from spaceborne radiometer observations

    Wentz, Frank J.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The Liebe and Rosenkranz atmospheric absorption models for dry air and water vapor below 100 GHz are refined based on an analysis of antenna temperature (TA) measurements taken by the Global Precipitation Measurement Microwave Imager (GMI) in the frequency range 10.7 to 89.0 GHz. The GMI TA measurements are compared to the TA predicted by a radiative transfer model (RTM), which incorporates both the atmospheric absorption model and a model for the emission and reflection from a rough-ocean surface. The inputs for the RTM are the geophysical retrievals of wind speed, columnar water vapor, and columnar cloud liquid water obtained from the satellite radiometer WindSat. The Liebe and Rosenkranz absorption models are adjusted to achieve consistency with the RTM. The vapor continuum is decreased by 3% to 10%, depending on vapor. To accomplish this, the foreign-broadening part is increased by 10%, and the self-broadening part is decreased by about 40% at the higher frequencies. In addition, the strength of the water vapor line is increased by 1%, and the shape of the line at low frequencies is modified. The dry air absorption is increased, with the increase being a maximum of 20% at the 89 GHz, the highest frequency considered here. The nonresonant oxygen absorption is increased by about 6%. In addition to the RTM comparisons, our results are supported by a comparison between columnar water vapor retrievals from 12 satellite microwave radiometers and GPS-retrieved water vapor values.

  2. Dielectric relaxation of binary polar liquid mixture measured in benzene at 10 GHz frequency

    S Sahoo; K Dutta; S Acharyya; S K Sit

    2008-03-01

    The dielectric relaxation times 's and dipole moments 's of the binary () polar liquid mixture of N,N-dimethyl acetamide (DMA) and acetone (Ac) dissolved in benzene (i) are estimated from the measured real ′ and imaginary ″ parts of complex high frequency conductivity * of the solution for different weight fractions 's of 0.0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 1.0 mole fractions of Ac and temperatures (25, 30, 35 and 40°C) respectively under 9.88 GHz electric field. 's are obtained from the ratio of slopes of ″ - and ′ - curves at → 0 as well as linear slope of ″ - ′ curves of the existing method (Murthy et al, 1989) in order to eliminate polar-polar interaction in the latter case. The calculated 's are in excellent agreement with the reported 's due to Gopalakrishna's method. 's are also estimated from slopes 's of total conductivity - curves at → 0 and the values agree well with the reported 's from G.K. method. The variation of 's and 's with of Ac reveals that solute-solute molecular association occurs within 0.0-0.3 of Ac beyond which solute-solvent molecular association is predicted. The theoretical dipole moments theo's are calculated from bond angles and bond moments to have exact 's only to show the presence of inductive, mesomeric and electromeric effects in the substituent polar groups. The thermodynamic energy parameters are estimated from ln () against 1/ linear curve from Eyring's rate theory to know the molecular dynamics of the system and to establish the fact that the mixture obeys the Debye-Smyth relaxation mechanism.

  3. Measures of maximum magnetic field in 3 GHz radio frequency superconducting cavities

    Theoretical models have shown that the maximum magnetic field in radio frequency superconducting cavities is the superheating field Hsh. For niobium, Hsh is 25 - 30% higher than the thermodynamical Hc field: Hsh within (240 - 274) mT. However, the maximum magnetic field observed so far is in the range Hc,max = 152 mT for the best 1.3 GHz Nb cavities. This field is lower than the critical field Hc1 above which the superconductor breaks up into divided normal and superconducting zones (Hc1≤Hc). Thermal instabilities are responsible for this low value. In order to reach Hsh before thermal breakdown, high power short pulses are used. The cavity needs then to be strongly over-coupled. The dedicated test bed has been built from the collaboration between Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) - Sezione di Genoa, and the Service d'Etudes et Realisation d'Accelerateurs (SERA) of Laboratoire de l'Accelerateur Lineaire (LAL). The maximum magnetic field, Hrf,max, measurements on INFN cavities give lower results than the theoretical speculations and are in agreement with previous results. The superheating magnetic fields is linked to the magnetic penetration depth. This superconducting characteristic length can be used to determine the quality of niobium through the ratio between the resistivity measured at 300 K and 4.2 K in the normal conducting state (RRR). Results have been compared to previous ones and agree pretty well. They show that the RRR measured on cavities is superficial and lower than the RRR measured on samples which concerns the volume. (author)

  4. A 3 to 5 GHz low-phase-noise fractional-N frequency synthesizer with adaptive frequency calibration for GSM/PCS/DCS/WCDMA transceivers

    A low-phase-noise Σ—Δ fractional-N frequency synthesizer for GSM/PCS/DCS/WCDMA transceivers is presented. The voltage controlled oscillator is designed with a modified digital controlled capacitor array to extend the tuning range and minimize phase noise. A high-resolution adaptive frequency calibration technique is introduced to automatically choose frequency bands and increase phase-noise immunity. A prototype is implemented in 0.13 μm CMOS technology. The experimental results show that the designed 1.2 V wideband frequency synthesizer is locked from 3.05 to 5.17 GHz within 30 μs, which covers all five required frequency bands. The measured in-band phase noise are −89, −95.5 and −101 dBc/Hz for 3.8 GHz, 2 GHz and 948 MHz carriers, respectively, and accordingly the out-of-band phase noise are −121, −123 and −132 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset, which meet the phase-noise-mask requirements of the above-mentioned standards. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  5. Design, development and verification of the 30 and 44 GHz front-end modules for the Planck Low Frequency Instrument

    Davis, R. J.; Wilkinson, A.; Davies, R. D.; Winder, W. F.; Roddis, N.; Blackhurst, E. J.; Lawson, D.; Lowe, S. R.; Baines, C.; Butlin, M.; Galtress, A.; Shepherd, D.; Aja, B.; Artal, E.; Bersanelli, M.; Butler, R. C.; Castelli, C.; Cuttaia, F.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Gaier, T.; Hoyland, R.; Kettle, D.; Leonardi, R.; Mandolesi, N.; Mennella, A.; Meinhold, P.; Pospieszalski, M.; Stringhetti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Valenziano, L.; Zonca, A.

    2009-12-01

    We give a description of the design, construction and testing of the 30 and 44 GHz Front End Modules (FEMs) for the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) of the Planck mission to be launched in 2009. The scientific requirements of the mission determine the performance parameters to be met by the FEMs, including their linear polarization characteristics. The FEM design is that of a differential pseudo-correlation radiometer in which the signal from the sky is compared with a 4-K blackbody load. The Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) at the heart of the FEM is based on indium phosphide High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). The radiometer incorporates a novel phase-switch design which gives excellent amplitude and phase match across the band. The noise temperature requirements are met within the measurement errors at the two frequencies. For the most sensitive LNAs, the noise temperature at the band centre is 3 and 5 times the quantum limit at 30 and 44 GHz respectively. For some of the FEMs, the noise temperature is still falling as the ambient temperature is reduced to 20 K. Stability tests of the FEMs, including a measurement of the 1/f knee frequency, also meet mission requirements. The 30 and 44 GHz FEMs have met or bettered the mission requirements in all critical aspects. The most sensitive LNAs have reached new limits of noise temperature for HEMTs at their band centres. The FEMs have well-defined linear polarization characteristcs.

  6. Design, development and verification of the 30 and 44 GHz front-end modules for the Planck Low Frequency Instrument

    We give a description of the design, construction and testing of the 30 and 44 GHz Front End Modules (FEMs) for the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) of the Planck mission to be launched in 2009. The scientific requirements of the mission determine the performance parameters to be met by the FEMs, including their linear polarization characteristics. The FEM design is that of a differential pseudo-correlation radiometer in which the signal from the sky is compared with a 4-K blackbody load. The Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) at the heart of the FEM is based on indium phosphide High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). The radiometer incorporates a novel phase-switch design which gives excellent amplitude and phase match across the band. The noise temperature requirements are met within the measurement errors at the two frequencies. For the most sensitive LNAs, the noise temperature at the band centre is 3 and 5 times the quantum limit at 30 and 44 GHz respectively. For some of the FEMs, the noise temperature is still falling as the ambient temperature is reduced to 20 K. Stability tests of the FEMs, including a measurement of the 1/f knee frequency, also meet mission requirements. The 30 and 44 GHz FEMs have met or bettered the mission requirements in all critical aspects. The most sensitive LNAs have reached new limits of noise temperature for HEMTs at their band centres. The FEMs have well-defined linear polarization characteristics.

  7. Calibrated complex impedance of CHO cells and E. coli bacteria at GHz frequencies using scanning microwave microscopy

    Tuca, Silviu-Sorin; Badino, Giorgio; Gramse, Georg; Brinciotti, Enrico; Kasper, Manuel; Oh, Yoo Jin; Zhu, Rong; Rankl, Christian; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Kienberger, Ferry

    2016-04-01

    The application of scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) to extract calibrated electrical properties of cells and bacteria in air is presented. From the S 11 images, after calibration, complex impedance and admittance images of Chinese hamster ovary cells and E. coli bacteria deposited on a silicon substrate have been obtained. The broadband capabilities of SMM have been used to characterize the bio-samples between 2 GHz and 20 GHz. The resulting calibrated cell and bacteria admittance at 19 GHz were Y cell = 185 μS + j285 μS and Y bacteria = 3 μS + j20 μS, respectively. A combined circuitry-3D finite element method EMPro model has been developed and used to investigate the frequency response of the complex impedance and admittance of the SMM setup. Based on a proposed parallel resistance-capacitance model, the equivalent conductance and parallel capacitance of the cells and bacteria were obtained from the SMM images. The influence of humidity and frequency on the cell conductance was experimentally studied. To compare the cell conductance with bulk water properties, we measured the imaginary part of the bulk water loss with a dielectric probe kit in the same frequency range resulting in a high level of agreement.

  8. The highest-frequency detection of a radio relic: 16-GHz AMI observations of the `Sausage' cluster

    Stroe, Andra; Harwood, Jeremy J; van Weeren, Reinout; Röttgering, Huub J A; Saunders, Richard D E; Sobral, David; Perrott, Yvette C; Schammel, Michel P

    2014-01-01

    We observed the cluster CIZA J2242.8+5301 with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager at $16$ GHz and present the first high radio-frequency detection of diffuse, non-thermal cluster emission. This cluster hosts a variety of bright, extended, steep-spectrum synchrotron-emitting radio sources, associated with the intra-cluster medium, called radio relics. Most notably, the northern, Mpc-wide, narrow relic provides strong evidence for diffusive shock acceleration in clusters. We detect a puzzling, flat-spectrum, diffuse extension of the southern relic, which is not visible in the lower radio-frequency maps. The northern radio relic is unequivocally detected and measures an integrated flux of $1.2\\pm0.3$ mJy. While the low-frequency ($<2$ GHz) spectrum of the northern relic is well represented by a power-law, it clearly steepens towards $16$ GHz. This result is inconsistent with diffusive shock acceleration predictions of ageing plasma behind a uniform shock front. The steepening could be caused by an inhomogeneous...

  9. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5-10 GHz frequency range

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ˜6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ˜0.1° amplitude at ˜9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  10. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5–10 GHz frequency range

    Bonetti, Stefano, E-mail: bonetti@slac.stanford.edu; Chen, Zhao [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kukreja, Roopali [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Spoddig, Detlef; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany); Ollefs, Katharina [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Ney, Andreas [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany); Solid State Physics Division, Johannes Kepler University, 4040 Linz (Austria); Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef [Linear Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Ohldag, Hendrik [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ∼6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ∼0.1° amplitude at ∼9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  11. Radio Frequency Transistors Using Aligned Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes with Current-Gain Cutoff Frequency and Maximum Oscillation Frequency Simultaneously Greater than 70 GHz.

    Cao, Yu; Brady, Gerald J; Gui, Hui; Rutherglen, Chris; Arnold, Michael S; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-07-26

    In this paper, we report record radio frequency (RF) performance of carbon nanotube transistors based on combined use of a self-aligned T-shape gate structure, and well-aligned, high-semiconducting-purity, high-density polyfluorene-sorted semiconducting carbon nanotubes, which were deposited using dose-controlled, floating evaporative self-assembly method. These transistors show outstanding direct current (DC) performance with on-current density of 350 μA/μm, transconductance as high as 310 μS/μm, and superior current saturation with normalized output resistance greater than 100 kΩ·μm. These transistors create a record as carbon nanotube RF transistors that demonstrate both the current-gain cutoff frequency (ft) and the maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) greater than 70 GHz. Furthermore, these transistors exhibit good linearity performance with 1 dB gain compression point (P1dB) of 14 dBm and input third-order intercept point (IIP3) of 22 dBm. Our study advances state-of-the-art of carbon nanotube RF electronics, which have the potential to be made flexible and may find broad applications for signal amplification, wireless communication, and wearable/flexible electronics. PMID:27327074

  12. A HBAR-oscillator-based 4.596~GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    Daugey, Thomas; Martin, Gilles; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596~GHz frequency source. A 2.298~GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally-controlled two-port AlN-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24000 at 68$^{\\circ}$C, is frequency multiplied by 2 to 4.596~GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) of the HBAR is measured to be $-23$~ppm/$^{\\circ}$C at 2.298~GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596~GHz source is $-105$~dBrad$^2$/Hz at 1~kHz offset and $-150$~dBrad$^2$/Hz at 100~kHz offset. The 4.596~GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator (LO) in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter (VCPS) implemented in the 2.298~GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming...

  13. Surfatron plasma source working at frequency 2.45 GHz for technological applications

    Plasma as an active medium is widely exploited in technological applications processes. To the most important plasma application belongs plasma-aided surface processing of solid-state samples. Due to unique reactivity and chemical interaction with materials, plasma is capable to treat the surface i.e. to be used for material deposition, surface cleaning or surface activation, sterilisation etc. We attempted to develop microwave plasma source, based on surfatron that is potentially applicable for technological purposes. Plasma is generated by commercial (Sairem) surfatron working at frequency 2.45 GHz. The surfatron is fed by microwave power in the range from several watts up to 300 watts. A quartz tube is inserted into surfatron cavity. The outlet of the tube is situated in a cylindrical vacuum vessel pumped out by rotary vacuum pump. The microwave power interacts with the working gas (we used Ar or He as carrier gases with reactive admixtures of O2 or N2) which flows through quartz tube, and ionizes the gas/mixture. The azimuthally symmetric surface wave then sustains created plasma also further downstream of the quartz tube end to the reactor vessel volume. Substrate table movable in three dimensions by stepping motors and controlled via computer is located inside the vessel. This equipment allows uniform surface treatment of the samples. The generator can be operated in cw as well as in computer-controlled impulse regime. The impulse regime of plasma source is one of the ways how to prevent treated materials (especially thermal sensitive materials, e.g. plastics) against thermal damage. Plasma exiting the tube was studied with Langmuir probes and optical spectroscopy. These diagnostics were done at different experimental conditions. Single probe method was used for determination of basic plasma parameters (plasma potential Vpl, mean electron energy Em, electron density ne, EEDF) at low pressures. Double probe method was used at higher vessel pressures when ion

  14. The widest frequency radio relic spectra: observations from 150 MHz to 30 GHz

    Stroe, Andra; Shimwell, Timothy; Rumsey, Clare; Weeren, Reinout; Kierdorf, Maja; Donnert, Julius; Jones, Thomas W.; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Hoeft, Matthias; Rodriguez-Gonzalvez, Carmen; Harwood, Jeremy J.; Saunders, Richard D. E.

    2015-01-01

    Radio relics are patches of diffuse synchrotron radio emission that trace shock waves. Relics are thought to form when intra-cluster medium electrons are accelerated by cluster merger induced shock waves through the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. In this paper, we present observations spanning 150 MHz to 30 GHz of the `Sausage' and `Toothbrush' relics from the Giant Metrewave and Westerbork telescopes, the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, the Effelsberg telescope, the Arcminute Micro...

  15. Complex permeability and permittivity variation of carbonyl iron rubber in the frequency range of 2 to 18 GHz

    Adriana Medeiros Gama

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The complex dielectric permittivity (e and magnetic permeability (m of Radar Absorbing Materials (RAM based on metallic magnetic particles (carbonyl iron particles embedded in a dielectric matrix (silicon rubber have been studied in the frequency range of 2 to 18 GHz. The relative permeability and permittivity of carbonyl iron-silicon composites for various mass fractions are measured by the transmission/reflection method using a vector network analyzer. The concentration dependence of permittivity and permeability on the frequency is analyzed. In a general way, the results show that e´ parameter shows a more significant variation among the evaluated parameters (e”, m”, m’. The comparison of dielectric and magnetic loss tangents (e”/e” and m”/m’, respectively shows more clearly the variation of both parameters (e and m according to the frequency. It is also observed that higher carbonyl iron content fractions favor both dielectric and magnetic loss tangents.

  16. A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb spanning >400 nm for near-infrared astronomical spectrograph calibration

    A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb locked to a global positioning system disciplined oscillator for near-infrared (IR) spectrograph calibration is presented. The comb is generated via filtering a 250 MHz-spaced comb. Subsequent nonlinear broadening of the 12.5 GHz comb extends the wavelength range to cover 1380-1820 nm, providing complete coverage over the H-band transmission window of earth's atmosphere. Finite suppression of spurious sidemodes, optical linewidth, and instability of the comb has been examined to estimate potential wavelength biases in spectrograph calibration. Sidemode suppression varies between 20 and 45 dB, and the optical linewidth is ∼350 kHz at 1550 nm. The comb frequency uncertainty is bounded by ±30 kHz (corresponding to a radial velocity of ±5 cm/s), limited by the global positioning system disciplined oscillator reference. These results indicate that this comb can readily support radial velocity measurements below 1 m/s in the near IR.

  17. Design, development and verification of the 30 and 44 GHz front-end modules for the Planck Low Frequency Instrument

    Davis, R J; Davies, R D; Winder, W F; Roddis, N; Blackhurst, E J; Lawson, D; Lowe, S R; Baines, C; Butlin, M; Galtress, A; Shepherd, D; Aja, B; Artal, E; Bersanelli, M; Butler, R C; Castelli, C; Cuttaia, F; D'Arcangelo, O; Gaier, T; Hoyland, R; Kettle, D; Leonardi, R; Mandolesi, N; Mennella, A; Meinhold, P; Pospieszalski, M; Stringhetti, L; Tomasi, M; Valenziano, L; Zonca, A; 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12002

    2009-01-01

    We give a description of the design, construction and testing of the 30 and 44 GHz Front End Modules (FEMs) for the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) of the Planck mission to be launched in 2009. The scientific requirements of the mission determine the performance parameters to be met by the FEMs, including their linear polarization characteristics. The FEM design is that of a differential pseudo-correlation radiometer in which the signal from the sky is compared with a 4-K blackbody load. The Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) at the heart of the FEM is based on indium phosphide High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). The radiometer incorporates a novel phase-switch design which gives excellent amplitude and phase match across the band. The noise temperature requirements are met within the measurement errors at the two frequencies. For the most sensitive LNAs, the noise temperature at the band centre is 3 and 5 times the quantum limit at 30 and 44 GHz respectively. For some of the FEMs, the noise temperature is stil...

  18. The contribution of microbunching instability to solar flare emission in the GHz to THz range of frequencies

    Klopf, J Michael; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Szpigel, Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    Recent solar flare observations in the sub-THz range have provided evidence of a new spectral component with fluxes increasing for larger frequencies, separated from the well-known microwave emission that maximizes in the GHz range. Suggested interpretations explain the THz spectral component, but do not account for the simultaneous microwave component. We present a mechanism for producing the observed double-spectra. Based on coherent enhancement of synchrotron emission at long wavelengths in laboratory accelerators, we consider how similar processes may occur within a solar flare. The instability known as microbunching arises from perturbations that produce electron beam density modulations, giving rise to broadband coherent synchrotron emission at wavelengths comparable to the characteristic size of the microbunch structure. The spectral intensity of this coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can far exceed that of the incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), which peaks at higher frequency, thus producing a...

  19. A 5 GHz CMOS frequency synthesizer with novel phase-switching prescaler and high-Q LC-VCO

    A phase-locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer with a novel phase-switching prescaler and a high-Q LC voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) is presented. The phase-switching prescaler with a novel modulus control mechanism is much more robust on process variations. The Q factor of the inductor, I-MOS capacitors and varactors in the VCO are optimized. The proposed frequency synthesizer was fabricated by SMIC 0.13 μm 1P8M MMRF CMOS technology with a chip area of 1150 x 2500 μm2. When locking at 5 GHz, the current consumption is 15 mA from a supply voltage of 1.2 V and the measured phase noise at a 1 MHz offset is -122.45 dBc/Hz.

  20. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Torrezan, Antonio C; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R; Temkin, Richard J; Barnes, Alexander B; Griffin, Robert G

    2010-06-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE(11,2) and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnetic field values is in good agreement with theoretical start currents obtained from linear theory for successive high-order axial modes TE(11,2,q). The minimum start current is 27 mA. Power and frequency tuning measurements as a function of the electron cyclotron frequency have also been carried out. A smooth frequency tuning range of 1 GHz was obtained for the operating second-harmonic mode either by magnetic field tuning or beam voltage tuning. Long-term CW operation was evaluated during an uninterrupted period of 48 h, where the gyrotron output power and frequency were kept stable to within ±0.7% and ±6 ppm, respectively, by a computerized control system. Proper operation of an internal quasi-optical mode converter implemented to transform the operating whispering-gallery mode to a Gaussian-like beam was also verified. Based on the images of the gyrotron output beam taken with a pyroelectric camera, the Gaussian-like mode content of the output beam was computed to be 92% with an ellipticity of 12%. PMID:21243088

  1. Remote sensing of soil moisture content over bare field at 1.4 GHz frequency

    Wang, J. R.; Choudhury, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    An algorithm for estimating moisture content of a bare soil from the observed brightness temperature at 1.4 GHz is discussed and applied to a limited data base. The method is based on a radiative transfer model calculation, which has been successfully used in the past to account for many observational results, with some modifications to take into account the effect of surface roughness. Besides the measured brightness temperatures, the three additional inputs required by the method are the effective soil thermodynamic temperature, the precise relation between moisture content and the smooth field brightness temperatures and a pair of parameters related to surface roughness. The procedures of estimating surface roughness parameters and of obtaining moisture content from observed brightness temperature are discussed. The algorithm is applied to observations from truck mounted and airborne radiometers. The estimated moisture contents compare favorably with the observations in the top 2 cm layer.

