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Sample records for 10d effective action

  1. Dimensional reduction of 10d heterotic string effective lagrangian with higher derivative terms

    Dimensional reduction of the 10d Supergravity-Yang-Mills theories containing up to four derivatives is described. Unexpected nondiagonal corrections to 4d gauge kinetic function and negative contributions to scalar potential are found. We analyzed the general structure of the resulting lagrangian and discuss the possible phenomenological consequences. (author)

  2. Effective actions near singularities

    We study the heterotic string compactified on K3x T2 near the line T=U, where the effective action becomes singular due to an SU(2) gauge symmetry enhancement. By 'integrating in' the light W± vector multiplets we derive a quantum corrected effective action which is manifestly SU(2) invariant and non-singular. This effective action is found to be consistent with a residual SL(2,Ζ) quantum symmetry on the line T=U. In an appropriate decompactification limit, we recover the known SU(2) invariant action in five dimensions. (author)

  3. Thermopower, Hall effect and magnetoresistivity of Ru 1- xSb xSr 2Sm 1.5Ce 0.5Cu 2O 10- d

    Ilonca, G.; Patapis, S.; Beiusan, F.; Lung, C.; Toma, V.; Balint, P.; Bodea, M.; Jurcut, T.

    2007-09-01

    Magnetoresistivity, thermopower and Hall effect on the samples of Ru1-xSbxSr2Sm1.5Ce0.5Cu2O10-d were investigated in the temperature range 4-300 K with a magnetic field up to 9 T. Superconducting transition temperature decreases with increases content of Sb, due to a distortion of RuO6 octahedral, which is responsible of the increase in hole localization, reflected by Hall concentration, too. The inhomogeneous granular structure is put in evidence by the intragranular, Tco, and intergranular Tcg, transition temperatures. Hall effect and thermopower anomalous decreases below Tmagnetic can be explained within a simple two-band model by a transition from localized to more itinerant behavior in the RuO2 layer at Tmagnetic.

  4. Effects of Security actions

    Bergman, Ramona; Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne; Nyberg, Lars; Johansson, Magnus

    2010-05-01

    In a project funded by the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency, the effort and work to reduce different kinds of accidents are being evaluated. The project wants to illuminate the links between actions and outcome, so we can learn from today's performance and in the future select more effective measures and overall deal with accidents more efficiently. The project ESS covers the field of frequent accidents such as sliding accidents at home, in house fires and less common accidents such as chemical and land fill accidents up to even more rare accidents such as natural accidents and hazards. In the ESS project SGI (Swedish geotechnical institute) will evaluate the work and effort concerning various natural hazards limited to landslides, erosion and flooding. The aim is to investigate how municipalities handle, especially prevention, of such natural disasters today. The project includes several aspects such as: • which are the driving forces for risk analysis in a municipality • do one use risk mapping (and what type) in municipal risk analysis • which aspects are most important when selecting preventive measures • in which way do one learn from past accidents • and from previous accidents elsewhere, by for example use existing databases • etc There are many aspects that play a role in a well-functioning safety promotion work. The overall goal is to examine present work and activities, highlight what is well functioning and identify weak points. The aim is to find out where more resources are needed and give suggestions for a more efficient security work. This includes identification of the most efficient "tools" in use or needed. Such tools can be education, directives, funding, more easily available maps and information regarding previous accidents and preventive measures etc. The project will result in recommendations for more effective ways to deal with landslides, erosion and flooding. Since different kinds of problems can occur depending on level of

  5. Wilsonian Effective Action of Superstring Theory

    Sen, Ashoke

    2016-01-01

    By integrating out the heavy fields in type II or heterotic string field theory one can construct the effective action for the light fields. This effective theory inherits all the algebraic structures of the parent theory and the effective action automatically satisfies the Batalin-Vilkovisky quantum master equation. This theory is manifestly ultraviolet finite, has only light fields as its explicit degrees of freedom, and the Feynman diagrams of this theory reproduce the exact scattering amplitudes of light states in string theory to any arbitrary order in perturbation theory. Furthermore in this theory the degrees of freedom of light fields above certain energy scale are also implicitly integrated out. This energy scale is determined by a particular parameter labelling a family of equivalent actions, and can be made arbitrarily low, leading to the interpretation of the effective action as the Wilsonian effective action.

  6. Separate and combined effects of a 10-d exposure to hypoxia and inactivity on oxidative function in vivo and mitochondrial respiration ex vivo in humans.

    Salvadego, Desy; Keramidas, Michail E; Brocca, Lorenza; Domenis, Rossana; Mavelli, Irene; Rittweger, Jörn; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor B; Grassi, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    An integrative evaluation of oxidative metabolism was carried out in 9 healthy young men (age, 24.1 ± 1.7 yr mean ± SD) before (CTRL) and after a 10-day horizontal bed rest carried out in normoxia (N-BR) or hypoxia (H-BR, FiO2 = 0.147). H-BR was designed to simulate planetary habitats. Pulmonary O2 uptake (V̇o2) and vastus lateralis fractional O2 extraction (changes in deoxygenated hemoglobin+myoglobin concentration, Δ[deoxy(Hb+Mb)] evaluated using near-infrared spectroscopy) were evaluated in normoxia and during an incremental cycle ergometer (CE) and one-leg knee extension (KE) exercise (aimed at reducing cardiovascular constraints to oxidative function). Mitochondrial respiration was evaluated ex vivo by high-resolution respirometry in permeabilized vastus lateralis fibers. During CE V̇o2peak and Δ[deoxy(Hb+Mb)]peak were lower (P work rate exercise was greater in N-BR and H-BR than CTRL, whereas during KE a significant difference vs. CTRL was observed only after N-BR. Maximal mitochondrial respiration determined ex vivo was not affected by either intervention. In N-BR, a significant impairment of oxidative metabolism occurred downstream of central cardiovascular O2 delivery and upstream of mitochondrial function, possibly at the level of the intramuscular matching between O2 supply and utilization and peripheral O2 diffusion. Superposition of hypoxia on bed rest did not aggravate, and partially reversed, the impairment of muscle oxidative function in vivo induced by bed rest. The effects of longer exposures will have to be determined. PMID:27197861

  7. On String Field Theory and Effective Actions

    Giveon, Amit

    1992-01-01

    A truncation of string field theory is compared with the duality invariant effective action of $D=4, N=4$ heterotic strings to cubic order. The three string vertex must satisfy a set of compatibility conditions. Any cyclic three string vertex is compatible with the $D=4, N=4$ effective field theory. The effective actions may be useful in understanding the non--polynomial structure and the underlying symmetry of covariant closed string field theory, and in addressing issues of background indep...

  8. Action-based effects on music perception

    Pieter-Jan eMaes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The classical, disembodied approach to music cognition conceptualizes action and perception as separate, peripheral phenomena. In contrast, embodied accounts to music cognition emphasize the central role of the close coupling of action and perception. It is a commonly established fact that perception spurs action tendencies. We present a theoretical framework capturing the ways that the human motor system, and the actions it produces, can reciprocally influence the perception of music. The cornerstone of this framework is the common coding theory postulating a representational overlap in the brain between the planning, the execution, and the perception of movement. The integration of action and perception in so-called internal models is explained as a result of associative learning processes. Characteristic of internal models is that they allow intended or perceived sensory states to be transferred into corresponding motor commands (inverse modelling, and vice versa, to predict the sensory outcomes of planned actions (forward modelling. Embodied accounts typically adhere to inverse modelling to explain action effects on music perception (Leman, 2007. We extent this account by pinpointing forward modelling as an alternative mechanism by which action can modulate perception. We provide an extensive overview of recent empirical evidence in support of this idea. Additionally, we demonstrate that motor dysfunctions can cause perceptual disabilities, supporting the main idea of the paper that the human motor system plays a functional role in auditory perception. The finding that music perception is shaped by the human motor system, and the action it produces, suggests that the musical mind is highly embodied. However, we advocate for a more radical approach to embodied (music cognition in the sense that it needs to be considered as a dynamic process, in which aspects of action, perception, introspection, and social interaction are of crucial

  9. Action-based effects on music perception.

    Maes, Pieter-Jan; Leman, Marc; Palmer, Caroline; Wanderley, Marcelo M

    2014-01-01

    The classical, disembodied approach to music cognition conceptualizes action and perception as separate, peripheral processes. In contrast, embodied accounts of music cognition emphasize the central role of the close coupling of action and perception. It is a commonly established fact that perception spurs action tendencies. We present a theoretical framework that captures the ways in which the human motor system and its actions can reciprocally influence the perception of music. The cornerstone of this framework is the common coding theory, postulating a representational overlap in the brain between the planning, the execution, and the perception of movement. The integration of action and perception in so-called internal models is explained as a result of associative learning processes. Characteristic of internal models is that they allow intended or perceived sensory states to be transferred into corresponding motor commands (inverse modeling), and vice versa, to predict the sensory outcomes of planned actions (forward modeling). Embodied accounts typically refer to inverse modeling to explain action effects on music perception (Leman, 2007). We extend this account by pinpointing forward modeling as an alternative mechanism by which action can modulate perception. We provide an extensive overview of recent empirical evidence in support of this idea. Additionally, we demonstrate that motor dysfunctions can cause perceptual disabilities, supporting the main idea of the paper that the human motor system plays a functional role in auditory perception. The finding that music perception is shaped by the human motor system and its actions suggests that the musical mind is highly embodied. However, we advocate for a more radical approach to embodied (music) cognition in the sense that it needs to be considered as a dynamical process, in which aspects of action, perception, introspection, and social interaction are of crucial importance. PMID:24454299

  10. Action-effect bindings and ideomotor learning in intention- and stimulus-based actions

    ArvidHerwig

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available According to ideomotor theory, action-effect associations are crucial for voluntary action control. Recently, a number of studies started to investigate the conditions that mediate the acquisition and application of action-effect associations by comparing actions carried out in response to exogenous stimuli (stimulus-based with actions selected endogenously (intention-based. There is evidence that the acquisition and/or application of action-effect associations is boosted when acting in an intention-based action mode. For instance, bidirectional action-effect associations were diagnosed in a forced choice test phase if participants previously experienced action-effect couplings in an intention-based but not in a stimulus-based action mode. The present study aims at investigating effects of the action mode on action-effect associations in more detail. In a series of experiments, we compared the strength and durability of short-term action-effect associations (binding immediately following intention- as well as stimulus-based actions. Moreover, long-term action-effect associations (learning were assessed in a subsequent test phase. Our results show short-term action-effect associations of equal strength and durability for both action modes. However, replicating previous results, long-term associations were observed only following intention-based actions. These findings indicate that the effect of the action mode on long-term associations cannot merely be a result of accumulated short-term action-effect bindings. Instead, only those episodic bindings are selectively perpetuated or retrieved that integrate action-relevant aspects of the processing event, i.e., in case of intention-based actions, the link between action and ensuing effect.

  11. Effective actions for anomalous hydrodynamics

    We argue that an effective field theory of local fluid elements captures the constraints on hydrodynamic transport stemming from the presence of quantum anomalies in the underlying microscopic theory. Focussing on global current anomalies for an arbitrary flavour group, we derive the anomalous constitutive relations in arbitrary even dimensions. We demonstrate that our results agree with the constraints on anomaly governed transport derived hitherto using a local version of the second law of thermodynamics. The construction crucially uses the anomaly inflow mechanism and involves a novel thermofield double construction. In particular, we show that the anomalous Ward identities necessitate non-trivial interaction between the two parts of the Schwinger-Keldysh contour

  12. (-)-Carvone: antispasmodic effect and mode of action.

    Souza, Fábia Valéria M; da Rocha, Marcelly Barbosa; de Souza, Damião P; Marçal, Rosilene Moretti

    2013-03-01

    (-)-Carvone is a monoterpene ketone found in spearmint (Mentha spicata var. crispa) essential oil that is widely used as an odor and flavor additive. An intestinal antispasmodic effect was recently reported for (-)-carvone, and it has been shown to be more potent than its (+)-antipode. The mechanism of (-)-carvone action in the intestines has not been investigated. To gain a better understanding of the (-)-carvone antispasmodic effect, we investigated its pharmacological effects in the guinea pig ileum. Terminal portions of the ileum were mounted for isotonic contraction recordings. The effect of (-)-carvone was compared with that of the classical calcium channel blocker (CCB) verapamil. In isolated ileal smooth muscle, (-)-carvone did not produce direct contractile or relaxation responses and did not modify electrically elicited contractions or low K(+)-evoked contractions. The submaximal contractions induced by histamine (p<0.001), BaCl2 (p<0.05), and carbachol (p<0.01) were significantly reduced by (-)-carvone. The contractile response elicited by high concentrations of carbachol was reduced but not abolished by (-)-carvone. No additive action was detected with co-incubation of (-)-carvone and verapamil on carbachol-induced contraction. (-)-Carvone reduced the contraction induced by high K(+) and was almost 100 times more potent than verapamil. Thus, (-)-carvone showed a typical and potent CCB-like action. Many effects described for both (-)-carvone and spearmint oil can be explained as a CCB-like mode of action. PMID:23103297

  13. Effective boundary action in fermion string theory

    Continual Polyakov integral for the Neveu-Schwarz-Ramon (NSR) type fermion string is calculated on the Riemann Surface with special choice of local boundary conditions for the fermion fields. The derived expressions are used when studying behaviour of the string Green function in configurational space. Generalization of the effective fermion action for the case of non-Archimedean strings is discussed. 11 refs

  14. Low energy effective actions with composite fields

    We investigate a Wilson real space renormalization gorup approach for theories in which composite fields are needed at low energies. It furnishes a sequence of effective actions SΛ which depend on an UV cut-off Λ. We adopt Wilsons fundamental postulate that these effective actions should be local. This is our basic guiding principle on how to construct ''blockspins'', i.e. the fields which appear in the effective actions. Given a fundamental high energy theory which does not contain composite fields we gradually integrate out high frequency modes in order to lower the cut-off Λ. Eventually appearing nonlocalities at some cut-off value Λc indicate the necessity to introduce new composite degrees of freedom into the theory. An analysis based on Symanzik's infinite set of Bethe-Salpeter equations for all n-point functions shows that a local low energy effective action containing composite fields can be constructed at the compositeness scale Λc. Further integration of high frequency modes generates new nonlocalities which can be absorbed into the composite degrees of freedom. There are indications from an 1/N expansion that this suffices already to eliminate high energy degrees of freedom from the composite field so that no separate integration is needed to achieve this. In general the composite field will have self interactions. (orig.)

  15. Holographic effective actions from black holes

    Using the Wald's relation between the Noether charge of diffeomorphisms and the entropy for a generic spacetime possessing a bifurcation surface, we introduce a method to obtain a family of higher order derivatives effective actions from the entropy of black holes. We consider the entropy as the starting point and we analyze the procedure of derivation of the action functional. We specialize to a particular class of theories which simplifies the calculations, f(R) theories. We apply the procedure to loop quantum gravity and to a general class of log-corrected entropy formulas.

  16. Symmetry-improved CJT effective action

    The formalism introduced by Cornwall, Jackiw and Tomboulis (CJT) provides a systematic approach to consistently resumming non-perturbative effects in Quantum Thermal Field Theory. One major limitation of the CJT effective action is that its loopwise expansion introduces residual violations of possible global symmetries, thus giving rise to massive Goldstone bosons in the spontaneously broken phase of the theory. In this paper we develop a novel symmetry-improved CJT formalism for consistently encoding global symmetries in a loopwise expansion. In our formalism, the extremal solutions of the fields and propagators to a loopwise truncated CJT effective action are subject to additional constraints given by the Ward Identities due to global symmetries. By considering a simple O(2) scalar model, we show that, unlike other methods, our approach satisfies a number of important field-theoretic properties. In particular, we find that the Goldstone boson resulting from spontaneous symmetry breaking of O(2) is massless and the phase transition is a second-order one, already in the Hartree–Fock approximation. After taking the sunset diagrams into account, we show how our approach properly describes the threshold properties of the massless Goldstone boson and the Higgs particle in the loops. Finally, assuming minimal modifications to the Hartree–Fock approximated CJT effective action, we calculate the corresponding symmetry-improved CJT effective potential and discuss the conditions for its uniqueness for scalar-field values away from its minimum

  17. Cosmic fluctuations from quantum effective action

    Wetterich, C

    2015-01-01

    Does the observable spectrum of cosmic fluctuations depend on detailed initial conditions? This addresses the question if the general inflationary paradigm is sufficient to predict within a given model the spectrum and amplitude of cosmic fluctuations, or if additional particular assumptions about the initial conditions are needed. The answer depends on the number of e-foldings $N_{in}$ between the beginning of inflation and horizon crossing of the observable fluctuations. We discuss an interacting inflaton field in an arbitrary homogeneous and isotropic geometry, employing the quantum effective action $\\Gamma$. An exact time evolution equation for the correlation function involves the second functional derivative $\\Gamma^{(2)}$. The operator formalism and quantum vacua for interacting fields are not needed. Use of the effective action also allows one to address the change of frames by field transformations (field relativity). For not too large $N_{in}$ we find that memory of the initial conditions is preserv...

  18. Effectively Discriminating Fighting Shots in Action Movies

    Shu-Gao Ma; Wei-Qiang Wang

    2011-01-01

    Fighting shots are the highlights of action movies and an effective approach to discriminating fighting shots is very useful for many applications, such as movie trailer construction, movie content filtering, and movie content retrieval. In this paper, we present a novel method for this task. Our approach first extracts the reliable motion information of local invariant features through a robust keypoint tracking computation; then foreground keypoints are distinguished from background keypoints by a sophisticated voting process; further, the parameters of the camera motion model is computed based on the motion information of background keypoints, and this model is then used as a reference to compute the actual motion of foreground keypoints; finally, the corresponding feature vectors are extracted to characterizing the motions of foreground keypoints, and a support vector machine (SVM) classifier is trained based on the extracted feature vectors to discriminate fighting shots. Experimental results on representative action movies show our approach is very effective.

  19. Effective action in general chiral superfield model

    Petrov, A. Yu.

    2000-01-01

    The effective action in general chiral superfield model with arbitrary k\\"{a}hlerian potential $K(\\bar{\\Phi},\\Phi)$ and chiral (holomorphic) potential $W(\\Phi)$ is considered. The one-loop and two-loop contributions to k\\"{a}hlerian effective potential and two-loop (first non-zero) contribution to chiral effective potential are found for arbitrary form of functions $K(\\bar{\\Phi},\\Phi)$ and $W(\\Phi)$. It is found that despite the theory is non-renormalizable in general case two-loop contributi...

  20. Instant Attraction: Immediate Action-Effect Bindings Occur for Both, Stimulus- and Goal-Driven Actions

    Janczyk, Markus; Heinemann, Alexander; Pfister, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Flexible behavior is only possible if contingencies between own actions and following environmental effects are acquired as quickly as possible; and recent findings indeed point toward an immediate formation of action-effect bindings already after a single coupling of an action and its effect. The present study explored whether these short-term bindings occur for both, stimulus- and goal-driven actions (“forced-choice actions” vs. “free-choice actions”). Two experiments confirmed that immedia...

  1. Instant attraction: Immediate action-effect bindings occur for both, stimulus- and goal-driven actions

    MarkusJanczyk

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Flexible behavior is only possible if contingencies between own actions and following environmental effects are acquired as quickly as possible; and recent findings indeed point toward an immediate formation of action-effect bindings already after a single coupling of an action and its effect. The present study explored whether these short-term bindings occur for both, stimulus- and goal-driven actions (“forced-choice actions” vs. “free-choice actions”. Two experiments confirmed that immediate action-effect bindings are formed for both types of actions and affect upcoming behavior. These findings support the view that action-effect binding is a ubiquitous phenomenon which occurs for any type of action.

  2. Effective action approach to quantum chromodynamics

    Though the Lagrangian of quantum chromodynamics is well known, it has proven extremely difficult to derive precisely all its consequences to compare with experiment. Approximations based on physical reasoning must be made. One method is to calculate the effective action for some particularly simple configuration of gluons and use this to analyze an arbitrary system of interacting quarks. In the first chapter, the one-loop correction to the gluon propagator is computed in two different ways - dimensional regularization and Schwinger's proper time method. The renormalization mass parameters appearing in the two treatments can then be related and the exact one-loop effective action of a constant gluon field can be expressed in terms of the experimentally determinable Λ/sub MS/. In the following chapter, the interaction of a heavy quark-antiquark pair governed by this action is considered and it is shown how the spectrum, and, in particular, the spin splittings of the bound states can be found. Due to asymptotic freedom, a massive quarkonium is analogous to a non-relativistic electromagnetic system. At short distances, the results are the same as those derived from perturbation theory though, for example, the hyperfine structure arises in a different way. At large distances, the analysis is qualitative but our results agree with the predictions of strong coupling lattice gauge theories

  3. Effective actions for relativistic fluids from holography

    de Boer, Jan; Pinzani-Fokeeva, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent progress in developing action formulations of relativistic hydrodynamics, we use holography to derive the low energy dissipationless effective action for strongly coupled conformal fluids. Our analysis is based on the study of novel double Dirichlet problems for the gravitational field, in which the boundary conditions are set on two codimension one timelike hypersurfaces (branes). We provide a geometric interpretation of the Goldstone bosons appearing in such constructions in terms of a family of spatial geodesics extending between the ultraviolet and the infrared brane. Furthermore, we discuss supplementing double Dirichlet problems with information about the near-horizon geometry. We show that upon coupling to a membrane paradigm boundary condition, our approach reproduces correctly the complex dispersion relation for both sound and shear waves. We also demonstrate that upon a Wick rotation, our formulation reproduces the equilibrium partition function formalism, provided the near-horiz...

  4. From action intentions to action effects: how does the sense of agency come about?

    Valérian Chambon; Nura Sidarus

    2014-01-01

    Sense of agency refers to the feeling of controlling an external event through one’s own action. On one influential view, agency depends on how predictable the consequences of one’s action are, getting stronger as the match between predicted and actual effect of an action gets closer. Thus, sense of agency arises when external events that follow our action are consistent with predictions of action effects made by the motor system while we perform or simply intend to perform an action. Accordi...

  5. Cosmic fluctuations from a quantum effective action

    Wetterich, C.

    2015-10-01

    Does the observable spectrum of cosmic fluctuations depend on detailed initial conditions? This addresses the question if the general inflationary paradigm is sufficient to predict within a given model the spectrum and amplitude of cosmic fluctuations, or if additional particular assumptions about the initial conditions are needed. The answer depends on the number of e -foldings Nin between the beginning of inflation and horizon crossing of the observable fluctuations. We discuss an interacting inflaton field in an arbitrary homogeneous and isotropic geometry, employing the quantum effective action Γ . An exact time evolution equation for the correlation function involves the second functional derivative Γ(2 ) . The operator formalism and quantum vacua for interacting fields are not needed. Use of the effective action also allows one to address the change of frames by field transformations (field relativity). Within the approximation of a derivative expansion for the effective action we find the most general solution for the correlation function, including mixed quantum states. For not too large Nin the memory of the initial conditions is preserved. In this case the cosmic microwave background cannot disentangle between the initial spectrum and its processing at horizon crossing. The inflaton potential cannot be reconstructed without assumptions about the initial state of the universe. We argue that for very large Nin a universal scaling form of the correlation function is reached for the range of observable modes. This can be due to symmetrization and equilibration effects, not yet contained in our approximation, which drive the short distance tail of the correlation function toward the Lorentz invariant propagator in flat space.

  6. Effective actions for statistical data assimilation

    Data assimilation is a problem in estimating the fixed parameters and state of a model of an observed dynamical system as it receives inputs from measurements passing information to the model. Using methods developed in statistical physics, we present effective actions and equations of motion for the mean orbits associated with the temporal development of a dynamical model when it has errors, there is uncertainty in its initial state, and it receives information from noisy measurements. If there are statistical dependences among errors in the measurements they can be included in this approach.

  7. Effective action of domain wall networks

    U(NC) gauge theory with NF fundamental scalars admits BPS junctions of domain walls. When the networks/webs of these walls contain loops, their size moduli give localized massless modes. We construct Kaehler potential of their effective action. In the large size limit Kaehler metric is well approximated by kinetic energy of walls and junctions, which is understood in terms of tropical geometry. Kaehler potential can be expressed in terms of hypergeometric functions that are useful to understand small size behavior. Even when the loop shrinks, the metric is regular with positive curvature. Moduli space of a single triangle loop has a geometry between a cone and a cigar

  8. Effective action calculation in lattice QCD

    A method (called the effective action method) devised to make analytic calculations in Quantum Chromodynamics in the region of strong coupling is presented. First, the author deals with developing the calculation of a strong coupling expansion of the generating functional for gauge systems on a lattice with arbitrary sources. An accompanying manual describes the implementation of this calculation on a computer. The next step consists of substituting the expressions for the one-link free energies for a specific gauge group in the result of the previous calculation. This process of substitution, together with the replacement of the sources by a bilinear combination of fermion fields, is described for the group SU(3). More details on the implementation of the substitution scheme on a computer can be found in the accompanying manual. From the effective action thus obtained in terms of meson fields and baryon fields the Green functions of the theory can be derived. As an illustrative application the effective potential determining the vacuum expectation value of the meson field is calculated. (Auth.)

  9. Exploring soft constraints on effective actions

    Bianchi, Massimo; Huang, Yu-tin; Lee, Chao-Jung; Wen, Congkao

    2016-01-01

    We study effective actions for simultaneous breaking of space-time and internal symmetries. Novel features arise due to the mixing of Goldstone modes under the broken symmetries which, in contrast to the usual Adler's zero, leads to non-vanishing soft limits. Such scenarios are common for spontaneously broken SCFT's. We explicitly test these soft theorems for $\\mathcal{N}=4$ sYM in the Coulomb branch both perturbatively and non-perturbatively. We explore the soft constraints systematically utilizing recursion relations. In the pure dilaton sector of a general CFT, we show that all amplitudes up to order $s^{n} \\sim \\partial^{2n}$ are completely determined in terms of the $k$-point amplitudes at order $s^k$ with $k \\leq n$. Terms with at most one derivative acting on each dilaton insertion are completely fixed and coincide with those appearing in the conformal DBI, i.e. DBI in AdS. With maximal supersymmetry, the effective actions are further constrained, leading to new non-renormalization theorems. In particu...

  10. The Universal One-Loop Effective Action

    Drozd, Aleksandra; Quevillon, Jérémie; You, Tevong

    2016-01-01

    We present the universal one-loop effective action for all operators of dimension up to six obtained by integrating out massive, non-degenerate multiplets. Our general expression may be applied to loops of heavy fermions or bosons, and has been checked against partial results available in the literature. The broad applicability of this approach simplifies one-loop matching from an ultraviolet model to a lower-energy effective field theory (EFT), a procedure which is now reduced to the evaluation of a combination of matrices in our universal expression, without any loop integrals to evaluate. We illustrate the relationship of our results to the Standard Model (SM) EFT, using as an example the supersymmetric stop and sbottom squark Lagrangian and extracting from our universal expression the Wilson coefficients of dimension-six operators composed of SM fields.

  11. The universal one-loop effective action

    Drozd, Aleksandra; Ellis, John; Quevillon, Jérémie; You, Tevong

    2016-03-01

    We present the universal one-loop effective action for all operators of dimension up to six obtained by integrating out massive, non-degenerate multiplets. Our general expression may be applied to loops of heavy fermions or bosons, and has been checked against partial results available in the literature. The broad applicability of this approach simplifies one-loop matching from an ultraviolet model to a lower-energy effective field theory (EFT), a procedure which is now reduced to the evaluation of a combination of matrices in our universal expression, without any loop integrals to evaluate. We illustrate the relationship of our results to the Standard Model (SM) EFT, using as an example the supersymmetric stop and sbottom squark Lagrangian and extracting from our universal expression the Wilson coefficients of dimension-six operators composed of SM fields.

  12. The effective action for composite Higgs particles

    There is reason to believe that massive composite (fermion-antifermion) scalar particles closely resembling the usual fundamental scalar Higgs fields exist in theories with dynamically broken gauge symmetries. This composite Higgs couples directly to the fermions in proportion to their symmetry-violating self-energies. Induced couplings to the gauge bosons and self-couplings are claculated as loop effects. This involves deriving the effective action in terms of the full propagators and background fields. The couplings between the composite Higgs and the gauge bosons are the same as those in models with fundamental scalars. The self-couplings are determined and fix all parameters associated with the composite scalars. Comments regarding extending work to higher orders and concerning the symmetry-violating solutions to the fermion Schwinger-Dyson equation are given in this paper

  13. Action-based effects on music perception

    Maes, Pieter-Jan; Leman, Marc; Palmer, Caroline; Wanderley, Marcelo M.

    2014-01-01

    The classical, disembodied approach to music cognition conceptualizes action and perception as separate, peripheral processes. In contrast, embodied accounts of music cognition emphasize the central role of the close coupling of action and perception. It is a commonly established fact that perception spurs action tendencies. We present a theoretical framework that captures the ways in which the human motor system and its actions can reciprocally influence the perception of music. The cornerst...

  14. Action-based effects on music perception

    Pieter-Jan eMaes; Marc eLeman; Caroline ePalmer; Marcelo eWanderley

    2014-01-01

    The classical, disembodied approach to music cognition conceptualizes action and perception as separate, peripheral phenomena. In contrast, embodied accounts to music cognition emphasize the central role of the close coupling of action and perception. It is a commonly established fact that perception spurs action tendencies. We present a theoretical framework capturing the ways that the human motor system, and the actions it produces, can reciprocally influence the perception of music. The co...

  15. Effective Action of Domain Wall Networks

    Eto, M; Nagashima, T; Nitta, M; Ohashi, K; Sakai, N; Eto, Minoru; Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Sakai, Norisuke

    2007-01-01

    U(Nc) gauge theory with Nf fundamental scalars admits BPS junctions of domain walls. When the networks/webs of these walls contain loops, their size moduli give localized massless modes. We construct K\\"ahler potential of their effective action. In the large size limit K\\"ahler metric is well approximated by kinetic energy of walls and junctions, which is understood in terms of tropical geometry. K\\"ahler potential can be expressed in terms of hypergeometric functions which are useful to understand small size behavior. Even when the loop shrinks, the metric is regular with positive curvature. Moduli space of a single triangle loop has a geometry between a cone and a cigar.