  2. A stabilized 18 GHz chip-scale optical frequency comb at 2.8x10-16 relative inaccuracy

    Huang, S -W; Yu, M; McGuyer, B H; Kwong, D -L; Zelevinsky, T; Wong, C W

    2015-01-01

    Optical frequency combs, coherent light sources that connect optical frequencies with microwave oscillations, have become the enabling tool for precision spectroscopy, optical clockwork and attosecond physics over the past decades. Current benchmark systems are self-referenced femtosecond mode-locked lasers, but four-wave-mixing in high-Q resonators have emerged as alternative platforms. Here we report the generation and full stabilization of CMOS-compatible optical frequency combs. The spiral microcomb's two degrees-of-freedom, one of the comb line and the native 18 GHz comb spacing, are first simultaneously phase-locked to known optical and microwave references. Second, with pump power control, active comb spacing stabilization improves the long-term stability by six orders-of-magnitude, reaching an instrument-limited 3.6 mHz/sqrt(t) residual instability. Third, referencing thirty-three of the nitride frequency comb lines against a fiber comb, we demonstrate the comb tooth-to-tooth frequency relative inaccu...

  3. Power measurement for frequencies up to approx.1 GHz using a sampling oscilloscope and a low-frequency multiplier

    Accurate measurement of electrical power above approx.1 MHz is accomplished by reconstruction of the voltage and current waveforms at a lower frequency using a sampling oscilloscope. The low-frequency waveforms are then multiplied in a 4-quadrant tranconductance-type multiplier module

  4. A high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source: Application to a coherent population trapping Cs vapor cell atomic clock

    This article reports on the design and characterization of a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR)-oscillator-based 4.596 GHz frequency source. A 2.298 GHz signal, generated by an oscillator constructed around a thermally controlled two-port aluminum nitride-sapphire HBAR resonator with a Q-factor of 24 000 at 68 °C, is frequency multiplied by 2–4.596 GHz, half of the Cs atom clock frequency. The temperature coefficient of frequency of the HBAR is measured to be −23 ppm/ °C at 2.298 GHz. The measured phase noise of the 4.596 GHz source is −105 dB rad2/Hz at 1 kHz offset and −150 dB rad2/Hz at 100 kHz offset. The 4.596 GHz output signal is used as a local oscillator in a laboratory-prototype Cs microcell-based coherent population trapping atomic clock. The signal is stabilized onto the atomic transition frequency by tuning finely a voltage-controlled phase shifter implemented in the 2.298 GHz HBAR-oscillator loop, preventing the need for a high-power-consuming direct digital synthesis. The short-term fractional frequency stability of the free-running oscillator is 1.8 × 10−9 at one second integration time. In locked regime, the latter is improved in a preliminary proof-of-concept experiment at the level of 6.6 × 10−11 τ−1/2 up to a few seconds and found to be limited by the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected CPT resonance

  5. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of composite carbon nanotube macro-film at a high frequency range of 40 GHz to 60 GHz

    Zi Ping Wu; Ming Cheng; Wen Jing Ma; Jing Wei Hu; Yan Hong Yin; Ying Yan Hu; Ye Sheng Li; Jian Gao Yang; Qian Feng Xu

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of carbon nanotube (CNT) macro-film that is adhered to common cloth to maintain the light weight, silk-like quality, and smooth surface of the material for EMI shielding is investigated. The results show that a high and stable EMI SE of 48 dB to 57 dB at 40 GHz to 60 GHz was obtained by the macro-film with a thickness of only ∼4 μm. The composite CNT macro-film is easily manipulated, and its EMI property is significantly diff...

  6. Design and simulation of circularly polarized pentagonal-shaped microstrip patch antenna at RFID frequency 2.4 GHz

    Bondili Kohitha Bai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In wireless communication system antennas play an inherent role. In terms of geometrical shapes and implementations microstrip patch antennas are versatile in nature. Characteristics like low gain and smaller bandwidth make single microstrip more popular. Printed type of antenna which consists of a radiating patch on one side of a dielectric substrate and ground plane on the other side is a microstrip patch antenna. The intension of exploiting design is to implement a circularly polarized pentagonal-shaped microstrip patch antenna with a dielectric constant of 2.33, for a dielectric substrate. The antenna is designed and simulated using IE3D electromagnetic simulator. Circularly polarized pentagonal-shaped microstrip patch antenna has good CP axial ratio bandwidth and minimum reflection coefficient. The aimed antenna designed for WLAN applications at RFID frequency of 2.4 GHz in ISM band. The simulation outcomes shows that the designed CP pentagonal shaped microstrip patch antenna gives axial ratio of 0.6023 at 2.38 GHz and CP axial ratio bandwidth of 36MHz with 1.5%.

  7. The faint source population at 15.7 GHz - III. A high-frequency study of HERGs and LERGs

    Whittam, Imogen H; Green, David A; Jarvis, Matt J

    2016-01-01

    A complete sample of 96 faint ($S > 0.5$ mJy) radio galaxies is selected from the Tenth Cambridge (10C) survey at 15.7~GHz. Optical spectra are used to classify 17 of the sources as high-excitation or low-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs and LERGs respectively), for the remaining sources three other methods are used; these are optical compactness, X-ray observations and mid-infrared colour--colour diagrams. 32 sources are HERGs and 35 are LERGs while the remaining 29 sources could not be classified. We find that the 10C HERGs tend to have higher 15.7-GHz flux densities, flatter spectra, smaller linear sizes and be found at higher redshifts than the LERGs. This suggests that the 10C HERGs are more core dominated than the LERGs. Lower-frequency radio images, linear sizes and spectral indices are used to classify the sources according to their radio morphology; 18 are Fanaroff and Riley type I or II sources, a further 13 show some extended emission, and the remaining 65 sources are compact and are referred to as...

  8. Sensing glucose concentrations at GHz frequencies with a fully embedded Biomicro-electromechanical system (BioMEMS)

    Birkholz, M.; Ehwald, K.-E.; Basmer, T.; Kulse, P.; Reich, C.; Drews, J.; Genschow, D.; Haak, U.; Marschmeyer, S.; Matthus, E.; Schulz, K.; Wolansky, D.; Winkler, W.; Guschauski, T.; Ehwald, R.

    2013-06-01

    The progressive scaling in semiconductor technology allows for advanced miniaturization of intelligent systems like implantable biosensors for low-molecular weight analytes. A most relevant application would be the monitoring of glucose in diabetic patients, since no commercial solution is available yet for the continuous and drift-free monitoring of blood sugar levels. We report on a biosensor chip that operates via the binding competition of glucose and dextran to concanavalin A. The sensor is prepared as a fully embedded micro-electromechanical system and operates at GHz frequencies. Glucose concentrations derive from the assay viscosity as determined by the deflection of a 50 nm TiN actuator beam excited by quasi-electrostatic attraction. The GHz detection scheme does not rely on the resonant oscillation of the actuator and safely operates in fluidic environments. This property favorably combines with additional characteristics—(i) measurement times of less than a second, (ii) usage of biocompatible TiN for bio-milieu exposed parts, and (iii) small volume of less than 1 mm3—to qualify the sensor chip as key component in a continuous glucose monitor for the interstitial tissue.

  9. An open-ended waveguide system for SAR system validation or probe calibration for frequencies above 3 GHz

    Compliance with safety guidelines prescribed in terms of maximum electromagnetic power absorption (specific absorption rate or SAR) for any 1- or 10-g of tissue is required for all newly introduced personal wireless devices such as wireless PCs. The prescribed SAR measuring system is a planar phantom with a relatively thin base of thickness 2.0 mm filled with a lossy fluid to simulate dielectric properties of the tissues. A well-characterized, broadband irradiator is required for SAR system validation or submerged E-field probe calibration for the Wi-Fi frequencies in the 5-6 GHz band. We describe an open-ended waveguide system that may be used for this purpose. Using a fourth-order polynomial least-squares fit to the experimental data gives SAR variations close to the bottom surface of the phantom that are in excellent agreement with those obtained using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical method. The experimentally determined peak 1- and 10-g SARs are within 1 to 2% of those obtained using the FDTD both at 5.25 and 5.8 GHz

  10. Dual-frequency comb generation with differing GHz repetition rates by parallel Fabry–Perot cavity filtering of a single broadband frequency comb source

    Mildner, Jutta; Meiners-Hagen, Karl; Pollinger, Florian

    2016-07-01

    We present a dual-comb-generator based on a coupled Fabry–Perot filtering cavity doublet and a single seed laser source. By filtering a commercial erbium-doped fiber-based optical frequency comb with CEO-stabilisation and 250 MHz repetition rate, two broadband coherent combs of different repetition rates in the GHz range are generated. The filtering doublet consists of two Fabry–Perot cavities with a tunable spacing and Pound–Drever–Hall stabilisation scheme. As a prerequisite for the development of such a filtering unit, we present a method to determine the actual free spectral range and transmission bandwidth of a Fabry–Perot cavity in situ. The transmitted beat signal of two diode lasers is measured as a function of their tunable frequency difference. Finally, the filtering performance and resulting beat signals of the heterodyned combs are discussed as well as the optimisation measures of the whole system.

  11. Digital coherent detection of multi-gigabit 40 GHz carrier frequency radio-over-fiber signals using photonic downconversion

    Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Zibar, Darko; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    Detection of high speed radio signals is a challenge for next generation radio-over-fiber links, requiring high bandwidth and linearity in the receiver. By using photonic downconversion in a coherent receiver, it is possible to detect signals exceeding the electrical bandwidth of the receiver, by...... performing the mixing of the radio signal with a free-running local oscillator in the optical domain. In this paper we present the experimental emonstration of high bitrate 16-QAM signal detection, up to 4 Gb/s, at 40 GHz carrier frequency, using low bandwidth electronics.......Detection of high speed radio signals is a challenge for next generation radio-over-fiber links, requiring high bandwidth and linearity in the receiver. By using photonic downconversion in a coherent receiver, it is possible to detect signals exceeding the electrical bandwidth of the receiver, by...

  12. Precision waveguide system for measurement of complex permittivity of liquids at frequencies from 60 to 90 GHz.

    Hunger, J; Cerjak, I; Schoenmaker, H; Bonn, M; Bakker, H J

    2011-10-01

    We describe a variable path length waveguide setup developed to accurately measure the complex dielectric permittivity of liquids. This is achieved by measuring the complex scattering parameter of the liquid in a waveguide section with a vector network analyzer in combination with an E-band frequency converter. The automated measurement procedure allows fast acquisition at closely spaced intervals over the entire measurement bandwidth: 60-90 GHz. The presented technique is an absolute method and as such is not prone to calibration errors. The technique is suited to investigate low-loss as well as high-loss liquids in contrast to similar setups described previously. We present measurements for a high-loss liquid (water), an intermediate-loss sample (ethanol), and for nearly loss-less n-octane. Due to the available phase information, the present data have an improved accuracy in comparison with literature data. PMID:22047313

  13. Precision waveguide system for measurement of complex permittivity of liquids at frequencies from 60 to 90Â GHz

    Hunger, J.; Cerjak, I.; Schoenmaker, H.; Bonn, M.; Bakker, H. J.

    2011-10-01

    We describe a variable path length waveguide setup developed to accurately measure the complex dielectric permittivity of liquids. This is achieved by measuring the complex scattering parameter of the liquid in a waveguide section with a vector network analyzer in combination with an E-band frequency converter. The automated measurement procedure allows fast acquisition at closely spaced intervals over the entire measurement bandwidth: 60-90 GHz. The presented technique is an absolute method and as such is not prone to calibration errors. The technique is suited to investigate low-loss as well as high-loss liquids in contrast to similar setups described previously. We present measurements for a high-loss liquid (water), an intermediate-loss sample (ethanol), and for nearly loss-less n-octane. Due to the available phase information, the present data have an improved accuracy in comparison with literature data.

  14. Remote sensing of soil moisture content over bare fields at 1.4 GHz frequency

    Wang, J. R.; Choudhury, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    A simple method of estimating moisture content (W) of a bare soil from the observed brightness temperature (T sub B) at 1.4 GHz is discussed. The method is based on a radiative transfer model calculation, which has been successfully used in the past to account for many observational results, with some modifications to take into account the effect of surface roughness. Besides the measured T sub B's, the three additional inputs required by the method are the effective soil thermodynamic temperature, the precise relation between W and the smooth field brightness temperature T sub B and a parameter specifying the surface roughness characteristics. The soil effective temperature can be readily measured and the procedures of estimating surface roughness parameter and obtaining the relation between W and smooth field brightness temperature are discussed in detail. Dual polarized radiometric measurements at an off-nadir incident angle are sufficient to estimate both surface roughness parameter and W, provided that the relation between W and smooth field brightness temperature at the same angle is known. The method of W estimate is demonstrated with two sets of experimental data, one from a controlled field experiment by a mobile tower and the other, from aircraft overflight. The results from both data sets are encouraging when the estimated W's are compared with the acquired ground truth of W's in the top 2 cm layer. An offset between the estimated and the measured W's exists in the results of the analyses, but that can be accounted for by the presently poor knowledge of the relationship between W and smooth field brightness temperature for various types of soils. An approach to quantify this relationship for different soils and thus improve the method of W estimate is suggested.

  15. Laser frequency locking with 46 GHz offset using an electro-optic modulator for magneto-optical trapping of francium atoms

    Harada, K; Ezure, S; Kato, K; Hayamizu, T; Kawamura, H; Inoue, T; Arikawa, H; Ishikawa, T; Aoki, T; Uchiyama, A; Sakamoto, K; Ito, S; Itoh, M; Ando, S; Hatakeyama, A; Hatanaka, K; Imai, K; Murakami, T; Nataraj, H S; Shimizu, Y; Sato, T; Wakasa, T; Yoshida, H P; Sakemi, Y

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated a frequency offset locking between two laser sources using a waveguide-type electro-optic modulator (EOM) with 10th-order sidebands for magneto-optical trapping of Fr atoms. The frequency locking error signal was successfully obtained by performing delayed self-homodyne detection of the beat signal between the repumping frequency and the 10th-order sideband component of the trapping light. Sweeping the trapping-light and repumping-light frequencies with keeping its frequency difference of 46 GHz was confirmed over 1 GHz by monitoring the Doppler absorption profile of I2. This technique enables us to search for a resonance frequency of magneto-optical trapping of Fr.

  16. Second-order fractional Talbot effect induced frequency-doubling optical pulse injection for 40 GHz rational-harmonic mode-locking of an SOA fiber laser

    A second-order fractional Talbot effect induced frequency-doubling of a 10 GHz optical pulse-train is demonstrated to backward injection mode-lock a semiconductor optical amplifier fiber laser (SOAFL) for 40 GHz rational-harmonic mode-locking (RHML). That is, a real all-optical gain-modulation of the SOAFL can be created by injecting such a time-multiplexed but pseudo-frequency-doubled pulse-train into the cavity. The time-multiplexing pulse-train can thus be transformed into a frequency-multiplied pulse-train via cross-gain modulation (XGM). The optical pulse-train at 10 GHz is generated by nonlinearly driving an electro-absorption modulator (EAM), which experiences the second-order fractional Talbot effect after propagating through a 4 km long dispersion compensation fiber (DCF). The DCF not only plays the role of frequency-doubler but also compensates the frequency chirp of the 10 GHz optical pulse-train. The pulsewidth broadening from 22 to 60 ps for initiating the time-domain Talbot effect is simulated by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. With careful detuning of the RF modulation power of the EAM at 5 dBm, the generated 20 GHz optical pulse-train exhibits a positive frequency chirp with minimum peak-to-peak value of 2 GHz, and the peak-amplitude fluctuation between adjacent pulses is below 1.4%. In comparison with the SOAFL pulse-train repeated at 40 GHz generated by the fourth-order purely RHML process, the optimized second-order fractional Talbot effect in combination with the second-order RHML mechanism significantly enhances the modulation-depth of RHML, thus improving the on/off extinction ratio of the 40 GHz SOAFL pulse-train from 1.8 to 5.6 dB. Such a new scheme also provides a more stable 40 GHz RHML pulse-train from the SOAFL with its timing jitter reducing from 0.51 to 0.23 ps. (paper)

  17. Radio Frequency Mapping using an Autonomous Robot: Application to the 2.4 GHz Band

    Lebreton, J. M.; Murad, N. M.; Lorion, R.

    2016-03-01

    Radio signal strength measurement systems are essential to build a Radio Frequency (RF) mapping in indoor and outdoor environments for different application scenarios. This paper presents an autonomous robot making the construction of a radio signal mapping, by collecting and forwarding different useful information related to all access point devices and inherent to the robot towards the base station. A real case scenario is considered by measuring the RF field from our department network. The RF signal mapping consistency is shown by fitting the measurements with the radio signal strength model in two-dimensional area, and a path-loss exponent of 2.3 is estimated for the open corridor environment.

  18. Design of a LNA in the frequency band 1.8-2.2GHz in 0.13μm CMOS Technology

    E. Di Gioia

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this work is a low noise amplifier (LNA, operating in the frequency range 1.8-2.1GHz. The CMOS 0.13μm technology is used in respect to the low cost of the final device. Among the specifications, a variable gain and an adjustable working frequency are required. In particular, four different working modes are provided: 1.8, 1.9 and 2.1GHz high gain and 2.1GHz low gain. The amplifier is designed to be used as first stage of a receiver for mobile telephony. For this reason low power consumption is taken into consideration (low supply voltage and low drain currents. A simple digital circuit, integrated on-chip, is used to select the operating mode of the LNA by means of two input pins. A Noise figure of 1dB is obtained with a supply voltage of 0.8V.

  19. Effects of low intensity electromagnetic irradiation of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies and antibiotics on energy-dependent proton and potassium ion transport by E. coli.

    Torgomyan, H

    2012-12-01

    The effects of low intensity (flux capacity 0.06 mW/cm2) coherent electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies and their combined effects with antibiotics--ceftriaxone or kanamycin (0.4 or 15 microM, correspondingly) on E. coli K12 growth and survival have been reported previously. To further study the effects of EMI and antibiotics and mechanisms, decrease in overall energy (glucose)-dependent H+ and K+ fluxes across the cell membrane was investigated in E. coli. The depression of H+ and K+ fluxes rate was maximally achieved with the 73 GHz frequency. The EMI strengthened the effect of N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide (DCCD, an inhibitor of the F0F1-ATPase). The 73 GHz EMI had more influence on H+ efflux inhibition, whereas 70.6 GHz on K+ influx. Also, EMI strengthened the depressive effects of ceftriaxone and kanamycin on the overall and DCCD-inhibited H+ and K+ fluxes. The 73 GHz EMI strengthened the effect of ceftriaxone on both ions fluxes. Kanamycin depressed H+ efflux more as compared to ceftriaxone, which was also strengthened with EMI. The results of E. coli H+ and K+ transport systems activities depression by irradiation and the irradiation effect on DCCD and antibiotics action indicated the EMI and antibiotics causing primary changes in the bacterial membrane. PMID:23350277

  20. Numerical investigation of In{sub 0.23}Ga{sub 0.77}As-based planar Gunn diodes with fundamental frequency up to 116 GHz

    Li, B.; Wen, C. [Southwest University of Science and Technology, School of Science, Mianyang (China); Liu, H.X. [Xidian University, School of Microelectronics, Xi' an (China)

    2015-09-15

    The current capability and frequency of In{sub 0.23}Ga{sub 0.77}As-based planar Gunn diode have been studied using numerical simulation. Our simulated results are well in agreement with the experimental observation with fundamental frequency operating up to 116 GHz. Through the Fast Fourier transform algorithm, it has been revealed that oscillating frequency tunes downward slightly with increased applied voltage above threshold voltage, and a second-harmonic frequency is observed at 233 GHz for 1.45-μm channel length. This structure provides feasibility of generating a tunable millimeter wave or terahertz wave source and has an overwhelming advantage over equivalent traditional vertical structure because of increased facilitated integration and flexibility. (orig.)

  1. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    Biri, S., E-mail: biri@atomki.hu [National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS), 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Institute for Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen, Bem tér 18/c (Hungary); Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Drentje, A. G. [National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS), 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Rácz, R. [Institute for Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen, Bem tér 18/c (Hungary); Yano, K.; Kato, Y. [Graduated School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sasaki, N.; Takasugi, W. [Accelerator Engineering Corporation (AEC), Inage, Chiba 263-0043 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1–18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1–18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode.

  2. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences.

    Biri, S; Kitagawa, A; Muramatsu, M; Drentje, A G; Rácz, R; Yano, K; Kato, Y; Sasaki, N; Takasugi, W

    2014-02-01

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide band-width (17.1-18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1-18.5 GHz), and the effect of this frequency on the HCI-production rate was examined under several operation conditions. As an overall result, new beam records of highly charged argon, krypton, and xenon beams were obtained at the NIRS-HEC ion source by this high-power two-frequency operation mode. PMID:24593510

  3. Impedance Modeling for a Unit Cell of the Square Loop Frequency Selective Surface at 2.4 GHz

    M.Z.A. Abd. Aziz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Equivalent Circuit (EC method gives a simple alternative method in Frequency Selective Surface (FSS analyses which are useful for quickly predicting the characteristic of FSS. An impedance modeling of the Equivalent Circuit (EC for a unit cell of the square loop FSS structure is presented in this paper. The unit cell of the square loop FSS is designed and simulated using the CST Microwave Studio software at 2.4 GHz based on industrial, scientific and medical bands (ISM standard. The square loop FSS is simulated without FSS, with square FSS and square FSS with slot. The investigation has been done on the length of substrate (s, width of substrate (w, length of square FSS (a and length of square FSS with slot (b. Real (Re and Imaginary (Im component of EC or known as resistance and reactancehas been modeled based on physical parameters of the design structure of the FSS. The resistance and reactance of the impedance are depending on the geometry of the unit cell of FSS. This impedancemodelling can be used to design the advance FSS for the similar ISM band. EC gives a simple alternative method in FSS analyses which are useful for quickly predicting the performance of FSS.

  4. A More Precise Empirical Formula for Estimating Normalized Fog Attenuation in the Millimeter-Wave Frequency Range 30 ~ 100 GHz

    Mao, Xia; Liu, Yun-Long; Chen, Li-Jiang; Xue, Yu-Li

    2013-04-01

    At millimeter wavelengths, normalized fog attenuation (NFA) in units of (dB/km)/ (g/m3) is generally calculated by the Rayleigh approximation when working wavelengths are much larger than the average diameter of fog droplets. The calculations of the Rayleigh approximation are much less than those of Mie scattering theory, but still complex and heavy. To solve the above problem and facilitate the engineering applications of the Rayleigh approximation, a new empirical formula is discussed to estimate NFA in the frequency range 30 ~ 100 GHz and the fog common temperature range -8 ~ 20 °C. The simulation results of the new formula are compared with those got by other three empirical formulae: the Altshuler empirical formula, the Liebe empirical formula and the Zhao empirical formula. Maximal absolute value of the relative errors (MAVRE) and Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC) indicate the largest deviation of estimated results and the fitting performance of an empirical formula, respectively. Comparisons show that the MAVRE of the new formula is only 4.482 %, which is much smaller than those of the other three formulae. The mean value of the Pearson correlation coefficients (PCCs) of the proposed formula is 0.999943, larger than those of other methods. Additionally, relative error (RE) curves of the four empirical formulae are given at four certain temperatures -8 °C, 0 °C, 10 °C and 20 °C.

  5. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Cavity design and linear analysis of 225 GHz frequency-quadrupling gyroklystron

    Liu, Di-Wei; Yuan, Xue-Song; Yan, Yang; Liu, Sheng-Gang

    2009-07-01

    This paper considers the frequency-quadrupling three-cavity gyroklystrons with successive frequency-doubling in each cavity. The cavities of 225 GHz frequency-quadrupling gyroklystron are designed with the scattering matrices method and the possible operating mode are discussed. With the point-gap theory, the starting currents of the possible operating modes and the potential parasitic modes in the output cavity are calculated. The optimal operating mode is proposed under consideration of the mode competition and the power capacity of the cavity.

  6. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    Biri, S; Muramatsu, M; Drentje, A G; Rácz, R; Yano, K; Kato, Y; Sasaki, N; Takasugi, W

    2015-01-01

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide bandwidth (17.1-18.5 GHz) travelling-wave-tube amplifier (TWTA) was installed. After some single tests with klystron and TWT amplifiers the simultaneous injection of the two microwaves has been successfully realized. The dependence of highly charged ions (HCI) currents on the superposed microwave power was studied by changing only the output power of one of the two amplifiers, alternatively. While operating the klystron on its fixed 18.0 GHz, the frequency of the TWTA was swept within its full limits (17.1-18.5 GHz), and the effec...

  7. Enhanced Microwave Absorption of SiO2-Coated Fe0.65Co0.35 Flakes at a Wide Frequency Band (1-18 GHz)

    Luo, Hui; Gong, Rongzhou; Wang, Xian; Song, Kai; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G.

    2016-07-01

    Fe0.65Co0.35 (Fe-35Co) flakes were coated with SiO2 by the Stober process. The complex permittivity and permeability of both Fe-35Co and Fe-35Co/SiO2 composites were investigated over the frequency range of 1-18 GHz. Two dielectric resonance peaks were found in the Fe-35Co/SiO2 composite. Magnetic loss was verified to arise predominately from the natural resonance. Of particular importance is the natural resonance frequency increases with the SiO2 cladding. The experiments indicated that a reflection loss (RL) less than -20 dB for the Fe-35Co/SiO2 composites can be measured over the frequency range of 5.16-10.6 GHz with an absorbing thickness of 2-3.5 mm. Furthermore, an optimal RL of -60.23 dB was observed at 6.27 GHz with a thickness of 2.93 mm. The results provide a valuable path towards realizing microwave absorption over a wide frequency range.

  8. High Current Multi-finger InGaAs/InP Double Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor with the Maximum Oscillation Frequency 253 GHz

    A four-finger InGaAs/InP double heterojunction bipolar transistor is designed and fabricated successfully by using planarization technology. The emitter area of each finger is 1 × 15μm2. The breakdown voltage is more than 7 V, the maximum collector current could be more than 100 mA. The current gain cutoff frequency is as high as 155 GHz and the maximum oscillation frequency reaches 253 GHz. The heterostructure bipolar transistor can offer more than 70mW class-A maximum output power at W band and the maximum power density can be as high as 1.2W/mm. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  9. UWB and 60-GHz RF generation and transmission over WDM-PON based on bidirectional asymmetric polarization modulation and frequency multiplication

    Liu, Weilin; Yao, Jianping

    2013-10-01

    A novel scheme to simultaneously provide UWB, 60-GHz millimeter-wave (mmW), and baseband services over a wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) passive optical network (PON) is proposed and demonstrated. In the proposed system, an OOK Gaussian pulse signal is modulated on the optical carrier and then converted to an OOK UWB impulse signal at an edge filter, a baseband signal and a 30-GHz signal are then modulated on the same optical carrier. By employing polarization multiplex technique, the UWB and baseband signal will have orthogonal polarization directions and the spectrum interference between the two signals is avoided. By suppressing the optical carrier, a frequencydoubled mmW signal at 60 GHz is generated by beating the two 1st order sidebands at a photodetector (PD). Error-free transmission of a UWB signal at 2.5 Gbps and a wired baseband signal at 2.5 and 5 Gbps over a 25-km single-mode fiber (SMF) is achieved. A frequency-doubled mmW signal at 60 GHz is also obtained.

  10. Up to 427 GHz All Optical Frequency Down-Conversion Clock Recovery Based on Quantum-Dash Fabry―Perot Mode-Locked Laser

    Costa E Silva, Marcia; Lagrost, Alexandra; Bramerie, Laurent; Gay, Mathilde; Besnard, Pascal; Joindot, Michel; Simon, Jean-Claude; Shen, Alexandre; Duan, Guang-Hua

    2011-01-01

    International audience This paper reports on all optical frequency down conversion clock recovery based on Quantum-Dash Fabry-Perot mode-locked laser diode (QD-MLLD). A first section is dedicated to the generation of a tunable repetition rate pulse source based on a first QD-MLLD. The principle is to select three lines in the QD-MLLD spectrum with a filtering technique; the lines spacing are properly chosen to generate the desired repetition rate. In this paper, a frequency of 427 GHz was ...

  11. THE EFFECT INDUCED BY MILLIMETER WAVES WITH THE FREQUENCY 53.33 GHZ ON SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE CNMN-Y-18 YEAST STRAIN

    Agafia Usatîi; Elena Molodoi; Nadejda Efromova; Ludmila Fulga

    2015-01-01

    The effect of extremely high frequency electromagnetic waves on the biosynthetic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-18 yeast strain in dependence on the duration of irradiation was studied. The maximum amount of biomass, protein, carbohydrates, mannoproteins and catalase has been showed to accumulate when the yeast cells were irradiated with a frequency f = 53.33 GHz for 10 minutes. High degree of dependence between the content of cellular components (a correlation coefficient betwee...

  12. 11.8GHz低相噪频率源的设计%Design of 11.8 GHz low phase noise frequency synthesizer

    綦超; 姜兴

    2012-01-01

    Low phase noise frequency synthesizer plays an important role in radar system. A 11. 8 GHz low phase noise frequency synthesizer is designed for automotive anti-collision radar. Based on the study of phase locked-loop CPLL) , the possibility for the implement of low phase noise is analysed, the design of the phase frequency detector, the VCO and the loop-filter is also introduced. The test result of the 11. 8 GHz frequency synthesizer shows low phase noise is below —90 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz. The other results also reach intended targets. The 11. 8 GHz low phase noise frequency synthesizer enhances the performance of the automotive anti-collision radar.%针对汽车防撞雷达系统,设计了11.8 GHz低相噪频率源.在对锁相环技术研究的基础上,分析相位噪声达到要求指标的可行性,并介绍鉴相器电路、压控振荡器电路以及环路滤波器电路的设计.测试结果表明该输出频率为11.8 GHz的频率源获得很好的相位噪声性能,实现1 kHz处相位噪声指标优于-90 dBc/Hz,并且其他指标均达到要求.11.8 GHz低相噪频率源能提高汽车防撞雷达系统的性能.

  13. Hybrid bidirectional radio-over-fiber-based orthogonal frequency division multiple access-passive optical network supporting 60/120 GHz using offset quadrate phase shift keying

    Zhang, Chongfu; Chen, Chen; Qiu, Kun

    2015-09-01

    A hybrid bidirectional orthogonal frequency division multiple access-passive optical network (OFDMA-PON) based on offset quadrate phase shift keying (OQPSK) to support 60- and 120-GHz radio-over-fiber system is proposed. The system can support wired/wireless applications and enable the dynamic bandwidth allocation according to a subscriber's application. It is successfully achieved by using the millimeter waves (MMWs) generation and the carrier-reuse technique. In the proposed scheme, the MMW bands used for downlink (DL) and uplink transmissions are generated at the optical line terminal by the dual-arm Mach-Zehnder modulators. Both 60- and 120-GHz MMWs are obtained for the transmission of the high bit-rate services in source-free optical network units (ONUs), only using a single 15-GHz sinusoidal wave source. The Rayleigh backscattering effect is considered in the proposed OQPSK-based OFDMA-PON. For DL transmission over a 30-km single-mode fiber, the power penalties are less than 0.8 and 1 dB for the OQPSK-OFDM wired data at 10 Gb/s and the OQPSK-OFDM wireless data at 5 Gb/s, respectively.

  14. THE EFFECT INDUCED BY MILLIMETER WAVES WITH THE FREQUENCY 53.33 GHZ ON SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE CNMN-Y-18 YEAST STRAIN

    Agafia Usatîi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of extremely high frequency electromagnetic waves on the biosynthetic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN-Y-18 yeast strain in dependence on the duration of irradiation was studied. The maximum amount of biomass, protein, carbohydrates, mannoproteins and catalase has been showed to accumulate when the yeast cells were irradiated with a frequency f = 53.33 GHz for 10 minutes. High degree of dependence between the content of cellular components (a correlation coefficient between R2 = 0.875 and 0.926 it has been shown which demonstrates that biosynthetic processes were influenced by the same phenomenon - millimeter waves. A procedure for increasing of mannoprotein content in yeasts with the utilization of extremely high frequency waves has been proposed in this study.

  15. Relationship between peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate and peak temperature elevation in human head in frequency range of 1–30 GHz

    Morimoto, Ryota; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the peak temperature elevation and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue in human head models in the frequency range of 1–30 GHz. As a wave source, a half-wave dipole antenna resonant at the respective frequencies is located in the proximity of the pinna. The bioheat equation is used to evaluate the temperature elevation by employing the SAR, which is computed by electromagnetic analysis, as a heat source. The computed SAR is post-processed by calculating the peak spatial-averaged SAR with six averaging algorithms that consider different descriptions provided in international guidelines and standards, e.g. the number of tissues allowed in the averaging volume, different averaging shapes, and the consideration of the pinna. The computational results show that the SAR averaging algorithms excluding the pinna are essential when correlating the peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna. In the averaging scheme considering an arbitrary shape, for better correlation, multiple tissues should be included in the averaging volume rather than a single tissue. For frequencies higher than 3–4 GHz, the correlation for peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna is modest for the different algorithms. The 95th percentile value of the heating factor as well as the mean and median values derived here would be helpful for estimating the possible temperature elevation in the head.

  16. Planck intermediate results: VII. Statistical properties of infrared and radio extragalactic sources from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue at frequencies between 100 and 857 GHz

    Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.;

    2013-01-01

    We make use of the Planck all-sky survey to derive number counts and spectral indices of extragalactic sources-infrared and radio sources-from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) at 100 to 857 GHz (3 mm to 350 μm). Three zones (deep, medium and shallow) of approximately...... Planck High Frequency Instrument, all the sources have been classified as either dust-dominated (infrared galaxies) or synchrotron-dominated (radio galaxies) on the basis of their spectral energy distributions (SED). Our sample is thus complete, flux-limited and color-selected to differentiate between...

  17. Photonic filtering of microwave signals in the frequency range of 0.01-20 GHz using a Fabry-Perot filter

    We demonstrate experimentally the efficiency of tuning of a photonic filter in the frequency range of 0.01 to 20 GHz. The presented work combines the use of a multimode optical source associated with a dispersive optical fiber to obtain the filtering effect. Tunability effect is achieved by the use of a Fabry-Perot filter that allows altering the spectral characteristics of the optical source. Experimental results are validated by means of numerical simulations. The scheme here proposed has a potential application in the field of optical telecommunications.

  18. Continuous-Wave Operation of a Frequency-Tunable 460-GHz Second-Harmonic Gyrotron for Enhanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Torrezan, Antonio C.; Han, Seong-Tae; Mastovsky, Ivan; Shapiro, Michael A; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Griffin, Robert G.; Barnes, Alexander B.

    2010-01-01

    The design, operation, and characterization of a continuous-wave (CW) tunable second-harmonic 460-GHz gyrotron are reported. The gyrotron is intended to be used as a submillimeter-wave source for 700-MHz nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with sensitivity enhanced by dynamic nuclear polarization. The gyrotron operates in the whispering-gallery mode TE11,2 and has generated 16 W of output power with a 13-kV 100-mA electron beam. The start oscillation current measured over a range of magnet...

  19. Astrometrically Registered Simultaneous Observations of the 22 GHz H$_2$O and the 43GHz SiO masers towards R Leonis Minoris using KVN and Source/Frequency Phase Referencing

    Dodson, Richard; Jung, Tae-Hyun; Sohn, Bong-Won; Byun, Do-Young; Cho, Se-Hyung; Lee, Sang-Sung; Kim, Jongsoo; Kim, Kee-Tae; Oh, Chung-Sik; Han, Seog-Tae; Je, Do-Heung; Chung, Moon-Hee; Wi, Seog-Oh; Kang, Jiman; Lee, Jung-Won; Chung, Hyunsoo; Kim, Hyo-Ryoung; Kim, Hyun-Goo; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Oh, Se-Jin; Yeom, Jae-Hwan; Song, Min-Gyu; Kang, Yong-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars can be intense emitters of SiO ($v$=1 and 2, J=1$\\rightarrow$0) and H$_2$O maser lines at 43 and 22 GHz, respectively. VLBI observations of the maser emission provide a unique tool to probe the innermost layers of the circumstellar envelopes in AGB stars. Nevertheless, the difficulties in achieving astrometrically aligned \\water\\ and $v$=1 and $v$=2 SiO maser maps have traditionally limited the physical constraints that can be placed on the SiO maser pumping mechanism. We present phase referenced simultaneous spectral-line VLBI images for the SiO $v$=1 and $v$=2, J=1$\\rightarrow$0, and H$_2$O maser emission around the AGB star R\\,LMi, obtained from the Korean VLBI Network (KVN). The simultaneous multi-channel receivers of the KVN offer great possibilities for astrometry in the frequency domain. With this facility we have produced images with bona-fide absolute astrometric registration between high frequency maser transitions of different species to provide the p...

  20. Flexible electromagnetic wave sensor operating at GHz frequencies for instantaneous concentration measurements of NaCl, KCl, MnCl2 and CuCl solutions

    A novel electromagnetic wave sensor operating at GHz frequencies for real-time chlorides concentration analysis is reported. The sensor response to deionized water, NaCl, KCl, MnCl2 and CuCl solutions at various concentrations was tested. The sensing element, in the form of a silver pattern antenna that emits an electromagnetic field, was printed on a polyimide flexible laminate substrate to form a sensor to suit a broad range of applications, where a sensor could be placed in water reservoirs or fluid-carrying pipes for continuous analysis. The developed system confirmed the viability of using microwaves for real-time chloride solutions monitoring as the reflected signals represented by S11 parameters were unique with clearly observed shifts in the resonant frequencies and amplitude changes when placed in direct contact with 20 µl of each solution. (paper)

  1. A stabilized 18 GHz chip-scale optical frequency comb at 2.8x10-16 relative inaccuracy

    Huang, S.-W.; Yang, J.; Yu, M.; McGuyer, B. H.; Kwong, D. -L.; Zelevinsky, T.; Wong, C. W.

    2015-01-01

    Optical frequency combs, coherent light sources that connect optical frequencies with microwave oscillations, have become the enabling tool for precision spectroscopy, optical clockwork and attosecond physics over the past decades. Current benchmark systems are self-referenced femtosecond mode-locked lasers, but four-wave-mixing in high-Q resonators have emerged as alternative platforms. Here we report the generation and full stabilization of CMOS-compatible optical frequency combs. The spira...

  2. Theoretical and experimental study of two-frequency solid-state lasers in the GHz to THz ranges. Opto-microwave applications waves

    We explored some new features of single- and dual-frequency solid-state lasers oscillating in continuous-wave or pulsed regimes. First, we have developed some techniques to optimise the characteristics of pulsed lasers. A weak modulation of the pump power made it possible to obtain a stable repetition rate with a relative stability of 10-6. The pulse duration was continuously controlled from ten nanoseconds to a few hundreds nanoseconds by three different methods: adjustment of the laser beam diameter in the absorber, adjustment of the pump beam diameter in the active medium, and, in particular, the use of forked eigenstates in a two-axis laser. Moreover, the forked eigenstates allows to increase the pulse energy by coherent addition of the pulses. A compact two-frequency Nd:YAG-Cr:YAG laser with a beat note frequency continuously adjustable up to 2,7 GHz was demonstrated. The two-frequency pulses are ideal sources to meet various needs of applications such as the Doppler lidar-radar. Moreover, we show that two-frequency pulses at 1,55 μm can be obtained by using a new c-cut Co:ASL saturable absorber in an Er-Yb:glass laser. These pulses are perfectly adapted to free-space detection systems requiring eye safety. The coherence time of the beat note in these lasers was also studied: it is limited by the pulse duration. A new technique of modulating the pump power of a solid-state laser at frequencies close to its relaxation oscillation frequency was studied and made it possible to generate a beat note coherence from pulse to pulse. Frequency conversion techniques using the nonlinear optical effects make it possible to obtain tunable two-frequency sources in the visible spectrum. Green and red two-frequency pulses were obtained by using different conversion techniques, intra-cavity or extra-cavity. A two-frequency THz source in the red spectrum was also obtained by doubling the frequencies of a two-frequency THz Er-Yb:glass laser using a mixed fan-out PPLN crystal

  3. Direct generation of 12.5-GHz-spaced optical frequency comb with ultrabroad coverage in near-infrared region by cascaded fiber configuration.

    Kashiwagi, Ken; Kurokawa, Takashi; Okuyama, Yasushi; Mori, Takahiro; Tanaka, Yosuke; Yamamoto, Yoshinori; Hirano, Masaaki

    2016-04-18

    We generated a 12.5-GHz-spacing optical frequency comb that can be resolved over 100 THz, from 1040 to 1750 nm, without spectral mode filtering. To cover such a broad spectrum, we used electro-optic modulation of single frequency light and line-by-line pulse synthesis to produce a clear pulse train and subsequent spectral broadening in highly nonlinear fibers (HNLFs). We numerically and experimentally investigated a configuration of the HNLFs and find that a two-stage broadening through different HNLFs is required when using limited pulse energy at a high repetition rate. We designed and fabricated solid silica-based HNLFs with small zero-dispersion wavelengths to obtain strong spectral broadening, especially at the shorter wavelengths. The individual lines of the proposed frequency comb are resolvable with high contrast over the entire spectral range. The results described in this paper should lead to the development of multicarrier sources for wavelength-division-multiplexing communication and super-multi-point frequency calibration for spectrometers, especially in astrophysics. PMID:27137251

  4. Electromagnetic energy absorption potential and microwave heating capacity of SiC thin films in the 1-16 GHz frequency range

    We report on the electromagnetic (EM) absorption potential and microwave heating capacity of amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbide thin films (a-SiC:H) in the 1-16 GHz frequency domain. a-SiC:H thin films with typical thickness of 1 μm were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on [1 0 0] undoped silicon substrates, and exhibit a deep EM absorption - up to 96% of the total EM energy irradiation - which is systematically converted into heat. Two-wavelength pyrometer tests show that temperatures exceeding 2000 K can be reached in a very short time, less than 100 s exposure to microwaves, showing a promising potential for specific microwave heating applications.

  5. Dosimetry of a set-up for the exposure of newborn mice to 2.45-GHz WiFi frequencies

    This work describes the dosimetry of a two waveguide cell system designed to expose newborn mice to electromagnetic fields associated with wireless fidelity signals in the frequency band of 2.45 GHz. The dosimetric characterisation of the exposure system was performed both numerically and experimentally. Specific measures were adopted with regard to the increase in both weight and size of the biological target during the exposure period. The specific absorption rate (SAR, W kg-1) for 1 W of input power vs. weight curve was assessed. The curve evidenced an SAR pattern varying from -1 to > 6 W kg-1 during the first 5 weeks of the life of mice, with a peak resonance phenomenon at a weight around 5 g. This curve was used to set the appropriate level of input power during experimental sessions to expose the growing mice to a defined and constant dose. (authors)

  6. Research and Development of 2-frequency (110/138 GHz FADIS for JT-60SA ECHCD system

    Idei H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A FAst DIrectional Switch (FADIS of 2-frequency (2-ƒ gyrotron system for the JT-60SA project is being developed under collaboration between Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA and Kyushu University. At first, the frequency drift and dip in the gyrotron operation were measured to consider which kind of FADIS is preferred for application in the Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECHCD system for the JT- 60SA. Various types of the FADIS have been considered. A square corrugated waveguide diplexer system with double resonant rings was considered as one of the most attractive FADIS systems for stable high-power and long-pulse operations in the 2-ƒ JT-60SA ECHCD system.

  7. A 2-to-2.4-GHz differentially-tuned fractional-N frequency synthesizer for DVB tuner applications

    This paper describes the design of a fractional-N frequency synthesizer for digital video broadcasting-terrestrial (DVB-T) receivers. Transfer functions in differentially-tuned PLL are derived and loop parameters are designed. In addition, a fully-differential charge pump is presented. An 8/9 high speed prescaler is analyzed and the design considerations for the CML logic are also presented. Test results show that the RMS phase error is less than 0.70 in integer-N mode and less than 10 in fractional-N mode. The implemented frequency synthesizer draws 10 mA from a 1.8-V supply while occupying a die area of about 1-mm2 in a 0.18-μm CMOS process.