  16. Boundary Effective Action for Quantum Hall States

    Gromov, Andrey; Jensen, Kristan; Abanov, Alexander G.

    2016-03-01

    We consider quantum Hall states on a space with boundary, focusing on the aspects of the edge physics which are completely determined by the symmetries of the problem. There are four distinct terms of Chern-Simons type that appear in the low-energy effective action of the state. Two of these protect gapless edge modes. They describe Hall conductance and, with some provisions, thermal Hall conductance. The remaining two, including the Wen-Zee term, which contributes to the Hall viscosity, do not protect gapless edge modes but are instead related to the local boundary response fixed by symmetries. We highlight some basic features of this response. It follows that the coefficient of the Wen-Zee term can change across an interface without closing a gap or breaking a symmetry.

  17. Perception of actions performed by external agents presupposes knowledge about the relationship between action and effect.

    Raos, Vassilis; Savaki, Helen E

    2016-05-15

    We used the (14)C-deoxyglucose method to reveal changes in activity, in the lateral sulcus of monkeys, elicited by reaching-to-grasp in the light or in the dark and by observation of the same action executed by an external agent. Both visually-guided execution and observation of the same action activated the secondary somatosensory cortex, the ventral somatosensory area, the somatorecipient parietal ventral area, the retroinsula and the caudo-medial area of the auditory belt. These matching activations indicate that the somesthetic consequences of movements, generated bottom-up during action execution, may also be triggered top-down during action observation to represent the predicted sensory consequences of the perceived movement. The posterior granular part of insula found to be activated only for action execution and its anterior agranular part activated only for action observation may contribute to the attribution of action to the correct agent. Also, execution in the dark implicated all components activated by execution in the light but the retroinsula. In conclusion, activation of the somatorecipient parietal areas, not only for action-execution but also for action-observation, indicates that perception of actions performed by an external agent presupposes knowledge about the action-effect relationships, and that understanding others' actions consists of running off-line previously stored sensory-motor programs. PMID:26892857

  18. Motor imagery during action observation modulates automatic imitation effects in rhythmical actions

    Daniel Lloyd Eaves

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that passively observing a task-irrelevant rhythmical action can bias the cycle time of a subsequently executed rhythmical action. Here we use the same paradigm to investigate the impact of different forms of motor imagery (MI during action observation (AO on this automatic imitation (AI effect. Participants saw a picture of the instructed action followed by a rhythmical distractor movie, wherein cycle time was subtly manipulated across trials. They then executed the instructed rhythmical action. When participants imagined performing the instructed action in synchrony with the distractor action (AO + MI, a strong imitation bias was found that was significantly greater than in our previous study. The bias was pronounced equally for compatible and incompatible trials, wherein observed and imagined actions were different in type (e.g., face washing vs. painting or plane of movement, or both. In contrast, no imitation bias was observed when MI conflicted with AO. In Experiment 2, motor execution synchronised with AO produced a stronger imitation bias compared to AO + MI, showing an advantage in synchronisation for overt execution over MI. Furthermore, the bias was stronger when participants synchronised the instructed action with the distractor movie, compared to when they synchronised the distractor action with the distractor movie. Although we still observed a significant bias in the latter condition, this finding indicates a degree of specificity in AI effects for the identity of the synchronised action. Overall, our data show that MI can substantially modulate the effects of AO on subsequent execution, wherein: (1 combined AO + MI can enhance AI effects relative to passive AO; (2 observed and imagined actions can be flexibly coordinated across different action types and planes; and (3 conflicting AO + MI can abolish AI effects. Therefore, combined AO + MI instructions should be considered in motor training and

  19. The role of action effects in 12-month-olds' action control: a comparison of televised model and live model.

    Klein, Annette M; Hauf, Petra; Aschersleben, Gisa

    2006-12-01

    The present study investigated differences in infant imitation after watching a televised model and a live model and addressed the issue of whether action effects influence infants' action control in both cases. In a 2x2 design, 12-month-old infants observed a live or a televised model performing a three-step action sequence, in which either the 2nd or the 3rd action step was combined with an acoustical action effect. We assumed that infants would use the observed action-effect relations for their own action control in the test phase afterwards. Even though results exhibited differences in the absolute amount of imitation between the two demonstration groups, both groups showed similar result patterns regarding the action effect manipulation: infants imitated the action step that was followed by a salient action effect more often and mostly as the first target action, emphasizing the important role of action effects in infants' action control. PMID:17138306

  20. The effective action in four-dimensional CDT

    Gizbert-Studnicki, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    We present recent results concerning the measurement and analysis of the effective action in four-dimensional Causal Dynamical Triangulations. The action describes quantum fluctuations of the spatial volume of the CDT universe (or alternatively the scale factor) after integrating out other degrees of freedom. We use the covariance of volume fluctuations to measure and parametrize the effective action inside the de Sitter phase, also called the C phase. We show that the action is consistent with a simple discretization of the minisuperspace action (with a reversed overall sign). We discuss possible subleading corrections and show how to construct a more complicated effective action comprising both integer and half-integer discrete proper time layers. We introduce a new method of the effective action measurement based on the transfer matrix. We show that the results of the new method are fully consistent with the covariance matrix method inside the de Sitter phase. We use the new method to measure the effective...

  1. Faddeev-Niemi Conjecture and Effective Action of QCD

    Cho, Y. M.; Lee, H. W.; Pak, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    We calculate a one loop effective action of SU(2) QCD in the presence of the monopole background, and find a possible connection between the resulting QCD effective action and a generalized Skyrme-Faddeev action of the non-linear sigma model. The result is obtained using the gauge-independent decomposotion of the gauge potential into the topological degrees which describes the non-Abelian monopoles and the local dynamical degrees of the potential, and integrating out all the dynamical degrees...

  2. Effective action for supersymmetrical chiral anomaly

    It is proved that the consistency conditions of the type of Wess-Zumino conditions are necessary and sufficient for local integrability of supersymmetrical chiral anomaly. The global integrability condition implies discreteness of the coefficient in anomalous action. Explicit formulas for consistent anomalies and corresponding functional depending on superfields of various types are obtained

  3. Conformally covariant operators and effective action in external gravitational field

    The n-dimensional expressions for the second order conformally covariant differentional operators acting on vector and tensor fields and for the fourth order conformally covariant operator acting on scalar fields are obtained. For the fourth order operator one-loop effective action is evaluated in four dimensions. The possibility of effective action evaluation for other conformally covariant operators is discussed

  4. Energy Transfer between Throats from a 10d Perspective

    Harling, B v; Noguchi, T

    2007-01-01

    Strongly warped regions, also known as throats, are a common feature of the type IIB string theory landscape. If one of the throats is heated during cosmological evolution, the energy is subsequently transferred to other throats or to massless fields in the unwarped bulk of the Calabi-Yau orientifold. This energy transfer proceeds either by Hawking radiation from the black hole horizon in the heated throat or, at later times, by the decay of throat-localized Kaluza-Klein states. In both cases, we calculate in a 10d setup the energy transfer rate (respectively decay rate) as a function of the AdS scales of the throats and of their relative distance. Compared to existing results based on 5d models, we find a significant suppression of the energy transfer rates if the size of the embedding Calabi-Yau orientifold is much larger than the AdS radii of the throats. This effect can be partially compensated by a small distance between the throats. These results are relevant, e.g., for the analysis of reheating after b...

  5. Energy transfer between throats from a 10D perspective

    Strongly warped regions, also known as throats, are a common feature of the type IIB string theory landscape. If one of the throats is heated during cosmological evolution, the energy is subsequently transferred to other throats or to massless fields in the unwarped bulk of the Calabi-Yau orientifold. This energy transfer proceeds either by Hawking radiation from the black hole horizon in the heated throat or, at later times, by the decay of throat-localized Kaluza-Klein states. In both cases, we calculate in a 10d setup the energy transfer rate (respectively decay rate) as a function of the AdS scales of the throats and of their relative distance. Compared to existing results based on 5d models, we find a significant suppression of the energy transfer rates if the size of the embedding Calabi-Yau orientifold is much larger than the AdS radii of the throats. This effect can be partially compensated by a small distance between the throats. These results are relevant, e.g., for the analysis of reheating after brane inflation. Our calculation employs the dual gauge theory picture in which each throat is described by a strongly coupled 4d gauge theory, the degrees of freedom of which are localized at a certain position in the compact space

  6. On the influence of reward on action-effect binding

    PaulSimonMuhle-Karbe

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ideomotor theory states that the formation of anticipatory representations about the perceptual consequences of an action (i.e. action-effect (A-E binding provides the functional basis of voluntary action control. A host of studies has demonstrated that A-E binding occurs fast and effortlessly, yet only little is known about cognitive and affective factors that influence this learning process. In the present study, we sought to test whether the motivational value of an action modulates the acquisition of A-E associations. To this end, we associated specific actions with monetary incentives during the acquisition of novel A-E mappings. In a subsequent test phase, the degree of binding was assessed by presenting the former effect stimuli as task-irrelevant response primes in a forced-choice response task in the absence of any reward. Binding, as indexed by response priming through the former action effects, was only found for reward-related A-E mappings. Moreover, the degree to which reward associations modulated the binding strength was predicted by individuals’ trait sensitivity to reward. These observations indicate that the association of actions and their immediate outcomes depends on the motivational value of the action during learning, as well as on the motivational disposition of the individual. On a larger scale, these findings also highlight the link between ideomotor theories and reinforcement-learning theories, providing an interesting perspective for future research on anticipatory regulation of behavior.

  7. Effective average action for gauge theories and exact evolution equations

    We propose a new nonperturbative evolution equation for Yang-Mills theories. It describes the scale dependence of an effective action. The running of the nonabelian gauge coupling in arbitrary dimension is computed. (orig.)

  8. World-volume Effective Actions of Exotic Five-branes

    Kimura, Tetsuji; Yata, Masaya

    2014-01-01

    We construct world-volume effective actions of exotic $5^2_2$-branes in type IIA and IIB string theories. The effective actions are given in fully space-time covariant forms with two Killing vectors associated with background isometries. The effective theories are governed by the six-dimensional $\\mathcal{N}=(2,0)$ tensor multiplet and $\\mathcal{N}=(1,1)$ vector multiplet, respectively. Performing the S-duality transformation to the $5^2_2$-brane effective action in type IIB string theory, we also work out the world-volume action of the $5^2_3$-brane. We discuss some additional issues relevant to the exotic five-branes in type I and heterotic string theories.

  9. Arsenic: health effects, mechanisms of actions, and research issues.

    Abernathy, C O; Liu, Y. P.; Longfellow, D; Aposhian, H V; Beck, B.; Fowler, B.; Goyer, R; Menzer, R.; Rossman, T; Thompson, C.; Waalkes, M

    1999-01-01

    A meeting on the health effects of arsenic (As), its modes of action, and areas in need of future research was held in Hunt Valley, Maryland, on 22-24 September 1997. Exposure to As in drinking water has been associated with the development of skin and internal cancers and noncarcinogenic effects such as diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiovascular diseases. There is little data on specific mechanism(s) of action for As, but a great deal of information on possible modes of action. Alth...

  10. Holographic RG flow and the quantum effective action

    The calculation of the full (renormalized) holographic action is undertaken in general Einstein-scalar theories. The appropriate formalism is developed and the renormalized effective action is calculated up to two derivatives in the metric and scalar operators. The holographic RG equations involve a generalized Ricci flow for the space-time metric as well as the standard β-function flow for scalar operators. Several examples are analyzed and the effective action is calculated. A set of conserved quantities of the holographic flow is found, whose interpretation is not yet understood. (Copyright copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Non-dissipative hydrodynamics : effective actions versus entropy current.

    Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy; Bhattacharyya, Sayantani; Rangamani, Mukund

    2013-01-01

    While conventional hydrodynamics incorporating dissipative effects is hard to derive from an action principle, it is nevertheless possible to construct classical actions when the dissipative terms are switched off. In this note we undertake a systematic exploration of such constructions from an effective field theory approach and argue for the existence of non-trivial second order non-dissipative hydrodynamics involving pure energy-momentum transport. We find these fluids to be characterized ...

  12. Quantum effective action from the AdS/CFT correspondence

    Skenderis, K; Skenderis, Kostas; Solodukhin, Sergey N.

    2000-01-01

    We obtain an Einstein metric of constant negative curvature given an arbitrary boundary metric in three dimensions, and a conformally flat one given an arbitrary conformally flat boundary metric in other dimensions. In order to compute the on-shell value of the gravitational action for these solutions, we propose to integrate the radial coordinate from the boundary till a critical value where the bulk volume element vanishes. The result, which is a functional of the boundary metric, provides a sector of the quantum effective action common to all conformal field theories that have a gravitational description. We verify that the so-defined boundary effective action is conformally invariant in odd (boundary) dimensions and has the correct conformal anomaly in even (boundary) dimensions. In three dimensions and for arbitrary static boundary metric the bulk metric takes a rather simple form. We explicitly carry out the computation of the corresponding effective action and find that it equals the non-local Polyakov...

  13. Urban Heat Island Effect Actions - Neighborhood Data

    Louisville Metro Government — The urban heat island effect — defined as the difference in temperature between the core of Louisville and its suburbs — contributes to heat-related illnesses and...

  14. Effect of mutagen combined action on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. II

    The effect of UV radiation and UV radiation combined with alkylnitrosourea derivatives (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) was observed on survival of cells of the algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In particular, single parts were evaluated of the overall lethal effect - dying of cells before division and dying of cells after division. It was found that the combined action of low doses of UV radiation and alkylnitrosoureas result in a pronounced protective effect which manifests itself by a higher frequency of surviving cells than was that effected by the action of alkylnitrosoureas alone. As a result of combined action with higher doses of UV radiation this effect is lost, and the resultant values will come close to the theoretically anticipated values. This gradual transition from a protective to an additive effect mainly manifests itself by changes in the proportion of cells dying before division. (author)

  15. Radiosensitizers action on Iodine 131 therapeutical effect

    Present studies were aimed to research the possible application of a radiosensitizer, nicotinamide, to increase the therapeutical effect of radioiodine. There were used goitrous and normal rats with growing dose of Iodine 131, with and without simultaneous treatment with nicotinamide. The obtained results show that the nicotinamide treatment importantly increases the thyroid radio destructive effect induced by radioiodine. Under these experimental conditions, nicotinamide induces to a significant increase of thyroid vascularisation, without changes in the proteins ADP-ribosylation activity. These results show, for the first time, the radiosensitizer effect of nicotinamide in front of Iodine 131 and give the possibility of using it in the treatment of hyperthyroid or thyroid difference cancer patients. (author)

  16. Fractional Effective Action at strong electromagnetic fields

    Kleinert, Hagen; Xue, She-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In 1936, Weisskopf showed that for vanishing electric or magnetic fields the strong-field behavior of the one loop Euler-Heisenberg effective Lagrangian of quantum electro dynamics (QED) is logarithmic. Here we generalize this result for different limits of the Lorentz invariants \\(\\vec{E}^2-\\vec{B}^2\\) and \\(\\vec{B}\\cdot\\vec{E}\\). The logarithmic dependence can be interpreted as a lowest-order manifestation of an anomalous power behavior of the effective Lagrangian of QED, with critical exponents \\(\\delta=e^2/(12\\pi)\\) for spinor QED, and \\(\\delta_S=\\delta/4\\) for scalar QED.

  17. Background independent effective action from D=1 matrix model

    We derive the background independent form of the Das-Jevicki action. The tachyon terms are given to all orders by a generally covariant form of the Das-Jevicki action. The graviton-dilaton sector is the usual low energy effective action. This enables us to examine questions such as the back reaction of the tachyon on the metric. In particular the reason why the usual Liouville term is an exact solution of the conformal invariance conditions, as well as the fact that it has no back reaction, become manifest. We comment on the propagation of a tachyonic perturbation in the background of a black-hole metric. (orig.)

  18. Renormalization and Effective Actions for General Relativity

    Neugebohrn, Falk

    2007-01-01

    Quantum gravity is analyzed from the viewpoint of the renormalization group. The analysis is based on methods introduced by J. Polchinski concerning the perturbative renormalization with flow equations. In the first part of this work, the program of renormalization with flow equations is reviewed and then extended to effective field theories that have a finite UV cutoff. This is done for a scalar field theory by imposing additional renormalization conditions for some of the nonrenormalizable couplings. It turns out that one so obtains a statement on the predictivity of the effective theory at scales far below the UV cutoff. In particular, nonrenormalizable theories can be treated without problems in the proposed framework. In the second part, the standard covariant BRS quantization program for Euclidean Einstein gravity is applied. A momentum cutoff regularization is imposed and the resulting violation of the Slavnov-Taylor identities is discussed. Deriving Polchinski's renormalization group equation for Eucl...

  19. Renormalization and effective actions for general relativity

    Neugebohrn, F.

    2007-05-15

    Quantum gravity is analyzed from the viewpoint of the renormalization group. The analysis is based on methods introduced by J. Polchinski concerning the perturbative renormalization with flow equations. In the first part of this work, the program of renormalization with flow equations is reviewed and then extended to effective field theories that have a finite UV cutoff. This is done for a scalar field theory by imposing additional renormalization conditions for some of the nonrenormalizable couplings. It turns out that one so obtains a statement on the predictivity of the effective theory at scales far below the UV cutoff. In particular, nonrenormalizable theories can be treated without problems in the proposed framework. In the second part, the standard covariant BRS quantization program for Euclidean Einstein gravity is applied. A momentum cutoff regularization is imposed and the resulting violation of the Slavnov-Taylor identities is discussed. Deriving Polchinski's renormalization group equation for Euclidean quantum gravity, the predictivity of effective quantum gravity at scales far below the Planck scale is investigated with flow equations. A fine-tuning procedure for restoring the violated Slavnov-Taylor identities is proposed and it is argued that in the effective quantum gravity context, the restoration will only be accomplished with finite accuracy. Finally, the no-cutoff limit of Euclidean quantum gravity is analyzed from the viewpoint of the Polchinski method. It is speculated whether a limit with nonvanishing gravitational constant might exist where the latter would ultimatively be determined by the cosmological constant and the masses of the elementary particles. (orig.)

  20. Renormalization and effective actions for general relativity

    Quantum gravity is analyzed from the viewpoint of the renormalization group. The analysis is based on methods introduced by J. Polchinski concerning the perturbative renormalization with flow equations. In the first part of this work, the program of renormalization with flow equations is reviewed and then extended to effective field theories that have a finite UV cutoff. This is done for a scalar field theory by imposing additional renormalization conditions for some of the nonrenormalizable couplings. It turns out that one so obtains a statement on the predictivity of the effective theory at scales far below the UV cutoff. In particular, nonrenormalizable theories can be treated without problems in the proposed framework. In the second part, the standard covariant BRS quantization program for Euclidean Einstein gravity is applied. A momentum cutoff regularization is imposed and the resulting violation of the Slavnov-Taylor identities is discussed. Deriving Polchinski's renormalization group equation for Euclidean quantum gravity, the predictivity of effective quantum gravity at scales far below the Planck scale is investigated with flow equations. A fine-tuning procedure for restoring the violated Slavnov-Taylor identities is proposed and it is argued that in the effective quantum gravity context, the restoration will only be accomplished with finite accuracy. Finally, the no-cutoff limit of Euclidean quantum gravity is analyzed from the viewpoint of the Polchinski method. It is speculated whether a limit with nonvanishing gravitational constant might exist where the latter would ultimatively be determined by the cosmological constant and the masses of the elementary particles. (orig.)

  1. Perception, action, and Roelofs effect: a mere illusion of dissociation.

    Paul Dassonville

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available A prominent and influential hypothesis of vision suggests the existence of two separate visual systems within the brain, one creating our perception of the world and another guiding our actions within it. The induced Roelofs effect has been described as providing strong evidence for this perception/action dissociation: When a small visual target is surrounded by a large frame positioned so that the frame's center is offset from the observer's midline, the perceived location of the target is shifted in the direction opposite the frame's offset. In spite of this perceptual mislocalization, however, the observer can accurately guide movements to the target location. Thus, perception is prone to the illusion while actions seem immune. Here we demonstrate that the Roelofs illusion is caused by a frame-induced transient distortion of the observer's apparent midline. We further demonstrate that actions guided to targets within this same distorted egocentric reference frame are fully expected to be accurate, since the errors of target localization will exactly cancel the errors of motor guidance. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the various perceptual and motor effects of the induced Roelofs illusion without requiring the existence of separate neural systems for perception and action. Given this, the behavioral dissociation that accompanies the Roelofs effect cannot be considered evidence of a dissociation of perception and action. This indicates a general need to re-evaluate the broad class of evidence purported to support this hypothesized dissociation.

  2. Boldine action against the stannous chloride effect.

    Reiniger, I W; Ribeiro da Silva, C; Felzenszwalb, I; de Mattos, J C; de Oliveira, J F; da Silva Dantas, F J; Bezerra, R J; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A; Bernardo-Filho, M

    1999-12-15

    Peumus boldus extract has been used in popular medicine in the treatment of biliar litiase, hepatic insufficiency and liver congestion. Its effects are associated to the substance boldine that is present in its extract. In the present work, we evaluated the influence of boldine both in: (i) the structural conformation of a plasmid pUC 9.1 through gel electrophoresis analysis; and in (ii) the survival of the strain of Escherichia coli AB1157 submitted to reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated by a Fenton like reaction, induced by stannous chloride. Our results show a reduction of the lethal effect induced by stannous chloride on the survival of the E. coli culture in the presence of boldine. The supercoiled form of the plasmid is not modified by stannous chloride in the presence of boldine. We suggest that the protection induced by boldine could be explained by its anti-oxidant mechanism. In this way, the boldine could be reacting with stannous ions, protecting them against the oxidation and, consequently, avoiding the generation of ROS. PMID:10624900

  3. On the new definition of off-shell effective action

    We analyze the recently proposed definition of the off-shell, gauge invariant, gauge-independent, effective action GAMMA, utilizing an invariant metric on the field space. It is shown how to establish correspondence between GAMMA and the standard effective action, calculated in some particular (Landau-type) gauge. Several examples are explicitly discussed, including Yang-Mills theory, the effective potential in scalar QED, and one-loop quantum gravity. Generalization to the case of super-invariant theories (e.g. super-Yang Mills and supergravity) is also presented. (orig.)

  4. Constraining the effective action by a method of external sources

    Garbrecht, Björn; Millington, Peter

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel method of evaluating the effective action, wherein the physical one- and two-point functions are obtained in the limit of non-vanishing external sources. We illustrate the self-consistency of this method by recovering the usual 2PI effective action due to Cornwall, Jackiw and Tomboulis, differing only by the fact that the saddle-point evaluation of the path integral is performed along the extremal quantum, rather than classical, path. As such, this approach is of particular relevance to situations where the dominant quantum and classical paths are non-perturbatively far away from one-another. A pertinent example is the decay of false vacua in radiatively-generated potentials, as may occur for the electroweak vacuum of the Standard Model. In addition, we describe how the external sources may instead be chosen so as to yield the two-particle-point-irreducible (2PPI) effective action of Coppens and Verschelde. Finally, in the spirit of the symmetry-improved effective action of Pilaftsis and Teresi, we give an example of how the external sources can be used to preserve global symmetries in truncations of the 2PI effective action. Specifically, in the context of an O (2) model with spontaneous symmetry breaking, we show that this approach allows the Hartree-Fock approximation to be re-organized, such that the Goldstone boson remains massless algebraically in the symmetry-broken phase and we obtain the correct second-order thermal phase transition.

  5. Stratospheric ozone loss, ultraviolet effects and action spectroscopy

    Coohill, Thomas P.

    The major effect of stratospheric ozone loss will be an increase in the amount of ultraviolet radiation reaching the ground. This increase will be entirely contained within the UV-B (290-320nm). How this will impact life on Earth will be determined by the UV-B photobiology of exposed organisms, including humans. One of the analytical methods useful in estimating these effects is Action Spectroscopy (biological effect as a function of wavelength). Carefully constructed action spectra will allow us to partially predict the increase in bio-effect due to additional UV exposure. What effect this has on the organism and the system in which the organism resides is of paramount importance. Suitable action spectra already exist for human skin cancer, human cell mutation and killing, and for one immune response. Comprehensive and widely applicable action spectra for terrestrial and aquatic plant responses are being generated but are not yet suitable for extensive analysis. There is little data available for animals, other than those experiments completed in the laboratory as model systems for human studies. Some polychromatic action spectra have proven useful in determining the possible impact of ozone loss on biological systems. The pitfalls and limits of this approach will be addressed.

  6. Effective action of softly broken supersymmetric theories

    We study the renormalization of (softly) broken supersymmetric theories at the one loop level in detail. We perform this analysis in a superspace approach in which the supersymmetry breaking interactions are parameterized using spurion insertions. We comment on the uniqueness of this parameterization. We compute the one loop renormalization of such theories by calculating superspace vacuum graphs with multiple spurion insertions. To preform this computation efficiently we develop algebraic properties of spurion operators, that naturally arise because the spurions are often surrounded by superspace projection operators. Our results are general apart from the restrictions that higher super covariant derivative terms and some finite effects due to non-commutativity of superfield dependent mass matrices are ignored. One of the soft potentials induces renormalization of the Kaehler potential. (author)

  7. Early markers of ongoing action-effect learning

    Hannes eRuge

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Acquiring knowledge about the relationship between stimulus conditions, one’s own actions, and the resulting consequences or effects, is one prerequisite for intentional action. Previous studies have shown that such contextualized associations between actions and their effects (S-R-E associations can be picked up very quickly. The present study examined how such weakly practiced associations might affect overt behavior during the process of initial learning and during subsequent retrieval, and how these two measures are inter-related. We examined incidental (S-R-E learning in the context of trial-and-error S-R learning and in the context of instruction-based S-R learning. Furthermore, as a control condition, common outcome (CO learning blocks were included in which all responses produced one common sound effect, hence precluding differential (S-R-E learning. Post-learning retrieval of R-E associations was tested by re-using previously produced sound effects as novel imperative stimuli combined with actions that were either compatible or incompatible with the previously encountered R-E mapping. The central result was that the size of the compatibility effect could be predicted by the size of relative response slowing during ongoing learning in the preceding acquisition phase, both in trial-and-error learning and in instruction-based learning. Importantly, this correlation was absent for the common outcome control condition, precluding accounts based on unspecific factors. Instead, the results suggest that differential outcomes are ‘actively’ integrated into action planning and that this takes additional planning time. We speculate that this might be especially true for weakly practiced (S-R-E associations before an initial goal-directed action mode transitions into a more stimulus-based action mode.

  8. 10D = eesti disainer + soome firma / Ilona Gurjanova

    Gurjanova, Ilona, 1958-

    2006-01-01

    Koostööprojektist, mille tulemusena pidi valmima kümnel eesti disaineril soome mööblitootja poolt tellitud mööbliese, mille valmistab eesti tootja. 10D disainikonkursi võitjad: I koht -Igor Volkov, lastetool "Dixi", II - Martin Pärn, istepink "Kosta", Tarmo Luisk, pehme järi "Dog", ära märgiti Ilona Gurjanova graafiliselt kujundatud kahhelkivid ja ürituse tunnusgraafika

  9. The Geometric Construction of WZW Effective Action in Noncommutative Manifold

    HOU BoYu; WANG YongQiang; YANG ZhanYing; YUE RuiHong

    2002-01-01

    By constructing close-one-cochain density in the gauge group space we get the Wess Zumino Witten(WZW) effective Lagrangian on high-dimensional noncommutative space. Especially consistent anomalies derived fromthis WZW effective action in noncommutative four-dimensional space coincide with those obtained by L. Bonora etc.(hep-th /0002210).

  10. The Geometric Construction of WZW Effective Action in Noncommutative Manifold

    2002-01-01

    By constructing close-one-cochain density Ω12n in the gauge group space we get the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) effective Lagrangian on high-dimensional noncommutative space.Especially consistent anomalies derived from this WZW effective action in noncommutative four-dimensional space coincide with those obtained by L.Bonora etc.(het-th/0002210).

  11. Action and perception in social contexts: Intentional binding for social action effects

    Roland Pfister

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The subjective experience of controlling events in the environment alters the perception of these events. For instance, the interval between one’s own actions and their consequences is subjectively compressed – a phenomenon known as intentional binding. In two experiments, we studied intentional binding in a social setting in which actions of one agent prompted a second agent to perform another action. Participants worked in pairs and were assigned to a “leader” and a “follower” role, respectively. The leader’s key presses triggered (after a variable interval a tone effect and this tone served as go signal for the follower to perform a keypress as well. Leaders and followers estimated the interval between the leader’s keypress and the following tone, or the interval between the tone and the follower’s keypress. The leader showed reliable intentional binding for both intervals relative to the follower’s estimates. These results indicate that human agents experience a pre-reflective sense of agency for genuinely social consequences of their actions.

  12. Laxative effects and mechanism of action of Brazilian green propolis

    Kakino Mamoru; Izuta Hiroshi; Tsuruma Kazuhiro; Araki Yoko; Shimazawa Masamitsu; Ichihara Kenji; Hara Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Brazilian green propolis is reported to have wide range of biological properties including antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-influenza, and antioxidant activities. In the digestive system, a protective effect of propolis on gastric ulcer has been reported, but a laxative effect has not yet been reported. We investigated the effect and the mechanism of action of water and ethanol extracts of Brazilian green propolis. Methods We examined the laxative effect of propolis ...

  13. Non-dissipative hydrodynamics: Effective actions versus entropy current

    Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy; Rangamani, Mukund

    2012-01-01

    While conventional hydrodynamics incorporating dissipative effects is hard to derive from an action principle, it is nevertheless possible to construct classical actions when the dissipative terms are switched off. In this note we undertake a systematic exploration of such constructions from an effective field theory approach and argue for the existence of non-trivial second order non-dissipative hydrodynamics involving pure energy-momentum transport. We find these fluids to be characterized by five second-order transport coefficients based on the effective action (a three parameter family is Weyl invariant). On the other hand since all flows of such fluids are non-dissipative, they entail zero entropy production; one can therefore understand them using the entropy current formalism which has provided much insight into hydrodynamic transport. An analysis of the most general stress tensor with zero entropy production however turns out to give a seven parameter family of non-dissipative hydrodynamics (a four pa...