  8. A 2-to-2.4-GHz differentially-tuned fractional-N frequency synthesizer for DVB tuner applications

    Meng Lingbu; Lu Lei; Zhao Wei; Tang Zhangwen, E-mail: zwtang@fudan.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of ASIC and System, Fudan University, Shanghai 201203 (China)

    2010-07-15

    This paper describes the design of a fractional-N frequency synthesizer for digital video broadcasting-terrestrial (DVB-T) receivers. Transfer functions in differentially-tuned PLL are derived and loop parameters are designed. In addition, a fully-differential charge pump is presented. An 8/9 high speed prescaler is analyzed and the design considerations for the CML logic are also presented. Test results show that the RMS phase error is less than 0.7{sup 0} in integer-N mode and less than 1{sup 0} in fractional-N mode. The implemented frequency synthesizer draws 10 mA from a 1.8-V supply while occupying a die area of about 1-mm{sup 2} in a 0.18-{mu}m CMOS process.

  9. A 2-to-2.4-GHz differentially-tuned fractional-N frequency synthesizer for DVB tuner applications

    Lingbu, Meng; Lei, Lu; Wei, Zhao; Zhangwen, Tang

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes the design of a fractional-N frequency synthesizer for digital video broadcasting-terrestrial (DVB-T) receivers. Transfer functions in differentially-tuned PLL are derived and loop parameters are designed. In addition, a fully-differential charge pump is presented. An 8/9 high speed prescaler is analyzed and the design considerations for the CML logic are also presented. Test results show that the RMS phase error is less than 0.7° in integer-N mode and less than 1° in fractional-N mode. The implemented frequency synthesizer draws 10 mA from a 1.8-V supply while occupying a die area of about 1-mm2 in a 0.18-μm CMOS process.

  10. Escherichia coli membrane-associated energy-dependent processes and sensitivity toward antibiotics changes as responses to low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies.

    Torgomyan, Heghine; Trchounian, Armen

    2012-04-01

    Escherichia coli K-12(λ) was sensitive toward low-intensity (non-thermal, flux capacity 0.06 mW cm(-2)) electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of extremely high frequency-70.6 and 73 GHz. 1 h exposure to EMI markedly depressed growth and cell viability of bacteria. Membrane-associated processes-total H(+) efflux and H(2) evaluation by whole cells during glucose fermentation were shown to be lowered as well. At the same time, the F(0)F(1)-ATPase activity of membrane vesicles was little depressed with 70.6 GHz irradiation only. This finding was in conformity with non-changed N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-sensitive H(+) efflux. Furthermore, for understanding the different frequencies action mechanisms, the effects of antibiotics (chloramphenicol, ceftriaxone, kanamycin, and tetracycline) on irradiated cells growth and survival were determined. EMI with the frequencies of 70.6 and 73 GHz as with 51.8 and 53.0 GHz enhanced the sensitivity of bacteria toward antibiotics, but comparison revealed that each frequency had a different portion. Probably, EMI of specific frequency triggered changes in biological processes and afterward in growth and viability of bacteria, creating conditions when the action of antibiotics became facilitated. PMID:22101511

  11. 10-25 GHz frequency reconfigurable MEMS 5-bit phase shifter using push-pull actuator based toggle mechanism

    Dey, Sukomal; Koul, Shiban K.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a frequency tunable 5-bit true-time-delay digital phase shifter using radio frequency microelectromechanical system (RF MEMS) technology. The phase shifter is based on the distributed MEMS transmission line (DMTL) concept utilizing a MEMS varactor. The main source of frequency tuning in this work is a bridge actuation mechanism followed by capacitance variation. Two stages of actuation mechanisms (push and pull) are used to achieve a 2:1 tuning ratio. Accurate control of the actuation voltage between the pull to push stages contributes differential phase shift over the band of interest. The functional behavior of the push-pull actuation over the phase shifter application is theoretically established, experimentally investigated and validated with simulation. The phase shifter is fabricated monolithically using a gold based surface micromachining process on an alumina substrate. The individual primary phase-bits (11.25°/22.5°/45°/90°/180°) that are the fundamental building blocks of the complete 5-bit phase shifter are designed, fabricated and experimentally characterized from 10-25 GHz for specific applications. Finally, the complete 5-bit phase shifter demonstrates an average phase error of 4.32°, 2.8°, 1° and 1.58°, an average insertion loss of 3.76, 4.1, 4.2 and 4.84 dB and an average return loss of 11.7, 12, 14 and 11.8 dB at 10, 12, 17.2 and 25 GHz, respectively. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported band tunable stand alone 5-bit phase shifter in the literature which can work over the large spectrum for different applications. The total area of the 5-bit phase shifter is 15.6 mm2. Furthermore, the cold-switched reliability of the unit cell and the complete 5-bit MEMS phase shifter are extensively investigated and presented.

  12. 10–25 GHz frequency reconfigurable MEMS 5-bit phase shifter using push–pull actuator based toggle mechanism

    This paper presents a frequency tunable 5-bit true-time-delay digital phase shifter using radio frequency microelectromechanical system (RF MEMS) technology. The phase shifter is based on the distributed MEMS transmission line (DMTL) concept utilizing a MEMS varactor. The main source of frequency tuning in this work is a bridge actuation mechanism followed by capacitance variation. Two stages of actuation mechanisms (push and pull) are used to achieve a 2:1 tuning ratio. Accurate control of the actuation voltage between the pull to push stages contributes differential phase shift over the band of interest. The functional behavior of the push–pull actuation over the phase shifter application is theoretically established, experimentally investigated and validated with simulation. The phase shifter is fabricated monolithically using a gold based surface micromachining process on an alumina substrate. The individual primary phase-bits (11.25°/22.5°/45°/90°/180°) that are the fundamental building blocks of the complete 5-bit phase shifter are designed, fabricated and experimentally characterized from 10–25 GHz for specific applications. Finally, the complete 5-bit phase shifter demonstrates an average phase error of 4.32°, 2.8°, 1° and 1.58°, an average insertion loss of 3.76, 4.1, 4.2 and 4.84 dB and an average return loss of 11.7, 12, 14 and 11.8 dB at 10, 12, 17.2 and 25 GHz, respectively. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported band tunable stand alone 5-bit phase shifter in the literature which can work over the large spectrum for different applications. The total area of the 5-bit phase shifter is 15.6 mm2. Furthermore, the cold-switched reliability of the unit cell and the complete 5-bit MEMS phase shifter are extensively investigated and presented. (paper)

  13. Analysing limits for human exposure to electromagnetic fields in accordance with ITU- k.52 standard for frequencies between 10 khz and 3 GHz in urban areas of Bucaramanga

    José de Jesús Rugeles Uribe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an overview of the results obtained from testing the limits of human exposure to 10KHz to 3GHZ frequencies in the city of Bucaramanga (Colombia, taking into account decree 195-2005 approved by the Colombian Ministry of Communications, based on International Telecommunication Union (ITU recommendation K.52. Measuring levels of exposure to electromagnetic radiation at three chosen locations in the city considered to be sensitive did not reveal that exposure limits were being exceeded. Mobile phone, modulated amplitude emission, frequency modulation and television bands installed at the sites several years ago were also measured. Levels ob-tained from electric field strength exceeded 100 dBuV / m in all cases, maximum value being 139 dBuV / m. Levels were well below exposure limits established by the K-52 rule. The highest levels for the general public’s exposure were 1.74964% in the AM band and 0.006408% for the cellular band between 869 and 894 MHz. This article also contains a description of the modules, exposure limits, acquisition and geo-positioning using the EspecVIEW tool designed for performing several types of measurements by Ministry officials and used in this study.

  14. A 3.1-4.8 GHz transmitter with a high frequency divider in 0.18 μm CMOS for OFDM-UWB

    Zheng Renliang; Ren Junyan; Li Wei; Li Ning

    2009-01-01

    A fully integrated low power RF transmitter for a WiMedia 3.1-4.8 GHz multiband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing ultra-wideband system is presented. With a separate transconductance stage, the quadrature up-conversion modulator achieves high linearity with low supply voltage. The co-design of different resonant frequencies of the modulator and the differential to single (D2S) converter ensures in-band gain flatness. By means of a series inductor peaking technique, the D2S converter obtains 9 dB more gain without extra power consumption. A divided-by-2 divider is used for carrier signal generation. The measurement results show an output power between -10.7 and -3.1 dBm with 7.6 dB control range, an OIP3 up to 12 dBm, a sideband rejection of 35 dBc and a carrier rejection of 30 dBc. The ESD protected chip is fabricated in the Jazz 0.18/zm RF CMOS process with an area of 1.74 mm~2 and only consumes 32 mA current (at 1.8 V) including the test associated parts.

  15. FDTD calculation of whole-body average SAR in adult and child models for frequencies from 30 MHz to 3 GHz

    Due to the difficulty of the specific absorption rate (SAR) measurement in an actual human body for electromagnetic radio-frequency (RF) exposure, in various compliance assessment procedures the incident electric field or power density is being used as a reference level, which should never yield a larger whole-body average SAR than the basic safety limit. The relationship between the reference level and the whole-body average SAR, however, was established mainly based on numerical calculations for highly simplified human modelling dozens of years ago. Its validity is being questioned by the latest calculation results. In verifying the validity of the reference level with respect to the basic SAR limit for RF exposure, it is essential to have a high accuracy of human modelling and numerical code. In this study, we made a detailed error analysis in the whole-body average SAR calculation for the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method in conjunction with the perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundaries. We derived a basic rule for the PML employment based on a dielectric sphere and the Mie theory solution. We then attempted to clarify to what extent the whole-body average SAR may reach using an anatomically based Japanese adult model and a scaled child model. The results show that the whole-body average SAR under the ICNIRP reference level exceeds the basic safety limit nearly 30% for the child model both in the resonance frequency and 2 GHz band

  16. The contribution of microbunching instability to solar flare emission in the GHz to THz range of frequencies

    Michael Klopf, J. [Department of Applied Science, College of William and Mary, McGlothlin-Street Hall, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Kaufmann, Pierre; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Szpigel, Sérgio [Centro de Rádio-Astronomia e Astrofísica Mackenzie, Escola de Engenharia, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Rua Consolação 896, São Paulo, SP 01302-907 (Brazil)

    2014-08-10

    Recent solar flare observations in the sub-terahertz range have provided evidence of a new spectral component with fluxes increasing for larger frequencies, separated from the well-known microwave emission that maximizes in the gigahertz range. Suggested interpretations explain the terahertz spectral component but do not account for the simultaneous microwave component. We present a mechanism for producing the observed 'double spectra'. Based on coherent enhancement of synchrotron emission at long wavelengths in laboratory accelerators, we consider how similar processes may occur within a solar flare. The instability known as microbunching arises from perturbations that produce electron beam density modulations, giving rise to broadband coherent synchrotron emission at wavelengths comparable to the characteristic size of the microbunch structure. The spectral intensity of this coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can far exceed that of the incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), which peaks at a higher frequency, thus producing a double-peaked spectrum. Successful CSR simulations are shown to fit actual burst spectral observations, using typical flaring physical parameters and power-law energy distributions for the accelerated electrons. The simulations consider an energy threshold below which microbunching is not possible because of Coulomb repulsion. Only a small fraction of the radiating charges accelerated to energies above the threshold is required to produce the microwave component observed for several events. The ISR/CSR mechanism can occur together with other emission processes producing the microwave component. It may bring an important contribution to microwaves, at least for certain events where physical conditions for the occurrence of the ISR/CSR microbunching mechanism are possible.

  17. Compact MIMO Microstrip Antennas for USB Dongle Operating in 2.5–2.7 GHz Frequency Band

    Vladimir Ssorin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers design of microstrip MIMO antennas for an LTE/WiMAX USB dongle operating in the 2.5–2.7 GHz frequency band. The MIMO system includes two antenna elements with an additional requirement of high isolation between them that is especially difficult to realize due to size limitations of a USB dongle. Three approaches to achieve the needed system characteristics using microstrip PCB antennas are proposed. For the first design, high port-to-port isolation is achieved by using a decoupling techniques based on a direct connection of the antenna elements. For the second approach, high port-to-port isolation of the MIMO antenna system is realized by a lumped decorrelation capacitance between antenna elements feeding points. The third proposed antenna system does not use any special techniques, and high port-to-port isolation is achieved by using only the properties of a developed printed inverted-F antenna element. The designed MIMO antenna systems have the return loss S11 and the insertion loss S21 bandwidths of more than 200 MHz at the −8 dB level with the correlation coefficient lower than 0.1 and exhibit pattern diversity when different antenna elements are excited. Experimental measurements of the fabricated antenna systems proved the characteristics obtained from electromagnetic simulation.

  18. Performance Analysis of OFDM 60GHz System and SC-FDE 60GHz System

    Han Xueyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the performance of 60GHz wireless communication system with SC and OFDM is studied, the models of OFDM 60GHz system and SC 60GHz frequency domain equalization (SC-FDE system are established, and the bit error rate (BER performance of OFDM 60GHz system and SC-FDE 60GHz system in 802.15.3c channels is compared. The simulation results show that SC-FDE 60GHz system has a slight advantage over OFDM system in line-of-sight (LOS channels, while OFDM 60GHz system has a slight advantage over SC-FDE system in non-line-of-sight (NLOS channels. For 60GHz system, OFDM 60GHz system has a slight advantage over SC-FDE system in overcoming multipath fading, but the performance of both is close whether in the LOS or NLOS case.

  19. Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies enhances the effects of disulfide bonds reducer on Escherichia coli growth and affects the bacterial surface oxidation-reduction state

    Torgomyan, Heghine [Department of Biophysics of Biology Faculty, Yerevan State University, Yerevan 0025 (Armenia); Trchounian, Armen, E-mail: Trchounian@ysu.am [Department of Biophysics of Biology Faculty, Yerevan State University, Yerevan 0025 (Armenia)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Low intensity 70.6 and 73 GHz electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) strongly suppressed Escherichia coli growth at 73 GHz and pH 7.3. {yields} Reducer DL-dithiothreitol had bactericidal effect and disturbed the SH-groups number. {yields} EMI enhanced E. coli sensitivity toward dithiothreitol. {yields} EMI decreased the SH-groups number of membrane disturbed by ATP and N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide. {yields} The changed membrane oxidation-reduction state could be the primary mechanisms in EMI effects. -- Abstract: Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies (flux capacity - 0.06 mW cm{sup -2}) had bactericidal effects on Escherichia coli. This EMI (1 h) exposure suppressed the growth of E. coli K-12({lambda}). The pH value (6.0-8.0) did not significantly affect the growth. The lag-phase duration was prolonged, and the growth specific rate was inhibited, and these effects were more noticeable after 73 GHz irradiation. These effects were enhanced by the addition of DL-dithiothreitol (DTT), a strong reducer of disulfide bonds in surface membrane proteins, which in its turn also has bactericidal effect. Further, the number of accessible SH-groups in membrane vesicles was markedly decreased by EMI that was augmented by N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide and DTT. These results indicate a change in the oxidation-reduction state of bacterial cell membrane proteins that could be the primary membranous mechanism in the bactericidal effects of low-intensity EMI of the 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies.

  20. Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies enhances the effects of disulfide bonds reducer on Escherichia coli growth and affects the bacterial surface oxidation-reduction state

    Highlights: → Low intensity 70.6 and 73 GHz electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) strongly suppressed Escherichia coli growth at 73 GHz and pH 7.3. → Reducer DL-dithiothreitol had bactericidal effect and disturbed the SH-groups number. → EMI enhanced E. coli sensitivity toward dithiothreitol. → EMI decreased the SH-groups number of membrane disturbed by ATP and N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide. → The changed membrane oxidation-reduction state could be the primary mechanisms in EMI effects. -- Abstract: Low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) of 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies (flux capacity - 0.06 mW cm-2) had bactericidal effects on Escherichia coli. This EMI (1 h) exposure suppressed the growth of E. coli K-12(λ). The pH value (6.0-8.0) did not significantly affect the growth. The lag-phase duration was prolonged, and the growth specific rate was inhibited, and these effects were more noticeable after 73 GHz irradiation. These effects were enhanced by the addition of DL-dithiothreitol (DTT), a strong reducer of disulfide bonds in surface membrane proteins, which in its turn also has bactericidal effect. Further, the number of accessible SH-groups in membrane vesicles was markedly decreased by EMI that was augmented by N,N'-dicyclohexycarbodiimide and DTT. These results indicate a change in the oxidation-reduction state of bacterial cell membrane proteins that could be the primary membranous mechanism in the bactericidal effects of low-intensity EMI of the 70.6 and 73 GHz frequencies.

  1. Rain and cloud effects on a satellite dual-frequency radar altimeter system operating at 13.5 and 35 GHz

    Walsh, E. J.; Monaldo, F. M.; Goldhirsh, J.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of clouds and rain on the return waveform signatures from satellite borne radar altimeters operating at 13.5 and 35 GHz are examined. It is specifically demonstrated that spatial nonuniformity in the cloud liquid water content or variations of the rain rate may result in significant distortions of the altimeter signature. The distorted signal is produced as a result of nonuniform attenuation occurring at the different range bins associated with the reflected signal. Determination of the mean sea height by employing tracking algorithms on these distorted echoes may result in gross errors. Although the influence of clouds on the altimeter signature and hence tracking precision is minimal at 13.5 GHz (e.g., less than 4 cm for a 1-s average), it may produce unacceptable mean sea level uncertainties at 35 GHz (e.g., 20 cm for a 1-s average) assuming a significant waveheight of 4 m. On the other hand, the signatures at both 13.5 GHz and 35 GHz become grossly distorted for rain rates of 10 mm/h and higher resulting in mean sea height errors of 46 and 65 cm, respectively, for significant wave heights of 2 m.

  2. Conducted noise suppression up to GHz range by spin-sprayed Ni0.2ZnxFe2.8-xO4 (x=0.3, 0.6) films having different natural resonance frequencies

    In order to apply to a novel, flexible type of GHz noise suppressors, we prepared Ni0.2ZnxFe2.8-xO4 films with x=0.3 and 0.6 and thicknesses of 2 and 5μm, by spin spray ferrite plating from an aqueous solution on polyimide sheets at 90 deg. C. Placing the films onto a microstrip line, we measured transmission loss ΔPloss and reflection parameter S11 at 10MHz-10GHz. As x increased from 0.3 to 0.6, fr (natural resonance frequency) decreased from 350 to 50MHz, which resulted in decreasing fc (a frequency from which ΔPloss begins rising) from 400 to 100MHz. This means we can tune fc of the films by changing the Zn concentration x. At 8GHz, ΔPloss obtained by the ferrite films increased from 40% to 70% when their thickness increased from 2 to 5μm. We obtained S11loss=40%, which was as strong as that obtained by a commercially available composite sheet type noise suppressor of 25μm thickness that are made of ferromagnetic metal flakes embedded in a flexible polymer matrix. Moreover, ΔPloss by the ferrite film increased to 70% when the thickness was increased to 5μm. Therefore, our NiZn ferrite films are promising to be actually used as GHz noise suppressors with tunable working frequencies that exhibit stronger noise suppression than the commercialized composite type of noise suppressors

  3. The effects of low-intensity electromagnetic irradiation at the frequencies of 51.8 and 53 GHz and antibiotic ceftazidime on Lactobacillus acidophilus F0F1 ATP-ase activity

    The effects of low intensity electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) at the frequencies 51.8 and 53 GHz and antibiotic ceftazidime on N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), inhibited ATP-ase activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus membrane vesicles were investigated. It was shown that both frequencies decreased the ATP-ase activity, moreover, ceftazidime increase the sensitivity of cells to DCCD, inhibitor of the F0F1-ATP-ase. EMI combined with ceftazidime and DCCD markedly decreased the ATPase activity. The F0F1-ATP-ase is suggested can be a target for the effects observed

  4. 34 GHz pulsed magnicon project

    A high efficiency, high power magnicon amplifier at 34.272 GHz has been designed as a radiation source to drive a multi-TeV electron-positron linear collider. Simulations predict a peak output power of 45 MW in a 1.5 microsecond pulse with an efficiency of 45% and a gain of 55 dB. The amplifier is a frequency tripler, or third harmonic amplifier, in that the output frequency of 34.272 GHz is three times the input drive frequency of 11.424 GHz. Thus the rotating TM110 modes in the drive cavity, 3 gain cavities and 2 penultimate cavities are resonant near 11.424 GHz; and the rotating TM310 mode in the output cavity is resonant at 34.272 GHz. A 500 kV, 215 A high area compression electron gun will provide an electron beam with a diameter less then 1 mm. A superconducting solenoid magnet will provide a magnetic field of 13 kG in the deflection system and 23 kG in the output cavity. Simulation results for the operation of the entire magnicon amplifier (gun, magnetic system, RF system and collector) will be given, and the status described of critical hardware components

  5. Highly-efficient 1-GHz-repetition-frequency femtosecond Yb3+:KY(WO42 laser for super-continuum generation

    Leburn C.G.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a 1.024-GHz-repetition-rate femtosecond Yb3+:KY(WO42 laser with 61% optical-to-optical efficiency and 69% slope efficiency, generating a supercontinuum of bandwidth 400 nm in silica photonic-crystal fibre. RIN measurements of the laser yielded values <0.1%.

  6. VALIDATION STUDY OF PATH LOSS MODELS ON WIMAX AT 2.6 GHZ FREQUENCY BAND IN SUBURBAN ENVIRONMENT FOR CELL SIZE PLANNING

    Pratibha Maina; Gopal Chandra Manna; Namrata Sahayam

    2014-01-01

    The radio wave propagation in form of path loss model plays very significant role in planning of anywireless communication network. Measurement of signal strength of OFDM driven WiMAX technology at 2.6 GHz band is taken in Suburban Town of India. The results are analyzed and compared with Empirical path loss models such as Hata-Okumura, Modified Hata and COST-231Hata. COST-231 model shows highest path loss for suburban environment. These analyzed results establish that COST-231 model is suita...

  7. Contribution to the analysis and design of reflectarray antennas for reconfigurable beam applications at frequencies above 100 GHz using liquid crystal technology

    Pérez Palomino, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    El trabajo contenido en esta tesis doctoral está encuadrado en el desarrollo de antenas reconfigurables electrónicamente capaces de proporcionar prestaciones competitivas a las aplicaciones cada vez más comunes que operan a frecuencias superiores a 60 GHz. En concreto, esta tesis se centra en el estudio, diseño, e implementación de las antenas reflectarray, a las que se introduce la tecnología de cristal líquido como elemento característico con el que se consigue reconfigurabilidad de haz de ...