  14. Effective actions near singularities: the STU-model

    We derive the low energy effective action of the STU-model in four and five dimensions near the line T=U where SU(2) gauge symmetry enhancement occurs. By 'integrating in' the light W± bosons together with their superpartners, the quantum corrected effective action becomes non-singular at T=U and manifestly SU(2) invariant. The four-dimensional theory is found to be consistent with modular invariance and the five-dimensional decompactification limit. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Brane Effective Actions, Kappa-Symmetry and Applications

    Simon, Joan

    2011-01-01

    This is a review on brane effective actions, their symmetries and some of its applications. Its first part uncovers the Green-Schwarz formulation of single M- and D-brane effective actions focusing on kinematical aspects : the identification of their degrees of freedom, the importance of world volume diffeomorphisms and kappa symmetry, to achieve manifest spacetime covariance and supersymmetry, and the explicit construction of such actions in arbitrary on-shell supergravity backgrounds. Its second part deals with applications. First, the use of kappa symmetry to determine supersymmetric world volume solitons. This includes their explicit construction in flat and curved backgrounds, their interpretation as BPS states carrying (topological) charges in the supersymmetry algebra and the connection between supersymmetry and hamiltonian BPS bounds. When available, I emphasise the use of these solitons as constituents in microscopic models of black holes. Second, the use of probe approximations to infer about non-tr...

  16. Effective action approach to wave propagation in scalar QED plasmas

    Shi, Yuan; Qin, Hong

    2016-01-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory with nontrivial background fields is developed and applied to study waves in plasmas. The effective action of the electromagnetic 4-potential is calculated ab initio from the standard action of scalar QED using path integrals. The resultant effective action is gauge invariant and contains nonlocal interactions, from which gauge bosons acquire masses without breaking the local gauge symmetry. To demonstrate how the general theory can be applied, we study a cold unmagnetized plasma and a cold uniformly magnetized plasma. Using these two examples, we show that all linear waves well-known in classical plasma physics can be recovered from relativistic quantum results when taking the classical limit. In the opposite limit, classical wave dispersion relations are modified substantially. In unmagnetized plasmas, longitudinal waves propagate with nonzero group velocities even when plasmas are cold. In magnetized plasmas, anharmonically spaced Bernstein waves persist even when plasma...

  17. Anomalous effective action, Noether current, Virasoro algebra and Horizon entropy

    Several investigations show that in a very small length scale there exist corrections to the entropy of black hole horizon. Due to fluctuations of the background metric and the external fields the action incorporates corrections. In the low energy regime, the one-loop effective action in four dimensions leads to trace anomaly. We start from the Noether current corresponding to the Einstein-Hilbert plus the one-loop effective action to calculate the charge for the diffeomorphisms which preserve the Killing horizon structure. Then a bracket for the charges is calculated. We show that the Fourier modes of the bracket are exactly similar to the Virasoro algebra. Then using the Cardy formula the entropy is evaluated. Finally, the explicit terms of the entropy expression is calculated for a classical background. It turns out that the usual expression for the entropy; i.e. the Bekenstein-Hawking form, is not modified. (orig.)

  18. Effective action for the field equations of charged black holes

    We consistently reduce the equations of motion for the bosonic N = 2 supergravity action, using a multi-centered black hole ansatz for the metric. This reduction is done in a general, non-supersymmetric setup, in which we extend concepts of BPS black hole technology. First we obtain a more general form of the black hole potential, as part of an effective action for both the scalars and the vectors in the supergravity theory. Furthermore, we show that there are extra constraints specifying the solution, which we calculate explicitly. In the literature, these constraints have already been studied in the one-center case. We also show that the effective action we obtain for non-static metrics can be linked to the 'entropy function' for the spherically symmetric case, as defined by Sen (2005 J. High Energy Phys. JHEP09(2005)038) and Cardoso et al (2007 J. High Energy Phys. JHEP03(2007)085)

  19. Resummed effective action in the world-line formalism

    Auer, T; Zahlten, C; Auer, Thomas; Schmidt, Michael G.; Zahlten, Claus

    2004-01-01

    Using the world-line method we resum the scalar one-loop effective action. This is based on an exact expression for the one-loop action obtained for a background potential and a Taylor expansion of the potential up to quadratic order in x-space. We thus reproduce results of Masso and Rota very economically. An alternative resummation scheme is suggested using ``center of mass'' based loops which is equivalent under the assumption of vanishing third and higher derivatives in the Taylor expansion but leads to simplified expressions. In an appendix some general issues concerning the relation between world-line integrals with fixed end points versus integrals with fixed center are clarified. We finally note that this method is also very valuable for gauge field effective actions where it is based on the Euler--Heisenberg type resummation.

  20. Resumed effective action in the world-line formalism

    Using the world-line method we resume the scalar one-loop effective action. This is based on an exact expression for the one-loop action obtained for a background potential and a Taylor expansion of the potential up to quadratic order in x-space. We thus reproduce results of Masso and Rota very economically. An alternative resummation scheme is suggested using 'center of mass' based loops which is equivalent under the assumption of vanishing third and higher derivatives in the Taylor expansion but leads to simplified expressions. In an Appendix A some general issues concerning the relation between world-line integrals with fixed end points versus integrals with fixed center are clarified. We finally note that this method is also very valuable for gauge field effective actions where it is based on the Euler-Heisenberg type resummation

  1. Zeta function regularization and effective action in curved spacetime. 16

    This article expounds on a sophisticated regularization technique for quantum field theories in arbitrary gravitational fields: the zeta function regularization. The effective action in curved spacetime is obtained and used to discuss phase transitions in the De Sitter Universe. (author). 5 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 tab

  2. Boundary Conditions for NHEK through Effective Action Approach

    We study the asymptotic symmetry group (ASG) of the near horizon geometry of extreme Kerr black hole through the effective action approach developed by Porfyriadis and Wilczek (arXiv:1007.1031v1[gr-qc]). By requiring a finite boundary effective action, we derive a new set of asymptotic Killing vectors and boundary conditions, which are much more relaxed than the ones proposed by Matsuo Y et al. [Nucl. Phys. B 825 (2010) 231], and still allow a copy of a conformal group as its ASG. In the covariant formalism, the asymptotic charges are finite, with the corresponding central charge vanishing. By using the quasi-local charge and introducing a plausible cut-off, we find that the higher order terms of the asymptotic Killing vectors, which could not be determined through the effective action approach, contribute to the central charge as well. We also show that the boundary conditions suggested by Guica et al. [Phys. Rev. D 80 (2009) 124008] lead to a divergent first-order boundary effective action. (the physics of elementary particles and fields)

  3. Constraining the effective action by a method of external sources

    Garbrecht, Bjorn

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel method of evaluating the effective action, wherein the physical one- and two-point functions are obtained in the limit of non-vanishing external sources. We illustrate the self-consistency of this method by recovering the usual 2PI effective action due to Cornwall, Jackiw and Tomboulis, differing only by the fact that the saddle-point evaluation of the path integral is performed along the extremal quantum, rather than classical, path. As such, this approach is of particular relevance to situations where the dominant quantum and classical paths are non-perturbatively far away from one-another. A pertinent example is the decay of false vacua in radiatively-generated potentials, as may occur for the electroweak vacuum of the Standard Model. In addition, we describe how the external sources may instead be chosen so as to yield the two-particle-point-irreducible (2PPI) effective action of Coppens and Verschelde. Finally, in the spirit of the symmetry-improved effective action of Pilaftsis and Te...

  4. Action Research: Effective Marketing Strategies for a Blended University Program

    Cook, Ruth Gannon; Ley, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    This action research study investigated a marketing plan based on collaboration among a program faculty team and other organizational units for a graduate professional program. From its inception through the second year of operation, program enrollment increased due to the marketing plan based on an effective approach grounded in simple marketing…

  5. Effective action approach to dynamical generation of fermion mixing

    Blasone, Massimo; Smaldone, Luca

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a mechanism for the dynamical generation of flavor mixing, in the framework of the Nambu--Jona Lasinio model. Our approach is illustrated both with the conventional operatorial formalism and with functional integral and ensuing one-loop effective action. The results obtained are briefly discussed.

  6. Finiteness of the Coulomb gauge QCD perturbative effective action

    Andraši, A., E-mail: aandrasi@irb.hr [Vlaška 58, Zagreb (Croatia); Taylor, J.C., E-mail: jct@damtp.cam.ac.uk [DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    At 2-loop order in the Coulomb gauge, individual Feynman graphs contributing to the effective action have energy divergences. It is proved that these cancel in suitable combinations of graphs. This has previously been shown only for transverse external fields. The calculation results in a generalization of the Christ–Lee term which was inserted into the Hamiltonian.

  7. Finiteness of the Coulomb gauge QCD perturbative effective action

    Andrasi, A

    2015-01-01

    At 2-loop order in the Coulomb gauge, individual Feynman graphs contributing to the effective action have energy divergences. It is proved that these cancel in suitable combinations of graphs. This has previously been shown only for transverse external fields. The calculation results in a generalization of the Christ-Lee term which was inserted into the Hamiltonian.

  8. Effective action for a quantum scalar field in warped spaces

    Hoff da Silva, J.M.; Mendonca, E.L.; Scatena, E. [Universidade Estadual Paulista ' ' Julio de Mesquita Filho' ' -UNESP, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    We investigate the one-loop corrections, at zero as well as finite temperature, of a scalar field taking place in a braneworld motivated warped background. After to reach a well-defined problem, we calculate the effective action with the corresponding quantum corrections to each case. (orig.)

  9. Effective action for the Abelian Higgs model in FLRW

    George, Damien P.; Mooij, Sander(Nikhef, Science Park 105, Amsterdam, 1098 XG The Netherlands); Postma, Marieke

    2012-01-01

    We compute the divergent contributions to the one-loop action of the U(1) Abelian Higgs model. The calculation allows for a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker space-time and a time-dependent expectation value for the scalar field. Treating the time-dependent masses as two-point interactions, we use the in-in formalism to compute the first, second and third order graphs that contribute quadratic and logarithmic divergences to the effective scalar action. Working in R-xi gauge we show that the...

  10. Effective action for the Abelian Higgs model in FLRW

    George, Damien P; Postma, Marieke

    2012-01-01

    We compute the divergent contributions to the one-loop action of the U(1) Abelian Higgs model. The calculation allows for a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker space-time and a time-dependent expectation value for the scalar field. Treating the time-dependent masses as two-point interactions, we use the in-in formalism to compute the first, second and third order graphs that contribute quadratic and logarithmic divergences to the effective scalar action. Working in R-xi gauge we show that the result is gauge invariant upon using the equations of motion.

  11. Effect of mutagen combined action on Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii cells. I

    The effect was investigated of single and combined actions of alkylnitrosourea derivatives (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) and UV-radiation on the survival of cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae in dependence on the sequence of application of mutagens and on the given conditions of cultivation following mutagen activity. In particular, the single phases were investigated of the total lethal effect, i.e., the death of cells before division and their death after division. The most pronounced changes in dependence on the sequence of application of mutagens and on the given conditions of cultivation were noted in cell death before division. In dependence on the sequence of application of mutagens, the effect of the combined action on the survival of cells changed from an additive (alkylnitrosourea + UV-radiation) to a protective effect (UV-radiation + alkylnitrosourea). (author)

  12. Computing the Effective Action with the Functional Renormalization Group

    Codello, Alessandro; Rachwal, Leslaw; Tonero, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The "exact" or "functional" renormalization group equation describes the renormalization group flow of the effective average action $\\Gamma_k$. The ordinary effective action $\\Gamma_0$ can be obtained by integrating the flow equation from an ultraviolet scale $k=\\Lambda$ down to $k=0$. We give several examples of such calculations at one-loop, both in renormalizable and in effective field theories. We use the results of Barvinsky, Vilkovisky and Avramidi on the non-local heat kernel coefficients to reproduce the four point scattering amplitude in the case of a real scalar field theory with quartic potential and in the case of the pion chiral lagrangian. In the case of gauge theories, we reproduce the vacuum polarization of QED and of Yang-Mills theory. We also compute the two point functions for scalars and gravitons in the effective field theory of scalar fields minimally coupled to gravity.

  13. Computing the effective action with the functional renormalization group

    Codello, Alessandro; Percacci, Roberto; Rachwał, Lesław; Tonero, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The "exact" or "functional" renormalization group equation describes the renormalization group flow of the effective average action Γ _k. The ordinary effective action Γ _0 can be obtained by integrating the flow equation from an ultraviolet scale k=Λ down to k=0. We give several examples of such calculations at one-loop, both in renormalizable and in effective field theories. We reproduce the four-point scattering amplitude in the case of a real scalar field theory with quartic potential and in the case of the pion chiral Lagrangian. In the case of gauge theories, we reproduce the vacuum polarization of QED and of Yang-Mills theory. We also compute the two-point functions for scalars and gravitons in the effective field theory of scalar fields minimally coupled to gravity.

  14. Action video game training reduces the Simon Effect.

    Hutchinson, Claire V; Barrett, Doug J K; Nitka, Aleksander; Raynes, Kerry

    2016-04-01

    A number of studies have shown that training on action video games improves various aspects of visual cognition including selective attention and inhibitory control. Here, we demonstrate that action video game play can also reduce the Simon Effect, and, hence, may have the potential to improve response selection during the planning and execution of goal-directed action. Non-game-players were randomly assigned to one of four groups; two trained on a first-person-shooter game (Call of Duty) on either Microsoft Xbox or Nintendo DS, one trained on a visual training game for Nintendo DS, and a control group who received no training. Response times were used to contrast performance before and after training on a behavioral assay designed to manipulate stimulus-response compatibility (the Simon Task). The results revealed significantly faster response times and a reduced cost of stimulus-response incompatibility in the groups trained on the first-person-shooter game. No benefit of training was observed in the control group or the group trained on the visual training game. These findings are consistent with previous evidence that action game play elicits plastic changes in the neural circuits that serve attentional control, and suggest training may facilitate goal-directed action by improving players' ability to resolve conflict during response selection and execution. PMID:26238760

  15. The end-state comfort effect facilitates joint action.

    Herbort, Oliver; Koning, Arno; van Uem, Janet; G J Meulenbroek, Ruud

    2012-03-01

    Motor experts can accurately predict the future actions of others by observing their movements. This report describes three experiments that investigate such predictions in everyday object manipulations and test whether these predictions facilitate responses to the actions of others. Observing video excerpts showing an actor reaching for a vertically mounted dial, participants in Experiment 1 needed to predict how the actor would rotate it. Their predictions were specific to the direction and extent of the dial rotation and improved proportionate to the length of the video clip shown. Testing whether such predictions facilitate responses, in the subsequent experiments responders had to undo an actor's actions, back-rotating a dial (Exp 2) and a bar (Exp 3). The responders' actions were initiated faster when the actors' movements obeyed the so-called end-state comfort principle than when they did not. Our experiments show that humans exploit the end-state comfort effect to tweak their predictions of the future actions of others. The results moreover suggest that the precision of these predictions is mediated by perceptual learning rather than by motor simulation. PMID:22321453

  16. Invariant effective actions, cohomology of homogeneous spaces and anomalies

    D`Hoker, E. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-10-02

    We construct the most general local effective actions for Goldstone boson fields associated with spontaneous symmetry breakdown from a group G to a subgroup H. In a preceding paper, it was shown that any G-invariant term in the action, which results from a non-invariant Lagrangian density, corresponds to a non-trivial generator of the de Rham cohomology classes of G/H. Here, we present an explicit construction of all the generators of this cohomology for any coset space G/H and compact, connected group G. Generators contributing to actions in 4-dimensional space-time arise either as products of generators of lower degree such as the Goldstone-Wilczek current, or are of the Wess-Zumino-Witten type. The latter arise if and only if G has a non-zero G-invariant symmetric d-symbol, which vanishes when restricted to the subgroup H, i.e. when G has anomalous representations in which H is embedded in an anomaly free way. Coupling of additional gauge fields leads to actions whose gauge variation coincides with the chiral anomaly, which is carried here by Goldstone boson fields at tree level. Generators contributing to actions in 3-dimensional space-time arise as Chern-Simons terms evaluated on connections that are composites of the Goldstone field. (orig.).

  17. Invariant effective actions, cohomology of homogeneous spaces and anomalies

    We construct the most general local effective actions for Goldstone boson fields associated with spontaneous symmetry breakdown from a group G to a subgroup H. In a preceding paper, it was shown that any G-invariant term in the action, which results from a non-invariant Lagrangian density, corresponds to a non-trivial generator of the de Rham cohomology classes of G/H. Here, we present an explicit construction of all the generators of this cohomology for any coset space G/H and compact, connected group G. Generators contributing to actions in 4-dimensional space-time arise either as products of generators of lower degree such as the Goldstone-Wilczek current, or are of the Wess-Zumino-Witten type. The latter arise if and only if G has a non-zero G-invariant symmetric d-symbol, which vanishes when restricted to the subgroup H, i.e. when G has anomalous representations in which H is embedded in an anomaly free way. Coupling of additional gauge fields leads to actions whose gauge variation coincides with the chiral anomaly, which is carried here by Goldstone boson fields at tree level. Generators contributing to actions in 3-dimensional space-time arise as Chern-Simons terms evaluated on connections that are composites of the Goldstone field. (orig.)

  18. Surgical removal of visceral adipose tissue: effects on insulin action.

    Gabriely, Ilan; Barzilai, Nir

    2003-06-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that excess of visceral fat has deleterious effects on insulin action. Mainly, it has been shown to be associated with a decrease in hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity, which results in a clinical condition also known as insulin resistance. This report describes a novel experimental method that we employed in order to analyze the particular effects of visceral fat on insulin activity. By extracting visceral fat we were able to distinguish the specific role that it plays in insulin action, and to analyze its effects on the gene expression of a variety of fat-derived peptides, which may be considered to be (at least partially) mediators in the development of the metabolic syndrome and possibly diabetes mellitus. PMID:12762966

  19. Effect of exercise on insulin action in human skeletal muscle

    Richter, Erik; Mikines, K J; Galbo, Henrik;

    1989-01-01

    performed. Increased insulin action on glucose uptake was found in the exercised compared with the rested thigh at mean plasma insulin concentrations of 23, 40, and 410 microU/ml. Furthermore, prior contractions directed glucose uptake toward glycogen synthesis and increased insulin effects on thigh O2......The effect of 1 h of dynamic one-legged exercise on insulin action in human muscle was studied in 6 healthy young men. Four hours after one-legged knee extensions, a three-step sequential euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with arterial and bilateral femoral vein catheterization was...... consumption and at some insulin concentrations on potassium exchange. In contrast, no change in insulin effects on limb exchange of free fatty acids, glycerol, alanine or tyrosine were found after exercise. Glycogen concentration in rested vastus lateralis muscle did not increase measurably during the clamp...

  20. Effective action for scalar fields in two-dimensional gravity

    We consider a general two-dimensional gravity model minimally or nonminimally coupled to a scalar field. The canonical form of the model is elucidated, and a general solution of the equations of motion in the massless case is reviewed. In the presence of a scalar field all geometric fields (zweibein and Lorentz connection) are excluded from the model by solving exactly their Hamiltonian equations of motion. In this way the effective equations of motion and the corresponding effective action for a scalar field are obtained. It is written in a Minkowskian space-time and does not include any geometric variables. The effective action arises as a boundary term and is nontrivial both for open and closed universes. The reason is that unphysical degrees of freedom cannot be compactly supported because they must satisfy the constraint equation. As an example we consider spherically reduced gravity minimally coupled to a massless scalar field. The effective action is used to reproduce the Fisher and Roberts solutions

  1. Misunderstanding that the Effective Action is Convex under Broken Symmetry

    Asanuma, Nobu-Hiko

    2016-01-01

    The widespread belief that the effective action is convex and has a flat bottom under broken global symmetry is shown to be wrong. We show spontaneous symmetry breaking necessarily accompanies non-convexity in the effective action for quantum field theory, or in the free energy for statistical mechanics, and clarify the magnitude of non-convexity. For quantum field theory, it is also explicitly proved that translational invariance breaks spontaneously when the system is in the non-convex region, and that different vacua of spontaneously broken symmetry cannot be superposed. As applications of non-convexity, we study the first-order phase transition which happens at the zero field limit of spontaneously broken symmetry, and we propose a simple model of phase coexistence which obeys the Born rule.

  2. One-loop effective actions and higher spins

    Bonora, L; Prester, P Dominis; Giaccari, S; De Souza, B Lima; Stemberga, T

    2016-01-01

    The idea we advocate in this paper is that the one-loop effective action of a free (massive) field theory coupled to external sources (via conserved currents) contains complete information about the classical dynamics of such sources. We show many explicit examples of this fact for (scalar and fermion) free field theories in various dimensions $d=3,4,5,6$ coupled to (bosonic, completely symmetric) sources with a number of spins. In some cases we also provide compact formulas for any dimension. This paper is devoted to two-point correlators, so the one-loop effective action we construct contains only the quadratic terms and the relevant equations of motion for the sources we obtain are the linearized ones.

  3. Field theory without Feynman diagrams: One-loop effective actions

    In this paper the connection between standard perturbation theory techniques and the new Bern-Kosower calculational rules for gauge theory is clarified. For one-loop effective actions of scalars, Dirac spinors, and vector bosons in a background gauge field, Bern-Kosower type rules are derived without the use of either string theory or Feynman diagrams. The effective action is written as a one-dimensional path integral, which can be calculated to any order in the gauge coupling; evaluation leads to Feynman parameter integrals directly, bypassing the usual algebra required from Feynman diagrams, and leading to compact and organized expressions. This formalism is valid off-shell, is explicitly gauge invariant, and can be extended to a number of other field theories. (orig.)

  4. Laxative effects and mechanism of action of Brazilian green propolis

    Kakino Mamoru

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brazilian green propolis is reported to have wide range of biological properties including antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, anti-influenza, and antioxidant activities. In the digestive system, a protective effect of propolis on gastric ulcer has been reported, but a laxative effect has not yet been reported. We investigated the effect and the mechanism of action of water and ethanol extracts of Brazilian green propolis. Methods We examined the laxative effect of propolis on stool frequency by administering orally an ethanol extract of propolis (EEP or a water extract of propolis (WEP at 10, 50, 100, or 500 mg/kg to normal mice. We then investigated the effects of propolis using constipation model mice induced by two types of drugs, loperamide (a μ opioid receptor agonist and clonidine (an α-2 adrenergic receptor agonist. We also investigated the effects of WEP on gastrointestinal transit and contractional tension of the ileum to uncover the mechanism of action of WEP. Results Treatment with WEP, but not with EEP, significantly increased the weight of stools (p Conclusion These findings indicate that WEP has laxative effects both in normal mice and in clonidine-induced constipation model mice. The laxative effects of WEP might be mediated by increased contractional tension of the ileum exerted at least in part via activation of an acetylcholine receptor.

  5. Light composite Higgs from an effective action for technicolor

    Doff, A.(Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná – UTFPR – DAFIS, Av. Monteiro Lobato Km 04, 84016-210 Ponta Grossa, PR, Brazil); Natale, A. A.; da Silva, P. S. Rodrigues

    2008-01-01

    We compute an effective action for a composite Higgs boson formed by new fermions belonging to a general technicolor non-Abelian gauge theory, using a quite general expression for the fermionic self-energy that depends on a certain parameter (alpha), that defines the technicolor theory from the extreme walking behavior up to the one with a standard operator product expansion behavior. We discuss the values of the trilinear and quadrilinear scalar couplings. Our calculation spans all the possi...

  6. The effective action in Einstein-Maxwell theory

    Considerable work has been done on the one-loop effective action in combined electromagnetic and gravitational fields, particularly as a tool for determining the properties of light propagation in curved space. After a short review of previous work, I will present some recent results obtained using the worldline formalism. In particular, I will discuss various ways of generalizing the QED Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangians to the Einstein-Maxwell case.

  7. The effective action in Einstein-Maxwell theory

    Bastianelli, Fiorenzo; Davila, Jose Manuel; Schubert, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Considerable work has been done on the one-loop effective action in combined electromagnetic and gravitational fields, particularly as a tool for determining the properties of light propagation in curved space. After a short review of previous work, I present some recent results obtained using the worldline formalism. In particular, I will discuss various ways of generalizing the QED Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian to the Einstein-Maxwell case.

  8. Brane Effective Actions, Kappa-Symmetry and Applications

    Joan Simón

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This is a review on brane effective actions, their symmetries and some of their applications. Its first part covers the Green–Schwarz formulation of single M- and D-brane effective actions focusing on kinematical aspects: the identification of their degrees of freedom, the importance of world volume diffeomorphisms and kappa symmetry to achieve manifest spacetime covariance and supersymmetry, and the explicit construction of such actions in arbitrary on-shell supergravity backgrounds. Its second part deals with applications. First, the use of kappa symmetry to determine supersymmetric world volume solitons. This includes their explicit construction in flat and curved backgrounds, their interpretation as Bogomol’nyi–Prasad–Sommerfield (BPS states carrying (topological charges in the supersymmetry algebra and the connection between supersymmetry and Hamiltonian BPS bounds. When available, I emphasise the use of these solitons as constituents in microscopic models of black holes. Second, the use of probe approximations to infer about the non-trivial dynamics of strongly-coupled gauge theories using the anti de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT correspondence. This includes expectation values of Wilson loop operators, spectrum information and the general use of D-brane probes to approximate the dynamics of systems with small number of degrees of freedom interacting with larger systems allowing a dual gravitational description. Its final part briefly discusses effective actions for N D-branes and M2-branes. This includes both Super-Yang-Mills theories, their higher-order corrections and partial results in covariantising these couplings to curved backgrounds, and the more recent supersymmetric Chern–Simons matter theories describing M2-branes using field theory, brane constructions and 3-algebra considerations.

  9. Toward effective ecological risk-management of refinery corrective action

    Cleanup of complex industrial sites, such as refineries, requires risk-based decision tools to ensure that environmentally protective remediation is consistent with current and future land use. However, conventional ecological risk assessment approaches are not well suited for complex industrial sites. Site risk assessments focus on hypothetical chemical risk assuming diverse and undisturbed ecosystems, rather than industrial and disturbed area conditions. In addition, they offer little guidance as to how to make timely and effective risk management decisions. An innovative methodology is proposed to assist industry and regulatory risk managers with rapid EcoRisk reconnaissance and cost-effective remedial decision-making at complex industrial sites. Phase 1 comprises a three-step risk screening of areas of ecological concern at the site, which integrates habitat quality characteristics and potential chemical hazards. It yields an ordering of areas as follows: areas of no significant risk; areas of potentially significant risk; and areas of likely significant risk. A decision rule is then applied to determine appropriate risk management action, including: no action; additional study; and remedial or management action. In Phase 2, additional study is conducted for areas that exhibit potentially significant risk so as to facilitate risk management. This methodology is currently being applied at the 1,300 acre, former Exxon Bayway Refinery in New Jersey

  10. Using the Psychology of Language to Effectively Communicate Actionable Science

    Hall, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The words used to articulate science can have as significant a psychological impact on public perception as the data itself. It is therefore essential to utilize language that not only accurately relates the scientific information, but also effectively conveys a message that is congruent with the presenter's motivation for expressing the data. This is especially relevant for environmental subjects that are surrounded by emotionally charged, political discourses. For example are terms like catastrophe and disaster; while these words may accurately illustrate impartial scientific data, they will likely trigger psychological responses in audiences such as fear or denial that have a detrimental impact on the human decision making process. I propose a set of 5 key principles to assist in communicating data to the general public that both support the transfer of ideas and the presenter's intended psychological impact. 1) Articulate the underlying intentions that motivate the communication of data in a transparent manner 2) Use language congruent with the presenter's stated intentions 3) Maintain a neutral, non-judgmental attitude towards the complex human psychological and emotional dynamics present in a target audience 4) Demonstrate acceptance and compassion when analyzing past and present human actions that adversely affect the environment 5) Develop a perspective of non-attachment when proposing future actions and/or consequences of current human behaviors. The application of these 5 principles provides a framework to move from our current understanding of problems and solutions to effective physical action that allows us to gracefully adapt with our ever changing planet.

  11. Effect of metal complexation to anti-inflammatory over the action against oxidative and free radicals: ketoprofen action

    Free radicals are highly reactive species generated in living organisms for the purpose of protection. However, in some circumstances, they are responsible for the occurrence or aggravation of tissue damage. Many anti-inflammatory drugs have a direct effect on free radicals and not radical reactive species, which contributes to its actions against inflammation. Ketoprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent that generates free radicals by photo irradiation and has an important hemolytic effect with that. The complexation of metals to different drugs has been used as a strategy to improve the pharmacological action of different molecules and reduce their side effects. This paper presents the results of ketoprofen and their metallic complexes action on erythrocytes and free radicals. It was observed that the cerium enhances the scavenger properties of ketoprofen on free radicals, while copper enhances its action over non-radical oxidants. Copper also reduced the hemolytic effect presented by ketoprofen meanwhile its cerium derivative maintained it. (author)

  12. PARENTS' AUTHORITY AND THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THEIR EDUCATIONAL ACTIONS

    Romanowska-Tolloczko Anna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Facing a gradual crisis of moral authority in the modern world, educationalists underline its importance in the education and upbringing process. The first and, for a long period of time, the most important authority for children are their parents, who often fail to understand the nature of their own significance and impact on the child. They often wrongly associate parental authority with unquestionable power and this faulty reasoning carries negative developmental implications as the child's submissiveness is not tantamount to acceptance and may result from his/her weakness or fear rather than from recognizing parental authority. This article is to emphasise that parents need to be fully aware of their own educational actions in the child upbringing process. It is important to understand that such actions affect the way parents are perceived by children. This article suggests a number of behaviours conducive to building and sustaining the sense of authority and respect as these features are fundamental in ensuring the effectiveness of educational actions undertaken by parents in the upbringing process.