  8. Impact of High Power Interference Sources in Planning and Deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks and Devices in the 2.4 GHz Frequency Band in Heterogeneous Environments

    Francisco Falcone

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the impact of radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens and its effect on 802.15.4 ZigBee-compliant wireless sensor networks operating in the 2.4 GHz Industrial Scientific Medical (ISM band is analyzed. By means of a novel radioplanning approach, based on electromagnetic field simulation of a microwave oven and determination of equivalent radiation sources applied to an in-house developed 3D ray launching algorithm, estimation of the microwave oven’s power leakage is obtained for the complete volume of an indoor scenario. The magnitude and the variable nature of the interference is analyzed and the impact in the radio link quality in operating wireless sensors is estimated and compared with radio channel measurements as well as packet measurements. The measurement results reveal the importance of selecting an adequate 802.15.4 channel, as well as the Wireless Sensor Network deployment strategy within this type of environment, in order to optimize energy consumption and increase the overall network performance. The proposed method enables one to estimate potential interference effects in devices operating within the 2.4 GHz band in the complete scenario, prior to wireless sensor network deployment, which can aid in achieving the most optimal network topology.

  9. 105 GHz Notch Filter Design for Collective Thomson Scattering

    Furtula, Vedran; Michelsen, Poul; Leipold, Frank; Johansen, T.; Korsholm, Søren Bang; Meo, Fernando; Moseev, Dmitry; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Salewski, Mirko; Stejner Pedersen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    A millimeter-wave notch filter with 105-GHz center frequency, >20-GHz passband coverage, and 1-GHz rejection bandwidth has been constructed. The design is based on a fundamental rectangular waveguide with cylindrical cavities coupled by narrow iris gaps, i.e., small elongated holes of negligible...

  10. Vela X at 31 GHz

    Hales, A S; Alvarez, H; May, J; Bronfman, L; Readhead, A C; Pearson, T J; Mason, B S; Dodson, R

    2004-01-01

    We present observations of the Vela X region at 31 GHz using the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI). We find a strong compact radio source (5.9'x4.1', FWHM) about the Vela pulsar, which we associate with the Vela pulsar wind nebula (PWN) recently discovered at lower radio-frequencies. The CBI's 4' resolution for a 45' field of view allows the PWN to be studied in the large-scale context of Vela X. Filamentary structure in Vela X, which stands out in lower frequency maps, is very low-level at 31 GHz. By combining the 10 CBI channels, which cover 26-36 GHz, and 8.4 GHz archive data, we study the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the PWN and the brightest filaments. Our results show that the spectral index alpha (F_{nu} propto nu^alpha) of the PWN is flat, or even marginally positive, with a value of alpha_{8.4}^{31}=0.10+-0.06, while the Vela X filamentary structure has a negative spectral index of alpha_{8.4}^{31}=-0.28+-0.09. The SED inhomogeneity observed in Vela X suggests different excitation processes bet...

  11. Synchrotron Spectral Curvature from 22 MHZ to 23 GHZ

    Kogut, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    We combine surveys of the radio sky at frequencies 22 MHz to 1.4 GHz with data from the ARCADE-2 instrument at frequencies 3 GHz to 10 GHz to characterize the frequency spectrum of diffuse synchrotron emission in the Galaxy. The radio spectrum steepens with frequency from 22 MHz to 10 GHz. The projected spectral index at 23 GHz derived from the low-frequency data agrees well with independent measurements using only data at frequencies 23 GHz and above. Comparing the spectral index at 23 GHz to the value from previously published analyses allows extension of the model to higher frequencies. The combined data are consistent with a power-law index beta = -2.64 +/-= 0.03 at 0.31 GHz, steepening by an amount of Delta-beta = 0.07 every octave in frequency. Comparison of the radio data to models including the cosmic-ray energy spectrum suggests that any break in the synchrotron spectrum must occur at frequencies above 23 GHz.

  12. Two-frequency heating technique at the 18 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences

    Biri, S.; Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M; Drentje, A. G.; Rácz, R.; Yano, K.; Kato, Y; Sasaki, N; Takasugi, W.

    2015-01-01

    The two-frequency heating technique was studied to increase the beam intensities of highly charged ions provided by the high-voltage extraction configuration (HEC) ion source at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The observed dependences on microwave power and frequency suggested that this technique improved plasma stability but it required precise frequency tuning and more microwave power than was available before 2013. Recently, a new, high-power (1200 W) wide bandwidth...

  13. Recent Tests on 117.5 GHz and 170 GHz Gyrotrons

    Felch K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two megawatt-class gyrotrons at frequencies of 117.5 GHz and 170 GHz have recently been fabricated and tested at CPI. The 117.5 GHz gyrotron was designed to produce up to 1.8 MW for 10-second pulses, and will be used for electron cyclotron heating and current drive on the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics. The 170 GHz gyrotron is specified as a 500 kW CW system, but has been designed with the goal of generating up to 1 MW CW. Oak Ridge National Laboratory will use the gyrotron in ITER ECH transmission line testing.

  14. Recommended safety procedures for the installation and use of radiofrequency and microwave devices in the frequency range 10 MHz-300 GHz

    Studies of possible hazards to human health from exposure to radio frequency and microwave radiation show that there is a need for controls. Exposure to high levels of radio frequency and microwave radiation over prolonged periods can cause adverse health effects. The type and extent of injury depend not only on the intensity (strength) of the field and the exposure duration but also on various other factors such as the frequency of the radiation, type of modulation, polarization, and distance from the source. (auth)

  15. Electronic transport in boron carbides: temperature (4K-300K), frequency (0-1 GHz) and composition (B13C2-B4C) effects

    Boron carbide is a light ceramics of industrial interest. The equilibrium diagram reveals a large compositional range (B9C to B4C). The compositions close to the boundary B4C are obtained by pressing directly in graphite dies while the other compositions were obtained by using boron nitride lined graphite dies and boron additions to the commercial powders. The starting point of the present study was the idea to use the electrical transport properties as possible ways of characterising the industrial materials. We were thus led to measure at low temperatures dc and ac conductivity, dielectric constant and thermopower. The successful study of a measurement method for ac measurements between 10 KHz and 1 GHz and between 4 K and 300 K was one of the main experimental points of the present work. ac measurements have permitted a clear separation between bulk and grain boundary effects on the transport. The bulk results were analysed in terms of the usual conduction models in disordered solids (hopping, polarons...)

  16. Delivering Microwave Spectroscopy to the Masses: a Design of a Low-Cost Microwave Spectrometer Operating in the 18-26 GHZ Frequency Range

    Steber, Amanda; Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    Advances in chip-level microwave technology in the communications field have led to the possibilities of low cost alternatives for current Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometers. Many of the large, expensive microwave components in a traditional design can now be replaced by robust, mass market monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs). "Spectrometer on a board" designs are now feasible that offer dramatic cost reduction for microwave spectroscopy. These chip-level components can be paired with miniature computers to produce compact instruments that are operable through USB. A FTMW spectrometer design using the key MMIC components that drive cost reduction will be presented. Two dual channel synthesizers (Valon Technology Model 5008), a digital pattern generator (Byte Paradigm Wav Gen Xpress), and a high-speed digitizer/arbitrary waveform generator combination unit (Tie Pie HS-5 530 XM) form the key components of the spectrometer for operation in the 18-26.5 GHz range. The design performance is illustrated using a spectrometer that is being incorporated into a museum display for astrochemistry. For this instrument a user interface, developed in Python, has been developed and will be shown.

  17. Contactless Investigations of Yeast Cell Cultivation in the 7 GHz and 240 GHz Ranges

    Using a microfluidic system based on PTFE tubes, experimental results of contactless and label-free characterization techniques of yeast cell cultivation are presented. The PTFE tube has an inner diameter of 0.5 mm resulting in a sample volume of 2 μ1 for 1 cm sample length. Two approaches (at frequencies around 7 GHz and 240 GHz) are presented and compared in terms of sensitivity and applicability. These frequency bands are particularly interesting to gain information on the permittivity of yeast cells in Glucose solution. Measurements from 240 GHz to 300 GHz were conducted with a continuous wave spectrometer from Toptica. At 7 GHz band, measurements have been performed using a rat-race based characterizing system realized on a printed circuit board. The conducted experiments demonstrate that by selecting the phase as characterization parameter, the presented contactless and label-free techniques are suitable for cell cultivation monitoring in a PTFE pipe based microfluidic system.

  18. Transient DNA damage induced by high-frequency electromagnetic fields (GSM 1.8 GHz) in the human trophoblast HTR-8/SVneo cell line evaluated with the alkaline comet assay

    One of the most controversial issue regarding high-frequency electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) is their putative capacity to affect DNA integrity. This is of particular concern due to the increasing use of HF-EMF in communication technologies, including mobile phones. Although epidemiological studies report no detrimental effects on human health, the possible disturbance generated by HF-EMF on cell physiology remains controversial. In addition, the question remains as to whether cells are able to compensate their potential effects. We have previously reported that a 1-h exposure to amplitude-modulated 1.8 GHz sinusoidal waves (GSM-217 Hz, SAR = 2 W/kg) largely used in mobile telephony did not cause increased levels of primary DNA damage in human trophoblast HTR-8/SVneo cells. Nevertheless, further investigations on trophoblast cell responses after exposure to GSM signals of different types and durations were considered of interest. In the present work, HTR-8/SVneo cells were exposed for 4, 16 or 24 h to 1.8 GHz continuous wave (CW) and different GSM signals, namely GSM-217 Hz and GSM-Talk (intermittent exposure: 5 min field on, 10 min field off). The alkaline comet assay was used to evaluate primary DNA damages and/or strand breaks due to uncompleted repair processes in HF-EMF exposed samples. The amplitude-modulated signals GSM-217 Hz and GSM-Talk induced a significant increase in comet parameters in trophoblast cells after 16 and 24 h of exposure, while the un-modulated CW was ineffective. However, alterations were rapidly recovered and the DNA integrity of HF-EMF exposed cells was similar to that of sham-exposed cells within 2 h of recovery in the absence irradiation. Our data suggest that HF-EMF with a carrier frequency and modulation scheme typical of the GSM signal may affect the DNA integrity.

  19. Radio frequency electromagnetic radiation (RF-EMR from GSM (0.9/1.8GHz mobile phones induces oxidative stress and reduces sperm motility in rats

    Maneesh Mailankot

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Mobile phones have become indispensable in the daily lives of men and women around the globe. As cell phone use has become more widespread, concerns have mounted regarding the potentially harmful effects of RF-EMR from these devices. OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of RF-EMR from mobile phones on free radical metabolism and sperm quality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male albino Wistar rats (10-12 weeks old were exposed to RF-EMR from an active GSM (0.9/1.8 GHz mobile phone for 1 hour continuously per day for 28 days. Controls were exposed to a mobile phone without a battery for the same period. The phone was kept in a cage with a wooden bottom in order to address concerns that the effects of exposure to the phone could be due to heat emitted by the phone rather than to RF-EMR alone. Animals were sacrificed 24 hours after the last exposure and tissues of interest were harvested. RESULTS: One hour of exposure to the phone did not significantly change facial temperature in either group of rats. No significant difference was observed in total sperm count between controls and RF-EMR exposed groups. However, rats exposed to RF-EMR exhibited a significantly reduced percentage of motile sperm. Moreover, RF-EMR exposure resulted in a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and low GSH content in the testis and epididymis. CONCLUSION: Given the results of the present study, we speculate that RF-EMR from mobile phones negatively affects semen quality and may impair male fertility.

  20. Measurements of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss at MHz and GHz frequencies for ionic exchange resin embedded in concrete and bitumen

    Dielectric measurements have been carried out on concrete and bitumen containing ion exchange resin. The results indicate that absorption of radio waves would not prohibit measurements being made on full size waste forms, except in the case of concrete at high frequencies. The results also indicate that dielectric measurements on wastes may provide information related to the water content of concrete and bitumen, and possibly also to the curing time of concrete. (Auth.)

  1. Measurement of the circular polarization of radio sources at frequencies of 0.63, 1.4, 5.0 and 8.9 GHz

    Circular polarization measurements were made with the Parkes 64 m telescope on 66 mainly extragalactic sources, 33 of which were studied at two or more frequencies. Circular polarization was definitely found in the eight quasistellar sources PKS0237-23, 0537-441, 1127-14, 1226+02 (3C273), 1253-05 (3C279), 2134+004, 2145+06 and 2345-16, as it was measured at the 4sigma level or higher in at least two observing sessions. For all eight sources the total power spectrum shows the effects of self-absorption. For none of the eight is there evidence of a reversal of the sense of polarization with frequency. For several of the sources of the degree of circular polarization changed by a factor >2 between observing sessions, while any accompanying change in total flux density was <20%. Instrumental effects are discussed in some detail. Fluctuations due to system noise provide the main limitation, but for strong sources uncertainties in the determination of the zero of polarization are important. (author)

  2. Gyrotrons for magnetic fusion applications at 110 GHz and 170 GHz

    Cahalan P.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two megawatt-class gyrotrons at frequencies of 110 GHz and 170 GHz have recently been fabricated at CPI. The 110 GHz gyrotron is designed to produce 1.2 MW of output power for 10-second pulses, and will be used for electron cyclotron heating and current drive on the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics. This gyrotron has completed factory testing and has been delivered to General Atomics for installation and additional testing. The 170 GHz gyrotron, though specified as a 500 kW CW system, has been designed with the goal of generating up to 1 MW CW. Oak Ridge National Laboratory will use this gyrotron in ITER ECH transmission line testing. This gyrotron has been fabricated and is awaiting factory testing, Design features of each gyrotron are described, and test data for the 110 GHz gyrotron are presented.

  3. Millimeter wave transmission studies of YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films in the 26.5 to 40.0 GHz frequency range

    Miranda, F. A.; Gordon, W. L.; Bhasin, K. B.; Heinen, V. O.; Warner, J. D.; Valco, G. J.

    1989-01-01

    Millimeter wave transmission measurements through YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) thin films on MgO, ZrO2 and LaAlO3 substrates, are reported. The films (approx. 1 micron) were deposited by sequential evaporation and laser ablation techniques. Transition temperatures T sub c, ranging from 89.7 K for the Laser Ablated film on LaAlO3 to approximately 72 K for the sequentially evaporated film on MgO, were obtained. The values of the real and imaginary parts of the complex conductivity, sigma 1 and sigma 2, are obtained from the transmission data, assuming a two fluid model. The BCS approach is used to calculate values for an effective energy gap from the obtained values of sigma sub 1. A range of gap values from 2 DELTA o/K sub B T sub c = 4.19 to 4.35 was obtained. The magnetic penetration depth is evaluated from the deduced values of sigma 2. These results are discussed together with the frequency dependence of the normalized transmission amplitude, P/P sub c, below and above T sub c.

  4. A 250 GHz Gyrotron with a 3 GHz Tuning Bandwidth for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a novel tunable 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator with >10 W output power over most of a 3 GHz band and >35 W peak power. The tuning bandwidth and power are sufficient to generate a >1 MHz nutation frequency across the entire nitroxide EPR lineshape for cross effect DNP, as well as to excite solid effect transitions utilizing other radicals, without the need for sweeping the NMR magnetic field. Substantially improved tunability is achieved by implementin...

  5. 38 GHz Antennas on Micromachined Silicon Substrates.

    Marcelli, Romolo; Dragoman, M.; Neculoiu, Dan; Giacomozzi, Flavio; Muller, Alexandru; Nitescu, N.

    2001-01-01

    A new configuration of a double folded double slot CPW feed micromachined antenna array was realized on a 1.5 µm thin three-layer dielectric membrane fabricated on a silicon substrate. The antenna was designed for an operating frequency of 38 GHz, and the double folded configuration was used for minimizing the membrane extension.

  6. Traveling-Wave Maser for 32 GHz

    Shell, James; Clauss, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The figure depicts a traveling-wave ruby maser that has been designed (though not yet implemented in hardware) to serve as a low-noise amplifier for reception of weak radio signals in the frequency band of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The design offers significant improvements over previous designs of 32-GHz traveling-wave masers. In addition, relative to prior designs of 32-GHz amplifiers based on high-electron-mobility transistors, this design affords higher immunity to radio-frequency interference and lower equivalent input noise temperature. In addition to the basic frequency-band and low-noise requirements, the initial design problem included a requirement for capability of operation in a closed-cycle helium refrigerator at a temperature .4 K and a requirement that the design be mechanically simplified, relative to prior designs, in order to minimize the cost of fabrication and assembly. Previous attempts to build 32- GHz traveling-wave masers involved the use of metallic slow-wave structures comprising coupled transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-mode resonators that were subject to very tight tolerances and, hence, were expensive to fabricate and assemble. Impedance matching for coupling signals into and out of these earlier masers was very difficult. A key feature of the design is a slow-wave structure, the metallic portions of which would be mechanically relatively simple in that, unlike in prior slow-wave structures, there would be no internal metal steps, irises, or posts. The metallic portions of the slow-wave structure would consist only of two rectangular metal waveguide arms. The arms would contain sections filled with the active material (ruby) alternating with evanescent-wave sections. This structure would be transparent in both the signal-frequency band (the aforementioned range of 31.8 to 32.3 GHz) and the pump-frequency band (65.75 to 66.75 GHz), and would impose large slowing factors in both frequency bands. Resonant ferrite isolators would be placed in the

  7. Low Cost Automated Module Assembly for 180 GHz Devices Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Emergence of Indium Phosphide IC's has made possible devices operating at frequencies up to 200GHZ and beyond. Building modules using these devices opens a goldmine...

  8. VLBI difference astrometry at 43GHz

    Guirado, J C; Pérez-Torres, M A; Ros, E

    2000-01-01

    From 43GHz VLBA observations of the pair of radio sources 1928+738 and2007+777 we have demonstrated the feasibility of precision phase-delaydifferential astrometric techniques at millimeter wavelengths. For a pair ofsources with 5 degrees separation and high antenna elevations, we have shownthat present astrometric models and millimeter arrays are advanced enough tomodel the differential phase-delay to within 2 picoseconds, less than one tenthof a phase-cycle at 43GHz. The root-mean-square of the differential phase-delayresiduals is dominated by the fluctuations of the atmospheric water vapor. Wehave determined the relative position of the observed sources with a precisiontwofold better than previous determinations at lower frequencies and, moreimportantly, largely free from ambiguous definitions of the reference point onthe structure of the radio sources. Our result makes 43GHz VLBI phase-delaydifferential astrometry an ideal tool to study the absolute kinematics of thehighly variable structures of regions n...

  9. A 75-116-Ghz LNA with 23-K Noise Temperature at 108 Ghz

    Varonen, Mikko; Reeves, Rodrigo; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Samoska, Lorene; Cleary, Kieran; Gawande, Rohit; Fung, Andy; Gaier, Todd; Weinreb, Sander; Readhead, Anthony C. S.; Sarkozy, Stephen; Lai, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the design and measurement results, both on-wafer and in package, of an ultra-low-noise and wideband monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier in the frequency range of 75 to 116 GHz. The three-stage amplifier packaged in a WR10 waveguide housing and fabricated using a 35-nm InP HEMT technology achieves a record noise temperature of 23 K at 108 GHz when cryogenically cooled to 27 K. The measured gain is 22 to 27 dB for frequency range of 75 to 116 GHz. Furthermore, the amplifier utilizes four finger devices with total gate width of 60 um resulting for improved linearity.

  10. Oscillations up to 712 GHz in InAs/AlSb resonant-tunneling diodes

    Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.; Mahoney, L. J.; Molvar, K. M.; Soderstrom, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    Oscillations have been obtained at frequencies from 100 to 712 GHz in InAs/AlSb double-barrier resonant-tunneling diodes at room temperature. The measured power density at 360 GHz was 90 W/sq cm, which is 50 times that generated by GaAs/AlAs diodes at essentially the same frequency. The oscillation at 712 GHz represents the highest frequency reported to date from a solid-state electronic oscillator at room temperature.

  11. Turn-over in pulsar spectra above 1 GHz

    Kijak, J.; Gupta, Y; Krzeszowski, K.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first direct evidence for turn-over in pulsar radio spectra at high frequencies. Two pulsars are now shown to have a turn-over frequency > 1GHz. We also find some evidence that the peak frequency of turn-over in pulsar spectra appears to depend on dispersion measure and pulsar age.

  12. SEVENTH HARMONIC 20 GHz CO-GENERATOR

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2014-04-08

    To satisfy the need for multi-MW rf sources in frequency ranges where commercial sources do not exist, a study was undertaken on a class of devices based on gyro-harmonic frequency multiplication. This mechanism relies upon adding energy in gyrating motion to a linear electron beam that traverses a rotating-mode TE111-mode drive cavity in a dc magnetic field. The beam then drifts along the magnetic field into a second cavity, operating in the TEn11-mode tuned to the nth harmonic of the drive cavity. Studies of this configuration have been carried out for 2 < n < 7. Results are given for multi-MW, efficient operation of a 7th harmonic device operating at 20 GHz, and a 2nd harmonic device operating at 22.4 GHz.

  13. Design and Development of Low Pass Filter at 60 GHz

    Sanjeev Kumar Shah

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and development of low pass filter (LPF at 60 GHz. The present design uses stepped impedance method in suspended strip line. The design is modeled and optimized using CST (Computer Simulation Technology microwave studio. The design of a filter types that Tchebysheve 0.1 dB ripple in the passband with the standard bandwidth of 2% and 30 dB attenuation at 94 GHz. The 60 GHz low pass filter exhibits an insertion loss of 1 dB with 3 dB relative bandwidth at a cut-off frequency of 60 GHz and the return loss is better than -18 dB at a cut-off frequency. The designed and fabricated low pass filter shows the good performance for planar integrated millimeter-wave circuits

  14. 60 Gbit/s 400 GHz Wireless Transmission

    Yu, Xianbin; Asif, Rameez; Piels, Molly;

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a 400 GHz carrier wireless transmission system with real-time capable detection and demonstrate transmission of a 60 Gbit/s signal derived from optical Nyquist channels in a 12.5 GHz ultra-dense wavelength division multiplexing (UD-WDM) grid and carrying QPSK...... modulation. This is the highest data rate demonstrated for carrier frequencies above 300 GHz and also validates the feasibility of bridging between next generation 100 GbE wired data streams and indoor wireless applications....