  13. Side effect of acting on the world: Acquisition of action-outcome statistic relation alters visual interpretation of action outcome

    Takahiro eKawabe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Humans can acquire the statistical features of the external world and employ them to control behaviors. Some external events occur in harmony with an agent’s action, and thus humans should also be able to acquire the statistical features between an action and its external outcome. We report that the acquired action-outcome statistical features alter the visual appearance of the action outcome. Pressing either of two assigned keys triggered visual motion whose direction was statistically biased either upward or downward, and observers judged the stimulus motion direction. Points of subjective equality (PSE for judging motion direction were shifted repulsively from the mean of the distribution associated with each key. Our Bayesian model accounted for the PSE shifts, indicating the optimal acquisition of the action-effect statistical relation. The PSE shifts were moderately attenuated when the action-outcome contingency was reduced. The Bayesian model again accounted for the attenuated PSE shifts. On the other hand, when the action-outcome contiguity was greatly reduced, the PSE shifts were greatly attenuated, and however, the Bayesian model could not accounted for the shifts. The results indicate that visual appearance can be modified by prediction based on the optimal acquisition of action-effect causal relation.

  14. Maternal and child undernutrition: effective action at national level.

    Bryce, Jennifer; Coitinho, Denise; Darnton-Hill, Ian; Pelletier, David; Pinstrup-Andersen, Per

    2008-02-01

    80% of the world's undernourished children live in just 20 countries. Intensified nutrition action in these countries can lead to achievement of the first Millennium Development Goal (MDG) and greatly increase the chances of achieving goals for child and maternal mortality (MDGs 4 and 5). Despite isolated successes in specific countries or for interventions--eg, iodised salt and vitamin A supplementation--most countries with high rates of undernutrition are failing to reach undernourished mothers and children with effective interventions supported by appropriate policies. This paper reports on an assessment of actions addressing undernutrition in the countries with the highest burden of undernutrition, drawing on systematic reviews and best-practice reports. Seven key challenges for addressing undernutrition at national level are defined and reported on: getting nutrition on the list of priorities, and keeping it there; doing the right things; not doing the wrong things; acting at scale; reaching those in need; data-based decisionmaking; and building strategic and operational capacity. Interventions with proven effectiveness that are selected by countries should be rapidly implemented at scale. The period from pregnancy to 24 months of age is a crucial window of opportunity for reducing undernutrition and its adverse effects. Programme efforts, as well as monitoring and assessment, should focus on this segment of the continuum of care. Nutrition resources should not be used to support actions unlikely to be effective in the context of country or local realities. Nutrition resources should not be used to support actions that have not been proven to have a direct effect on undernutrition, such as stand-alone growth monitoring or school feeding programmes. In addition to health and nutrition interventions, economic and social policies addressing poverty, trade, and agriculture that have been associated with rapid improvements in nutritional status should be

  15. The effective action approach applied to nuclear chiral sigma model

    The nuclear chiral sigma model of nuclear matter is considered by means of the Cornwall-Jackiw-tomboulis (CTJ) effective action. The method provides a very general framework for investigating many important problems: chiral symmetry in nuclear medium, energy density of nuclear ground state, nuclear Schwinger-Dyson (SD) equations, etc. It is shown that the SD equations for sigma-omega mixing are actually not present in this formalism. For numerical computation purposes the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation for ground state energy density is also presented. (author). 26 refs

  16. Regular effective action of gauge field theory and quantum gravity

    Baaklini, N.S.

    1987-05-15

    We present a perturbative formalism for the effective quantum action of a general Fermi-Bose field theory. We propose a unitary alternative to the conventional virtual ghost prescription for handling the functional integral of gauge fields, based on the functional space metric that is determined by the Dirac brackets of the canonical theory. A gauge-invariant Gaussian cutoff is introduced by extending the functional space metric into a regular counterpart. The regular one-loop contributions of a scalar field to the photon and the graviton self-energies are computed. The otherwise logarithmically divergent contributions are found, in our scheme, to be independent of cutoff.

  17. Effective action for the Regge processes in gravity

    Lipatov, L.N. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2011-05-15

    It is shown, that the effective action for the reggeized graviton interactions can be formulated in terms of the reggeon fields A{sup ++} and A{sup --} and the metric tensor g{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}} in such a way, that it is local in the rapidity space and has the property of general covariance. The corresponding effective currents j{sup -} and j{sup +} satisfy the Hamilton-Jacobi equation for a massless particle moving in the gravitational field. These currents are calculated explicitly for the shock wave-like fields and a variation principle for them is formulated. As an application, we reproduce the effective lagrangian for the multi-regge processes in gravity together with the graviton Regge trajectory in the leading logarithmic approximation with taking into account supersymmetric contributions. (orig.)

  18. Effective corrective actions to enhance operational safety of nuclear installations

    The safe operation of nuclear power plants around the world and the prevention of incidents in these installations remain key concerns for the nuclear community. In this connection the feedback of operating experience plays a major role: every nuclear plant operator needs to have a system in place to identify and feed back the lessons learned from operating experience and to implement effective corrective actions to prevent safety events from reoccurring. An effective operating experience programme also includes a proactive approach that is aimed at preventing the first-time occurrence of safety events. In April 2003, the IAEA issued the PROSPER guidelines for nuclear installations to strengthen and enhance their own operating experience process and for self-assessment on the effectiveness of the feedback process. Subsequently, in the course of the Operational Safety Review Teams missions conducted by the IAEA that focused on the operational safety practices of nuclear power plants, the IAEA enhanced the review of the operating experience in nuclear power plants by implementing a new module that is derived from these guidelines. In order to highlight the effective implementation of the operating experience programme and to provide practical assistance in this area, the IAEA organized workshops and conferences to discuss recent trends in operating experience. The IAEA also performed assistance and review missions at plants and corporate organizations. The IAEA is further developing advice and assistance on operating experience feedback programmes and is reporting on good practices. The present publication is the outcome of two years of coordinated effort involving the participation of experts of nuclear organizations in several Member States. It provides information and good practices for successfully establishing an effective corrective actions programme. This publication forms part of a series that develops the principles set forth in these guidelines

  19. Effective Action for Cosmological Scalar Fields at Finite Temperature

    Cheung, Yeuk-Kwan E; Kang, Jin U; Kim, Jong Chol

    2015-01-01

    Scalar fields appear in many theories beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. In the early universe, they are exposed to extreme conditions, including high temperature and rapid cosmic expansion. Understanding their behavior in this environment is crucial to understand the implications for cosmology. We calculate the finite temperature effective action for the field expectation value in two particularly important cases, for damped oscillations near the ground state and for scalar fields with a flat potential. We find that the behavior in both cases can in good approximation be described by a complex valued effective potential that yields Markovian equations of motion. Near the potential minimum, we recover the solution to the well-known Langevin equation. For large field values we find a very different behavior, and our result for the damping coefficient significantly differs from the expressions given in the literature. We illustrate our results in a simple scalar model, for which we give analytic app...

  20. Nonlinear N=2 supersymmetry, effective actions and moduli stabilization

    Antoniadis, I. [Department of Physics, CERN - Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Centre de Physique Theorique, UMR du CNRS 7644, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Derendinger, J.-P. [Physics Institute, Neuchatel University, Breguet 1, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Maillard, T. [Centre de Physique Theorique, UMR du CNRS 7644, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)], E-mail: maillard@cpht.polytechnique.fr

    2009-02-11

    Nonlinear supersymmetry is used to compute the general form of the effective D-brane action in type I string theory compactified to four dimensions in the presence of internal magnetic fields. In particular, the scalar potential receives three contributions: (1) a nonlinear part of the D-auxiliary component, associated to the Dirac-Born-Infeld action; (2) a Fayet-Iliopoulos (FI) D-term with a moduli-dependent coefficient; (3) a D-auxiliary independent (but moduli dependent) piece from the D-brane tension. Minimization of this potential leads to three general classes of vacua with moduli stabilization: (i) supersymmetric vacua allowing in general FI terms to be cancelled by non-trivial vacuum expectation values (VEV's) of charged scalar fields; (ii) anti-de Sitter vacua of broken supersymmetry in the presence of a non-critical dilaton potential that can be tuned at arbitrarily weak string coupling; (iii) if the dilaton is fixed in a supersymmetric way by three-form fluxes and in the absence of charged scalar VEV's, one obtains non-supersymmetric vacua with positive vacuum energy.

  1. Dura’s Effect on Securities Class Actions

    Scotland M. Duncan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available On April 19, 2005, the United States Supreme Court rendered a unanimous decision in Dura Pharmaceuticals, Inc. v. Broudo, which had been described as “the most important securities case in a decade.” Simply put, the decision raises the pleading standard for Rule 10b-5 cases asserting fraud-onthe-market; instead of requiring a showing of ex ante losses, such as inflation at the time of purchase, Dura requires a showing of ex post losses, such as market decline resulting from a corrective disclosure. This paper assesses the decision’s practical implications by examining and empirically testing whether the Supreme Court’s enhanced pleading requirements have impacted the frequency and magnitude of post-Reform Act (PSLRA class action securities cases. Specifically, this paper examines Dura’s effect on the filing and settling of cases, as well as on settlement amount. In particular, the results suggest that Dura, ceteris paribus, has had a statistically significant impact on both the filing and settlement of class actions, suggesting a reduction in frivolous litigation.

  2. Covariant computation of effective actions in Horava-Lifshitz gravity

    D'Odorico, Giulio; Saueressig, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We initiate the systematic computation of the heat-kernel coefficients for Laplacian operators obeying anisotropic dispersion relations in curved spacetime. Our results correctly reproduce the limit where isotropy is restored and special anisotropic cases considered previously in the literature. Subsequently, the heat kernel is used to derive the scalar-induced one-loop effective action and beta functions of Horava-Lifshitz gravity. We identify the Gaussian fixed point which is supposed to provide the UV completion of the theory. In the present setting, this fixed point acts as an infrared attractor for the renormalization group flow of Newton's constant and the high-energy phase of the theory is screened by a Landau pole. We comment on the consequences of these findings for the renormalizability of the theory.

  3. Effective action and vacuum expectations in nonlinear $\\sigma$ model

    Fayzullaev, B A

    2015-01-01

    The equations for effective action for nonlinear $\\sigma$ model are derived using DeWitt method in two forms - for generator of vertex parts $\\Gamma$ and for generator of weakly connected parts $W$. Loop-expansion solutions to these equations are found. It is shown that vacuum expectation values for various quantities including divergence of a N\\"{o}ther current, trace of the energy-momentum tensor and so on, can be calculated by this method. Also it is shown that vacuum expectation to the sigma-field is determined by an explicit combination of tree Green function and classical solution. It is shown that the limit when coupling constant tends to zero is singular one.

  4. [NKT cells: their development, mechanisms and effects of action].

    Bojarska-Junak, Agnieszka; Tabarkiewicz, Jacek; Roliński, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    NKT cells are a heterogeneous subset of T lymphocytes that share surface markers and functional characteristics with both conventional T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Most NKT cells express a semi-invariant T cell receptor that reacts with glycolipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. NKT cells can modulate the immune response against infectious agents, autoantigens, tumors, tissue grafts and allergens. NKT cells mediate the activities through their ability to express pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines that influence the type and magnitude of the immune response. The manuscript summarizes current views on development of NKT cells as well as mechanisms and effects of their action.  PMID:23475484

  5. Mephedrone: Public health risk, mechanisms of action, and behavioral effects.

    Dybdal-Hargreaves, Nicholas F; Holder, Nicholas D; Ottoson, Paige E; Sweeney, Melanie D; Williams, Tyisha

    2013-08-15

    The recent shortage of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) has led to an increased demand for alternative amphetamine-like drugs such as the synthetic cathinone, 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone). Despite the re-classification of mephedrone as a Class B restricted substance by the United Kingdom and restrictive legislation by the United States, international policy regarding mephedrone control is still developing and interest in synthetic amphetamine-like drugs could drive the development of future mephedrone analogues. Currently, there is little literature investigating the mechanism of action and long-term effects of mephedrone. As such, we reviewed the current understanding of amphetamines, cathinones, and cocaine emphasizing the potentially translational aspects to mephedrone, as well as contrasting with the work that has been done specifically on mephedrone in order to present the current state of understanding of mephedrone in terms of its risks, mechanisms, and behavioral effects. Emerging research suggests that while there are structural and behavioral similarities of mephedrone with amphetamine-like compounds, it appears that serotonergic signaling may mediate more of mephedrone's effects unlike the more dopaminergic dependent effects observed in traditional amphetamine-like compounds. As new designer drugs are produced, current and continuing research on mephedrone and other synthetic cathinones should help inform policymakers' decisions regarding the regulation of novel 'legal highs.' PMID:23764466

  6. Actions for adoption of effective dose equivalent standards

    Regulations related with radiological protection have been revised to adopt SI units and to accept the ICRP recommendation requesting to use the effective dose equivalent for radiation exposure control. The present report mainly deals with actions to be taken in the field of radiation instrumentation to promote the adoption of effective dose equivalent standards. In the past, exposure in roentgen has been generally used as a quantity to represent the intensity of a X-ray or alpha-ray field, because it can be measured relatively easily and accurately. The introduction of the effective dose equivalent is intended to establish annual exposure limits to ensure that the possibility of death of workers in a radioactive environment and that of development of hereditary disorders in their children or grandchildren will be maintained below permissible levels. The quantity is expressed as the sum of each organ's dose equivalent multiplied by a weight that reflects risks. Presently, such weights are assigned to seven organs including the gential glands and red marrow. Fixed-type area monitors and portable survey meters are used for work environment monitoring while film badges, TLDs, dosimeters, etc., are employed for personnel monitoring. (Nogami, K.)

  7. Self-action effects in semiconductor quantum dots

    Dneprovskii, V. S.; Kanev, A. R.; Kozlova, M. V.; Smirnov, A. M.

    2014-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) dynamic photonic crystal regime has been utilized to investigate self-diffraction effect and nonlinear optical properties of excitons in CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots (QDs). Self-diffraction at 2D photonic crystal arises for three intersecting beams of Nd+3:YAG laser second harmonic in the case of one-photon resonant excitation of the exciton (electron - hole) transition QDs. The relaxation time of excited excitons has been measured by pump and probe technique at induced one-dimensional transient diffraction grating. Two-exponential decay with initial fast and slow parts was discovered. Self-action effect has been discovered in the case of stationary resonant excitation of excitons in CdSe/ZnS QDs by the beam of second harmonic of powerful 12-nanosecond laser pulses. The bleaching of exciton absorption and the creation of transparency channel (this effect provokes self-diffraction of the second harmonic beam) was explained by the dominating coexisting and competing processes of state filling in stationary excited quantum dots and Stark-shift of exciton spectral band. The peculiarities of the influence of these processes at the change of exciton absorption in quantum dots in the case of different detuning from exciton resonance (quantum dots with different size have been used) was analyzed.

  8. On the effects of action on visual perception & How new movement types are learned

    Beets, Iseult Anna Maria

    2010-01-01

    Perception can induce effects on action. Perception of others´ actions can thus influence our own actions. However, research on how action can shape perception is sparse. In this thesis, the effects of (i) motor learning and (ii) simple movements, can influence visual perception. Furthermore, the issue of motor learning is addressed; how can new movement types be learned and do active and passively guided motor training lead to ...

  9. The Geometry of Quantum Hall Effect: An Effective Action for all Dimensions

    Karabali, Dimitra; Nair, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    We present a general formula for the topological part of the effective action for quantum Hall systems in higher dimensions, including fluctuations of the gauge field and metric around background fields of a specified topological class. The result is based on a procedure of integrating up from the Dolbeault index density which applies for the degeneracies of Landau levels, combined with some input from the standard descent procedure for anomalies. Features of the topological action in (2+1), ...

  10. Ecological effects of contaminants and remedial actions in Bear Creek

    Southworth, G.R.; Loar, J.M.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Burris, J.A. (C. E. Environmental, Inc., Tallahassee, FL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Ecological studies of the Bear Creek watershed, which drains the area surrounding several Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities, were initiated in May 1984 and are continuing at present. These studies consisted of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek, and they were followed by a presently ongoing monitoring phase that involves reduced sampling intensities. The characterization phase utilized two approaches: (1) instream sampling of benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek to identify spatial and temporal patterns in distribution and abundance and (2) laboratory bioassays on water samples from Bear Creek and selected tributaries to identify potential sources of toxicity to biota. The monitoring phase of the ecological program relates to the long-term goals of identifying and prioritizing contaminant sources and assessing the effectiveness of remedial actions. It continues activities of the characterization phase at less frequent intervals. The Bear Greek Valley is a watershed that drains the area surrounding several closed Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities. Past waste disposal practices in Bear Creek Valley resulted in contamination of Bear Creek and consequent ecological damage. Extensive remedial actions have been proposed at waste sites, and some of the have been implemented or are now underway. The proposed study plan consists of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek in the first year followed by a reduction in sampling intensity during the monitoring phase of the plan. The results of sampling conducted from May 1984 through early 1989 are presented in this report.

  11. Scales, strategies and actions for effective energy planning: A review

    This paper is a review of the most recent literature on the interaction between climate change, land-use and energy, based on the analysis of papers collected through the most relevant scientific literature databases. A total of 114 papers published between 2000 and 2011 were reviewed. The aims of this review are: in general (1) to identify the different research topics that have been developed related to the interaction between climate change, land-use and energy; more specifically, (2) to analyze what are the most suitable spatial and temporal scales of investigation to focus on for actions and strategies to reduce critical issues in the field of energy and environment; (3) to identify which actions and strategies are deemed as the most appropriate to mitigate critical issues in energy and environment; and given the research gaps found in the review, (4) to propose research recommendations in the context of effective climate-energy planning. We argue that there are certain gaps and needs for a “nested” environmental governance. It is necessary to understand how different environmental policies overlap and how they can be integrated in order to verify whether there are conflicting targets that may negate each other in the long term. - Highlights: • Energy production and consumption can directly or indirectly affect climate change. • Energy sector is influenced directly and indirectly by changes in climate conditions. • Energy sector and climate change affect and limit alternative uses of land, causing land-use changes. • The most suitable spatial scale for energy planning is the municipal level requiring short-term perspectives. • Several research recommendations to deal with the complexity of energy-land-use-climate change issue are proposed

  12. Ecological effects of contaminants and remedial actions in Bear Creek

    Ecological studies of the Bear Creek watershed, which drains the area surrounding several Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities, were initiated in May 1984 and are continuing at present. These studies consisted of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek, and they were followed by a presently ongoing monitoring phase that involves reduced sampling intensities. The characterization phase utilized two approaches: (1) instream sampling of benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek to identify spatial and temporal patterns in distribution and abundance and (2) laboratory bioassays on water samples from Bear Creek and selected tributaries to identify potential sources of toxicity to biota. The monitoring phase of the ecological program relates to the long-term goals of identifying and prioritizing contaminant sources and assessing the effectiveness of remedial actions. It continues activities of the characterization phase at less frequent intervals. The Bear Greek Valley is a watershed that drains the area surrounding several closed Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant waste disposal facilities. Past waste disposal practices in Bear Creek Valley resulted in contamination of Bear Creek and consequent ecological damage. Extensive remedial actions have been proposed at waste sites, and some of the have been implemented or are now underway. The proposed study plan consists of an initial, detailed characterization of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities in Bear Creek in the first year followed by a reduction in sampling intensity during the monitoring phase of the plan. The results of sampling conducted from May 1984 through early 1989 are presented in this report

  13. Effects and Mechanism of Action of a Tribulus terrestris Extract on Penile Erection

    Do, Jungmo; Choi, Seemin; Choi, Jaehwi; Hyun, Jae Seog

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Tribulus terrestris has been used as an aphrodisiac. However, little is known about the effects and mechanism of action of T. terrestris on penile erection. Therefore, the effect of a T. terrestris extract and the mechanism of action of the extract on relaxation of the corpus cavernosum (CC) were investigated. The erectogenic effects of an oral preparation of the extract were also assessed. Materials and Methods The relaxation effects and mechanism of action of the T. terrestris extra...

  14. Regulation of international energy markets: Economic effects of political actions

    Shcherbakova, Anastasia V.

    Recent increases in volatility of energy prices have led many governments to reevaluate their regard of national energy reserves and reconsider future exploration, production, and consumption patterns. The flurry of activity that has been generated by such price volatility has included large-scale nationalizations of energy sectors, unilateral renegotiations of foreign energy development contracts, and expropriations of resources from foreign energy firms on one hand, and on the other hand more rapid energy sector liberalization, intensified search for and development of renewable fuels and technologies, and development of incentives for increased energy efficiency and conservation. The aim of this dissertation is to examine and quantify the extent of positive and negative effects that have resulted from some of these activities. The first chapter focuses on quantifying the effect that nationalistic sentiment has had on economic attractiveness of energy sectors during the decade prior to the recent global economic crisis, as measured by foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows. Empirical results demonstrate that both political and economic conditions play an important role in investors' decisions. A combination of investment friendliness, corruption levels, and democracy all help to explain the trends in energy-sector investment levels over time in my sample countries, although differences in the types of corruption existing in these nations do not. Investment levels, in turn, appear to influence future levels of oil production, underscoring the significance of good investment policies for future success of energy sectors. Chapter two considers the response of energy stock prices to severe regulatory actions. It employs an event study framework to examine causal effects of critical informational announcements (i.e. events of expropriation and nationalization) on daily returns and cumulative losses in firm value of energy corporations. Results show that a firm

  15. Effects of action video game training on visual working memory.

    Blacker, Kara J; Curby, Kim M; Klobusicky, Elizabeth; Chein, Jason M

    2014-10-01

    The ability to hold visual information in mind over a brief delay is critical for acquiring information and navigating a complex visual world. Despite the ubiquitous nature of visual working memory (VWM) in our everyday lives, this system is fundamentally limited in capacity. Therefore, the potential to improve VWM through training is a growing area of research. An emerging body of literature suggests that extensive experience playing action video games yields a myriad of perceptual and attentional benefits. Several lines of converging work suggest that action video game play may influence VWM as well. The current study utilized a training paradigm to examine whether action video games cause improvements to the quantity and/or the quality of information stored in VWM. The results suggest that VWM capacity, as measured by a change detection task, is increased after action video game training, as compared with training on a control game, and that some improvement to VWM precision occurs with action game training as well. However, these findings do not appear to extend to a complex span measure of VWM, which is often thought to tap into higher-order executive skills. The VWM improvements seen in individuals trained on an action video game cannot be accounted for by differences in motivation or engagement, differential expectations, or baseline differences in demographics as compared with the control group used. In sum, action video game training represents a potentially unique and engaging platform by which this severely capacity-limited VWM system might be enhanced. PMID:25068696

  16. Effect of Composite Action on the Strength of Wood Roofs

    Ivan A. Campos Varela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering certification for the installation of solar photovoltaic modules on wood roofs is often denied because existing wood roofs do not meet current building codes. Rather than requiring expensive structural retrofits, we desire to show that many roofs are actually sufficiently strong if the effect of composite action produced by joist-sheathing interaction is considered. In a series of laboratory experiments using a limited number of two-by-four wood joists with and without sheathing panels, conventionally sheathed stud-grade joists, surprisingly, exhibited between 18% and 63% higher nominal strength than similar bare joists. To explain this strength increase, a simple model was developed to predict the strengths of the nailed partially composite sections, but the model only justifies a 1.4% to 3.8% increase in bending strength of joists with an allowable bending strength of 1000 psi. More testing is indicated to resolve this discrepancy between laboratory results and analytical modeling results. In addition to elucidating nonlinear partial composite behavior of existing roof systems, this paper shows that, with minor changes in roof framing practices, strength increases of 70% or more are achievable, compared to the strengths of conventionally sheathed joists.

  17. Polyphenols: Extraction Methods, Antioxidative Action, Bioavailability and Anticarcinogenic Effects.

    Brglez Mojzer, Eva; Knez Hrnčič, Maša; Škerget, Mojca; Knez, Željko; Bren, Urban

    2016-01-01

    Being secondary plant metabolites, polyphenols represent a large and diverse group of substances abundantly present in a majority of fruits, herbs and vegetables. The current contribution is focused on their bioavailability, antioxidative and anticarcinogenic properties. An overview of extraction methods is also given, with supercritical fluid extraction highlighted as a promising eco-friendly alternative providing exceptional separation and protection from degradation of unstable polyphenols. The protective role of polyphenols against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, UV light, plant pathogens, parasites and predators results in several beneficial biological activities giving rise to prophylaxis or possibly even to a cure for several prevailing human diseases, especially various cancer types. Omnipresence, specificity of the response and the absence of or low toxicity are crucial advantages of polyphenols as anticancer agents. The main problem represents their low bioavailability and rapid metabolism. One of the promising solutions lies in nanoformulation of polyphenols that prevents their degradation and thus enables significantly higher concentrations to reach the target cells. Another, more practiced, solution is the use of mixtures of various polyphenols that bring synergistic effects, resulting in lowering of the required therapeutic dose and in multitargeted action. The combination of polyphenols with existing drugs and therapies also shows promising results and significantly reduces their toxicity. PMID:27409600

  18. On compatibility of string effective action with an accelerating universe

    Neupane, Ishwaree P [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Central Department of Physics, Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu (Nepal)

    2006-12-21

    In this paper, we fully investigate the cosmological effects of the moduli-dependent one-loop corrections to the gravitational couplings of the string effective action to explain the cosmic acceleration problem in the early (and/or late) universe. These corrections comprise a Gauss-Bonnet (GB) invariant multiplied by universal non-trivial functions of the common modulus {sigma} and the dilaton {phi}. The model exhibits several features of cosmological interest, including the transition between deceleration and acceleration phases. By considering some phenomenologically motivated ansatze for one of the scalars and/or the scale factor (of the universe), we also construct a number of interesting inflationary potentials. In all examples under consideration, we find that the model leads only to a standard inflation (w {>=} -1) when the numerical coefficient {delta} associated with modulus-GB coupling is positive, while the model can also lead to a non-standard inflation (w < -1), if {delta} is negative. In the absence of (or trivial) coupling between the GB term and the scalars, there is no crossing between the w < -1 and w > -1 phases, while this is possible with non-trivial GB couplings, even for the constant dilaton phase of the standard picture. Within our model, after a sufficient amount of e-folds of expansion, the rolling of both fields {phi} and {sigma} can be small. In turn, any possible violation of equivalence principle or deviations from the standard general relativity may be small enough to easily satisfy all astrophysical and cosmological constraints.

  19. Renormalization-group flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Garny, Mathias; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2016-01-01

    Following an approach of Matarrese and Pietroni, we derive the functional renormalization group (RG) flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures. Perturbative solutions of this RG flow equation are shown to be consistent with standard cosmological perturbation theory. Non-perturbative approximate solutions can be obtained by truncating the a priori infinite set of possible effective actions to a finite subspace. Using for the truncated effective action a form dictated ...

  20. Experts see it all: configural effects in action observation

    Calvo-Merino, B.; Ehrenberg, S; Leung, D. M. H.; Haggard, P

    2010-01-01

    Biological motion perception is influenced by observers’ familiarity with the observed action. Here we used classical dance as a means to investigate how visual and motor experience modulates perceptual mechanism for configural processing of actions. While some ballet moves are performed by only one gender, male and female dancers train together and acquire visual knowledge of all ballet moves. 24 expert ballet dancers (12 female) and matched non-expert participants viewed pairs of upright an...

  1. The effects of an action video game on visual and affective information processing.

    Bailey, Kira; West, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Playing action video games can have beneficial effects on visuospatial cognition and negative effects on social information processing. However, these two effects have not been demonstrated in the same individuals in a single study. The current study used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to examine the effects of playing an action or non-action video game on the processing of emotion in facial expression. The data revealed that 10h of playing an action or non-action video game had differential effects on the ERPs relative to a no-contact control group. Playing an action game resulted in two effects: one that reflected an increase in the amplitude of the ERPs following training over the right frontal and posterior regions that was similar for angry, happy, and neutral faces; and one that reflected a reduction in the allocation of attention to happy faces. In contrast, playing a non-action game resulted in changes in slow wave activity over the central-parietal and frontal regions that were greater for targets (i.e., angry and happy faces) than for non-targets (i.e., neutral faces). These data demonstrate that the contrasting effects of action video games on visuospatial and emotion processing occur in the same individuals following the same level of gaming experience. This observation leads to the suggestion that caution should be exercised when using action video games to modify visual processing, as this experience could also have unintended effects on emotion processing. PMID:23419898

  2. The Geometry of Quantum Hall Effect: An Effective Action for all Dimensions

    Karabali, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    We present a general formula for the topological part of the effective action for quantum Hall systems in higher dimensions, including fluctuations of the gauge field and metric around background fields of a specified topological class. The result is based on a procedure of integrating up from the Dolbeault index density which applies for the degeneracies of Landau levels, combined with some input from the standard descent procedure for anomalies. Features of the topological action in (2+1), (4+1), (6+1) dimensions, including the contribution due to gravitational anomalies, are discussed in some detail.

  3. Geometry of the quantum Hall effect: An effective action for all dimensions

    Karabali, Dimitra; Nair, V. P.

    2016-07-01

    We present a general formula for the topological part of the effective action for integer quantum Hall systems in higher dimensions, including fluctuations of the gauge field and metric around background fields of a specified topological class. The result is based on a procedure of integrating up from the Dolbeault index density which applies for the degeneracies of Landau levels, combined with some input from the standard descent procedure for anomalies. Features of the topological action in (2 +1 ), (4 +1 ), (6 +1 ) dimensions, including the contribution due to gravitational anomalies, are discussed in some detail.

  4. Effective actions for F-theory compactifications and tensor theories

    In this thesis we study the low-energy effective dynamics emerging from a class of F-theory compactifications in four and six dimensions. We also investigate six-dimensional supersymmetric quantum field theories with self-dual tensors, motivated by the problem of describing the long-wavelength regime of a stack of M5-branes in M-theory. These setups share interesting common features. They both constitute examples of intrinsically non-perturbative physics. On the one hand, in the context of F-theory the non-perturbative character is encoded in the geometric formulation of this class of string vacua, which allows the complexified string coupling to vary in space. On the other hand, the dynamics of a stack of multiple M5-branes flows in the infrared to a novel kind of superconformal field theories in six dimensions - commonly referred to as (2,0) theories - that are expected to possess no perturbative weakly coupled regime and have resisted a complete understanding so far. In particular, no Lagrangian description is known for these models. The strategy we employ to address these two problems is also analogous. A recurring Leitmotif of our work is a transdimensional treatment of the system under examination: in order to extract information about dynamics in d dimensions we consider a (d-1)-dimensional setup. As far as F-theory compactifications are concerned, this is a consequence of the duality between M-theory and F-theory, which constitutes our main tool in the derivation of the effective action of F-theory compactifications. We apply it to six-dimensional F-theory vacua, obtained by taking the internal space to be an elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau threefold, but we also employ it to explore a novel kind of F-theory constructions in four dimensions based on manifolds with Spin(7) holonomy. With reference to six-dimensional (2,0) theories, the transdimensional character of our approach relies in the idea of studying these theories in five dimensions. Indeed, we

  5. Interactions between sentence comprehension and concurrent action: The role of movement effects and timing

    Diefenbach, C

    2010-01-01

    Embodied approaches to language comprehension suggest that we understand sentences by using our perception and action systems for simulating their contents. In line with this assumption, the action-sentence compatibility effect (ACE) shows that sensibility judgments for sentences are faster when the direction of the described action matches the direction of the response movement. The aim of this thesis was to investigate whether this compatibility is effective between sentence direction and m...

  6. Effects of context on visuomotor interference depends on the perspective of observed actions.

    Marta Bortoletto

    Full Text Available Visuomotor interference occurs when the execution of an action is facilitated by the concurrent observation of the same action and hindered by the concurrent observation of a different action. There is evidence that visuomotor interference can be modulated top-down by higher cognitive functions, depending on whether own performed actions or observed actions are selectively attended. Here, we studied whether these effects of cognitive context on visuomotor interference are also dependent on the point-of-view of the observed action. We employed a delayed go/no-go task known to induce visuomotor interference. Static images of hand gestures in either egocentric or allocentric perspective were presented as "go" stimuli after participants were pre-cued to prepare either a matching (congruent or non-matching (incongruent action. Participants performed this task in two different cognitive contexts: In one, they focused on the visual image of the hand gesture shown as the go stimulus (image context, whereas in the other they focused on the hand gesture they performed (action context. We analyzed reaction times to initiate the prepared action upon presentation of the gesture image and found evidence of visuomotor interference in both contexts and for both perspectives. Strikingly, results show that the effect of cognitive context on visuomotor interference also depends on the perspective of observed actions. When focusing on own-actions, visuomotor interference was significantly less for gesture images in allocentric perspective than in egocentric perspective; when focusing on observed actions, visuomotor interference was present regardless of the perspective of the gesture image. Overall these data suggest that visuomotor interference may be modulated by higher cognitive processes, so that when we are specifically attending to our own actions, images depicting others' actions (allocentric perspective have much less interference on our own actions.

  7. Comment on ``Functional integral for Weyl fermions and the effective action''

    Banerjee, R.; Banerjee, H.

    1989-02-01

    Baaklini's method of obtaining the effective action for Weyl fermions is shown to yield either a gauge-invariant or a gauge-variant form depending on the specific definition employed in the analysis. The structures of the effective action proposed by Baaklini are found to correspond to the standard expressions.

  8. Conformally covariant operators and the effective action in an external gravitational field

    The n-dimensional expressions for the second-order conformally covariant differential operators acting on vector and tensor fields and for the fourth-order conformally covariant operator acting on scalar fields are obtained. For the fourth-order operator one-loop effective action is evaluated in four dimensions. The possibility of effective action evaluation for other conformally covariant operators is discussed

  9. The Effect of Timing on Gliclazide Absorption and Action

    Ishibashi, Fukashi; Takashina, Seiryo

    1990-01-01

    In this study we tried to determine when in relation to meals gliclazide should be taken for optimum hypoglycemic action. Eight non-insulin-dependent diabetics participated in this study during hospitalization for glycemic control.   After stabilization of glycemic control on gliclazide, they took a 40 mg tablet of gliclazide either 30 minutes before, immediately before, or immediately after breakfast on 3 consecutive days. We then determined serum gliclazide, glucose and IRI levels at 30...

  10. On the effective character of a non abelian DBI action

    Osorio, M A R; Suárez, María

    2001-01-01

    We study the way Lorentz covariance can be reconstructed from Matrix Theory as a IMF description of M-theory. The problem is actually related to the interplay between a non abelian Dirac-Born-Infeld action and Super-Yang-Mills as its generalized non-relativistic approximation. All this physics shows up by means of an analysis of the asymptotic expansion of the Bessel functions $K_\

  11. The Side-Effect Effect in Children Is Robust and Not Specific to the Moral Status of Action Effects

    Rakoczy, Hannes; Behne, Tanya; Clüver, Annette; Dallmann, Stephanie; Weidner, Sarah; Waldmann, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Adults’ intentionality judgments regarding an action are influenced by their moral evaluation of this action. This is clearly indicated in the so-called side-effect effect: when told about an action (e.g. implementing a business plan) with an intended primary effect (e.g. raise profits) and a foreseen side effect (e.g. harming/helping the environment), subjects tend to interpret the bringing about of the side effect more often as intentional when it is negative (harming the environment) than when it is positive (helping the environment). From a cognitive point of view, it is unclear whether the side-effect effect is driven by the moral status of the side effects specifically, or rather more generally by its normative status. And from a developmental point of view, little is known about the ontogenetic origins of the effect. The present study therefore explored the cognitive foundations and the ontogenetic origins of the side-effect effect by testing 4-to 5-year-old children with scenarios in which a side effect was in accordance with/violated a norm. Crucially, the status of the norm was varied to be conventional or moral. Children rated the bringing about of side-effects as more intentional when it broke a norm than when it accorded with a norm irrespective of the type of norm. The side-effect effect is thus an early-developing, more general and pervasive phenomenon, not restricted to morally relevant side effects. PMID:26218422

  12. 10D massive type IIA supergravities as the uplift of parabolic M2-brane torus bundles

    Garcia del Moral, Maria Pilar [Universidad de Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. de Fisica; Restuccia, Alvaro [Universidad de Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. de Fisica; Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of). Dept. de Fisica

    2016-04-15

    We remark that the two 10D massive deformations of the N = 2 maximal type IIA supergravity (Romans and HLW supergravity) are associated to the low energy limit of the uplift to 10D of M2-brane torus bundles with parabolic monodromy linearly and non-linearly realized respectively. Romans supergravity corresponds to M2-brane compactified on a twice-punctured torus bundle. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Numerical simulation of antiarrhythmic drugs effects on cardiac action potential

    Převorovská, Světlana; Maršík, František

    Brno : Brno University of Technology, 2006 - (Burša, J.; Fuis, V.), s. 170-171 ISBN 80-214-3232-2. [ Human Biomechanics 2006. Hrotovice (CZ), 13.11.2006-16.11.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/03/1073; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/03/0958 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : human cardiovascular system * cardiac action potential * antiarrhytmmic drugs-cell channel interaction Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  14. More evidence for a refined Gribov-Zwanziger action based on an effective potential approach

    Vandersickel, N.; Dudal, D.; Sorella, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this proceeding is twofold. Firstly, we shall make the refining of the Gribov-Zwanziger action more complete by taking into account more condensates than considered so far. Secondly, we shall provide more evidence for the refined Gribov-Zwanziger action based on an effective potential approach.

  15. Scaling behaviour of the effective chiral action and stability of the chiral soliton

    The effective chiral action is evaluated within a novel improved heat-kernel expansion, which includes gradients of the chiral field in a non-perturbative way. The exact scaling behaviour of the effective action of a localized chiral field with respect to changing its spatial size is found. From this it is proved that the radiatively induced derivative terms cannot absolutely stabilize the chiral soliton against collapsing. The collapsing of the soliton is, however, accompanied by a vanishing of the baryon charge. It is argued that the effective chiral action constrained to a fixed baryon number may still admit stable soliton configurations. (orig.)

  16. In-Out Formalism for One-Loop Effective Actions in QED and Gravity

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    The in-out formalism is a systematic and powerful method for finding the effective actions in an electromagnetic field and a curved spacetime provided that the field equation has explicitly known solutions. The effective action becomes complex when pairs of charged particles are produced due to an electric field and curved spacetime. This may lead to a conjecture of one-to-one correspondence between the vacuum polarization (real part) and the vacuum persistence (imaginary part). We illustrate the one-loop effective action in a constant electric field in a Minkowski spacetime and in a uniform electric field in a two-dimensional (anti-) de sitter space.

  17. System markets: Indirect network effects in action, or inaction?

    J.L.G. Binken (Jeroen)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn this dissertation, I empirically examine system markets up close. More specifically I examine indirect network effects, both demand-side and supply-side indirect network effects. Indirect network effects are the source of positive feedback in system markets, or so network effect theo

  18. Effective actions for the SU(2) confinement-deconfinement phase transition

    We compare different Polyakov-loop actions yielding effective descriptions of finite-temperature SU(2) Yang-Mills theory on the lattice. The actions are motivated by a simultaneous strong coupling and character expansion obeying center symmetry and include both Ising and Ginzburg-Landau type models. To keep things simple we limit ourselves to nearest-neighbor interactions. Some truncations involving the most relevant characters are studied within a novel mean-field approximation. Using inverse Monte Carlo techniques based on exact geometrical Schwinger-Dyson equations we determine the effective couplings of the Polyakov-loop actions. Monte Carlo simulations of these actions reveal that the mean-field analysis is a fairly good guide to the physics involved. Our Polyakov-loop actions reproduce standard Yang-Mills observables well up to limitations due to the nearest-neighbor approximation

  19. Action time effect of lime on its depressive ability for pyrite

    Tichang Sun

    2004-01-01

    Two sample groups of bulk concentrates consisting mainly of pyrite and chalcopyrite from Daye and Chenghchao Mines in Hubei Province of China were used to investigate the effect of the action time of lime on its depressive ability for pyrite. The experimental results conducted with different samples and collectors showed that the action time between lime and pyrite markedly influences the depressive ability of lime. The depressive ability of lime increased with the action time increasing. It was also proved that the depressive results obtained at a large lime dosage after a shorter action time are similar to those obtained at a small lime dosage after a longer action time. The increase of depressive ability of lime after a longer action time is because that there are different mechanisms in different action time. The composition on the surface of pyrite acted for different time with lime was studied by using ESCA (Electron Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis). The results showed that iron hydroxide and calcium sulphate formed on the pyrite surface at the presence of lime in the pulp but the amounts of iron hydroxide and calcium sulphate were different at different action time. At the beginning action time the compound formed on the pyrite surface was mainly calcium sulphate and almost no iron hydroxide formed; but with the action time increasing, iron hydroxide formed. The longer the action time, the more iron hydroxide and the less calcium sulphate formed. It was considered that the stronger depressive ability of lime after a longer action time is because more iron hydroxide forms on the pyrite surface.

  20. System markets: Indirect network effects in action, or inaction?

    Binken, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn this dissertation, I empirically examine system markets up close. More specifically I examine indirect network effects, both demand-side and supply-side indirect network effects. Indirect network effects are the source of positive feedback in system markets, or so network effect theory tells us. Systems are composed of complementary and interdependent products, such as hardware and software. For instance, a video game system is composed of the video game console, on the one han...

  1. Leadership: Improving Its Effectiveness. Research Action Brief Number 1.

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management, Eugene, OR.

    This brief summarizes the major findings of significant research studies dealing with different leadership behaviors and strategies for increasing leadership effectiveness. Fred Fiedler's Contingency Theory of Leadership Effectiveness emphasizes that a leader's effectiveness is determined by how well his leadership style fits the specific…

  2. Characteristics of Effective Training: Developing a Model To Motivate Action.

    Wise, Dena; Ezell, Patsy

    2003-01-01

    The Parenting and Consumer Education project identified effective models for training welfare-to-work facilitators. Premises were the importance of process, learner responsibility, and improvement of social networks. Effective training was learner focused, inspiring, and motivating; demonstrated productive behaviors and effective life skills; and…

  3. Fight against the greenhouse effect. From the local to the international action

    In the fight against the greenhouse gases emissions, the local government are directly concerned. This sheet aims to explain the greenhouse effect, the kyoto protocol, the french national policy and to orientate the local actions. (A.L.B.)

  4. The generalized Schwinger-DeWitt technique and the unique effective action in quantum gravity

    The purpose of this talk is to discuss how one can define and compute the effective action. The authors consider the following subjects: 1. The parameterization-independent and gauge-independent definition of the effective action in QFT. 2. Extension of the Schwinger-DeWitt technique to nonminimal operators, higher-order operators and higher loop orders. The method of generating functional traces. 3. Summation of the proper-time series. Nonlocal terms in the effective action. 4. Applications. The complete algorithm for divergences of a fourth-order operator. The calculational technique for the unique effective action in gauge theories. The unique counterterms for Einstein's theory. Covariant calculation of divergences in two-loop graphs and the absence of leading divergences in two-loop quantum gravity

  5. Mechanism and Effectiveness of Reduction Action of Unsaturated Polyester Resin Reducer

    2001-01-01

    The reduction action mechanism of unsaturated polyester resin reducer is analysed.The experimental results show that the active reducer bearing reactive functional group on the ends of molecules effectively lowers the curing shrinkage of unvaturated polyester resin.

  6. T-duality in the string theory effective action with a string source

    Nurmagambetov, Alexei

    2001-01-01

    We consider the T-duality transformations of the low-energy quantum string theory effective action in the presence of classical fundamental string source and demonstrate explicitly that T-duality still holds.

  7. A Conformal Fixed-Point Equation for the Effective Average Action

    Rosten, Oliver J

    2016-01-01

    A Legendre transform of the recently discovered conformal fixed-point equation is constructed, providing an unintegrated equation encoding full conformal invariance within the framework of the effective average action.

  8. The four-loop string effective action from the bosonic σ-model

    We discuss the formulation of the string effective action, in terms of quantities defined within the bosonic σ-model, at four loops or O(α'4). In particular we show that a recent construction given by Osborn correctly yields the effective action at this order for the minimal subtraction renormalisation scheme. We demonstrate a renormalisation scheme for which Osborn's action reduces to a simpler form proposed by Tseytlin at this order. As part of our analysis, we calculate, using indirect methods, various O(α'4) quantities for the σ-model, in particular the five-loop dilaton β-function. (orig.)

  9. The Quantum Consistency of the Ten-Dimensional Heterotic String Effective Action

    Simon Davis

    2011-01-01

    The finiteness of superstring theory at each order in perturbation theory is considered with respect to the ten-dimensional effective action. The quantum consistency of the ten-dimensional superstring effective action is confirmed with an analysis of the perturbative expansion of the quartic sector. It is found to be compatible with the finiteness of reduced four-dimensional theory. Furthermore, implications for the validity of superstring perturbation theory at lower energies is considered.

  10. Effect of Action Verbs on the Performance of a Complex Movement

    Rabahi, Tahar; Fargier, Patrick; Rifai Sarraj, Ahmad; Clouzeau, Cyril; Massarelli, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between language and motor action has been approached by studying the effect of action verbs, kinaesthetic imagery and mental subtraction upon the performance of a complex movement, the squat vertical jump (SVJ). The time of flight gave the value of the height of the SVJ and was measured with an Optojump® and a Myotest® apparatuses. The results obtained by the effects of the cognitive stimuli showed a statistically significant improvement of the SVJ performance after either lo...

  11. Effect of action verbs on the performance of a complex movement.

    Tahar Rabahi

    Full Text Available The interaction between language and motor action has been approached by studying the effect of action verbs, kinaesthetic imagery and mental subtraction upon the performance of a complex movement, the squat vertical jump (SVJ. The time of flight gave the value of the height of the SVJ and was measured with an Optojump® and a Myotest® apparatuses. The results obtained by the effects of the cognitive stimuli showed a statistically significant improvement of the SVJ performance after either loudly or silently pronouncing, hearing or reading the verb saute (jump in French language. Action verbs specific for other motor actions (pince = pinch, lèche = lick or non-specific (bouge = move showed no or little effect. A meaningless verb for the French subjects (tiáo = jump in Chinese showed no effect as did rêve (dream, tombe (fall and stop. The verb gagne (win improved significantly the SVJ height, as did its antonym perds (lose suggesting a possible influence of affects in the subjects' performance. The effect of the specific action verb jump upon the heights of SVJ was similar to that obtained after kinaesthetic imagery and after mental subtraction of two digits numbers from three digits ones; possibly, in the latter, because of the intervention of language in calculus. It appears that the effects of the specific action verb jump did seem effective but not totally exclusive for the enhancement of the SVJ performance. The results imply an interaction among language and motor brain areas in the performance of a complex movement resulting in a clear specificity of the corresponding action verb. The effect upon performance may probably be influenced by the subjects' intention, increased attention and emotion produced by cognitive stimuli among which action verbs.

  12. Effect of action verbs on the performance of a complex movement.

    Rabahi, Tahar; Fargier, Patrick; Rifai Sarraj, Ahmad; Clouzeau, Cyril; Massarelli, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between language and motor action has been approached by studying the effect of action verbs, kinaesthetic imagery and mental subtraction upon the performance of a complex movement, the squat vertical jump (SVJ). The time of flight gave the value of the height of the SVJ and was measured with an Optojump® and a Myotest® apparatuses. The results obtained by the effects of the cognitive stimuli showed a statistically significant improvement of the SVJ performance after either loudly or silently pronouncing, hearing or reading the verb saute (jump in French language). Action verbs specific for other motor actions (pince = pinch, lèche = lick) or non-specific (bouge = move) showed no or little effect. A meaningless verb for the French subjects (tiáo = jump in Chinese) showed no effect as did rêve (dream), tombe (fall) and stop. The verb gagne (win) improved significantly the SVJ height, as did its antonym perds (lose) suggesting a possible influence of affects in the subjects' performance. The effect of the specific action verb jump upon the heights of SVJ was similar to that obtained after kinaesthetic imagery and after mental subtraction of two digits numbers from three digits ones; possibly, in the latter, because of the intervention of language in calculus. It appears that the effects of the specific action verb jump did seem effective but not totally exclusive for the enhancement of the SVJ performance. The results imply an interaction among language and motor brain areas in the performance of a complex movement resulting in a clear specificity of the corresponding action verb. The effect upon performance may probably be influenced by the subjects' intention, increased attention and emotion produced by cognitive stimuli among which action verbs. PMID:23844233

  13. The effect of action recognition and robot awareness in cooperative robot teams

    Parker, L.E.

    1995-03-01

    Previous research in cooperative robotics has investigated several possible ways of coordinating the actions of cooperative teams -- from implicit cooperation through sensory feedback to explicit cooperation using the exchange of communicated messages. These various approaches differ in the extent to which robot team members arc aware of, or recognize, the actions of their teammates, and the extent to which they use this information to effect their own actions. The research described in this paper investigates this issue of robot awareness of team member actions and its effect on cooperative team performance by examining the results of a series of experiments on teams of physical mobile robots performing a laboratory version of hazardous waste cleanup. In these experiments. we vary the team size (and thus the level of redundancy in team member capabilities) and the level of awareness robots have of their teammates` current actions and evaluate the team`s performance using two metrics: time and energy. The results indicate that the impact of action awareness on cooperative team performance is a function not only of team size and the metric of evaluation. but also on the degree to which the effects of actions can be sensed through the world, the relative amount of work that is available per robot, and the cost of replicated actions. From these empirical studies, we propose a number of principles regarding the use of action recognition and robot awareness of team member actions in cooperative teams -- principles which will help guide engineers in the design and composition of the proper cooperative team for a given robotic mission.

  14. The effects of familiarity on thought--action fusion.

    Berman, Noah C; Wheaton, Michael G; Fabricant, Laura E; Jacobson, Spenser R; Abramowitz, Jonathan S

    2011-10-01

    The present study examined whether beliefs about the importance of thoughts (i.e., thought--action fusion; TAF) are related to the target subject of the negative thought. One hundred and seven undergraduate students were randomly assigned to imagine either a beloved relative or a stranger being diagnosed with cancer and provided in vivo ratings of anxiety, likelihood, moral wrongness, urge to neutralize, and how upsetting the event would be if it occurred. Results indicated that thinking of a relative being diagnosed with cancer provoked more distress, urges to neutralize, and higher estimates of likelihood, as well greater use of mental neutralizing behaviors, compared to thinking of a stranger. Contrary to our prediction, the groups did not differ in their ratings of the moral wrongness. These findings broadly support the assertion that the more personally significant a negative intrusive thought, the more it will provoke distress and urges to neutralize. Results are discussed in terms of the cognitive model of obsessions and clinical implications are addressed. PMID:21835394

  15. Buildup of the Kondo effect from real-time effective action for the Anderson impurity model

    Bock, Sebastian; Liluashvili, Alexander; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The nonequilibrium time evolution of a quantum dot is studied by means of dynamic equations for time-dependent Green's functions derived from a two-particle-irreducible (2PI) effective action for the Anderson impurity model. Coupling the dot between two leads at different voltages, the dynamics of the current through the dot is investigated. We show that the 2PI approach is capable of describing the dynamical buildup of the Kondo effect, which shows up as a sharp resonance in the spectral function, with a width exponentially suppressed in the electron self-coupling on the dot. An external voltage applied to the dot is found to deteriorate the Kondo effect at the hybridization scale. The dynamic equations are evaluated within different nonperturbative resummation schemes, within the direct, particle-particle, and particle-hole channels, as well as their combination, and the results compared with those from other methods.

  16. World-volume Effective Action of Exotic Five-brane in M-theory

    Kimura, Tetsuji; Yata, Masaya

    2016-01-01

    We study the world-volume effective action of an exotic five-brane, known as the M-theory $5^3$-brane (M$5^3$-brane) in eleven dimensions. The supermultiplet of the world-volume theory is the $\\mathcal{N} = (2, 0)$ tensor multiplet in six dimensions. The world-volume action contains three Killing vectors $\\hat{k}_{\\hat{I}} {}^M \\ (\\hat{I} =1,2,3)$ associated with the $U(1)^3$ isometry. We find the effective T-duality rule for the eleven-dimensional backgrounds that transforms the M5-brane effective action to that of the M$5^3$-brane. We also show that our action provides the source term for the M$5^3$-brane geometry in eleven-dimensional supergravity

  17. Renormalization-group flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2016-01-01

    Following an approach of Matarrese and Pietroni, we derive the functional renormalization group (RG) flow of the effective action of cosmological large-scale structures. Perturbative solutions of this RG flow equation are shown to be consistent with standard cosmological perturbation theory. Non-perturbative approximate solutions can be obtained by truncating the a priori infinite set of possible effective actions to a finite subspace. Using for the truncated effective action a form dictated by dissipative fluid dynamics, we derive RG flow equations for the scale dependence of the effective viscosity and sound velocity of non-interacting dark matter, and we solve them numerically. Physically, the effective viscosity and sound velocity account for the interactions of long-wavelength fluctuations with the spectrum of smaller-scale perturbations. We find that the RG flow exhibits an attractor behaviour in the IR that significantly reduces the dependence of the effective viscosity and sound velocity on the input ...

  18. On the Effective Action of Dressed Mean Fields for N = 4 Super-Yang-Mills Theory

    Gorazd Cvetic

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the general considerations such as R-operation and Slavnov-Taylor identity we show that the effective action, being understood as Legendre transform of the logarithm of the path integral, possesses particular structure in N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory for kernels of the effective action expressed in terms of the dressed effective fields. These dressed effective fields have been introduced in our previous papers as actual variables of the effective action. The concept of dressed effective fields naturally appears in the framework of solution to Slavnov-Taylor identity. The particularity of the structure is independence of these kernels on the ultraviolet regularization scale Λ. These kernels are functions of mutual spacetime distances and of the gauge coupling. The fact that β function in this theory vanishes is used significantly.

  19. Violent Juvenile Delinquents: Treatment Effectiveness and Implications for Future Action.

    Tate, David C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Considers the research in addressing how society should reasonably invest in the treatment of violent juvenile offenders. The authors first examine the problems of evaluating interventions with violent youth, then explore various intervention options. The use of multisystemic therapy is offered as a cost-effective program for reducing juvenile…

  20. Conformal Invariance of the D-Particle Effective Action

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Nakayama, Ryuichi

    1999-01-01

    It is shown that the effective theory of D-particles has conformal symmetry with field-dependent parameters. This is a consequence of the supersymmetry. The string coupling constant is not transformed in contrast with the recent proposal of generalized conformal symmtery by Jevicki et al. This conformal symmetry can also be generalized to other Dp-brane systems.

  1. Low-energy effective action in N = 2 supersymmetric field theories

    Review of new approach to finding effective action in N = 2 and N = 4 supersymmetric theory is given. The approach is based on the formulation of these theories in terms of unconstrained superfields in harmonic superspace. Construction of superfield model of N = 2 supersymmetric field theory (hypermultiplet, N = 2 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory) is discussed. N = 2 background field method is considered. Perturbative holomorphic effective potential in N = 2 models and non-holomorphic effective potential in N = 4 Yang-Mills field theory, defining exact low-energy effective action in this theory, are studied. Possible applications of low-energy effective action in supersymmetric theories and some open problems are discussed. Comparison of given approach with others is performed

  2. Technology and collective action: the effect of cell phone coverage on political violence in Africa

    Pierskalla, Jan H.; Hollenbach, Florian M.

    2013-01-01

    The spread of cell phone technology across Africa has transforming effects on the economic and political sphere of the continent. In this paper, we investigate the impact of cell phone technology on violent collective action. We contend that the availability of cell phones as a communication technology allows political groups to overcome collective action problems more easily and improve in-group cooperation, and coordination. Utilizing novel, spatially disaggregated data on cell phone covera...

  3. Improving Conservation Community Group Effectiveness Using Mind Mapping and Action Research

    Hanabeth Luke; David Lloyd; William Boyd; Kristin den Exter

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a case study where mind mapping is used within an action research project to foster improved community group effectiveness and decision-making. The case study focusses on the social dynamics experienced during the formative stage of a community action group in Byron Bay, New South Wales; one of a network of such groups, formed to ensure that sustainable environmental management practices are followed in proposed coal-seam gas developments. In the context of examining syste...

  4. The effects of scales, flows and filters on property rights and collective action in watershed management:

    Swallow, Brent M.; Garrity, Dennis P.; van Noordwijk, Meine

    2001-01-01

    Research and policy on property rights, collective action and watershed management requires good understanding of ecological and socio-political processes at different social-spatial scales. On-farm soil erosion is a plot or farm-level problem that can be mitigated through more secure property rights for individual farmers, while the sedimentation of streams and deterioration of water quality are larger-scale problems that may require more effective collective action and / or more secure prop...

  5. Effect of action observation therapy on daily activities and motor recovery in stroke patients

    Mei-Hong Zhu; Jing Wang; Xu-Dong Gu; Mei-Fang Shi; Ming Zeng; Chun-Yuan Wang; Qiao-Ying Chen; Jian-Ming Fu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of action observation therapy, which is based on mirror neuron theory, on upper limb function and activities of daily living in patients with stroke. Methods: Sixty-one patients with stroke were randomly divided into two groups; those in the control group received routine rehabilitation treatment and nursing, whereas those in the experimental group additionally received eight weeks of action observation therapy for 30 min, six times per week. Patients rec...

  6. Short-term effects of an action video game on attention

    Onstad, Malin Bjørklund

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine whether an action video game had short-term effects on selective attention and temporal attention, as measured by the Attentional blink, Simon task and Stroop task. The design was experimental in which the participants (N = 20) completed 1 hour of action video game playing or reading in a book on two occasions, separated by 7 days. All participants completed both conditions. The design was randomized, counterbalanced and with cross-over trials. A Kolmogor...

  7. Adiponectin Action: A Combination of Endocrine and Autocrine/Paracrine Effects

    Dadson, Keith; Liu, Ying; Sweeney, Gary

    2011-01-01

    The widespread physiological actions of adiponectin have now been well characterized as clinical studies and works in animal models have established strong correlations between circulating adiponectin level and various disease-related outcomes. Thus, conventional thinking attributes many of adiponectin’s beneficial effects to endocrine actions of adipose-derived adiponectin. However, it is now clear that several tissues can themselves produce adiponectin and there is growing evidence that loc...

  8. Adiponectin action: a combination of endocrine and autocrine/paracrine effects

    Gary eSweeney

    2011-01-01

    The widespread physiological actions of adiponectin have now been well characterized as clinical studies and work in animal models have established strong correlations between circulating adiponectin levels and various disease-related outcomes. Thus, conventional thinking attributes many of adiponectins beneficial effects to endocrine actions of adipose-derived adiponectin. However, it is now clear that several tissues can themselves produce adiponectin and there is growing evidence that loca...

  9. Autocrine effects of visfatin on hepatocyte sensitivity to insulin action

    Škop, V.; Kontrová, K.; Zídek, Václav; Pravenec, Michal; Kazdová, L.; Mikulík, Karel; Sajdok, J.; Zídková, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 4 (2010), s. 615-618. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110805; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08006; GA MZd(CZ) NR9387; GA MZd(CZ) NR9359 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Visfatin * RNA interference * insulin mimetic effects Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.646, year: 2010

  10. Estimation of Several Political Action Effects of Energy Prices

    Whitford, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    One important effect of price shocks in the United States has been increased political attention paid to the structure and performance of oil and natural gas markets, along with some governmental support for energy conservation. This paper describes how price changes helped lead the emergence of a political agenda accompanied by several interventions, as revealed through Granger causality tests on change in the legislative agenda.

  11. 10D to 4D Euclidean Supergravity over a Calabi-Yau three-fold

    Sabra, Wafic

    2015-01-01

    We dimensionally reduce the bosonic sector of 10D Euclidean type IIA supergravity over a Calabi-Yau three-fold. The resulting theory describes the bosonic sector of 4D, N = 2 Euclidean supergravity coupled to vector- and hyper-multiplets.

  12. The differentiated effects of CSR actions in the service industry

    Casado-Díaz, Ana B.; Nicolau, Juan Luis; Ruiz Moreno, Manuel Felipe; Sellers Rubio, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to attempt to explain why the impact of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives may be different and/or more important in service firms compared to manufacturing firms. CSR is becoming a common strategy, hence its extensive research. Central to it is the analysis of the effect of CSR on a firm’s performance, whose outcome depends on firm-specific and industry-related factors. Design/methodology/approach – The event study methodology is applied ...

  13. Causality-based cost-effective action mining

    Shamsinejadbabaki, Pirooz; Saraee, Mohamad; Blockeel, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    In many business contexts, the ultimate goal of knowledge discovery is not the knowledge itself, but putting it to use. Models or patterns found by data mining methods often require further post-processing to this effect. For instance, in churn prediction, data mining may give a model that predicts which customers are likely to end their contract, but companies are not just interested in knowing who is likely to do so, they want to know what they can do to avoid this. The models or patterns h...