  15. A Low-jitter 2.5-to-10 GHz Clock Multiplier Unit in CMOS

    Beek, van, P.; Vaucher, C.S.; Leenaerts, D. M. W.; Klumperink, E.A.M.; Nauta, B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a low-jitter clock multiplier unit [1] that generates a 10 GHz output clock from a 2.5 GHz reference clock. An integrated 10 GHz LCoscillator is locked to the input clock, using a simple and fast phase detector circuit. This phase detector overcomes the speed limitation of a conventional tri-state Phase Frequency Detector, by eliminating an internal feedback loop. A frequency detector guarantees PLL locking without degenerating jitter performance. The clock multiplier ...

  16. A 94-GHz Millimeter-Wave Sensor for Speech Signal Acquisition

    Jianqi Wang; Hua Zhang; Huijun Xue; Hao Lv; Xiao Yu; Yang Zhang; Guohua Lu; Ying Tian; Sheng Li; Xijing Jing

    2013-01-01

    High frequency millimeter-wave (MMW) radar-like sensors enable the detection of speech signals. This novel non-acoustic speech detection method has some special advantages not offered by traditional microphones, such as preventing strong-acoustic interference, high directional sensitivity with penetration, and long detection distance. A 94-GHz MMW radar sensor was employed in this study to test its speech acquisition ability. A 34-GHz zero intermediate frequency radar, a 34-GHz superheterodyn...

  17. 60 GHz SIW Steerable Antenna Array in LTCC

    Bahram Sanadgol; Sybille Holzwarth; Peter Uhlig; Alberto Milano; Raft Popovich

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a 60 GHz substrate-integrated waveguide fed-steerable low-temperature cofired ceramics array. The antenna is suitable for transmitting and receiving on the 60 GHz wireless personal area network frequency band. The wireless system can be used for HDTV, high-data-rate networking up to 4.5 GBit/s, security and surveillance, and similar applications.

  18. 60 GHz MAC Standardization: Progress and Way Forward

    2015-01-01

    Communication at mmWave frequencies has been the focus in the recent years. In this paper, we discuss standardization efforts in 60 GHz short range communication and the progress therein. We compare the available standards in terms of network architecture, medium access control mechanisms, physical layer techniques and several other features. Comparative analysis indicates that IEEE 802.11ad is likely to lead the short-range indoor communication at 60 GHz. We bring to the fore resolved and un...

  19. Above 8GHz Static T-Flip-Flop Operation using FT=22.9GHz GaAs MESFETs

    Riishøj, J; Danielsen, Per Lander

    1992-01-01

    A static SCFL Toggle Flip-Flop GaAs IC having maximum operating frequency of Fdiv=8.25GHz has been designed using a commercially available GaAs MESFET foundry service. The average Ft for the present wafer is Ft=22.9GHz giving a very high Fdiv/Ft-ratio of Fdiv/Ft=0.36. In addition output voltage...

  20. High performance 33.2 GHz gyroklystron

    The design for a high performance, 33.2 GHz three-cavity gyroklystron has been completed. The design modifies Varian's pioneering 28 GHz gyroklystron in order to suppress oscillation and yield higher gain and efficiency. Modifications include an additional buncher cavity, lower beam α, and a slight increase in frequency. Self-consistent simulation for an axial velocity spread of 7% and α = 1.5 predicts an output power of 250 kW with a saturated gain of 52 dB and an efficiency of 39%. An investigation of penultimate cavity detuning showed no improvement in efficiency for the above velocity spread. A synchronously tuned gyroklystron is currently being constructed

  1. 28 GHz Gyrotron ECRH Upgrade for LDX

    Michael, P. C.; Woskov, P. P.; Ellsworth, J. L.; Kesner, J.; Garnier, D. T.; Mauel, M. E.; Ellis, R. F.

    2009-11-01

    A 10 kW, CW, 28 GHz gyrotron is being implemented on LDX to increase the plasma density and to more fully explore the potential of high beta plasma stability in a dipole magnetic configuration. Higher density increases the heating of ions by thermal equilibration and allows for improved wave propagation in planned ICRF experiments. This represents over a 50% increase in the 17 kW ECRH from sources at 2.45, 6.4, and 10.5 GHz. The higher frequency will also make possible access to plasma densities of up to 10^13 cm-3. The 1 Tesla resonances are located above and below the floating coil near the dipole axial region. The gyrotron beam will be transmitted in TE01 mode in 32.5 mm diameter guide using one 90 bend and a short Tesla resonance region. A layout of the planned system will be presented.

  2. 47 CFR 15.252 - Operation of wideband vehicular radar systems within the bands 16.2-17.7 GHz and 23.12-29.0 GHz.

    2010-10-01

    ... fundamental frequency following the provisions of § 15.31(m). (3) For systems operating in the 23.12-29.0 GHz... are used only for back-up assistance and that operate only when the vehicle is engaged in reverse. (1... emission appear shall be greater than 24.075 GHz. (4) These devices shall operate only when the vehicle...

  3. Imaging, Doppler, and spectroscopic radars from 95 to 700 GHz

    Cooper, Ken B.

    2016-05-01

    Imaging, Doppler, and spectroscopic radars from 95 to 700 GHz, all using the frequency-modulated continuous-wave technique, are in various stages of development for both defense and science applications at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. For standoff security screening, a 340 GHz imaging radar now achieves an 8.3 Hz frame, and it has been tested using power-efficient MMIC-based active multiplier sources into its front end. That system evolved from a 680 GHz security radar platform, which has also been modified to operate in a Doppler mode for probing the dynamics of blowing sand and sensing small-amplitude target vibrations. Meanwhile, 95 and 183 GHz radars based on similar RF architectures are currently being developed to probe cometary jets in space and, using a differential absorption technique, humidity inside upper-tropospheric clouds.

  4. Microwave Radiometer - high frequency

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The Microwave Radiometer-High Frequency (MWRHF) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from two channels centered at 90 and 150 GHz. These two...

  5. Low Noise Amplifier for 2.45 GHz Frequency Band at 0.18 μm CMOS Technology for IEEE Standard 802.11 b/g WLAN

    Viranjay M. Srivastava

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of low noise amplifier (LNA at 2.45 GHz and integrated at 0.18 µm RF CMOS process technology. This type of LNA at 2.45 GHz is use in the Bluetooth receiver. The proposed method is useful to optimize noise performance and power gain while maintaining good input and output matching. The amplifier is designed to be used as first stage of a receiver for wireless communication. The main aim of designer is to achieve low noise figure with improved gain with the help of CMOS technology by using single stage n-MOS amplifier. The simulation results show a forward gain of 14.0 dB, a noise-figure of 0.5 dB and stability factor is approximate unity, in which the circuit operates at 14.2 mA drain current with supply voltage of 3.5 V and biasing voltage of 1.5 V.

  6. Gaussian entanglement distribution with GHz bandwidth

    Ast, Stefan; Mehmet, Moritz; Schnabel, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of Gaussian entanglement can be used to generate a mathematically-proven secure key for quantum cryptography. The distributed secret key rate is limited by the bandwidth of the nonlinear resonators used for entanglement generation, which is less than 100 MHz for current state-of-the-art setups. The development of an entanglement source with a higher bandwidth promises an increased measurement speed and a linear boost in the secure data rate. Here, we present the experimental realization of a continuous-variable entanglement source with a bandwidth of more than 1.25 GHz. The measured entanglement spectrum was quantified via the inseparability criterion introduced by Duan and coworkers with a critical value of 4 below which entanglement is certified. The measurements yielded an inseparability value of about 1.8 at a frequency of 300 MHz to about 2.8 at 1.2 GHz extending further to about 3.1 at 1.48 GHz. In the experiment we used two 2.6 mm long monolithic PPKTP crystal resonators to generate tw...

  7. High-purity 60GHz band millimeter-wave generation based on optically injected semiconductor laser under subharmonic microwave modulation.

    Fan, Li; Xia, Guangqiong; Chen, Jianjun; Tang, Xi; Liang, Qing; Wu, Zhengmao

    2016-08-01

    Based on an optically injected semiconductor laser (OISL) operating at period-one (P1) nonlinear dynamical state, high-purity millimeter-wave generation at 60 GHz band is experimentally demonstrated via 1/4 and 1/9 subharmonic microwave modulation (the order of subharmonic is with respect to the frequency fc of the acquired 60 GHz band millimeter-wave but not the fundamental frequency f0 of P1 oscillation). Optical injection is firstly used to drive a semiconductor laser into P1 state. For the OISL operates at P1 state with a fundamental frequency f0 = 49.43 GHz, by introducing 1/4 subharmonic modulation with a modulation frequency of fm = 15.32 GHz, a 60 GHz band millimeter-wave with central frequency fc = 61.28 GHz ( = 4fm) is experimentally generated, whose linewidth is below 1.6 kHz and SSB phase noise at offset frequency 10 kHz is about -96 dBc/Hz. For fm is varied between 13.58 GHz and 16.49 GHz, fc can be tuned from 54.32 GHz to 65.96 GHz under matched modulation power Pm. Moreover, for the OISL operates at P1 state with f0 = 45.02 GHz, a higher order subharmonic modulation (1/9) is introduced into the OISL for obtaining high-purity 60 GHz band microwave signal. With (fm, Pm) = (7.23 GHz, 13.00 dBm), a microwave signal at 65.07 GHz ( = 9fm) with a linewidth below 1.6 kHz and a SSB phase noise less than -98 dBc/Hz is experimentally generated. Also, the central frequency fc can be tuned in a certain range through adjusting fm and selecting matched Pm. PMID:27505789

  8. Phase Closure at 691 GHz using the Submillimeter Array

    Hunter, T R; Peck, A B; Christensen, R D; Blundell, R; Camacho, A; Patt, F; Sakamoto, K; Young, K H

    2007-01-01

    Phase closure at 682 GHz and 691 GHz was first achieved using three antennas of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) interferometer located on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Initially, phase closure was demonstrated at 682.5 GHz on Sept. 19, 2002 using an artificial ground-based "beacon" signal. Subsequently, astronomical detections of both Saturn and Uranus were made at the frequency of the CO(6-5) transition (691.473 GHz) on all three baselines on Sept. 22, 2002. While the larger planets such as Saturn are heavily resolved even on these short baselines (25.2m, 25.2m and 16.4m), phase closure was achieved on Uranus and Callisto. This was the first successful experiment to obtain phase closure in this frequency band. The CO(6-5) line was also detected towards Orion BN/KL and other Galactic sources, as was the vibrationally-excited 658 GHz water maser line toward evolved stars. We present these historic detections, as well as the first arcsecond-scale images obtained in this frequency band.

  9. Rain rate and modeled fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from five years of network rain gauge measurements

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Krichevsky, Vladimir; Gebo, Norman

    1992-08-01

    Five years of rain rate and modeled slant path attenuation distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz derived from a network of 10 tipping bucket rain gages was examined. The rain gage network is located within a grid 70 km north-south and 47 km east-west in the Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States in the vicinity of Wallops Island, Virginia. Distributions were derived from the variable integration time data and from one minute averages. It was demonstrated that for realistic fade margins, the variable integration time results are adequate to estimate slant path attenuations at frequencies above 20 GHz using models which require one minute averages. An accurate empirical formula was developed to convert the variable integration time rain rates to one minute averages. Fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz were derived employing Crane's Global model because it was demonstrated to exhibit excellent accuracy with measured COMSTAR fades at 28.56 GHz.

  10. 90 GHz AND 150 GHz OBSERVATIONS OF THE ORION M42 REGION. A SUBMILLIMETER TO RADIO ANALYSIS

    We have used the new 90 GHz MUSTANG camera on the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to map the bright Huygens region of the star-forming region M42 with a resolution of 9'' and a sensitivity of 2.8 mJy beam-1. Ninety GHz is an interesting transition frequency, as MUSTANG detects both the free-free emission characteristic of the H II region created by the Trapezium stars, normally seen at lower frequencies, and thermal dust emission from the background OMC1 molecular cloud, normally mapped at higher frequencies. We also present similar data from the 150 GHz GISMO camera taken on the IRAM 30 m telescope. This map has 15'' resolution. By combining the MUSTANG data with 1.4, 8, and 21 GHz radio data from the VLA and GBT, we derive a new estimate of the emission measure averaged electron temperature of Te = 11376 ± 1050 K by an original method relating free-free emission intensities at optically thin and optically thick frequencies. Combining Infrared Space Observatory-long wavelength spectrometer (ISO-LWS) data with our data, we derive a new estimate of the dust temperature and spectral emissivity index within the 80'' ISO-LWS beam toward Orion KL/BN, Td = 42 ± 3 K and β d = 1.3 ± 0.1. We show that both Td and β d decrease when going from the H II region and excited OMC1 interface to the denser UV shielded part of OMC1 (Orion KL/BN, Orion S). With a model consisting of only free-free and thermal dust emission, we are able to fit data taken at frequencies from 1.5 GHz to 854 GHz (350 μm).

  11. 50 MHz – 26,5 GHz Aralığında Çalışan Toplam Güç Radyometrenin Gerçekleştirilmesi ve Test Edilmesi - Realization and Test of The Total Power Radiometer Working Between 50MHz and 26.5 GHz Frequency Range

    Celep, Murat; Yaran, Şenel; Hayırlı, Cem; Dolma, Arif

    2013-01-01

    Bu çalışmada, yarı iletken bir gürültü kaynağının “excess noise source” (ENR) değerini izlenebilir şekilde ölçmek için bir toplam güç radyometre kurulmuştur. Oldukça geniş olarak kabul edilen 50 MHz – 26,5 GHz frekans aralığında, gürültü kaynağını tek seferde ölçebilen bu sistemin testi, nominal 15 dB ENR değerine sahip standart gürültü kaynakları kullanılarak yapılmıştır. Geliştirilen toplam güç radyometre kullanılarak, değeri bilinen bir gürültü kaynağının hesaplanan ENR değerleri ile gerçe...

  12. Cold test of cylindrical open resonator for 42 GHz, 200 kW gyrotron

    Vivek Yadav; Sudeep Sharan; Hasina Khatun; Nitin Kumar; M K Alaria; B Jha; S C Deorani; A K Sinha; P K Jain

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents experimental results for cold testing of a gyrotron open resonator. Experiments were carried out to measure resonant frequency and their particular quality factor for TE mode at the frequency 42 GHz. The perturbation technique was used to determine the axial, radial and azimuthal electric field profile for identification of TE031 mode at operating frequency 42 GHz. The good agreement between experimental results and theoretical studies was found. The results verify the design and fabrication of the specific gyrotron cavity.

  13. A 250 GHz gyrotron with a 3 GHz tuning bandwidth for dynamic nuclear polarization.

    Barnes, Alexander B; Nanni, Emilio A; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G; Temkin, Richard J

    2012-08-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a novel tunable 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator with >10 W output power over most of a 3 GHz band and >35 W peak power. The tuning bandwidth and power are sufficient to generate a >1 MHz nutation frequency across the entire nitroxide EPR lineshape for cross effect DNP, as well as to excite solid effect transitions utilizing other radicals, without the need for sweeping the NMR magnetic field. Substantially improved tunability is achieved by implementing a long (23 mm) interaction cavity that can excite higher order axial modes by changing either the magnetic field of the gyrotron or the cathode potential. This interaction cavity excites the rotating TE(₅,₂,q) mode, and an internal mode converter outputs a high-quality microwave beam with >94% Gaussian content. The gyrotron was integrated into a DNP spectrometer, resulting in a measured DNP enhancement of 54 on the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:22743211

  14. A 250 GHz gyrotron with a 3 GHz tuning bandwidth for dynamic nuclear polarization

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-08-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a novel tunable 250 GHz gyrotron oscillator with >10 W output power over most of a 3 GHz band and >35 W peak power. The tuning bandwidth and power are sufficient to generate a >1 MHz nutation frequency across the entire nitroxide EPR lineshape for cross effect DNP, as well as to excite solid effect transitions utilizing other radicals, without the need for sweeping the NMR magnetic field. Substantially improved tunability is achieved by implementing a long (23 mm) interaction cavity that can excite higher order axial modes by changing either the magnetic field of the gyrotron or the cathode potential. This interaction cavity excites the rotating TE5,2,q mode, and an internal mode converter outputs a high-quality microwave beam with >94% Gaussian content. The gyrotron was integrated into a DNP spectrometer, resulting in a measured DNP enhancement of 54 on the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin.

  15. Noise in waveguide between 18 GHz and 26.5 GHz

    Allal, D.

    2016-01-01

    This report summarises the results of the Key Comparison CCEM.RF-K22.W on noise temperature, performed between October 2007 and February 2011. In this comparison, the available noise temperature of three noise sources was determined by six National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) in the frequency range from 18 GHz to 26.5 GHz. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  16. A quasioptical resonant-tunneling-diode oscillator operating above 200 GHz

    Brown, E.R.; Parker, C.D.; Calawa, A.R.; Manfra, M.J.; Molvar, K.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Lexington, MA (United States). Lincoln Lab.)

    1993-08-01

    A quasioptical resonant-tunneling-diode oscillator is demonstrated at frequencies above 200 GHz. The oscillator is stabilized by a semiconfocal open cavity. The maximum output power and the linewidth are approximately 50 [mu]W and 20 kHz, respectively, at a fundamental frequency of 210 GHz. By varying the cavity length, the oscillator frequency can be adjusted over a 0.4 GHz range in a repetitive manner. This behavior is explained by analogy with laser oscillators. The quasioptical RTD oscillator is well suited as a local oscillator for low-power radiometric mixers.

  17. Solid-State Power Amplifier For 61.5 GHz

    Powers, Michael K.; Mcclymonds, James; Vye, David; Arthur, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Power amplifiers based on impact-avalanche-transit-time (IMPATT) diodes developed for operation in communication systems at frequencies near 60 GHz. Built in seven modular stages, power transferred through sections of waveguide and isolator/circulator assemblies. Intended as replacements for bulkier and heavier traveling-wave-tube amplifiers.

  18. First harmonic injection locking of 24-GHz-oscillators

    M. R. Kühn

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of applications is proposed for the 24 GHz ISM-band, like automotive radar systems and short-range communication links. These applications demand for oscillators providing moderate output power of a few mW and moderate frequency stability of about 0.5%. The maximum oscillation frequency of low-cost off-theshelf transistors is too low for stable operation of a fundamental 24GHz oscillator. Thus, we designed a 24 GHz first harmonic oscillator, where the power generated at the fundamental frequency (12 GHz is reflected resulting in effective generation of output power at the first harmonic. We measured a radiated power from an integrated planar antenna of more than 1mW. Though this oscillator provides superior frequency stability compared to fundamental oscillators, for some applications additional stabilization is required. As a low-cost measure, injection locking can be used to phase lock oscillators that provide sufficient stability in free running mode. Due to our harmonic oscillator concept injection locking has to be achieved at the first harmonic, since only the antenna is accessible for signal injection. We designed, fabricated and characterized a harmonic oscillator using the antenna as a port for injection locking. The locking range was measured versus various parameters. In addition, phase-noise improvement was investigated. A theoretical approach for the mechanism of first harmonic injection locking is presented.

  19. A high efficiency, high power 100 GHz gyrotron

    Gyrotrons, operating at 28 GHz, 35 GHz and 60 GHz are currently producing 100-200 KW, pulsed and CW, for electron cyclotron heating experiments in magnetically-confined gaseous fusion machines. Recently, considerable interest has been expressed towards the development of a 100 GHz, 1.0 MW CW gyrotron for increasing the electron temperature above that achieved with the lower frequency, lower power devices listed above. Toward this goal, Hughes Aircraft Company has developed a 100 GHz, 0.5 MW gyrotron operating at low duty at 30 msec pulse widths. This device employs a single anode magnetron injection gun operating at a cathode voltage of 90 kV at 14A cathode current. Control of the electron beam is by cathode pulsing or CW. RF control is accomplished by low-level cathode magnetic field modulation. Computations show that velocity spread, both perpendicular and parallel, is considerable lower, rotational energy is higher and voltage gradients are significantly lower than for a comparable double anode magnetron injection gun, typically employed on lower frequency gyrotrons

  20. Highly linear and transparent 3-18 GHz optical microwave link

    Nielsen, Torben Nørskov; Gliese, Ulrik Bo; Christensen, T.;

    1994-01-01

    A highly linear optical microwave link transmitter based on heterodyne phase-locked DFB lasers is presented. The transmitter is transparent for FM and PM input signals with carrier frequencies ranging from 3-18 GHz. Distortion-free transmission of a 7.6 GHz FM PAL video signal over 25 km of optical...

  1. High sensitivity broadband 360GHz passive receiver for TeraSCREEN

    Wang, Hui; Oldfield, Matthew; Maestrojuán, Itziar; Platt, Duncan; Brewster, Nick; Viegas, Colin; Alderman, Byron; Ellison, Brian N.

    2016-05-01

    TeraSCREEN is an EU FP7 Security project aimed at developing a combined active, with frequency channel centered at 360 GHz, and passive, with frequency channels centered at 94, 220 and 360 GHz, imaging system for border controls in airport and commercial ferry ports. The system will include automatic threat detection and classification and has been designed with a strong focus on the ethical, legal and practical aspects of operating in these environments and with the potential threats in mind. Furthermore, both the passive and active systems are based on array receivers with the active system consisting of a 16 element MIMO FMCW radar centered at 360 GHz with a bandwidth of 30 GHz utilizing a custom made direct digital synthesizer. The 16 element passive receiver system at 360 GHz uses commercial Gunn diode oscillators at 90 GHz followed by custom made 90 to 180 GHz frequency doublers supplying the local oscillator for 360 GHz sub-harmonic mixers. This paper describes the development of the passive antenna module, local oscillator chain, frequency mixers and detectors used in the passive receiver array of this system. The complete passive receiver chain is characterized in this paper.

  2. Single dish performance of KVN 21-m radio telescopes:Simultaneous observations at 22 and 43 GHz

    Lee, Sang-Sung; Oh, Chung Sik; Han, Seog-Tae; Je, Do-Heung; Kim, Kee-Tae; Wi, Seog-Oh; Cho, Se-Hyung; Sohn, Bong Won; Kim, Jaeheon; Lee, Jeewon; Oh, Se-Jin; Song, Min-Gyu; Kang, Jiman; Jung, Moon-Hee; Lee, Jeong Ae; Oh, Junghwan; Bae, Jae-Han; Yun, So-Young; Lee, Jung-Won; Kim, Bong Gyu; Chung, Hyunsoo; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Goo; Kim, Hyo Ryoung; Yeom, Jae-Hwan; Kurayama, Tomoharu; Jung, Taehyun; Park, Pulun; Kim, Min Joong; Yoon, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Won-Ju

    2011-01-01

    We report simultaneous multi-frequency observing performance at 22 and 43 GHz of the 21-m shaped-Cassegrain radio telescopes of the Korean VLBI Network (KVN). KVN is the first millimeter-dedicated VLBI network in Korea having a maximum baseline length of 480 km. It currently operates at 22 and 43 GHz and planed to operate in four frequency bands, 22, 43, 86, and 129 GHz. The unique quasioptics of KVN enable simultaneous multi-frequency observations based on efficient beam filtering and accuarate antenna-beam alignment at 22 and 43 GHz. We found that the offset of the beams is within 20 degrees.