  14. Evolution of the violin: The law of effect in action.

    Wasserman, Edward A; Cullen, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    As is true for most other human inventions, the origin of the violin is unknown. What is known is that this popular and versatile instrument has notably changed over the course of several hundred years. At issue is whether those evolutionary changes in the construction of the violin are the result of premeditated, intelligent design or whether they arose through a trial-and-error process. Recent scientific evidence favors the latter account. Our perspective piece puts these recent empirical findings into a comprehensive selectionist framework. According to this view, the many things we do and make--like violins--arise from a process of variation and selection which accords with the law of effect. Contrary to popular opinion, there is neither mystique nor romance in this process; it is as fundamental and ubiquitous as the law of natural selection. As with the law of natural selection in the evolution of organisms, there is staunch resistance to the role of the law of effect in the evolution of human inventions. We conclude our piece by considering several objections to our perspective. PMID:26569015

  15. Effective Swimmer’s Action during the Grab Start Technique

    Mourão, Luis; de Jesus, Karla; Roesler, Hélio; Machado, Leandro J.; Fernandes, Ricardo J.; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Vaz, Mário A. P.

    2015-01-01

    The external forces applied in swimming starts have been often studied, but using direct analysis and simple interpretation data processes. This study aimed to develop a tool for vertical and horizontal force assessment based on the swimmers’ propulsive and structural forces (passive forces due to dead weight) applied during the block phase. Four methodological pathways were followed: the experimented fall of a rigid body, the swimmers’ inertia effect, the development of a mathematical model to describe the outcome of the rigid body fall and its generalization to include the effects of the inertia, and the experimental swimmers’ starting protocol analysed with the inclusion of the developed mathematical tool. The first three methodological steps resulted in the description and computation of the passive force components. At the fourth step, six well-trained swimmers performed three 15 m maximal grab start trials and three-dimensional (3D) kinetic data were obtained using a six degrees of freedom force plate. The passive force contribution to the start performance obtained from the model was subtracted from the experimental force due to the swimmers resulting in the swimmers’ active forces. As expected, the swimmers’ vertical and horizontal active forces accounted for the maximum variability contribution of the experimental forces. It was found that the active force profile for the vertical and horizontal components resembled one another. These findings should be considered in clarifying the active swimmers’ force variability and the respective geometrical profile as indicators to redefine steering strategies. PMID:25978370

  16. Dynamical Tides in General Relativity: Effective Action and Effective-One-Body Hamiltonian

    Steinhoff, Jan; Buonanno, Alessandra; Taracchini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Tidal effects have an important impact on the late inspiral of compact binary systems containing neutron stars. Most current models of tidal deformations of neutron stars assume that the tidal bulge is directly related to the tidal field generated by the companion, with a constant response coefficient. However, if the orbital motion approaches a resonance with one of the internal modes of the neutron star, this adiabatic description of tidal effects starts to break down, and the tides become dynamical. In this paper, we consider dynamical tides in general relativity due to the quadrupolar fundamental oscillation mode of a neutron star. We devise a description of the effects of the neutron star's finite size on the orbital dynamics based on an effective point-particle action augmented by dynamical quadrupolar degrees of freedom. We analyze the post-Newtonian and test-particle approximations of this model and incorporate the results into an effective-one-body Hamiltonian. This enables us to extend the descripti...

  17. Covariant and single-field effective action with the background-field formalism

    Safari, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    In the context of scalar quantum field theory we introduce a class of generically nonlinear quantum-background splits for which the splitting Ward identity, encoding the single field dependence in the effective action, can be solved exactly. We show that this can be used to construct an effective action which is both covariant and dependent on the background and fluctuation fields only through a single total field in a way independent from the dynamics. Moreover we discuss the criteria under which the ultraviolet symmetries are inherited by the quantum effective action. The approach is demonstrated through some examples, including the $O(N)$ effective field theory, which might be of interest for the Higgs sector of the Standard Model or its extensions.

  18. Differential effects of thioridazine enantiomers on action potential duration in rabbit papillary muscle

    Jensen, Ask Schou; Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Sevcencu, Cristian;

    2015-01-01

    (+)-thioridazine. In this study we for the first time investigate the cardiotoxicity of the isolated thioridazine enantiomers and show their effects on ventricular repolarization. The effects of (+)-thioridazine, (-)-thioridazine, and racemate on the rabbit ventricular action potential duration (APD) were...... investigated in a randomized controlled blinded experiment. Action potentials were measured in papillary muscles isolated from 21 female rabbits, and the drug effect on 90% APD in comparison with control (DeltaDelta-APD90) was evaluated. Increasing concentrations of (+)-thioridazine and the racemate caused...

  19. The low-energy N=4 SYM effective action in diverse harmonic superspaces

    Buchbinder, I L; Samsonov, I B

    2016-01-01

    We review various superspace approaches to the description of the low-energy effective action in N=4 super Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We consider the four-derivative part of the low-energy effective action in the Coulomb branch. The typical components of this effective action are the gauge field F^4/X^4 and the scalar field Wess-Zumino terms. We construct N=4 supersymmetric completions of these terms in the framework of different harmonic superspaces supporting N=2,3,4 supersymmetries. These approaches are complementary to each other in the sense that they make manifest different subgroups of the total SU(4) R-symmetry group. We show that the effective action acquires an extremely simple form in those superspaces which manifest the non-anomalous maximal subgroups of SU(4). The common characteristic feature of our construction is that we restore the superfield effective actions exclusively by employing the N=4 supersymmetry and/or superconformal PSU(2,2|4) symmetry.

  20. Reviewing Biosphere Reserves globally: effective conservation action or bureaucratic label?

    Coetzer, Kaera L; Witkowski, Edward T F; Erasmus, Barend F N

    2014-02-01

    The Biosphere Reserve (BR) model of UNESCO's Man and the Biosphere Programme reflects a shift towards more accountable conservation. Biosphere Reserves attempt to reconcile environmental protection with sustainable development; they explicitly acknowledge humans, and human interests in the conservation landscape while still maintaining the ecological values of existing protected areas. Conceptually, this model is attractive, with 610 sites currently designated globally. Yet the practical reality of implementing dual 'conservation' and 'development' goals is challenging, with few examples successfully conforming to the model's full criteria. Here, we review the history of Biosphere Reserves from first inception in 1974 to the current status quo, and examine the suitability of the designation as an effective conservation model. We track the spatial expansion of Biosphere Reserves globally, assessing the influence of the Statutory Framework of the World Network of Biosphere Reserves and Seville strategy in 1995, when the BR concept refocused its core objectives on sustainable development. We use a comprehensive range of case studies to discuss conformity to the Programme, the social and ecological consequences associated with implementation of the designation, and challenges in aligning conservation and development. Given that the 'Biosphere Reserve' label is a relatively unknown designation in the public arena, this review also provides details on popularising the Biosphere Reserve brand, as well as prospects for further research, currently unexploited, but implicit in the designation. PMID:23701641

  1. Effect of Action Video Games on the Spatial Distribution of Visuospatial Attention

    Green, C. Shawn; Bavelier, Daphne

    2006-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of action gaming on the spatial distribution of attention. The authors used the flanker compatibility effect to separately assess center and peripheral attentional resources in gamers versus nongamers. Gamers exhibited an enhancement in attentional resources compared with nongamers, not only in the periphery but…

  2. Extracting the effective Polyakov line action from SU(2) and SU(3) lattice gauge theories

    Greensite, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    We describe the "relative weights" method used to compute the effective Polyakov line action corresponding to a given lattice gauge theory, and present some results that have been obtained so far. The main motivation is the sign problem, which may be easier to address in the effective theory than in the underlying gauge theory.

  3. Voluntary action and tactile sensory feedback in the intentional binding effect.

    Zhao, Ke; Hu, Li; Qu, Fangbing; Cui, Qian; Piao, Qiuhong; Xu, Hui; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Liang; Fu, Xiaolan

    2016-08-01

    The intentional binding effect refers to a subjective compression over a temporal interval between the start point initialized by a voluntary action and the endpoint signaled by an external sensory (visual or audio) feedback. The present study aimed to explore the influence of tactile sensory feedback on this binding effect by comparing voluntary key-press actions with voluntary key-release actions. In experiment 1, each participant was instructed to report the perceived interval (in ms) between an action and the subsequent visual sensory feedback. In this task, either the action (key-press or key-release) was voluntarily performed by the participant or a kinematically identical movement was passively applied to the left index finger of the participant. In experiment 2, we explored whether the difference in the perception of time was affected by the direction of action. In experiment 3, we developed an apparatus in which two parallel laser beams were generated by a laser emission unit and detected by a laser receiver unit; this allowed the movement of the left index finger to be detected without it touching a keyboard (i.e., without any tactile sensory feedback). Convergent results from all of the experiments showed that the temporal binding effect was only observed when the action was both voluntary and involved physical contact with the key, suggesting that the combination of intention and tactile sensory feedback, as a form of top-down processing, likely distracted attention from temporal events and caused the different binding effects. PMID:27038203

  4. Renal Vasodilatory Action of Dopamine in Patients With Heart Failure: Magnitude of Effect and Site of Action.

    Elkayam, Uri; Ng, Tien M H; Hatamizadeh, Parta; Janmohamed, Munir; Mehra, Anilkumar

    2008-01-15

    BACKGROUND: A "renal dose" of dopamine is often used to increase renal blood flow; however, data on the magnitude of effect and site of action in patients with heart failure are scarce. METHODS AND RESULTS: Renal effects of intravenous dopamine (1, 2, 3, 5, and 10 mug . kg(-1) . min(-1)) were evaluated in 13 patients with chronic heart failure. Renal blood flow was calculated from renal artery cross-sectional area measured with intravascular ultrasound and renal blood flow velocity-time integral measured by the intravascular Doppler technique. Cross-sectional area increased and was significantly higher than baseline (0.30+/-0.04 cm(2)) at 5 mug . kg(-1) . min(-1) (0.36+/-0.05 cm(2)) and 10 mug . kg(-1) . min(-1) (0.38+/-0.06 cm(2)). The velocity-time integral was significantly higher than baseline (22+/-3 cm) at doses of 3 and 5 mug . kg(-1) . min(-1) (both 31+/-4 cm). Renal blood flow increased, whereas renal vascular resistance decreased, reaching statistical significance at 2 mug . kg(-1) . min(-1) through 10 mug . kg(-1) . min(-1). Cardiac output gradually increased, reaching statistical significance at doses of 5 and 10 mug . kg(-1) . min(-1) (5.5+/-0.5 and 6.1+/-0.7 versus 4.5+/-5.2 L/min at baseline), but the increase in renal blood flow appeared proportionately larger than corresponding increases in cardiac output. CONCLUSIONS: Dopamine is associated with an increase in renal blood flow in patients with heart failure. This effect is due to dilation of both the large conductance and small resistance renal blood vessels. Further evaluation of the efficacy and safety of dopamine for improvement of renal function in hospitalized patients with heart failure is warranted. PMID:18172028

  5. The combined effect of precession and convection on the dynamo action

    Wei, Xing

    2016-01-01

    To understand the generation of the Earth's and planetary magnetic fields, we investigate numerically the combined effect of precession and convection on the dynamo action in a spherical shell. The convection alone, the precession alone and the combined effect of convection and precession are studied at the low Ekman number at which the precessing flow is already unstable. The key result is that although the precession or convection alone is not strong to support the dynamo action the combined effect of precession and convection can support the dynamo action because of the resonance of precessional and convective instabilities. This result may interpret why the geodynamo maintains for such a long history compared to the Martian dynamo.

  6. The effective action for edge states in higher-dimensional quantum Hall systems

    We show that the effective action for the edge excitations of a quantum Hall droplet of fermions in higher dimensions is generically given by a chiral bosonic action. We explicitly analyze the quantum Hall effect on complex projective spaces CPk, with a U(1) background magnetic field. The edge excitations are described by Abelian bosonic fields on S2k-1 with only one spatial direction along the boundary of the droplet relevant for the dynamics. Our analysis also leads to an action for edge excitations for the case of the Zhang-Hu four-dimensional quantum Hall effect defined on S4 with an SU(2) background magnetic field, using the fact that CP3 is an S2-bundle over S4

  7. Two-loop low-energy effective action in Abelian supersymmetric Chern–Simons matter models

    We compute two-loop low-energy effective actions in Abelian Chern–Simons matter models with N=2 and N=3 supersymmetry up to four-derivative order. Calculations are performed with a slowly-varying gauge superfield background. Though the gauge superfield propagator depends on the gauge fixing parameter, it is shown that the obtained results are independent of this parameter. In the massless case the considered models are superconformal. We demonstrate that the superconformal symmetry strongly restricts the form of two-loop quantum corrections to the effective actions such that the obtained terms have simpler structure than the analogous ones in the effective action of three-dimensional supersymmetric electrodynamics (SQED) with vanishing topological mass

  8. Effective actions in ${\\cal N}$=1, D5 supersymmetric gauge theories: harmonic superspace approach

    Buchbinder, I L

    2015-01-01

    We consider the off-shell formulation of the 5D, $ {\\cal N}$=1 super Yang-Mills and super Chern-Simons theories in harmonic superspace. Using such a formulation we develop a manifestly supersymmetric and gauge invariant approach to constructing the one-loop effective action both in super Yang-Mills and super Chern-Simons models. On the base of this approach we compute the leading low-energy quantum contribution to the effective action on the Abelian vector multiplet background. This contribution corresponds to $F^4$ invariant which is given in 5D superfield form.

  9. Evaluative priming reveals dissociable effects of cognitive versus physiological anxiety on action monitoring.

    De Saedeleer, Lien; Pourtois, Gilles

    2016-06-01

    Performance monitoring enables the rapid detection of mismatches between goals or intentions and actions, as well as subsequent behavioral adjustment by means of enhanced attention control. These processes are not encapsulated, but they are readily influenced by affective or motivational variables, including negative affect. Here we tested the prediction that worry, the cognitive component of anxiety, and arousal, its physiological counterpart, can each influence specific processes during performance monitoring. In 2 experiments, participants were asked to discriminate the valence of emotional words that were preceded by either correct (good) or incorrect (bad) actions, serving as primes in a standard evaluative priming procedure. In Experiment 1 (n = 36) we examined the influence of trait worry and arousal. Additionally, we included a face priming task to examine the specificity of this effect. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that increased worry, but not arousal, weakened the evaluative priming effect and therefore the rapid and automatic processing of actions as good or bad. By contrast, arousal, but not worry, increased posterror slowing. In Experiment 2 (n = 30) state worry was induced using an anagram task. Effects of worry on action monitoring were trait but not state dependent, and only evidenced when actions were directly used as primes. These results suggest a double dissociation between worry and arousal during performance monitoring. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26709858

  10. Covariant and background independent functional RG flow for the effective average action

    Safari, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    We extend our prescription for the construction of a covariant and background-independent effective action for scalar quantum field theories to the case where momentum modes below a certain scale are suppressed by the presence of an infrared regulator. The key step is an appropriate choice of the infrared cutoff for which the Ward identity, capturing the information from single-field dependence of the ultraviolet action, continues to be exactly solvable, and therefore, in addition to covariance, manifest background independence of the effective action is guaranteed at any scale. A practical consequence is that in this framework one can adopt truncations dependent on the single total field. Furthermore we discuss the necessary and sufficient conditions for the preservation of symmetries along the renormalization group flow.

  11. Community ACTION Boards: An Innovative Model for Effective Community–Academic Research Partnerships

    James, Sherline; Arniella, Guedy; Bickell, Nina A.; Walker, Willie; Robinson, Virginia; Taylor, Barbara; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Community-based participatory research (CBPR) requires equitable partnerships between community stakeholders and academics. Traditionally, researchers relied on community advisory boards, but these boards often play a reactive role on a project-by-project basis. The East and Central Harlem Health Outcomes (ECHHO) Community Action Board (CAB), however, is an effective, proactive group. Objectives The ECHHO board sought to identify key strategies and tools to build and employ a partnership model, and to disseminate lessons learned to other community–academic partnerships. Methods Current and former board members were interviewed and a wide range of related documents was reviewed. Lessons Learned The board became effective when it prioritized action and relationship-building, across seven key domains: Shared priorities, diversity, participation, transparency, mutual respect and recognition, and personal connections. The model is depicted graphically. Conclusion Community advisory boards may benefit from attention to taking action, and to building relationships between academics and community members. PMID:22616207

  12. Effect of Fuzheng Huayu formula and its actions against liver fibrosis

    Xu Lieming

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Liver fibrosis is a common histological process to develop into cirrhosis in various chronic liver diseases including chronic hepatitis and fatty liver. Therefore anti-liver fibrosis is very important strategy to treat chronic liver diseases. Fuzheng Huayu (FZHY, a preparation containing herbs such as Radix Salvia Miltiorrhizae, Cordyceps, Semen Persicae, was formulated on the basis of Chinese medicine theory in treating liver fibrosis and was approved. Pharmacological studies and clinical trials demonstrate that FZHY has a significant effect against liver fibrosis and that many of the pharmacological actions are attributable to the effect. This article reviews the effects and actions of FZHY, in particular the effects observed from clinical trials in treating liver fibrosis caused by chronic hepatitis B and the actions on inhibition of hepatic stellate cell activation, protection of hepatocytes and inhibition of hepatic sinusoidal capillarization. This article also reviews the coordinated effects of the constituent herbs of FZHY and the actions of their active compounds such as salvianonic acid B (SA-B on liver fibrosis.

  13. Effects of certain muscarinic antagonists on the actions of anticholinesterases on cat skeletal muscle.

    Brimblecombe, R W; French, M C; Webb, S N

    1979-04-01

    1. The effects of some muscarinic antagonists, namely, N-ethyl-2-pyrrolidylmethyl-cyclopentylphenyl glycollate (PMCG), N-methyl-4-piperidyl-phenylcyclohexyl glycollate (PPCG, racemate and R and S enantiomers) and 4'-N-methyl-piperidyl-1-phenyl-cyclopentane carboxylate (G3063) on organophosphate (sarin, soman)- and carbamate (neostigmine)-induced twitch augmentation have been studied in cat soleus muscle. 2. The results of a preliminary study comparing the potency of sarin and soman in inhibiting the acetylcholinesterase activity of muscle in relation to the effect on the maximal twitch response indicated that there is not a simple relationship between degree of enzyme inhibition by these drugs and alteration of muscle function. 3. The muscarinic antagonists studied were capable of preventing or reversing sarin-, soman- or neostigmine-induced twitch augmentation. Doses sufficient to give complete protection from the effects of the anticholinesterase agents had little or no effect on the twitch response of normal muscle. 4. The protective action of these muscarinic antagonists is dose-dependent but independent of known antagonist actions at muscarinic receptors. 5. The effects of some local anaesthetics (lignocaine, prilocaine, cinchocaine, procaine) and other membrane stabilizers (quinine, ketamine, chlorpromazine, triflupromazine) were compared with those of the muscarinic antagonists in an attempt to elucidate the mode of action of these acetylcholine antagonists. The evidence is insufficient to exclude the involvement of a membrane stabilizing action. PMID:435681

  14. The combined effects of action observation and passive proprioceptive training on adaptive motor learning.

    Lei, Yuming; Bao, Shancheng; Wang, Jinsung

    2016-09-01

    Sensorimotor adaptation can be induced by action observation, and also by passive training. Here, we investigated the effect of a protocol that combined action observation and passive training on visuomotor adaptation, by comparing it with the effect of action observation or passive training alone. Subjects were divided into five conditions during the training session: (1) action observation, in which the subjects watched a video of a model who adapted to a novel visuomotor rotation; (2) proprioceptive training, in which the subject's arm was moved passively to target locations that were associated with desired trajectories; (3) combined training, in which the subjects watched the video of a model during a half of the session and experienced passive movements during the other half; (4) active training, in which the subjects adapted actively to the rotation; and (5) a control condition, in which the subjects did not perform any task. Following that session, all subjects adapted to the same visuomotor rotation. Results showed that the subjects in the combined training condition adapted to the rotation significantly better than those in the observation or proprioceptive training condition, although their performance was not as good as that of those who adapted actively. These findings suggest that although a protocol that combines action observation and passive training consists of all the processes involved in active training (error detection and correction, effector-specific and proprioceptively based reaching movements), these processes in that protocol may work differently as compared to a protocol in which the same processes are engaged actively. PMID:27298007

  15. Short Term Effectiveness of High Density Large Woody Debris in Asotin Creek as a Cheap and Cheerful Restoration Restoration Action

    Camp, Reid

    2015-01-01

    In response to human impacts, river restoration and rehabilitation actions have become a priority in the United States. In the Pacific Northwest, most restoration actions are focused on repairing degraded freshwater habitat to increase or improve Pacific salmonid production. However, traditional river restoration actions remained largely unchanged for over 100 years despite a lack of definitive evidence that the actions were effective. More recently, there has been a surge in process-based re...

  16. Wogonin potentiates the antitumor action of etoposide and ameliorates its adverse effects.

    Enomoto, Riyo; Koshiba, Chika; Suzuki, Chie; Lee, Eibai

    2011-05-01

    Wogonin, a flavone in the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis, reduced etoposide-induced apoptotic cell death in normal cells, such as bone marrow cells and thymocytes. On the other hand, wogonin potentiated the proapoptotic or cytotoxic action of etoposide in tumor cells, such as Jurkat, HL-60, A549, and NCI-H226. These contradictory actions of wogonin on apoptosis are distinguished by normal or cancer cell types. Wogonin had no effect on apoptosis induced by other anticancer agents in the tumor cells. Thus, the potentiation effect of wogonin was observed only in etoposide-induced apoptosis in tumor cells. In a functional assay for P-glycoprotein (P-gp), wogonin suppressed excretion of calcein, a substrate for P-gp, in these tumor cells. Moreover, wogonin decreased the excretion of radiolabeled etoposide and accordingly increased intracellular content of this agent in the cells. P-gp inhibitors showed a similar potentiation effect on etoposide-induced apoptosis in these tumor cells. Thus, wogonin is likely to potentiate the anticancer action of etoposide due to P-gp inhibition and accumulation of this agent. These findings suggest that wogonin may be a useful chemotherapeutic adjuvant to potentiate the pharmacological action of etoposide and ameliorate its adverse effects. PMID:20658136

  17. Modulatory effect of raloxifene and estrogen on the metabolic action of growth hormone in hypopituitary women.

    Birzniece, Vita

    2010-05-01

    The metabolic action of GH is attenuated by estrogens administered via the oral route. Selective estrogen receptor modulators lower IGF-I to a lesser degree than 17beta-estradiol in GH-deficient women, and their effect on fat and protein metabolism is unknown.

  18. Positive Education for School Leaders: Exploring the Effects of Emotion-Gratitude and Action-Gratitude

    Waters, Lea; Stokes, Helen

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study describes the effect of two gratitude interventions designed to trigger emotion-gratitude (gratitude diary) and action-gratitude (gratitude letter) in school leaders. Case study methodology was applied to analyse reflective journals of 27 school leaders. The gratitude diary served to foster a more balanced view of the…

  19. Non-abelian chiral anomalies and Wess-Zumino effective actions

    An elementary account is given of the construction of anomalies and effective actions for Goldstone bosons, using the techniques of differential geometry. The emphasis is on simplicity of presentation, comparison of different renormalization schemes and the relationship to bosonization in the case of 2 dimensions. (Auth.)

  20. Action Control and Dispositional Hope: An Examination of Their Effect on Self-Regulated Learning

    Papantoniou, Georgia; Moraitou, Despina; Katsadima, Effie; Dinou, Magda

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The present study examined the effect of action control (i.e., disengagement, initiative, and persistence) and dispositional hope (i.e., pathways thought, and agency thinking) on self-regulated learning strategy use (i.e., cognitive, metacognitive, and resource management) and course achievement. Method: A total of 275 undergraduate…

  1. Effective action for order parameters and the problem of phase transitions in lattice QCD thermodynamics

    The phase structure of lattice SU(N)-chromodynamics is discussed. An effective action for Polyakov lines of quark and baryon condensates is constructed for the Euclidean formulation of theory with naive fermions at finite temperatures and baryon number densities. The behaviour of respective averages and the interrelation between them are studied. 25 refs

  2. The N=4 effective action of type IIA supergravity compactified on SU(2)-structure manifolds

    Danckaert, Thomas; Martínez-Pedrera, Danny; Spanjaard, Bastiaan; Triendl, Hagen

    2011-01-01

    We study compactifications of type IIA supergravity on six-dimensional manifolds with SU(2) structure and compute the low-energy effective action in terms of the non-trivial intrinsic torsion. The consistency with gauged N=4 supergravity is established and the gauge group is determined. Depending on the structure of the intrinsic torsion, antisymmetric tensor fields can become massive.

  3. Characterizing Teaching Effectiveness in the Joint Action Theory in Didactics: An Exploratory Study in Primary School

    Sensevy, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study of two consecutive reading sessions conducted in primary school by two different teachers. Our purpose is twofold. From a theoretical viewpoint, we propose a tentative set of conditions of teaching effectiveness by relying on the Joint Action Theory in Didactics. From a methodological viewpoint, drawing on…

  4. Induced low-energy effective action in the 6D, N = (1 , 0) hypermultiplet theory on the vector multiplet background

    Buchbinder, I. L.; Merzlikin, B. S.; Pletnev, N. G.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the six dimensional N = (1 , 0) hypermultiplet model coupled to an external field of the Abelian vector multiplet in harmonic superspace approach. Using the superfield proper-time technique we find the divergent part of the effective action and derive the complete finite induced low-energy superfield effective action. This effective action depends on external field and contains in bosonic sector all the powers of the constant Maxwell field strength. The obtained result can be treated as the 6D, N = (1 , 0) supersymmetric Heisenberg-Euler type effective action.

  5. Effects of benactyzine on action potentials and contractile force of guinea pig papillary muscles

    2000-01-01

    Aim:To explore the effects of benactyzine (BEN) on the action potential and contractile force in guinea pig papillary muscles.Methods:Conventional microelectrode technique was used to record the fast action potentials (FAP) and slow action potentials (SAP) of guinea pig papillary muscles.Results:Benactyzine 5,10,50 μmol·L-1 suppressed the maximal upstroke velocity (vmax) of FAP and contractile force (Fc) concentration-dependently while prolonged the action potential duration at 50%,90% repolarization (APD50,APD90) and effective refractory period (ERP) of FAP.The suppression on the vmax was frequency-dependent.Benactyzine 5,10,50μmol·L-1 lengthened the APD50,APD90 of SAP induced by isoprenaline or histamine when perfused with KCl 22 mmol·L-1 Tyrode's solution.The vmax of the SAP was not decreased by benactyzine 5,10 μmol·L-1 but by 50 μmol·L-1.The effects on the SAP were antagonized by elevation of the extracellular calcium from 2.0 to 5.6 mmol·L-1.The effects of benactyzine on SAP elicited by tetrodotoxin resembled that by isoprenaline or histamine except the more pronounced suppression on vmax and action potential amplitude (APA).The persistent rapid spontaneous activity and triggered tachyarrhythmia induced by ouabain were also abolished immediately by benactyzine 5 μmol·L-1.Conclusion:Benactyzine can inhibit Na+,K+,Ca2+ transmembrane movement and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in the myocardium,and this may be the electrophysiological basis of its effects against experimental arrhythmias.

  6. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam

    Gorash ZM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor antagonists with benzodiazepines, which may impact the clinical use of alprazolam, was also studied. Behavioral despair was examined in six groups of albino mice. Drugs were administered intraperitoneally. The control group received only a single dose of 1% Tween 80. The second group received a single dose of alprazolam, and the third group received an antagonist followed by alprazolam. The fourth group was treated with imipramine, and the fifth group received an antagonist followed by imipramine. The sixth group was treated with a single dose of an antagonist alone (atenolol, a β1-selective adrenoceptor antagonist; propranolol, a non selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist; and prazocin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Results confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Prazocin treatment alone produced depression, but it significantly potentiated the antidepressant actions of imipramine and alprazolam. Atenolol alone produced an antidepressant effect and potentiated the antidepressant action of alprazolam. Propranolol treatment alone produced depression, and antagonized the effects of alprazolam and imipramine, even producing depression in combined treatments. In conclusion, our results reveal that alprazolam may produce antidepressant effects through the release of noradrenaline, which stimulates β2 receptors to produce an antidepressant action. Imipramine may act by activating β2 receptors by blocking or down-regulating β1 receptors.

  7. THE EFFECTS OF MAINTENANCE ACTIONS ON THE PFDavg OF SPRING OPERATED PRESSURE RELIEF VALVES

    Harris, S.; Gross, R.

    2014-04-01

    The safety integrity level (SIL) of equipment used in safety instrumented functions is determined by the average probability of failure on demand (PFDavg) computed at the time of periodic inspection and maintenance, i.e., the time of proof testing. The computation of PFDavg is generally based solely on predictions or estimates of the assumed constant failure rate of the equipment. However, PFDavg is also affected by maintenance actions (or lack thereof) taken by the end user. This paper shows how maintenance actions can affect the PFDavg of spring operated pressure relief valves (SOPRV) and how these maintenance actions may be accounted for in the computation of the PFDavg metric. The method provides a means for quantifying the effects of changes in maintenance practices and shows how these changes impact plant safety.

  8. Feature activation during word recognition: action, visual, and associative-semantic priming effects

    Kevin J.Y. Lam

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Embodied theories of language postulate that language meaning is stored in modality-specific brain areas generally involved in perception and action in the real world. However, the temporal dynamics of the interaction between modality-specific information and lexical-semantic processing remain unclear. We investigated the relative timing at which two types of modality-specific information (action-based and visual-form information contribute to lexical-semantic comprehension. To this end, we applied a behavioral priming paradigm in which prime and target words were related with respect to (1 action features, (2 visual features, or (3 semantically associative information. Using a Go/No-Go lexical decision task, priming effects were measured across four different inter-stimulus intervals (ISI = 100 ms, 250 ms, 400 ms, and 1,000 ms to determine the relative time course of the different features . Notably, action priming effects were found in ISIs of 100 ms, 250 ms, and 1,000 ms whereas a visual priming effect was seen only in the ISI of 1,000 ms. Importantly, our data suggest that features follow different time courses of activation during word recognition. In this regard, feature activation is dynamic, measurable in specific time windows but not in others. Thus the current study (1 demonstrates how multiple ISIs can be used within an experiment to help chart the time course of feature activation and (2 provides new evidence for embodied theories of language.