  3. Flaring Activity of Sgr A* at 43 and 22 GHz: Evidence for Expanding Hot Plasma

    Yusef-Zadeh, F; Heinke, C O; Roberts, D; Wardle, M

    2006-01-01

    We have carried out Very Large Array (VLA) continuum observations to study the variability of Sgr A* at 43 GHz ($\\lambda$=7mm) and 22 GHz ($\\lambda$=13mm). A low level of flare activity has been detected with a duration of $\\sim$ 2 hours at these frequencies, showing the peak flare emission at 43 GHz leading the 22 GHz peak flare by $\\sim20$ to 40 minutes. The overall characteristics of the flare emission are interpreted in terms of the van der Laan model by considering the ejection and adiabatically expansion of a uniform, spherical plasma blob due to flare activity. The observed peak of the flare emission with a spectral index $\

  4. Ultra-wideband and 60 GHz communications for biomedical applications

    Yuce, Mehmet R

    2013-01-01

    This book investigates the design of devices, systems, and circuits for medical applications using the two recently established frequency bands: ultra-wideband (3.1-10.6 GHz) and 60 GHz ISM band. These two bands provide the largest bandwidths available for communication technologies and present many attractive opportunities for medical applications. The applications of these bands in healthcare are wireless body area network (WBAN), medical imaging, biomedical sensing, wearable and implantable devices, fast medical device connectivity, video data transmission, and vital signs monitoring. The r

  5. First results of the 2.45 GHz Oshima electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Asaji, T., E-mail: asaji@nc-toyama.ac.jp [National Institute of Technology, Toyama College, 13 Hongo, Toyama 939-8630 (Japan); Nakamura, T.; Furuse, M. [National Institute of Technology, Oshima College, 1091-1 Komatsu, Suouoshima, Oshima, Yamaguchi 742-2193 (Japan); Hitobo, T. [Tateyama Machine Co., Ltd., 30 Shimonoban, Toyama 930-1305 (Japan); Uchida, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Muramatsu, M. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kato, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been constructed at Oshima College with a 2.45 GHz magnetron microwave source and permanent magnets employed as the main components. In addition, a solid-state power amplifier with a frequency range of 2.5–6.0 GHz was installed to study two-frequency plasma heating. Three solenoid coils were set up for adjusting the axial magnetic fields. Argon plasma generation and ion beam production have been conducted during the first year of operation. Ion current densities in the ECR plasma were measured using a biased disk. For 2.45 and 4.65 GHz two-frequency plasma heating, the ion density was approximately 1.5 times higher than that of 2.45 GHz single-frequency heating.

  6. First results of the 2.45 GHz Oshima electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Asaji, T.; Nakamura, T.; Furuse, M.; Hitobo, T.; Uchida, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Kato, Y.

    2016-02-01

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been constructed at Oshima College with a 2.45 GHz magnetron microwave source and permanent magnets employed as the main components. In addition, a solid-state power amplifier with a frequency range of 2.5-6.0 GHz was installed to study two-frequency plasma heating. Three solenoid coils were set up for adjusting the axial magnetic fields. Argon plasma generation and ion beam production have been conducted during the first year of operation. Ion current densities in the ECR plasma were measured using a biased disk. For 2.45 and 4.65 GHz two-frequency plasma heating, the ion density was approximately 1.5 times higher than that of 2.45 GHz single-frequency heating.

  7. First results of the 2.45 GHz Oshima electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    A new electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been constructed at Oshima College with a 2.45 GHz magnetron microwave source and permanent magnets employed as the main components. In addition, a solid-state power amplifier with a frequency range of 2.5–6.0 GHz was installed to study two-frequency plasma heating. Three solenoid coils were set up for adjusting the axial magnetic fields. Argon plasma generation and ion beam production have been conducted during the first year of operation. Ion current densities in the ECR plasma were measured using a biased disk. For 2.45 and 4.65 GHz two-frequency plasma heating, the ion density was approximately 1.5 times higher than that of 2.45 GHz single-frequency heating

  8. LFI 30 and 44 GHz receivers Back-End Modules

    Artal, E; de la Fuente, M L; Pascual, J P; Mediavilla, A; Martinez-Gonzalez, E; Pradell, L; de Paco, P; Bara, M; Blanco, E; Garcia, E; Davis, R; Kettle, D; Roddis, N; Wilkinson, A; Bersanelli, M; Mennella, A; Tomasi, M; Butler, R C; Cuttaia, F; Mandolesi, N; Stringhetti, L; 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/T12003

    2010-01-01

    The 30 and 44 GHz Back End Modules (BEM) for the Planck Low Frequency Instrument are broadband receivers (20% relative bandwidth) working at room temperature. The signals coming from the Front End Module are amplified, band pass filtered and finally converted to DC by a detector diode. Each receiver has two identical branches following the differential scheme of the Planck radiometers. The BEM design is based on MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers using GaAs P-HEMT devices, microstrip filters and Schottky diode detectors. Their manufacturing development has included elegant breadboard prototypes and finally qualification and flight model units. Electrical, mechanical and environmental tests were carried out for the characterization and verification of the manufactured BEMs. A description of the 30 and 44 GHz Back End Modules of Planck-LFI radiometers is given, with details of the tests done to determine their electrical and environmental performances. The electrical performances of the 30 and 44 GHz Back End Modules: f...

  9. Development of a 30 GHz Gyroklystron

    DOE requires sources for testing of high gradient accelerator structures. A power of 50 MW is required at K and Ka band. The pulse length must be ∼ 1 microsecond and the pulse repetition frequency at least 100 Hz. At least some applications may require phase stability not offered by a free running oscillator. CCR proposed to build a 50 MW 30 GHz gyrklystron amplifier. This approach would give the required phase stability. The frequency was at the second harmonic of the cycltron frequency and used the TE02 mode. This makes it possible to design a device without an inner conductor, and with a conventional (non-inverted) MIG. This minimizes cost and the risk due to mechanical alignment issues. A detailed design of the gyroklystron was produced. The design was based on simulations of the cavity(ies), electron gun, output coupler and output window. Two designs were produced. One was at the fundamental of the cyclotron frequency. Simulations predicted an output power of 72 MW with an efficiency of 48%. The other was at the second harmonic, producing 37 MW with an efficiency of 37%.

  10. 100 GHz, 1 MW, CW gyrotron study program. Final report

    The results of a study program to investigate the feasibility of various approaches in designing a 100 GHz, 1 MW CW gyrotron are presented. A summary is given of the possible configurations for a high average power, high frequency gyrotron, including an historical survey of experimental results which are relevant to the various approaches. A set of basic scaling considerations which enable qualitative comparisons between particular gyrotron interaction circuits is presented. These calculations are important in understanding the role of various electron beam and circuit parameters in achieving a viable gyrotron design. Following these scaling exercises, a series of design calculations is presented for a possible approach in achieving 100 GHz, 1 MW CW. These calculations include analyses of the electron gun and interaction circuit parts of the gyrotron, and a general analysis of other aspects of a high average power, high frequency gyrotron. Scalability of important aspects of the design to other frequencies is also discussed, as well as key technology issues

  11. The properties of extragalactic radio sources selected at 20 GHz

    Sadler, E M; Ekers, R D; Ekers, J A; Hancock, P J; Jackson, C A; Kesteven, M J; Murphy, T; Phillips, C; Reinfrank, R F; Staveley-Smith, L; Subramanian, R; Walker, M A; Wilson, W E; De Zotti, G; Sadler, Elaine M.; Ricci, Roberto; Ekers, Ronald D.; Hancock, Paul J.; Jackson, Carole A.; Kesteven, Michael J.; Murphy, Tara; Phillips, Chris; Reinfrank, Robert F.; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Walker, Mark A.; Wilson, Warwick E.; Zotti, Gianfranco De

    2006-01-01

    We present some first results on the variability, polarization and general properties of a flux-limited sample of radio sources selected in a blind survey at 20 GHz, the highest frequency at which a sensitive radio survey has been carried out over a large area of sky. Sources with flux densities above 100 mJy in the ATCA 20 GHz Pilot Survey were observed at up to three epochs during 2002-4, including near-simultaneous flux measurements at 4.8, 8.6 and 18 GHz in late 2003. Of the 173 sources in our sample, 65% are identified with candidate QSOs, BL Lac objects or blazars, 20% with galaxies and 15% with faint (b > 22 mag) optical objects or blank fields. On a 1-2 year timescale, the general level of variability at 20 GHz appears to be low. For the 108 sources with good-quality measurements in both 2003 and 2004, the median variability index at 20 GHz over this one-year timescale was 6.9% and only five sources varied by more than 30% in flux density. Most sources in our sample show low levels of linear polarizat...

  12. IR-correlated 31 GHz radio emission from Orion East

    Dickinson, C; Davies, R D; Allison, J R; Bustos, R; Cleary, K; Davis, R J; Jones, M E; Pearson, T J; Readhead, A C S; Reeves, R; Taylor, A C; Tibbs, C T; Watson, R A

    2010-01-01

    Lynds dark cloud LDN1622 represents one of the best examples of anomalous dust emission, possibly originating from small spinning dust grains. We present Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) 31 GHz data of LDN1621, a diffuse dark cloud to the north of LDN1622 in a region known as Orion East. A broken ring with diameter g\\approx 20 arcmin of diffuse emission is detected at 31 GHz, at \\approx 20-30 mJy beam$^{-1}$ with an angular resolution of \\approx 5 arcmin. The ring-like structure is highly correlated with Far Infra-Red emission at $12-100 \\mu$m with correlation coefficients of r \\approx 0.7-0.8, significant at $\\sim10\\sigma$. Multi-frequency data are used to place constraints on other components of emission that could be contributing to the 31 GHz flux. An analysis of the GB6 survey maps at 4.85 GHz yields a $3\\sigma$ upper limit on free-free emission of 7.2 mJy beam$^{-1}$ ($\\la 30 per cent of the observed flux) at the CBI resolution. The bulk of the 31 GHz flux therefore appears to be mostly due to dust radiat...

  13. Frequency selective lens antenna

    Thornton, J.; Haines, P.

    2007-01-01

    A variant of the hemispherical microwave lens antenna is reported where the ground plane region is modified through use of a frequency selective surface. This allows discrimination of frequencies by two closely spaced primary feeds. A scale model is reported operating at 12 and 30 GHz.

  14. A 60 GHz Planar Diplexer Based on Substrate Integrated Waveguide Technology

    Nikolaos Athanasopoulos; Dimitrios Makris; Konstantinos Voudouris

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a millimeter-wave, 60 GHz frequency band planar diplexer based on substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) technology. Diplexer consists of a pair of 5th-order SIW bandpass channel filters with center frequencies at 59.8 GHz and 62.2 GHz providing 1.67% and 1.6% relative bandwidths, respectively. SIW-to-microstrip transitions at diplexer ports enable integration in a millimeter-wave transceiver front end. Measurements are in good agreement with electromagnetic simulation, repo...

  15. MMIC DHBT Common-Base Amplifier for 172 GHz

    Paidi, Vamsi; Griffith, Zack; Wei, Yun; Dahlstrom, Mttias; Urteaga, Miguel; Rodwell, Mark; Samoska, Lorene; Fung, King Man; Schlecht, Erich

    2006-01-01

    Figure 1 shows a single-stage monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifier in which the gain element is a double-heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) connected in common-base configuration. This amplifier, which has been demonstrated to function well at a frequency of 172 GHz, is part of a continuing effort to develop compact, efficient amplifiers for scientific instrumentation, wide-band communication systems, and radar systems that will operate at frequencies up to and beyond 180 GHz. The transistor is fabricated from a layered structure formed by molecular beam epitaxy in the InP/InGaAs material system. A highly doped InGaAs base layer and a collector layer are fabricated from the layered structure in a triple mesa process. The transistor includes two separate emitter fingers, each having dimensions of 0.8 by 12 m. The common-base configuration was chosen for its high maximum stable gain in the frequency band of interest. The input-matching network is designed for high bandwidth. The output of the transistor is matched to a load line for maximum saturated output power under large-signal conditions, rather than being matched for maximum gain under small-signal conditions. In a test at a frequency of 172 GHz, the amplifier was found to generate an output power of 7.5 mW, with approximately 5 dB of large-signal gain (see Figure 2). Moreover, the amplifier exhibited a peak small-signal gain of 7 dB at a frequency of 176 GHz. This performance of this MMIC single-stage amplifier containing only a single transistor represents a significant advance in the state of the art, in that it rivals the 170-GHz performance of a prior MMIC three-stage, four-transistor amplifier. [The prior amplifier was reported in "MMIC HEMT Power Amplifier for 140 to 170 GHz" (NPO-30127), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 11 (November 2003), page 49.] This amplifier is the first heterojunction- bipolar-transistor (HBT) amplifier built for medium power operation in this

  16. Dynamic spectra of pulsar scintillations at frequencies near 0.34, 0.41, 0.63, 1.4, 1.7, 3.2 and 5.0 GHz

    Examples are given of the dynamic spectra of the interstellar scintillations of radiation received from the pulsars PSR 0628-28, 0833-45, 0834+06, 0950+08, 1451-68, 1642-03, 1749-28, 1919+21 and 1929+10. The auto-covariance of the intensity is calculated as a function of separation in time and frequency to yield scattering parameters for eight of these pulsars and for PSR 1933+16. For PSR 0833-45 the details of the shapes of the auto-covariance functions, and the scaling with frequency, are compared with theory. For two pulsars, PSR 0628-28 and PSR 0834+06, systematic patterns of drifting bands were found in the dynamic spectra. The occurrence of such spectra implies that on these occasions the radiation reached the Earth predominantly from a few directions only. The implications of this result for the distribution of irregularity scales in the interstellar medium are discussed. (author)

  17. Integrated 60GHz RF beamforming in CMOS

    Yu, Yikun; van Roermund, Arthur H M

    2011-01-01

    ""Integrated 60GHz RF Beamforming in CMOS"" describes new concepts and design techniques that can be used for 60GHz phased array systems. First, general trends and challenges in low-cost high data-rate 60GHz wireless system are studied, and the phased array technique is introduced to improve the system performance. Second, the system requirements of phase shifters are analyzed, and different phased array architectures are compared. Third, the design and implementation of 60GHz passive and active phase shifters in a CMOS technology are presented. Fourth, the integration of 60GHz phase shifters

  18. Miniature microwave plasma antenna at 2.45 GHz

    Vachkov, Vasil; Kiss'ovski, Zhivko

    2015-12-01

    New unique miniature plasma antenna driven by a one microwave signal at frequency of 2.45 GHz is constructed and tested. The length of the antenna (l = 16 mm) is much shorter than the free space wavelength of the signal. The parameters of the plasma column (n = 2.6±0.4×1018 m-3, Te = 3.1±0.2 eV) are obtained from argon emission spectrum by applying the line ratio method. The simulations of this monopole antenna reveal that in the standing wave regime the plasma antenna is effective transmitter at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. The results we obtained show that the shape of the radiation pattern of the plasma antenna depends on the plasma density, the exciter and the distance above the grounded plane.

  19. Analisis Kelayakan Implementasi Teknologi LTE 1.8 GHz Bagi Operator Seluler di Indonesia [Feasibility Analysis of LTE 1.8 GHz for Mobile Operators in Indonesia

    Sri Ariyanti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Peningkatan kebutuhan layanan data mendorong operator telekomunikasi berusaha mengimplementasikan jaringan akses broadband yang lebih handal.  Teknologi LTE merupakan salah satu teknologi dengan kecepatan mencapai tiga kali dibanding teknologi HSDPA, sehingga diharapkan dapat memenuhi kebutuhan pelanggan data mobile. Refarming frekuensi 1.8 GHz  untuk penerapan teknologi LTE memberikan efisiensi karena tidak perlu membayar BHP lagi untuk menyewa frekuensi baru. Teknologi 2G GSM selama ini juga semakin ditinggalkan, masyarakat di daerah perkotaan cenderung lebih banyak menggunakan layanan data.  Sebelum diterapkannya teknologi LTE pada frekuensi 1.8 GHz perlu adanya kajian untuk mengetahui kelayakan teknologi LTE pada frekuensi 1.8 GHz. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk melakukan cost-benefit analysis implementasi LTE pada frekuensi 1.8 GHz.  Metode penelitian menggunakan pendekatan kualitataif yang didukung dengan data kuantitatif.  Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa minimal bandiwdth yang diperlukan agar implementasi LTE layak digunakan adalah 15 MHz.  Meskipun tanpa Global Frequency Returning, penggunaan bandwidth 10 MHz tidak layak digunakan untuk implementasi LTE.      *****The incresing of data demand drives mobile operators to implement more reliable broadband access network. LTE technology has downlink peak rate up to three times than HSDPA,  hence it may fulfill the mobile data user requirement. Frequency 1.8 GHz refarming can be implemented to provide efficiency because They do not need to pay licence fee for leasing new frequency. GSM technology will be abandoned since it is not growing anymore. Besides that, dense urban users tend to use data mobile.  Before implementing LTE technology  on 1.8 GHz frequency, It is necessary to analysis the feasibility such technology. This research used qualitative method supported by quantitative  approach.  The result of this research showed that minimum bandwidth to implement 1.8 GHz LTE

  20. A Frequency-Reconfigurable Monopole Antenna with Switchable Stubbed Ground Structure

    Liu, X. L.; X. L. Yang; F.L.Kong

    2015-01-01

    A frequency-reconfigurable coplanar-waveguide (CPW) fed monopole antenna using switchable stubbed ground structure is presented. Four PIN diodes are employed in the stubs stretching from the ground to make the antenna reconfigurable in three operating modes: a single-band mode (2.4-2.9 GHz), a dual-band mode (2.4-2.9 GHz/5.09-5.47 GHz) and a triple-band mode (3.7-4.26 GHz/5.3-6.3 GHz/8.0-8.8 GHz). The monopole antenna is resonating at 2.4 GHz, while the stubs produce other operating frequency...

  1. High power 303 GHz gyrotron for CTS in LHD

    A high-power pulsed gyrotron is under development for 300 GHz-band collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics in the Large Helical Device (LHD). High-density plasmas in the LHD require a probe wave with power exceeding 100 kW in the sub-terahertz region to obtain sufficient signal intensity and large scattering angles. At the same time, the frequency bandwidth should be less than several tens of megahertz to protect the CTS receiver using a notch filter against stray radiations. Moreover, duty cycles of ∼ 10% are desired for the time domain analysis of the CTS spectrum. At present, a 77 GHz gyrotron for electron cyclotron heating is used as a CTS wave source in the LHD. However, the use of such a low-frequency wave suffers from refraction, cutoff and absorption at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. Additionally, the signal detection is severely affected by background noise from electron cyclotron emission. To resolve those problems, high-power gyrotrons in the 300 GHz range have been developed. In this frequency range, avoiding mode competition is critical to realizing high-power and stable oscillation. A moderately over-moded cavity was investigated to isolate a desired mode from neighbouring modes. After successful tests with a prototype tube, the practical one was constructed with a cavity for TE22,2 operation mode, a triode electron gun forming intense laminar electron beams, and an internal mode convertor. We have experimentally confirmed single mode oscillation of the TE22,2 mode at the frequency of 303.3 GHz. The spectrum peak is sufficiently narrow. The output power of 290 kW has been obtained at the moment

  2. 10 GHz femtosecond pulse interleaver in planar waveguide technology

    Sander, M. Y.; Frolov, S.; Shmulovich, J.; Ippen, E. P.; Kärtner, F. X.

    2012-01-01

    Coherent pulse interleaving implemented in planar waveguide technology is presented as a compact and robust solution to generate high repetition rate frequency combs. We demonstrate a 10 GHz pulse train from an Er-doped femtosecond fiber laser that is coupled into waveguide interleavers and multiplied in repetition rate by a factor of 16. With thermal tuning of the chip elements, we achieve optical and RF sidemode suppression levels of at least -30 dB.

  3. Characterization of a gyrotron cavity at 10 GHz

    Experiments have been conducted to characterize a gyrotron cavity designed to operate in the Te 021 mode at 10 GHz. Small holes were introduced into the cavity to couple in and detect the probing power. Evaluation of the loaded Q factor is based on bandwidth measurements whereas standing-wave electric field profile is determined by using perturbation techniques. Good agreement between measured and predicted values of resonant frequencies and Q factors for several fundamental TE modes is found. (author)

  4. InP Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor Amplifiers to 255 GHz

    Radisic, Vesna; Sawdai, Donald; Scott, Dennis; Deal, William; Dang, Linh; Li, Danny; Cavus, Abdullah; To, Richard; Lai, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Two single-stage InP heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) amplifiers operate at 184 and 255 GHz, using Northrop Grumman Corporation s InP HBT MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) technology. At the time of this reporting, these are reported to be the highest HBT amplifiers ever created. The purpose of the amplifier design is to evaluate the technology capability for high-frequency designs and verify the model for future development work.

  5. High power 303 GHz gyrotron for CTS in LHD

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Kasa, J.; Saito, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Kotera, M.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Tanaka, K.; Nishiura, M.

    2015-10-01

    A high-power pulsed gyrotron is under development for 300 GHz-band collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics in the Large Helical Device (LHD). High-density plasmas in the LHD require a probe wave with power exceeding 100 kW in the sub-terahertz region to obtain sufficient signal intensity and large scattering angles. At the same time, the frequency bandwidth should be less than several tens of megahertz to protect the CTS receiver using a notch filter against stray radiations. Moreover, duty cycles of ~ 10% are desired for the time domain analysis of the CTS spectrum. At present, a 77 GHz gyrotron for electron cyclotron heating is used as a CTS wave source in the LHD. However, the use of such a low-frequency wave suffers from refraction, cutoff and absorption at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. Additionally, the signal detection is severely affected by background noise from electron cyclotron emission. To resolve those problems, high-power gyrotrons in the 300 GHz range have been developed. In this frequency range, avoiding mode competition is critical to realizing high-power and stable oscillation. A moderately over-moded cavity was investigated to isolate a desired mode from neighbouring modes. After successful tests with a prototype tube, the practical one was constructed with a cavity for TE22,2 operation mode, a triode electron gun forming intense laminar electron beams, and an internal mode convertor. We have experimentally confirmed single mode oscillation of the TE22,2 mode at the frequency of 303.3 GHz. The spectrum peak is sufficiently narrow. The output power of 290 kW has been obtained at the moment.