  9. Reducing aggressive intergroup action tendencies : effects of intergroup contact via perceived intergroup threat

    Schmid, K.; Hewstone, M.; Küpper, B.; Zick, A.; Tausch, N.

    2014-01-01

    Katharina Schmid and Miles Hewstone gratefully acknowledge support from the Leverhulme Trust that facilitated the writing of this paper. Two studies tested the prediction that more positive intergroup contact would be associated with reduced aggressive intergroup action tendencies, an effect predicted to occur indirectly via reduced intergroup threat perceptions, and over and above well-established effects of contact on intergroup attitudes. Study 1, using data based on a cross-section of ...

  10. Inverse Scattering Method and Soliton Solution Family for String Effective Action

    GAO Ya-Jun

    2009-01-01

    A modified Hauser-Ernst-type linear system is established and used to develop an inverse scattering method for solving the motion equations of the string effective action describing the coupled gravity, dilaton and Kalb-Ramond fields. The reduction procedures in this inverse scattering method are found to be fairly simple, which makes the proposed inverse scattering method applied fine and effective. As an application, a concrete family of soliton solutions for the considered theory is obtained.

  11. Mechanisms of action underlying the antiandrogenic effects of the fungicide prochloraz

    Laier, Peter; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Boberg, Julie; Hagen, Marie; Hass, Ulla; Christiansen, Sofie; Petersen, Marta Axelstad; Kledal, Thuri; Dalgaard, Majken; McKinnell, C.; Brokken, L. J. S.; Vinggaard, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The fungicide prochloraz has got multiple mechanisms of action that may influence the demasculinizing and reproductive toxic effects of the compound. In the present study, Wistar rats were dosed perinatally with prochloraz (50 and 150 mg/kg/day) from gestational day (GD) 7 to postnatal day (PND) ...... prochloraz acts directly on the fetal testis to inhibit steroidogenesis and that this effect is exhibited at protein, and not at genomic, level. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  12. Wess-Zumino-Witten action and photons from the Chiral Magnetic Effect

    Fukushima, Kenji; Mameda, Kazuya

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) using the chiral Lagrangian. We demonstrate that the electric-current formula of the CME is derived immediately from the contact part of the Wess-Zumino-Witten action. This implies that the CME could be, if observed, a signature for the local parity violation, but a direct evidence for neither quark deconfinement nor chiral restoration. We also discuss the reverse Chiral Magnetic Primakoff Effect, i.e. the real photon production through the vertex a...

  13. Mechanism of Action of the Arylomycin Antibiotics and Effects of Signal Peptidase I Inhibition

    Smith, Peter A.; Romesberg, Floyd E.

    2012-01-01

    Clinically approved antibiotics inhibit only a small number of conserved pathways that are essential for bacterial viability, and the physiological effects of inhibiting these pathways have been studied in great detail. Likewise, characterizing the effects of candidate antibiotics that function via novel mechanisms of action is critical for their development, which is of increasing importance due to the ever-growing problem of resistance. The arylomycins are a novel class of natural-product a...

  14. Effect of Action Video Games on the Spatial Distribution of Visuospatial Attention

    Green, C. Shawn; Bavelier, Daphne

    2006-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of action gaming on the spatial distribution of attention. The authors used the flanker compatibility effect to separately assess center and peripheral attentional resources in gamers versus nongamers. Gamers exhibited an enhancement in attentional resources compared with nongamers, not only in the periphery but also in central vision. The authors then used a target localization task to unambiguously establish that gaming enhances the spatial distribution o...

  15. Promoting the translation of intentions into action by implementation intentions: Behavioral effects and physiological correlates

    Frank eWieber

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present review addresses the physiological correlates of planning effects on behavior. Although intentions to act qualify as predictors of behavior, accumulated evidence indicates that there is a substantial gap between even strong intentions and subsequent action. One effective strategy to reduce this intention-behavior gap is the formation of implementation intentions that specify when, where, and how to act on a given goal in an if-then format (If I encounter situation Y, then I will initiate action Z!. It has been proposed that implementation intentions render the mental representation of the situation highly accessible and establish a strong associative link between the mental representations of the situation and the action. These process assumptions have been examined in behavioral research, and in physiological research, a field that has begun to investigate the temporal dynamics of and brain areas involved in implementation intention effects. In the present review, we first summarize studies on the cognitive processes that are central to the strategic automation of action control by implementation intentions. We then examine studies involving critical samples with impaired self-regulation. Lastly, we review studies that have applied physiological measures such as heart rate, cortisol level, and eye movement, as well as electroencephalography (EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies on the neural correlates of implementation intention effects. In support of the assumed processes, implementation intentions increased goal attainment in studies on cognitive processes and in critical samples, modulated brain waves related to perceptual and decision processes, and generated less activity in brain areas associated with effortful action control. In our discussion, we reflect on the status quo of physiological research on implementation intentions, methodological and conceptual issues, related research, and propose future

  16. Mixed Heavy-Light Matching in the Universal One-Loop Effective Action

    Ellis, Sebastian A R; You, Tevong; Zhang, Zhengkang

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a general result for evaluating the path integral at one loop was obtained in the form of the Universal One-Loop Effective Action. It may be used to derive effective field theory operators of dimensions up to six, by evaluating the traces of matrices in this expression, with the mass-dependence encapsulated in the universal coefficients. Here we show that it can account for loops of mixed heavy-light particles in the matching procedure. Our prescription for computing these mixed contributions to the Wilson coefficients is conceptually simple. Moreover it has the advantage of maintaining the universal structure of the effective action, which we illustrate using the example of integrating out a heavy electroweak triplet scalar coupling to a light Higgs doublet. Finally we also identify new structures that were previously neglected in the universal results.

  17. Linear response theory for symmetry improved two particle irreducible effective actions

    Brown, Michael J.; Whittingham, Ian B.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the linear response of an O (N ) scalar quantum field theory subject to external perturbations using the symmetry-improved two-particle irreducible effective action (SI-2PIEA) formalism [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nucl. Phys. B874, 594 (2013)]. Despite satisfactory equilibrium behavior, we find a number of unphysical effects at the linear response level. Goldstone boson field fluctuations are overdetermined, with the only consistent solution being to set the fluctuations and their driving sources to zero, except for momentum modes where the Higgs and Goldstone self-energies obey a particular relationship. Also Higgs field fluctuations propagate masslessly, despite the Higgs propagator having the correct mass. These pathologies are independent of any truncation of the effective action and still exist even if we relax the overdetermining Ward identities, so long as the constraint is formulated O (N ) covariantly. We discuss possible reasons for the apparent incompatibility of the constraints and linear response approximation and possible ways forward.

  18. Linear Response Theory for Symmetry Improved Two Particle Irreducible Effective Actions

    Brown, Michael J; Kosov, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the linear response of an O(N) scalar quantum field theory subject to external perturbations using the symmetry improved two particle irreducible effective action formalism [A. Pilaftsis and D. Teresi, Nucl. Phys. B874, 594 (2013)]. Despite satisfactory equilibrium behavior, we find a number of unphysical effects at the linear response level. Goldstone boson field fluctuations are over-determined, with the only consistent solution being to set the fluctuations and their driving sources to zero, except for momentum modes where the Higgs and Goldstone self-energies obey a particular relationship. Also Higgs field fluctuations propagate masslessly, despite the Higgs propagator having the correct mass. These pathologies are independent of any truncation of the effective action and still exist even if we relax the over-determining Ward identities, so long as the constraint is formulated O(N)-covariantly. We discuss possible reasons for the apparent incompatibility of the constraints and linear respo...

  19. Entrainment and task co-representation effects for discrete and continuous action sequences.

    van der Wel, Robrecht P R D; Fu, En

    2015-12-01

    A large body of work has established an influence of other people's actions on our own actions. For example, actors entrain to the movements of others, in studies that typically employ continuous movements. Likewise, studies on co-representation have shown that people automatically co-represent a co-actor's task, in studies that typically employ discrete actions. Here we examined entrainment and co-representation within a single task paradigm. Participants sat next to a confederate while simultaneously moving their right hand back and forth between two targets. We crossed whether or not the participant and the confederate moved over an obstacle and manipulated whether participants generated discrete or continuous movement sequences, while varying the space between the actors and whether the actors could see each other's movements. Participants moved higher when the confederate cleared an obstacle than when he did not. For continuous movements, this effect depended on the availability of visual information, as would be expected on the basis of entrainment. In contrast, the co-actor's task modulated the height of discrete movements, regardless of the availability of visual information, which is consistent with co-representation. Space did not have an effect. These results provide new insights into the interplay between co-representation and entrainment for discrete- and continuous-action tasks. PMID:25911443

  20. The mechanism of the reaction B10 (d,p) B11 at low deuteron energies

    Excitation functions and angular distributions were measured for the four most energetic proton groups from the reaction B10 (d,p) B11 in the deuteron energy range Ed = 0.8 to 2.4 MeV. The excitation functions for all the measured groups showed no noticeable resonance structure. Spectroscopic factors for the states at 0.00 and 4.46 MeV of B11 were extracted from a DWBA analysis of the angular distributions. The average values of the spectroscopic factors were compared with those predicted theoretically. (orig.)

  1. Kappa-symmetry of superstring sigma model and generalized 10d supergravity equations

    Wulff, L

    2016-01-01

    We determine the constraints imposed on the 10d target superspace geometry by the requirement of classical kappa-symmetry of the Green-Schwarz superstring. In the type I case we find that the background must satisfy a generalization of type I supergravity equations. These equations depend on an arbitrary vector X_a and imply the one-loop scale invariance of the GS sigma model. In the special case when X_a is the gradient of a scalar \\phi (dilaton) one recovers the standard type I equations equivalent to the 2d Weyl invariance conditions of the superstring sigma model. In the type II case we find a generalized version of the 10d supergravity equations the bosonic part of which was introduced in arXiv:1511.05795. These equations depend on two vectors \\X_a and K_a subject to 1st order differential relations (with the equations in the NS-NS sector depending only on the combination X_a = \\X_a + K_a). In the special case of K_a=0 one finds that \\X_a=\\d_a \\phi and thus obtains the standard type II supergravity equat...

  2. Comment on ''Functional integral for Weyl fermions and the effective action''

    Banerjee, R.; Banerjee, H.

    1989-02-15

    Baaklini's method of obtaining the effective action for Weyl fermions is shown to yield either a gauge-invariant or a gauge-variant form depending on the specific definition employed in the analysis. The structures of the effective action proposed by Baaklini are found to correspond to the standard expressions.

  3. Effectiveness and sustainability of remedial actions for land restoration in Abeokuta urban communities, Ogun State, Nigeria

    Lawal-Adebowale, Okanlade

    2016-04-01

    Land as a major collective human property faces a great deal of threats and eventual degradation from both natural and human causal factors across the globe. But for the central role of land in human's sustenance and quality living, man cannot afford to lose its natural asset and as such takes mitigating or remedial actions to save and restore his land for sustainable use. In view of this, the study assessed the causal factors of land degradation in urban areas of Abeokuta and effectiveness and sustainability of the taken remedial actions to stem the tide of land degradation in the study area. The selected communities were purposively selected based on the observed prevalence of degraded lands in the areas. A qualitative research approach which encompasses observational techniques - participant/field observation, interactive discussion and photographic capturing, was used for collection of data on land degradation in the study area. A combination of phenomenological, inductive thematic analysis and conversation/discourse analysis was employed for data analysis. The results showed land gradients/slopes, rainfall, run-offs/erosion, land-entrenched foot impacts, sand scraping/mining, poor/absence of drainage system and land covers as causal factors of land degradation in the study area. The employed remedial actions for restoration of degraded land included filling of drenches with sand bags, wood logs, bricks and stones, and sand filling. The study though observed that filling of drenches caused by erosion with rubles/stones and construction of drainage were effective remedial actions, good drainage system was presumed to be the most appropriate and sustainable remedial action for land restoration in the study area.

  4. Exact solution for a quantum field with delta-like interaction effective action and UV renormalization

    Solodukhin, S N

    1999-01-01

    A quantum field described by the field operator $\\Delta_{\\bf a}=\\Delta+{\\bf a}\\delta_\\Sigma$ involving a $\\delta$-like potential is considered. Mathematically, the treatment of the $\\delta$-potential is based on the theory of self-adjoint extension of the unperturbed operator $\\Delta$. We give the general expressions for the resolvent and the heat kernel of the perturbed operator $\\Delta_{\\bf a}$. The main attention is payed to $d=2$ We calculate exactly the heat kernel, Green's functions and the effective action for the operator $\\Delta_{\\bf a}$ in diverse dimensions and for various spaces $\\Sigma$. The renormalization phenomenon for the coupling constant $\\bf a$ of $d=2$ and $d=3$ $\\delta$-potentials is observed. We find the non-perturbative behavior of the effective action with respect to the renormalized coupling ${\\bf a}_{ren}$.

  5. A note on scaling arguments in the effective average action formalism

    Pagani, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The effective average action (EAA) is a scale dependent effective action where a scale $k$ is introduced via an infrared regulator. The $k-$dependence of the EAA is governed by an exact flow equation to which one associates a boundary condition at a scale $\\mu$. We show that the $\\mu-$dependence of the EAA is controlled by an equation fully analogous to the Callan-Symanzik equation which allows to define scaling quantities straightforwardly. Particular attention is paid to composite operators which are introduced along with new sources. We discuss some simple solutions to the flow equation for composite operators and comment their implications in the case of a local potential approximation.

  6. Supplemental action learning workshops: Understanding the effects of independent and cooperative workshops on students' knowledge

    Morris, Kathryn Michelle

    Community colleges enroll more than half of the undergraduate population in the United States, thereby retaining students of varying demographics with extracurricular demands differing from traditional four-year university students. Often in a collegiate lecture course, students are limited in their abilities to absorb and process information presented by their instructors due to content-specific cognitive gaps between the instructor and the student (Preszler, 2009). Research has shown that implementation of instructor-facilitated action learning workshops as supplemental instruction may help bridge these cognitive gaps allowing better student conceptualization and dissemination of knowledge (Drake, 2011; Fullilove & Treisman, 1990; Preszler, 2009; Udovic, Morris, Dickman, Postlethwait, & Wetherwax, 2002). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of cooperative action learning workshops and independent action learning workshops on students' knowledge of specified topics within a General Biology I with lab course. The results of this investigation indicate that implementation of an instructor-facilitated action learning workshop did not affect students' knowledge gain; furthermore, attendance of a particular workshop style (independent or cooperative) did not affect students' knowledge gain.

  7. Effect of intrathecal baclofen on the monosynaptic reflex in humans: evidence for a postsynaptic action.

    Azouvi, P; Roby-Brami, A.; Biraben, A; Thiebaut, J B; Thurel, C; Bussel, B

    1993-01-01

    Intrathecal baclofen is a very powerful antispastic agent. Its mechanism of action on the monosynaptic H-reflex in spinal patients was investigated. It could inhibit rapidly and profoundly monosynaptic reflexes in lower limbs, but did not modify Ia vibratory inhibition of the soleus H-reflex. To assess more precisely its effect on Ia afferents, an experimental paradigm using Ia heteronymous facilitation of the soleus H-reflex was used. Intrathecal baclofen did not modify the amount of monosyn...

  8. Radiological effects of Chernobylsk-4 reactor accident and preventive measures to decrease its action

    Analysis of radiological effects of Chernobylsk-4 reactor accident in the USSR and preventive measures to decrease its action are given. Systematic medical examination of population and radiation situation in settlements of contaminated area confirmed efficiency of carried out preventive and protective measures. They include decontamination of settlements, removal of children and pregnant women for summer period rest, regular medical examination of local food-stuff, prohibition of conteminated food-stuff usage

  9. On the application of the effective action approach to amplitudes with reggeon splitting

    Application of the effective action approach to amplitudes with loop integration is studied for collisions on two and three centers with possible gluon emission. A rule is formulated for the integration around pole singularities in the induced vertices which brings the results in agreement with the QCD. It is demonstrated that the amplitudes can be restored from the purely transverse picture by introducing the standard Feynman propagators for intermediate gluons and quarks. (orig.)

  10. Low energy effective action on a self-gravitating D-brane

    Onda, S; Koyama, K; Hayakawa, S; Onda, Sumitada; Shiromizu, Tetsuya; Koyama, Kazuya; Hayakawa, Shoko

    2003-01-01

    Recently the study of braneworld on the self-gravitating D-brane has been initiated and derived the gravitational equation on the brane by holographic and geometrical projection methods. Surprisingly, in common with these two methods, the matter on the brane cannot be the source of the gravity on the brane at leading order. In this paper we will propose the low energy effective action on the D-brane coupled with gravity which derives the same results.

  11. The action of mimetic peptides on connexins protects fibroblasts from the negative effects of ischemia reperfusion

    Beverley J. Glass; Rebecca G. Hu; Anthony R. J. Phillips; Becker, David L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Connexins have been proposed as a target for therapeutic treatment of a variety of conditions. The main approaches have been by antisense or small peptides specific against connexins. Some of these peptides enhance communication while others interfere with connexin binding partners or bind to the intracellular and extracellular loops of connexins. Here, we explored the mechanism of action of a connexin mimetic peptide by evaluating its effect on gap junction channels, connexin protei...

  12. An Investigation into the Mutagenic Effect of Urban Dust under Its Chronic Action on Laboratory Animals

    Manara A. Mukasheva; Kirill O. Osipov; Sabina D. Makisheva

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the action of soil dust in the city of Balkhash in an experiment on laboratory animals. In the city of Balkhash, 35 % of its territory is characterized by a dangerous, to various extents, level of soil pollution. The rest of the city’s territory has demonstrated increased (supra-background) concentrations of toxic elements. The findings obtained in the course of the study attest to the adverse effect of the chemical composition of soil dust in ecogenetic disturbances of ...

  13. The pressure of QED from the two-loop 2PI effective action

    Borsanyi, Szabolcs; Reinosa, Urko

    2007-01-01

    We compute the pressure of hot quantum electrodynamics from the two-loop truncation of the 2PI effective action. Since the 2PI resummation guarantees gauge-fixing independence only up to the order of the truncation, our result for the pressure presents a gauge dependent contribution of O(e^4). We numerically characterize the credibility of this gauge-dependent calculation and find that the uncertainty due to gauge parameter dependence is under control for xi

  14. Effects of action of ultrasound with capsaicin in the treatment of post traumatic pathology

    Ioan OSWALD

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous methods of administering drugs to the body,both passive and active. A recent review of the literature on phonophoresis reports that 75 % of the studies reviewed reported positive effects, ultrasound energy with drugs like gel or cream can travel through body tissue. Capsaicin was the active ingredient in hot chilli peppers has selection actions on unmyelinated C fibres and thinly myelinated A primary sensory neurones.

  15. Induced parity violating thermal effective action for (2+1)-dimensional fermions interacting with a non-Abelian background

    We study the parity breaking effective action in 2+1 dimensions, generated, at finite temperature, by massive fermions interacting with a non-Abelian gauge background. We explicitly calculate, in the static limit, parity violating amplitudes up to the seven point function, which allows us to determine the corresponding effective actions. There are two classes of such actions that arise: namely, terms that do not manifestly depend on E(vector sign) and ones that do. We derive the exact effective action that is not manifestly dependent on E(vector sign). For the other class that depends explicitly on E(vector sign), there are families of terms that can be determined order by order in perturbation theory. We attempt to generalize our results to nonstatic backgrounds through the use of time ordered exponentials and prove gauge invariance, both small and large, of the resulting effective action. We also point out some open questions that need to be further understood

  16. New Insights into the Mechanisms of Action of Cotinine and its Distinctive Effects from Nicotine.

    Grizzell, J Alex; Echeverria, Valentina

    2015-10-01

    Tobacco consumption is far higher among a number of psychiatric and neurological diseases, supporting the notion that some component(s) of tobacco may underlie the oft-reported reduction in associated symptoms during tobacco use. Popular dogma holds that this component is nicotine. However, increasing evidence support theories that cotinine, the main metabolite of nicotine, may underlie at least some of nicotine's actions in the nervous system, apart from its adverse cardiovascular and habit forming effects. Though similarities exist, disparate and even antagonizing actions between cotinine and nicotine have been described both in terms of behavior and physiology, underscoring the need to further characterize this potentially therapeutic compound. Cotinine has been shown to be psychoactive in humans and animals, facilitating memory, cognition, executive function, and emotional responding. Furthermore, recent research shows that cotinine acts as an antidepressant and reduces cognitive-impairment associated with disease and stress-induced dysfunction. Despite these promising findings, continued focus on this potentially safe alternative to tobacco and nicotine use is lacking. Here, we review the effects of cotinine, including comparisons with nicotine, and discuss potential mechanisms of cotinine-specific actions in the central nervous system which are, to date, still being elucidated. PMID:24970109

  17. Acute effects of specific actions after the “on your marks” command

    IOANNIS KESOGLOU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Improved temporal sequencing of high – intensity muscle contractions prior to the sprint start may maximize motoneuron excitability and may enhance fast twitch fiber recruitment and sprint start effectiveness. The aim of the study was to assess a the electromyographic activity of the gastrocnemius lateralis, biceps femoris and vastus femoris muscles under exposure to specific voluntary, dynamic actions (quick skipping or tuck jumps that sometimes sprinters perform after the “on your marks” command and to an external involuntary stimulus (WBV-whole body vibration and b the effectiveness of the above stimuli applied on the activation level of lower limb muscles in order to produce neuromuscular activation the very last moment just behind the blocks, as this is measured by the RT and time in 1.5m and 3m after the sprint start.Ten male sprinters executed sprint starts under 4 experimental conditions after the “on your marks command”: 1st condition – without performing any action, 2nd performing tuck jumps, 3rd performing quick skipping and 4th after being exposed to vibration stimuli. No significant difference in average muscle activity was observed after evaluation of the EMG raw data for the tuck jumps and quick skipping actions. No significant differences were, also, observed for RT and time in 1.5m and 3m in conditions 2 to 4.

  18. Learning to control actions: transfer effects following a procedural cognitive control computerized training.

    Nitzan Shahar

    Full Text Available Few studies have addressed action control training. In the current study, participants were trained over 19 days in an adaptive training task that demanded constant switching, maintenance and updating of novel action rules. Participants completed an executive functions battery before and after training that estimated processing speed, working memory updating, set-shifting, response inhibition and fluid intelligence. Participants in the training group showed greater improvement than a no-contact control group in processing speed, indicated by reduced reaction times in speeded classification tasks. No other systematic group differences were found across the different pre-post measurements. Ex-Gaussian fitting of the reaction-time distribution revealed that the reaction time reduction observed among trained participants was restricted to the right tail of the distribution, previously shown to be related to working memory. Furthermore, training effects were only found in classification tasks that required participants to maintain novel stimulus-response rules in mind, supporting the notion that the training improved working memory abilities. Training benefits were maintained in a 10-month follow-up, indicating relatively long-lasting effects. The authors conclude that training improved action-related working memory abilities.

  19. High efficiency, blue emitting materials based on phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazole derivatives

    Jayabharathi, J., E-mail: jtchalam2005@yahoo.co.in; Sathishkumar, R.; Thanikachalam, V.; Jayamoorthy, K.

    2014-09-15

    The blue light emitting materials based on a fluoro phenanthro [9,10-d] imidazole derivatives prepared by a facial synthetic process exhibit good thermal stability, highly efficient fluorescence and balanced carrier injection. The multi-layered device based on fluoro phenanthroimidazole derivatives shows a higher luminance in a lower turn-on voltage. The device performance implies that the phenanthroimidazole unit is an excellent building block for tuning the carrier injection properties as well as blue emission. - Highlights: • Phenanthroimidazole exhibits high T{sub m} and T{sub d5} values, fluorescent efficiency, preparation cost and charge injection property. • The carrier injection and transport ability can be evidenced from the hole-only and electron-only devices. • These materials are used as building block for efficient blue light emitting materials. • Chemical structure modification improving the materials' properties.

  20. High efficiency, blue emitting materials based on phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazole derivatives

    The blue light emitting materials based on a fluoro phenanthro [9,10-d] imidazole derivatives prepared by a facial synthetic process exhibit good thermal stability, highly efficient fluorescence and balanced carrier injection. The multi-layered device based on fluoro phenanthroimidazole derivatives shows a higher luminance in a lower turn-on voltage. The device performance implies that the phenanthroimidazole unit is an excellent building block for tuning the carrier injection properties as well as blue emission. - Highlights: • Phenanthroimidazole exhibits high Tm and Td5 values, fluorescent efficiency, preparation cost and charge injection property. • The carrier injection and transport ability can be evidenced from the hole-only and electron-only devices. • These materials are used as building block for efficient blue light emitting materials. • Chemical structure modification improving the materials' properties

  1. Some biochemical effects of partial body irradiation in case of combined radiation action

    ATPase and creatinkinase activity of water extracts from the brain, liver and spleen of rats has been studied 5, 12, 19 and 26 days after X-irradiation (50 R) of the whole body, anterior one-third and hind two-thirds of the body, and external β-irradiation (Kr85, 3.05 krads) delivered separately and in a combination. It has been shown that under conditions, partial exposures are comparable by their biochemical effectiveness to the action of the whole-body irradiation. The combined exposure was, on the whole, less effective than separate ones

  2. Some problems of biological effects under the combined action of nitrogen oxides, their metabolites and radiation

    The progress of power engineering envisages the intensive construction of nuclear-energy plants, where an organic or nuclear fuel is used. Nowadays the concept of nuclear-energy plant with the coolant based on dissociating N2O4 is being developed. A great deal of radioactive and chemical products escapes into surroundings as the result of the power plants being in service. Their action on organisms is performed simultaneously, that could have an essential effect on the quantitative and qualitative regularities of response. The estimation of the combined effect of nitrogen oxides, sodium nitrite and nitrate and radiation has been carried out on the base of the investigation into methemoglobin formation, genetic effects and the pathomorphological changes in lungs. The formation of methemoglobin has been studied on rats in 1, 3, 7 and 15 days after the single total irradiation of 300 and 700 R doses at the gamma-installation (UGU-420) using a radioactive 60Co. Methemoglobin was determined in the interval of 15-180 min after NaNO2 administration in the dosage of 7.0 mg per 100 g body weight. The irradiation essentially affects the process of methemoglobin formation and its reduction. The methemoglobin content in the blood of radiation exposed animals exceeds the value, that could be expected to obtain by summing up its concentration under the separate effects of nitrite and irradiation. The genetic effects of sodium nitrite and nitrate and X-radiation have been studied on the Drosophila. The one-day flies were exposed to the radiation dose of 1500 R in the medium with the sodium nitrite or nitrate contents of 0.1 or 1.0 g/l, respectively. The combined action estimated through the frequency of the dominant lethal mutation, recessive coupled with a lethal mutation sex, viability and fecundity definitely differs from the expected summing values of the separate effect indices of radiation and toxic factors. The morpho- and functional changes in the rat lungs (the

  3. On modelling of physical effects accompanying the propagation of action potentials in nerve fibres

    Engelbrecht, Jüri; Tamm, Kert; Laasmaa, Martin; Vendelin, Marko

    2016-01-01

    The recent theoretical and experimental studies have revealed many details of signal propagation in nervous systems. In this paper an attempt is made to unify various mathematical models which describe the signal propagation in nerve fibres. The analysis of existing single models permits to select the leading physiological effects. As a result, a more general mathematical model is described based on the coupling of action potentials with mechanical waves in a nerve fibre. The crucial issue is how to model coupling effects which are strongly linked to the ion currents through biomembranes.

  4. Effects of terpineol on the compound action potential of the rat sciatic nerve

    M.R. Moreira; G.M.P. Cruz; Lopes, M S; A.A.C. Albuquerque; J.H. Leal-Cardoso

    2001-01-01

    Terpineol, a volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity, is widely used in the perfumery industry. It is an important chemical constituent of the essential oil of many plants with widespread applications in folk medicine and in aromatherapy. The effects of terpineol on the compound action potential (CAP) of rat sciatic nerve were studied. Terpineol induced a dose-dependent blockade of the CAP. At 100 µM, terpineol had no demonstrable effect. At 300 µM terpineol, peak-to-peak amplitude and con...