  6. VLBI observations of 3C273 at 22 GHz and 43 GHz ; 2, test of Synchrotron Self-Compton process

    Mantovani, F; McHardy, I M; Valerio, C

    1999-01-01

    The VLBI observations at 22 GHz and 43 GHz of the quasar 3C273 obtained during a multi-frequency campaign in late 1992 in the radio, millimetre and X-ray bands allow us to derive the components' angular sizes, their peak fluxes and turnover frequencies. Lower limits to the Doppler factors have been derived by comparing the observed X-ray fluxes with those predicted by the Synchrotron Self-Compton model. Independent estimates of the Doppler factors were obtained through the assumption of the energy equipartition between the particles and the magnetic field. Of the five components used to model the first two milli-arcseconds of the jet, apart from the core, two components are in equipartition and the remaining two, at larger distances from the core, have large Doppler factors and are mainly responsible for the X-ray emission due to the Synchrotron Self-Compton process.

  7. The properties of powerful radio sources at 90 GHz

    Hardcastle, M J

    2008-01-01

    We have observed a small sample of powerful double radio sources (radio galaxies and quasars) at frequencies around 90 GHz with the BIMA millimetre array, with the intention of constraining the resolved high-frequency spectra of radio galaxies. When combined with other sources we have previously observed and with data from the BIMA archive, these observations allow us for the first time to make general statements about the high-frequency behaviour of compact components of radio galaxies -- cores, jets and hotspots. We find that cores in our sample remain flat-spectrum up to 90 GHz; jets in some of our targets are detected at 90 GHz for the first time in our new observations; and hotspots are found to be almost universal, but show a wide range of spectral properties. Emission from the extended lobes of radio galaxies is detected in a few cases and shows rough consistency with the expectations from standard spectral ageing models, though our ability to probe this in detail is limited by the sensitivity of BIMA....

  8. Optimization of a 115 GHz waveguide mixer based on an HTS Josephson junction

    A waveguide mixer based on a Josephson junction made from a high-temperature superconductor (HTS) has been analysed at frequencies of 90 GHz and 115 GHz. The mixer consisted of a single-grain-boundary bicrystal junction which was integrated with a bow-tie antenna and a microstrip filter structure fabricated on an MgO substrate. Two different designs of mixer block were tested. Using the first design the best noise performance was measured at a local oscillator (LO) frequency of about 90 GHz. At the projected LO frequency of 115 GHz significant deterioration of performance was observed. A computer simulation of the mixer chip and substrate channel structure was performed using the 3D simulation program HFSS. Sufficient RF signal rejection by the filter structure was confirmed at 90 GHz. After a simulation cycle at 115 GHz the substrate channel in the mixer block was modified. Using this second design we measured a double-sideband mixer noise temperature of 1090 K at 10 K operating temperature which is the best performance of an HTS Josephson mixer to date obtained at this frequency and temperature. (author)

  9. Experimental results of superimposing 9.9 GHz extraordinary mode microwaves on 2.45 GHz ECRIS plasma

    Efficient production of multicharged ions has been investigated on the tandem-type ECRIS in Osaka University. According to the consideration of the accessibility conditions of microwaves to resonance and cutoff regions, it was suggested that the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) heating contributed to enhancement of ion beam intensity. In order to enhance multicharged ion beams efficiently, injecting higher frequency microwave with extraordinary (X-mode) toward UHR region has been tried. In this study, 2.45 GHz frequency microwaves are used for conventional ECR discharge, and 9.9 GHz frequency microwaves with X-mode are superimposed for UHR heating. The effects of additive microwave injection are investigated experimentally in terms of plasma parameters and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measured by Langmuir probe and ion beam current. As the results show, it is confirmed that the electrons in the high energy region are affected by 9.9 GHz X-mode microwave injection from the detailed analysis of EEDF

  10. Experimental results of superimposing 9.9 GHz extraordinary mode microwaves on 2.45 GHz ECRIS plasma

    Nishiokada, Takuya, E-mail: nishiokada@nf.eie.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nagaya, Tomoki; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi [Division of Electrical, Electronic, and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Muramatsu, Masayuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-855 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Efficient production of multicharged ions has been investigated on the tandem-type ECRIS in Osaka University. According to the consideration of the accessibility conditions of microwaves to resonance and cutoff regions, it was suggested that the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) heating contributed to enhancement of ion beam intensity. In order to enhance multicharged ion beams efficiently, injecting higher frequency microwave with extraordinary (X-mode) toward UHR region has been tried. In this study, 2.45 GHz frequency microwaves are used for conventional ECR discharge, and 9.9 GHz frequency microwaves with X-mode are superimposed for UHR heating. The effects of additive microwave injection are investigated experimentally in terms of plasma parameters and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measured by Langmuir probe and ion beam current. As the results show, it is confirmed that the electrons in the high energy region are affected by 9.9 GHz X-mode microwave injection from the detailed analysis of EEDF.

  11. 75 FR 45058 - Operation of Wireless Communications Services in the 2.3 GHz Band; Establishment of Rules and...

    2010-08-02

    ... Licensees. The Wireless Communication Service in the 2305- 2360 MHz (2.3 GHz) frequency band has flexible...- 8610; FCC 10-82] Operation of Wireless Communications Services in the 2.3 GHz Band; Establishment of... amends its rules to enable the deployment of mobile broadband services in the Wireless...

  12. The Australia Telescope 20GHz (AT20G) Survey: analysis of the extragalactic source sample

    Massardi, Marcella; end_of_the_skype_highlighting, Tara Murphy begin_of_the_skype_highlighting end_of_the_skype_highlighting begin_of_the_skype_highlighting; Mahony, Elizabeth; Hancock, Paul J; Chhetri, Rajan; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Sadler, Elaine M; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Calabretta, Mark; Edwards, Philip G; Ekers, Jennifer A; Jackson, Carole A; Kesteven, Michael J; Newton-McGee, Katherine; Phillips, Chris; Ricci, Roberto; Roberts, Paul; Sault, Robert J; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Walker, Mark A; Wilson, Warwick E

    2010-01-01

    The Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey is a blind survey of the whole Southern sky at 20 GHz with follow-up observations at 4.8, 8.6, and 20 GHz carried out with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). In this paper we present an analysis of radio spectral properties in total intensity and polarisation, sizes, optical identifications, and redshifts of the sample of the 5808 extragalactic sources in the survey catalogue of confirmed sources over the whole Southern sky excluding the strip at Galactic latitude |b|500mJy, to 60% for S<100mJy. There is also a clear spectral steepening at higher frequencies with the median spectral index decreasing from -0.16 between 4.8 and 8.6GHz to -0.28 between 8.6 and 20GHz. Simultaneous observations in polarisation are available for all the sources at all the frequencies. 768 sources have a good quality detection of polarised flux density at 20GHz; 467 of them were also detected in polarisation at 4.8 and/or at 8.6GHz so that it has been possible to compare th...

  13. A 3 to 6 GHz microwave/photonic transceiver for phased-array interconnects

    Ackerman, Edward; Wanuga, Stephen; Candela, Karen; Scotti, Ronald E.; MacDonald, V. W.; Gates, John V.

    1992-04-01

    The general design and operation of a microwave/photonic transceiver operating in the range 3-6 GHz are presented. The transceiver consists of drop-in submodules with optical fiber pigtails mounted on a brass carrier measuring less than 1 x 1 x 0.1 inch along with MMIC amplifiers and an alumina motherboard. Minimum 3 to 6 GHz return losses of 6 dB have been measured for both the microwave input and the microwave output of the module; the insertion loss is between 19 and 20 dB at most frequencies in the 3-6 GHz band.

  14. 80 GHz waveform generated by the optical Fourier synthesis of four spectral sidebands

    Fatome, Julien; Hammani, Kamal; Kibler, Bertrand; Finot, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Using the linear phase shaping of a simple four-line optical frequency comb, we experimentally demonstrate the generation of various optical waveforms such as parabolic, triangular or flat-top pulse trains at a repetition rate of 80 GHz. The initial 80 GHz comb is obtained through the nonlinear spectral broadening of a 40 GHz carrier-suppressed sinusoidal beating in a highly nonlinear fiber. Proof-of-principle experiments are reported for two distinct configurations of the waveform generated: continuous trains and bunches of shaped pulses.

  15. The 4.8 GHz LHC Schottky pick-up system

    The LHC Schottky observation system is based on traveling wave type high sensitivity pickup structures operating at 4.8 GHz. The choice of the structure and operating frequency is driven by the demanding LHC impedance requirements, where very low impedance is required below 2 GHz, and good sensitivity at the selected band at 4.8 GHz. A sophisticated filtering and triple down -mixing signal processing chain has been designed and implemented in order to achieve the specified 100 dB instantaneous dynamic range without range switching. Detailed design aspects for the complete systems and test results without beam are presented and discussed

  16. High performance oscillator with 2-mW output power at 300 GHz

    Material structures and device structures of a 100-GHz InP based transferred-electron device are designed in this paper. In order to successfully fabricate the Gunn devices operating at 100 GHz, the InP substrate was entirely removed by mechanical thinning and wet etching. The Gunn device was connected to a tripler link and a high RF (radio frequency) output with power of 2 mW working at 300 GHz was obtained, which is high enough for applications in current military electronic systems. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  17. High-Capacity 60 GHz and 75–110 GHz Band Links Employing All-Optical OFDM Generation and Digital Coherent Detection

    Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Zibar, Darko; Sambaraju, Rakesh; Marti, Javier; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2012-01-01

    The performance of wireless signal generation and detection at millimeter-wave frequencies using baseband optical means is analyzed and experimentally demonstrated. Multigigabit wireless signal generation is achieved based on all-optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) and photo...... scalability and bit-rate transparency of our proposed approach, we experimentally demonstrated generation and detection in the 60 GHz and 75–110 GHz band of an all-optical OFDM quadrature phase shift keying, with two and three subcarriers, for a total bit rate over 20 Gb/ s....

  18. Diseño de un amplificador de alta eficiencia clase-E @ 2GHz

    Peña Catalina, Roberto; García García, José Ángel; Chaibi, Mohamed; Amar Touhami, Naima

    2004-01-01

    Class-E power amplifiers have 100% theoretical efficiency, due to switched-mode operation. This concept has traditionally been applied to VHF and UHF frequency ranges. In this paper we propose its application to microwave frequencies, designing and characterizing a class-E power amplifier at 2 GHz based on a HEMT solid state device and microstrip technology.

  19. LFI 30 and 44 GHz receivers Back-End Modules

    Artal, E.; Aja, B.; de la Fuente, M. L.; Pascual, J. P.; Mediavilla, A.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Pradell, L.; de Paco, P.; Bara, M.; Blanco, E.; García, E.; Davis, R.; Kettle, D.; Roddis, N.; Wilkinson, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Mennella, A.; Tomasi, M.; Butler, R. C.; Cuttaia, F.; Mandolesi, N.; Stringhetti, L.

    2009-12-01

    The 30 and 44 GHz Back End Modules (BEM) for the Planck Low Frequency Instrument are broadband receivers (20% relative bandwidth) working at room temperature. The signals coming from the Front End Module are amplified, band pass filtered and finally converted to DC by a detector diode. Each receiver has two identical branches following the differential scheme of the Planck radiometers. The BEM design is based on MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers using GaAs P-HEMT devices, microstrip filters and Schottky diode detectors. Their manufacturing development has included elegant breadboard prototypes and finally qualification and flight model units. Electrical, mechanical and environmental tests were carried out for the characterization and verification of the manufactured BEMs. A description of the 30 and 44 GHz Back End Modules of Planck-LFI radiometers is given, with details of the tests done to determine their electrical and environmental performances. The electrical performances of the 30 and 44 GHz Back End Modules: frequency response, effective bandwidth, equivalent noise temperature, 1/f noise and linearity are presented.

  20. A 12 GHZ RF Power source for the CLIC study

    Peauger, F; Curt, S; Doebert, S; McMonagle, G; Rossat, G; Schirm, KM; Syratchev, I; Timeo, L; Kuzikhov, S; Vikharev, AA; Haase, A; Sprehn, D; Jensen, A; Jongewaard, EN; Nantista, CD; Vlieks, A

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC RF frequency has been changed in 2008 from the initial 30 GHz to the European X-band 11.9942 GHz permitting beam independent power production using klystrons for CLIC accelerating structure testing. A design and fabrication contract for five klystrons at that frequency has been signed by different parties with SLAC. France (IRFU, CEA Saclay) is contributing a solid state modulator purchased in industry and specific 12 GHz RF network components to the CLIC study. RF pulses over 120 MW peak at 230 ns length will be obtained by using a novel SLED-I type pulse compression scheme designed and fabricated by IAP, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. The X-band power test stand is being installed in the CLIC Test Facility CTF3 for independent structure and component testing in a bunker, but allowing, in a later stage, for powering RF components in the CTF3 beam lines. The design of the facility, results from commissioning of the RF power source and the expected performance of the Test Facility are reported.

  1. Planck 2013 results. VI. High Frequency Instrument data processing

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.;

    2013-01-01

    , and 857 GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.07 to 4.06. The detector noise per (effective) beam solid angle is respectively,10, 6 , 12, and 39 µK in the four lowest HFI frequency channels (100-353 GHz) and 13 and 14 kJy sr-1 in the 545 and 857 GHz channels. Relativeto the 143 GHz channel...

  2. Specifics of processing SRS lidar signals in GHz frequency range

    Grishkanich, A. S.; Elizarov, V. V.; Kascheev, S. V.; Zhevlakov, A. P.; Sidorov, I. S.

    2015-12-01

    One of the highly effective methods of operative remote environmental monitoring on land and water surfaces is laser sensing. It knew that the Raman scattering cross section is very small (10-25-10-27), so in some cases radiation back into captivity to the target could be a few tens of photons. For high-speed sensing, speed of processing and ease of use lidar units required for the use of appropriate hardware and software systems used for the decision of tasks of collecting, processing, storing, organizing large amounts of data.

  3. Antennas for 20/30 GHz and beyond

    Chen, C. Harry; Wong, William C.; Hamada, S. Jim

    1989-01-01

    Antennas of 20/30 GHz and higher frequency, due to the small wavelength, offer capabilities for many space applications. With the government-sponsored space programs (such as ACTS) in recent years, the industry has gone through the learning curve of designing and developing high-performance, multi-function antennas in this frequency range. Design and analysis tools (such as the computer modelling used in feedhorn design and reflector surface and thermal distortion analysis) are available. The components/devices (such as BFN's, weight modules, feedhorns and etc.) are space-qualified. The manufacturing procedures (such as reflector surface control) are refined to meet the stringent tolerance accompanying high frequencies. The integration and testing facilities (such as Near-Field range) also advance to facilitate precision assembling and performance verification. These capabilities, essential to the successful design and development of high-frequency spaceborne antennas, shall find more space applications (such as ESGP) than just communications.

  4. Single- and Multiband OFDM Photonic Wireless Links in the 75−110 GHz Band Employing Optical Combs

    Beltrán, M.; Deng, Lei; Pang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Xu; Arlunno, Valeria; Zhao, Ying; Yu, Xianbin; Llorente, R.; Liu, D.; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2012-01-01

    The photonic generation of electrical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) modulated wireless signals in the 75−110 GHz band is experimentally demonstrated employing in-phase/quadrature electrooptical modulation and optical heterodyn upconversion. The wireless transmission of 16...

  5. Design of a 50 MW, 34 GHz second harmonic coaxial gyroklystron for advanced accelerators

    At the University of Maryland, the authors have been investigating the feasibility of using gyroklystrons and gyroklystrons as drivers for linear colliders and advanced accelerators for a number of years. The most recent experimental tube achieved a peak power of about 80 MW at 8.57 GHz with 32% efficiency and over 30 dB gain with a three-cavity first harmonic circuit. The current experimental effort is devoted to producing about 100 MW of peak power at 17.14 GHz with a second-harmonic three-cavity tube. Some schemes for advanced linear colliders with center-of-mass energies of 5 TeV or more expect to require higher frequency sources, perhaps near 35 GHz or 91 GHz. A design study at 95 GHz indicated that peak powers near 7 MW were possible. In this design study, they present the simulated operating characteristics of a four cavity 34 GHz second-harmonic gyroklystron tube which is capable of producing about 60 MW of peak power with an efficiency of about 40% and a gain above 50 dB. The electron gun is a single-anode magnetron injection gun. The input cavity is a TE011 cavity which is driven at 17 GHz. The remainder of the cavities are TE021 cavities which interact near the second harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. The gain cavity and the output cavities are at twice the drive frequency, but the penultimate cavity is detuned to enhance efficiency. All cavities are abrupt-transition cavities. Both systems are derived from scaled versions of the 17 GHz tube. In this paper, they present detailed designs and performance predictions for both the electron gun and the microwave circuit

  6. Design of a 50 MW, 34 GHz second harmonic coaxial gyroklystron for advanced accelerators

    Arjona, M.R.; Lawson, W.

    1999-07-01

    At the University of Maryland, the authors have been investigating the feasibility of using gyroklystrons and gyroklystrons as drivers for linear colliders and advanced accelerators for a number of years. The most recent experimental tube achieved a peak power of about 80 MW at 8.57 GHz with 32% efficiency and over 30 dB gain with a three-cavity first harmonic circuit. The current experimental effort is devoted to producing about 100 MW of peak power at 17.14 GHz with a second-harmonic three-cavity tube. Some schemes for advanced linear colliders with center-of-mass energies of 5 TeV or more expect to require higher frequency sources, perhaps near 35 GHz or 91 GHz. A design study at 95 GHz indicated that peak powers near 7 MW were possible. In this design study, they present the simulated operating characteristics of a four cavity 34 GHz second-harmonic gyroklystron tube which is capable of producing about 60 MW of peak power with an efficiency of about 40% and a gain above 50 dB. The electron gun is a single-anode magnetron injection gun. The input cavity is a TE{sub 011} cavity which is driven at 17 GHz. The remainder of the cavities are TE{sub 021} cavities which interact near the second harmonic of the cyclotron frequency. The gain cavity and the output cavities are at twice the drive frequency, but the penultimate cavity is detuned to enhance efficiency. All cavities are abrupt-transition cavities. Both systems are derived from scaled versions of the 17 GHz tube. In this paper, they present detailed designs and performance predictions for both the electron gun and the microwave circuit.

  7. Teleportation of a 3-dimensional GHZ State

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Wang, Huai-Sheng; Li, Peng-Fei; Song, He-Shan

    2012-05-01

    The process of teleportation of a completely unknown 3-dimensional GHZ state is considered. Three maximally entangled 3-dimensional Bell states function as quantum channel in the scheme. This teleportation scheme can be directly generalized to teleport an unknown d-dimensional GHZ state.

  8. Exploring the faint source population at 15.7 GHz

    Whittam, Imogen H; Green, David A; Jarvis, Matt J

    2016-01-01

    We discuss our current understanding of the nature of the faint, high-frequency radio sky. The Tenth Cambridge (10C) survey at 15.7 GHz is the deepest high-frequency radio survey to date, covering 12 square degrees to a completeness limit of 0.5 mJy, making it the ideal starting point from which to study this population. In this work we have matched the 10C survey to several lower-frequency radio catalogues and a wide range of multi-wavelength data (near- and far-infrared, optical and X-ray). We find a significant increase in the proportion of flat-spectrum sources at flux densities below 1 mJy - the median radio spectral index between 15.7 GHz and 610 MHz changes from 0.75 for flux densities greater than 1.5 mJy to 0.08 for flux densities less than 0.8 mJy. The multi-wavelength analysis shows that the vast majority (> 94 percent) of the 10C sources are radio galaxies; it is therefore likely that these faint, flat spectrum sources are a result of the cores of radio galaxies becoming dominant at high frequenci...

  9. NASA 60 GHz intersatellite communication link definition study. Addendum A: Mixed baseband and IF signals

    1986-01-01

    As part of a definition study for a 60 GHz intersatellite communications link system (ICLS), baseline design concepts for a channelized crosslink were identified. The crosslink would allow communications between geostationary satellites of the planned Tracking and Data Acquisition System (TDAS) and would accommodate a mixture of frequency translation coherent links (bent pipe links) and baseband-in/baseband-out links (mod/demod links). A 60 GHz communication system was developed for sizing and analyzing the crosslink. For the coherent links this system translates incoming signals directly up to the 60 GHz band; trunks the signals across from one satellite to a second satellite at 60 GHz then down converts to the proper frequency for re-transmission from the second satellite without converting to any intermediate frequencies. For the baseband-in/baseband-out links the baseband data is modulated on to the 60 GHz carrier at the transmitting satellite and demodulated at the receiving satellite. The frequency plan, equipment diagrams, and link calculations are presented along with results from sizing and reliability analyses.

  10. Design of High Gain and Broadband Antennas at 60 GHz for Underground Communications Systems

    Yacouba Coulibaly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new broadband and high gain dielectric resonator antenna for millimeter wave is presented. The investigated antenna configuration consists of a periodic square ring frequency selective surfaces on a superstrate, an aperture-coupled scheme feed, an intermediate substrate, and a cylindrical dielectric resonator. This antenna is designed to cover the ISM frequency band at 60 GHz (57 GHz–64 GHz. It was numerically designed using CST microwave Studio simulation software package. Another prototype with a plain dielectric superstrate is also studied for comparison purposes. A bandwidth of 13.56% at the centered frequency of 61.34 GHz and a gain of 11 dB over the entire ISM band have been achieved. A maximum gain of 14.26 dB is obtained at 60 GHz. This is an enhancement of 9 dB compared to a single DRA. HFSS is used to validate our antenna designs. Good agreement between the results of the two softwares is obtained. With these performances, these antennas promise to be useful in the design of future wireless underground communication systems operating in the unlicensed 60 GHz frequency band.