  5. The cognition-enhancing effects of psychostimulants involve direct action in the prefrontal cortex.

    Spencer, Robert C; Devilbiss, David M; Berridge, Craig W

    2015-06-01

    Psychostimulants are highly effective in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The clinical efficacy of these drugs is strongly linked to their ability to improve cognition dependent on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and extended frontostriatal circuit. The procognitive actions of psychostimulants are only associated with low doses. Surprisingly, despite nearly 80 years of clinical use, the neurobiology of the procognitive actions of psychostimulants has only recently been systematically investigated. Findings from this research unambiguously demonstrate that the cognition-enhancing effects of psychostimulants involve the preferential elevation of catecholamines in the PFC and the subsequent activation of norepinephrine α2 and dopamine D1 receptors. In contrast, while the striatum is a critical participant in PFC-dependent cognition, where examined, psychostimulant action within the striatum is not sufficient to enhance cognition. At doses that moderately exceed the clinical range, psychostimulants appear to improve PFC-dependent attentional processes at the expense of other PFC-dependent processes (e.g., working memory, response inhibition). This differential modulation of PFC-dependent processes across dose appears to be associated with the differential involvement of noradrenergic α2 versus α1 receptors. Collectively, this evidence indicates that at low, clinically relevant doses, psychostimulants are devoid of the behavioral and neurochemical actions that define this class of drugs and instead act largely as cognitive enhancers (improving PFC-dependent function). This information has potentially important clinical implications as well as relevance for public health policy regarding the widespread clinical use of psychostimulants and for the development of novel pharmacologic treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and other conditions associated with PFC dysregulation. PMID:25499957

  6. Cellular action of cholecystokinin-8S-mediated excitatory effects in the rat periaqueductal gray.

    Yang, Yu-Mi; Chung, Jun-Mo; Rhim, Hyewhon

    2006-09-27

    The peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) is one of the major neurotransmitters modulating satiety, nociception, and anxiety behavior. Although many behavioral studies showing anti-analgesic and anxiogenic actions of CCK have been reported, less is known about its cellular action in the central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, we examined the action of CCK in rat dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (PAG) neurons using slice preparations and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Application of CCK-8S produced an inward current accompanied by increased spontaneous synaptic activities. The CCK-8S-induced inward current (I(CCK)) was recovered after washout and reproduced by multiple exposures. Current-voltage plots revealed that I(CCK) reversed near the equilibrium potential for K(+) ions with a decreased membrane conductance. When several K(+) channel blockers were used, application of CdCl(2), TEA, or apamin significantly reduced I(CCK). I(CCK) was also significantly reduced by the CCK(2) receptor antagonist, L-365,260, while it was not affected by the CCK(1) receptor antagonist, L-364,718. Furthermore, we examined the effects of CCK-8S on miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in order to determine the mechanism of CCK-mediated increase on synaptic activities. We found that CCK-8S increased the frequency of mEPSCs, but had no effect on mEPSC amplitude. This presynaptic effect persisted in the presence of CdCl(2) or Ca(2+)-free bath solution, but was completely abolished by pre-treatment with BAPTA-AM, thapsigargin or L-365,260. Taken together, our results indicate that CCK can excite PAG neurons at both pre- and postsynaptic loci via the activation of CCK(2) receptors. These effects may be important for the effects of CCK on behavior and autonomic function that are mediated via PAG neurons. PMID:16797032

  7. Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-like models and the low-energy effective action of QCD

    We present a derivation of the low-energy effective action of an extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (ENJL) model to O(p4) in the chiral counting. Two alternative scenarios are considered on how the ENJL model could originate as a low-energy approximation to QCD. The low-energy effective lagrangian we derive includes the usual pseudoscalar Goldstone models, as well as the lower scalar, vector and axial-vector degrees of freedom. By taking appropriate limits, we recover most of the effective low-energy models discussed in the literature; in particular the gauged Yang-Mills vector lagrangian, the Georgi-Manohar constituent quark-meson model, and the QCD effective action approach model. Another property of the ensuing effective lagrangian is that it incorporates most of the short-distance relations which follow from QCD. (We derive these relations in the presence of all possible gluonic interactions to leading order in the 1/Nc expansion.) Finally the numerical predictions are compared with the experimental values of the low-energy parameters. (orig.)

  8. UV action spectra for mammalian systems: their implications for the predicted effects of ozone depletion on skin cancer incidence

    The predicted environmental effect of UV-B depend on the action spectrum for the response studied. Since such spectra change rapidly - usually decreasing with increasing wavelength - and since the biological effects depend on the product of the action spectrum and the sun's spectrum at the surface of the earth which decreases with decreasing wavelength, a slight change in action spectrum will markedly influence the predicted effects of ozone depletion on biological systems. Thus, the key, but by no means only step in the prediction, is a knowledge of the action spectrum. Unfortunately, it is rare that we know or even hope to know the spectrum for biological systems of interest such as skin cancer induction, nor is it possible to do experiments with solar simulators on many systems. Hence, we must base our predictions on the photobiological properties of simple systems and the knowledge of their action spectra and general biological theories connecting simple cells with higher organisms

  9. Effect of Sr90 and ethanol on work ability in case of combined and separate action of these factors

    Effect of 90Sr and ethanol on workability of white mice males in long-term experiment is studied. It is shown that dynamic workability is decreased to a greater extent at 90Sr effect than at ethanol one. The data on predominance of the effects of combined action of these factors are obtained. Differences in time regularities of dose-effect dependence for the studied factors make it difficult to get a unique answer to the question about the character of combined action. By most factors a slight increase of combined radionuclide and ethanol effect in the end of experiment, as well as accelerated decrease of muscular work, are detected. Lower radionuclide doses hat no effect on the value of combined action that is totally referred to ethanol action

  10. 20 CFR 266.12 - Effect of matters or actions submitted or taken by legal guardian, etc.

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effect of matters or actions submitted or taken by legal guardian, etc. 266.12 Section 266.12 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD... submitted or taken by legal guardian, etc. All matters and actions in connection with an annuity...

  11. Tetrandrine and related bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloids from medicinal herbs: cardiovascular effects and mechanisms of action

    Chiu-Yin KWAN; FI ACHIKE

    2002-01-01

    Tetrandrine (TET), a bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid purified and identified an active ingredient in a Chinese medicinal herb, Radix Stephanae tetrandrae, has been used traditionally for the treatment of congestive circulatory disorder and inflammatory diseases. TET, together with a few of its structural analogues, has long been demonstrated to have antihypertensive action in clinical as well as animal studies. Presumably, the primary anti-hypertensive action of TET is due to its vasodilatory properties. TET prevents or inhibits vascular contraction induced by membrane depolarization with KCl or α-adrenoceptor activation with phenylephrine (PE). TET (30 μmol/L) also inhibits the release of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) as well as NO production by inducible NO synthase.TET apparently inhibits multiple Ca2+ entry pathways as demonstrated in cell types lacking the L-type Ca2+ channels.In cardiac muscle cells, TET inhibits both L- and T-type Ca2+ channels. In addition to its actions on cardiovascular tissues, TET may also exert its anti-hypertensive action via a Ca2+-dependent manner on other tissues intimately involved in the modulation of blood pressure control, such as adrenal glands. In adrenal glomerulosa cells, KCl- or angiotensin II-induced aldosterone synthesis is highly dependent on extracellular Ca2+. Steroidogenesis and Ca2+-influx in bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells have been shown to be potently inhibited by TET. In bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, TET inhibits Ca2+ currents via L- and N-type channels as well as other unidentified channels with IC50 of 10 μmol/L. Other than the Ca2+ antagonistic effects, TET also interacts with the α-adrenergic receptors and muscarinic receptors based on functional as well as radioligand binding studies. Apart from its functional effects,TET and related compounds also exert effects on tissue structures, such as remodelling of hypertrophied heart and inhibition of angiogenesis, probably by causing apoptotic

  12. The high energy behavior of QCD. The effective action and the triple-Pomeron-vertex

    Hentschinski, Martin

    2009-07-15

    We study integrations over light-cone momenta in the high energy effective action of QCD. After a brief review of the effective action, we arrive on a regularization mechanism from matching of effective action diagrams with QCD diagrams, which we apply to a re-derivation of the reggeized gluon and of the BFKL-equation. We study consequences of the proposed regularization on the analytic structure of 2{yields}3 and 2{yields}4 production amplitudes in the Multi-Regge-Kinematics. We derive a certain part of the 1-loop corrections to the production vertex and demonstrate that they yield the on-set of corrections demanded by the Steinmann-relations. The Reggeon-Particle-2-Reggeon vertex is determined and applied to the construction of various signature configurations of the production amplitudes. We extend the proposed regularization method to states of three and four reggeized gluons and propose a supplement to the effective Lagrangian. We derive vertices for the 1-3 and 2-4 reggeized-gluon-transition inside the elastic amplitude and verify that signature conservation is obeyed. Integral equations for the state of three and four reggeized gluons are formulated and shown to be in accordance with a result by Bartels and Wuesthoff. In a second part we investigate the high-energy behavior of QCD for different surface topologies of color graphs. After a brief review of the planar limit (bootstrap and gluon reggeization) and of the cylinder topology (BFKL) we investigate the 3{yields}3 scattering in the triple Regge limit which belongs to the pair-of-pants topology. We re-derive the triple Pomeron vertex function and show that it belongs to a specific set of graphs in color space which we identify as the analog of the Mandelstam diagram. We then extend the study to the high-energy behavior of N=4 SYM where we find a new class of color graphs not present in QCD. (orig.)

  13. Gauge Coupling Field, Currents, Anomalies and N=1 Super-Yang-Mills Effective Actions

    Ambrosetti, Nicola; Derendinger, Jean-Pierre; Hartog, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    Working with a gauge coupling field in a linear superfield, we construct effective Lagrangians for N=1 super-Yang-Mills theory fully compatible with the expected all-order behaviour or physical quantities. Using the one-loop dependence on its ultraviolet cutoff and anomaly matching or cancellation of R and dilatation anomalies, we obtain the Wilsonian effective Lagrangian. With similar anomaly matching or cancellation methods, we derive the effective action for gaugino condensates, as a function of the real coupling field. Both effective actions lead to a derivation of the NSVZ beta function from algebraic arguments only. The extension of results to N=2 theories or to matter systems is briefly considered. The main tool for the discussion of anomalies is a generic supercurrent structure with 16_B+16_F operators (the S multiplet), which we derive using superspace identities and field equations for a fully general gauge theory Lagrangian with the linear gauge coupling superfield, and with various U(1)_R currents...

  14. Improving Conservation Community Group Effectiveness Using Mind Mapping and Action Research

    Hanabeth Luke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a case study where mind mapping is used within an action research project to foster improved community group effectiveness and decision-making. The case study focusses on the social dynamics experienced during the formative stage of a community action group in Byron Bay, New South Wales; one of a network of such groups, formed to ensure that sustainable environmental management practices are followed in proposed coal-seam gas developments. In the context of examining systemic social interactions within such a group, the study recognises both the importance of communication and the susceptibility of individuals to certain behavioural patterns. Negative emergent norms led to excessive behaviours that threatened to hinder effective communication and group behaviour. Use of mind mapping countered this negative tendency, focussing the inherent positive qualities of the group, and thus enabling more efficient decision-making. Shown to be an effective tool for overcoming communication barriers and increasing cohesion; its power lies in maintaining process transparency, removing power-structures and ego-centric personal barriers, hence facilitating effective communal knowledge sharing, clarification, idea crystallisation, and planning.

  15. Effect of dimerization on the mechanism of action of aurein 1.2.

    Lorenzón, E N; Riske, K A; Troiano, G F; Da Hora, G C A; Soares, T A; Cilli, E M

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides depends on physicochemical properties such as structure, concentration, and oligomerization. Here, we focused on the effect of dimerization on the mechanism of action of aurein 1.2 (AU). We designed a lysine-linked AU dimer, (AU)2K, and its interaction with membrane mimetics was studied using four biophysical techniques and molecular dynamics simulations. Circular dichroism and molecular dynamics studies showed that AU displayed a typical spectrum for disordered structures in aqueous solution whereas (AU)2K exhibited the typical spectrum of α-helices in a coiled-coil conformation, wherein helices are wrapped around each other. With the addition of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs), AU adopted an α-helix structure whereas the coiled-coil structure of (AU)2K assumed an extended conformation. Carboxyfluorescein release experiments with LUVs showed that both peptides were able to permeabilize vesicles although the leakage response to increases in peptide concentration differed. Optical microscopy experiments showed that both peptides induced pore opening and the dimer eventually caused the vesicles to burst. Finally, calorimetric traces determined by isothermal titration calorimetry on the LUVs also showed significant differences in peptide-membrane interactions. Together, the results of our study demonstrated that dimerization changes the mechanism of action of AU. PMID:26874207

  16. A functional approach to quantum friction: effective action and dissipative force

    Farías, M Belén; Lombardo, Fernando C; Mazzitelli, Francisco D; López, Adrián E Rubio

    2014-01-01

    We study the Casimir friction due to the relative, uniform, lateral motion of two parallel mirrors coupled to a vacuum real scalar field, $\\phi$. We follow a functional approach, whereby nonlocal terms in the action for $\\phi$, concentrated on the mirrors' locii, appear after functional integration of the microscopic degrees of freedom. This action for $\\phi$, which incorporates the relevant properties of the mirrors, is then used as the starting point for two complementary evaluations: Firstly, we calculate the { in-out} effective action for the system, which develops an imaginary part, hence a non-vanishing probability for the decay (because of friction) of the initial vacuum state. Secondly, we evaluate another observable: the vacuum expectation value of the frictional force, using the { in-in} or Closed Time Path formalism. Explicit results are presented for zero-width mirrors and half-spaces, in a model where the microscopic degrees of freedom at the mirrors are a set of identical quantum harmonic oscill...

  17. The effect of whole body irradiation on the action of strong analgesics of mice

    The effect of whole body irradiation of male mice with single doses of 3 and 7 Gy (60Co source) on analgesic action of three morphine-like drugs was studied. Over the first 6 days after irradiation, the analgesic effect of alfentanil and fentanyl was significantly less pronounced in irradiated animals than in control ones. During the subsequent period of 24 days till the end of experiment, the analgesic effect in irradiated animals gradually increased reaching and exceeding the control values. On the contrary, the analgesic effect of butorphanole was less pronounced in irradiated animals than in control ones, although the difference was not significantly. The difference between butorphanole and other two drugs are probably due to chemical structure and the metabolic fate in the body. (author) 8 refs.; 2 figs

  18. Effects of Calcium Channel Blockers on Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam and Imipramine

    Gorash ZM

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is effective as an anxiolytic and in the adjunct treatment of depression. In this study, the effects of calcium channel antagonists on the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine were investigated. A forced swimming maze was used to study behavioral despair in albino mice. Mice were divided into nine groups (n = 7 per group. One group received a single dose of 1% Tween 80; two groups each received a single dose of the antidepressant alone (alprazolam or imipramine; two groups each received a single dose of the calcium channel blocker (nifedipine or verapamil; four groups each received a single dose of the calcium channel blocker followed by a single dose of the antidepressant (with same doses used for either in the previous four groups. Drug administration was performed concurrently on the nine groups. Our data confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Both nifedipine and verapamil produced a significant antidepressant effect (delay the onset of immobility when administered separately. Verapamil augmented the antidepressant effects of alprazolam and imipramine (additive antidepressant effect. This may be due to the possibility that verapamil might have antidepressant-like effect through different mechanism. Nifedipine and imipramine combined led to a delay in the onset of immobility greater than their single use but less than the sum of their independent administration. This may be due to the fact that nifedipine on its own might act as an antidepressant but blocks one imipramine mechanism that depends on L-type calcium channel activation. Combining nifedipine with alprazolam produced additional antidepressant effects, which indicates that they exert antidepressant effects through different mechanisms.

  19. Mediobasal Hypothalamic SIRT1 Is Essential for Resveratrol’s Effects on Insulin Action in Rats

    Knight, Colette M.; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Lam, Tony K.T.; Arrieta-Cruz, Isabel; Huang, Loli; Schwartz, Gary; Barzilai, Nir; Rossetti, Luciano

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and its activator resveratrol are emerging as major regulators of metabolic processes. We investigate the site of resveratrol action on glucose metabolism and the contribution of SIRT1 to these effects. Because the arcuate nucleus in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) plays a pivotal role in integrating peripheral metabolic responses to nutrients and hormones, we examined whether the actions of resveratrol are mediated at the MBH. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Sprague Dawley (SD) male rats received acute central (MBH) or systemic injections of vehicle, resveratrol, or SIRT1 inhibitor during basal pancreatic insulin clamp studies. To delineate the pathway(s) by which MBH resveratrol modulates hepatic glucose production, we silenced hypothalamic SIRT1 expression using a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) inhibited the hypothalamic ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel with glibenclamide, or selectively transected the hepatic branch of the vagus nerve while infusing resveratrol centrally. RESULTS Our studies show that marked improvement in insulin sensitivity can be elicited by acute administration of resveratrol to the MBH or during acute systemic administration. Selective inhibition of hypothalamic SIRT1 using a cell-permeable SIRT1 inhibitor or SIRT1-shRNA negated the effect of central and peripheral resveratrol on glucose production. Blockade of the KATP channel and hepatic vagotomy significantly attenuated the effect of central resveratrol on hepatic glucose production. In addition, we found no evidence for hypothalamic AMPK activation after MBH resveratrol administration. CONCLUSIONS Taken together, these studies demonstrate that resveratrol improves glucose homeostasis mainly through a central SIRT1-dependent pathway and that the MBH is a major site of resveratrol action. PMID:21896928

  20. Perturbative Computation of the Gluonic Effective Action via Polyaokov's World-Line Path Integral

    Avramis, S D; Ktorides, C N

    2002-01-01

    The Polyakov world-line path integral describing the propagation of gluon field quanta is constructed by employing the background gauge fixing method and is subsequently applied to analytically compute the divergent terms of the one (gluonic) loop effective action to fourth order in perturbation theory. The merits of the proposed approach is that, to a given order, it reduces to performing two integrations, one over a set of Grassmann and one over a set of Feynman-type parameters through which one manages to accomodate all Feynman diagrams entering the computation at once.

  1. Antimicrobial compounds targeting Gram-negative bacteria in food: Their mode of action and combinational effects

    Hyldgaard, Morten

    2015-01-01

    interact with bacterial cells to exert their mechanism of inhibition or killing. Furthermore, natural antimicrobials are often not potent enough as single compounds, and may cause unwanted sensory side-effects, which limit the quantities that can be applied to food. These problems might be circumvented by...... charged phospholipid head groups, which induced a negative curvature folding of the membrane leading to formation of vesicles or micelles. The second project concerned the mechanism of action of the essential oil constituent isoeugenol against L. innocua and E. coli. This study demonstrated that...

  2. Effects of Potassium Currents upon Action Potential of Cardiac Cells Exposed to External Electric fields

    An-Ying Zhang; Xiao-Feng Pang

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies show that exposure to high-voltage electric fields would influence the electro cardiogram both in experimental animate and human beings. The effects of the external electric fields upon action potential of cardiac cells are studied in this paper based on the dynamical model, LR91. Fourth order Runger-Kuta is used to analyze the change of potassium ion channels exposed to external electric fields in detail. Results indicate that external electric fields could influence the current of potassium ion by adding an induced component voltage on membrane. This phenomenon might be one of the reasons of heart rate anomaly under the high-voltage electric fields.

  3. Three-dimensional noncommutative Yukawa theory: Induced effective action and propagating modes

    Bufalo, R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the analysis of noncommutative Yukawa theory, encompassing neutral and charged scalar fields. We approach the analysis by considering carefully the derivation of the respective effective actions. Hence, based on the obtained results, we compute the one-loop contributions to the neutral and charged scalar field self-energy, as well as to the Chern-Simons polarization tensor. In order to properly define the behaviour of the quantum fields, the known UV/IR mixing due to radiative corrections is analysed in the one-loop physical dispersion relation of the scalar and gauge fields.

  4. Covariant Computation of the Low Energy Effective Action of the Heterotic Superstring

    Boer, J; Boer, Jan de; Skenderis, Kostas

    1996-01-01

    We derive the low energy effective action of the heterotic superstring in superspace. This is achieved by coupling the covariantly quantized Green-Schwarz superstring of Berkovits to a curved background and requiring that the sigma model has superconformal invariance at tree level and at one loop in $\\a'$. Tree level superconformal invariance yields the complete supergravity algebra, and one-loop superconformal invariance the equations of motion of the low energy theory. The resulting low energy theory is old-minimal supergravity coupled to a tensor multiplet. The dilaton is part of the compensator multiplet.

  5. Effective actions of 2+1 dimensional gravity and BF theory

    We develop the perturbation theory of the BF theory, which is equivalent to 2+1 dimensional gravity without a cosmological constant if we take SO(1,2) as the gauge group. We show that the BF theory, which may have a Chern-Simons term, has only tree- or one loop connected Feynman diagrams and that the theory is completely finite (at all orders). We evaluate the effective actions of the BF theory and the generalized BF theory which has a 'cosmological constant' and show that quantum corrections lead to 'Chern-Simons terms', using a BRST invariant regularization based on Pauli-Villars. (author). 19 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  6. Effects of triclocarban on intact immature male rat: augmentation of androgen action.

    Duleba, Antoni J; Ahmed, Mohamed I; Sun, Meng; Gao, Allen C; Villanueva, Jesus; Conley, Alan J; Turgeon, Judith L; Benirschke, Kurt; Gee, Nancy A; Chen, Jiangang; Green, Peter G; Lasley, Bill L

    2011-02-01

    Triclocarban (TCC; 3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide) is an antimicrobial agent used widely in various personal hygiene products including soaps. Recently, TCC has been shown to enhance testosterone-induced effects in vitro and to enlarge accessory sex organs in castrated male rats. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of TCC on intact age-matched male rats and on human prostate LNCaP and C4-2B cells. Seven-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats received either a normal diet or a diet supplemented with TCC (0.25% in diet) for 10 days. Triclocarban induced hyperplasia of accessory sex organs in the absence of significant qualitative histological changes. Serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone were not significantly altered by TCC treatment. In prostate cancer-derived LNCaP and C4-2B cells, TCC potentiated androgen actions via androgen receptor-dependent actions. In conclusion, TCC significantly affects intact male reproductive organs and potentiates androgen effects in prostate cancer cells. PMID:20889956

  7. Effect of drugs modulating serotonergic system on the analgesic action of paracetamol in mice

    Karandikar, Yogita S.; Belsare, Peeyush; Panditrao, Aditi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The underlying mechanisms for the analgesic action of paracetamol (PCT) are still under considerable debate. It has been recently proposed that PCT may act by modulating the Serotonin system. This study was conducted to verify the influence of Serotonin modulating drugs (buspirone, ondansetron, and fluoxetine) on the analgesic effect of PCT. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult albino mice were assigned to five groups: Normal saline, PCT, fluoxetine selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) + PCT, buspirone (5-HT1A Agonist) + PCT, and ondansetron (5HT3 antagonist) + PCT. Hot-plate and formalin test were used to determine pain threshold, tests being conducted 60 min after the last treatment. Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance followed by Dunnet's test. Results: Coadministration of buspirone with PCT attenuated the antinociceptive activity of PCT (P < 0.001), whereas fluoxetine + PCT increased pain threshold in the hot-plate and formalin test (P = 0.0046). Analgesic effect of PCT was not affected by ondansetron in formalin models. It attenuated analgesic action of PCT in hot-plate test (P = 0.0137). Conclusion: The results suggest that 5-HT1 receptors could also be responsible for the analgesic effect of PCT. Also, higher analgesia is produced by co-administration of SSRI (fluoxetine) + PCT. PMID:27298498

  8. Anomaly-induced effective action and Chern–Simons modification of general relativity

    Mauro, Sebastião [Departamento de Física, ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, CEP: 36036-330, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Shapiro, Ilya L., E-mail: ilyashapiro2003@yahoo.com.br [Département de Physique Théorique and Center for Astroparticle Physics, Université de Genève, 24 quai Ansermet, CH-1211 Genéve 4 (Switzerland); Departamento de Física, ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, CEP: 36036-330, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Tomsk State Pedagogical University and Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634041 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-30

    Recently it was shown that the quantum vacuum effects of massless chiral fermion field in curved space–time leads to the parity-violating Pontryagin density term, which appears in the trace anomaly with imaginary coefficient. In the present work the anomaly-induced effective action with the parity-violating term is derived. The result is similar to the Chern–Simons modified general relativity, which was extensively studied in the last decade, but with the kinetic terms for the scalar different from those considered previously in the literature. The parity-breaking term makes no effect on the zero-order cosmology, but it is expected to be relevant in the black hole solutions and in the cosmological perturbations, especially gravitational waves.

  9. Effective action for the Regge processes in QCD and in gravity

    Lipatov, L.N. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Hamburg Universitaet (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    It is known, that the Gribov approach to the hadron-hadron high energy scattering is based on an effective field theory for the Pomeron interactions. The gluons and gravitons are reggeized and therefore it is natural to reformulate QCD and gravity at high energies in terms of the reggeons and their interactions. We review the basic ideas of the BFKL approach in QCD and in supersymmetric gauge models and present it in the form of the gauge-invariant effective theory for the reggeized gluon interactions. A similar generally covariant action for the reggeized gravitons is formulated in terms of effective currents satisfying the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Its supersymmetric generalization is discussed.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of protection actions to reduce occupational exposures in underground uranium mines

    The primary objective of this study is to present an analysis of protection actions against alpha energy due to short-lived Radon (Rn) daughters in an underground non sedimentary uranium mine. A set of combinations of simple protection (e.g. parpen wall isolating old stopes, increase in ventilation rates or installation of an electrostatic filter) options has been evaluated. The evaluation of the risk reduction options requires the knowledge of the effective dose equivalent (i.e. the indicator to express the risk) as a function of the considered options. For this purpose a mine model has to be defined, that will help modelling the alpha contamination due to short-lived Rn daughters. Finally a computer program has been established, that calculates the effective collective dose equivalent associated with the various protection options. Therefore, this study is able to point out the most 'cost-effective' options to reduce occupational exposure

  11. Effects of berberine in the gastrointestinal tract - a review of actions and therapeutic implications.

    Chen, Chunqiu; Yu, Zhen; Li, Yongyu; Fichna, Jakub; Storr, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid present in several plant species, including Coptis sp. and Berberis sp. In traditional medicine, extracts of berberine are used in the treatment of diarrhea of different origins. Recent studies have shown that berberine and its derivatives have significant biological effects on gastrointestinal (GI) and other functions and may become therapeutics for the treatment of diarrhea, gastroenteritis, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory conditions. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on the actions of berberine in the GI tract. Binding and target sites, activated intracellular pathways, as well as the absorption and metabolism of berberine are discussed. Effects that may be useful in future clinical treatment, like antidiarrheal, anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects are critically reviewed and potential clinical applications are presented in detail. PMID:25183302

  12. Anomaly-induced effective action and Chern–Simons modification of general relativity

    Recently it was shown that the quantum vacuum effects of massless chiral fermion field in curved space–time leads to the parity-violating Pontryagin density term, which appears in the trace anomaly with imaginary coefficient. In the present work the anomaly-induced effective action with the parity-violating term is derived. The result is similar to the Chern–Simons modified general relativity, which was extensively studied in the last decade, but with the kinetic terms for the scalar different from those considered previously in the literature. The parity-breaking term makes no effect on the zero-order cosmology, but it is expected to be relevant in the black hole solutions and in the cosmological perturbations, especially gravitational waves

  13. National Wildlife Refuge System Action Plan : Response to Independent Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Refuge System

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This action plan is the first in what the Leadership Team intends to be a recurring annual plan to monitor and address overall Refuge System effectiveness. The plan...

  14. Photochemical Conversion of Phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazoles into π-Expanded Heterocycles.

    Skonieczny, Kamil; Gryko, Daniel T

    2015-06-01

    We discovered that phenanthro[9,10-d]imidazoles bearing a 2-halogenoaryl substituent at position 2 undergo swift photochemically driven direct arylation, leading to barely known phenanthro[9',10':4,5]imidazo[1,2-f]phenanthridines. The reaction is high-yielding, and it does not require any sensitizer or base. The discovered process is tolerant of a variety of substituents present both at positions 1 and 2; i.e., strongly electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents are tolerated as well as various heterocyclic units. Steric hindrance does not affect this process. The evidence gathered here indicates that SRN1 mechanism is operating in this case with the formation of radical anion as a critical step, followed by heterolytic cleavage of a carbon-halogen bond. Also TfO groups were shown to undergo cyclization, which allows the use of salicylaldehydes in the construction of heterocyclic systems. Efficiency of this photochemically driven direct arylation has been demonstrated by the synthesis of two systems possessing 13 and 17 conjugated rings, respectively. Phenanthro[9',10':4,5]imidazo[1,2-f]phenanthridines are blue-emitters, and they exhibit strong fluorescence in solution and in the solid state in direct contrast to their precursors. PMID:25938658

  15. Impact of nutritional labelling on 10-d energy intake, appetite perceptions and attitudes towards food.

    Carbonneau, Elise; Perron, Julie; Drapeau, Vicky; Lamarche, Benoît; Doucet, Éric; Pomerleau, Sonia; Provencher, Véronique

    2015-12-28

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of nutritional labelling on energy intake, appetite perceptions and attitudes towards food. During a 10-d period, seventy normal-weight (BMImeals per d under ad libitum conditions. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three experimental labelling groups in which the only difference was the label posted on lunch meal entrée: (1) low-fat label, (2) energy label (energy content of the entrée and average daily needs) and (3) no label (control). Average energy intake was calculated by weighing all foods before v. after daily consumption. Hunger and fullness perceptions were rated on visual analogue scales immediately before and after each meal. Satiety efficiency was assessed through the calculation of the satiety quotient (SQ). The appreciation and perceived healthiness of the lunch entrées were rated on eight-point Likert scales. There was no difference in energy intake, SQ and attitudes towards food between the three labelling groups. Fasting hunger perception was higher in the low-fat label group compared with the two others groups (P=0·0037). No interactions between labelling groups and BMI categories were observed. In conclusion, although labelling does not seem to influence energy intake, a low-fat label may increase women's fasting hunger perceptions compared with an energy label or no label. PMID:26439975

  16. Biological Effects of Contact Action of 1470 vs. 810 nm Semiconductor Lasers in vitro

    Schumilova N.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to identify the character of biological effects of contact action of semiconductor laser with a wavelength of 1470 nm on the tissues with different optical and mechanical properties compared to the exposure to laser radiation with a wavelength of 810 nm. Materials and Methods. The study was performed on a chicken muscle tissue, liver of the cattle, nasal polyp, removed nasal septum cartilage. While making a linear incision of the tissues by the laser with a speed of 2 mm/s assessment of the width of ablation and coagulation zones, and the crater depth with the following measurement under the microscopy conditions were carried on. Weighing of the tissue specimens before and after the spot action was performed. Standardization of the operating speed was achieved by using uniformly moving recorder chart. Results. Radiation power increment of 1470 nm wavelength laser contributes to the increase of the ablation and coagulation zone width to a greater degree compared to 810 nm laser. Exposure to 1470 nm laser with a power of 1 W causes the tissue to stick to the fiber. When power is 2 W, coagulation zone of soft tissues is comparable, and in some cases exceeds it after treatment by 810 nm laser. In relation to the crater depth, 1470 nm radiation is inferior to 810 nm radiation, but is superior in relation to vaporization abilities. Conclusion. For tissue ablation with 1470 nm laser a power of 2 W is optimal, as it provides a sparing superficial effect, and in a number of cases exceeds the action of 810 nm 7 W laser by its coagulation properties. Generation of a crater with a less depth after application of 1470 nm laser allows it to be recommended for superficial coagulation of vascular lesions.

  17. Toxicity, sublethal effects, and potential modes of action of select fungicides on freshwater fish and invertebrates

    Elskus, Adria A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of agricultural and urban use of fungicides and widespread detection of these pesticides in surface waters, relatively few data are available on the effects of fungicides on fish and invertebrates in the aquatic environment. Nine fungicides are reviewed in this report: azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorothalonil, fludioxonil, myclobutanil, fenarimol, pyraclostrobin, pyrimethanil, and zoxamide. These fungicides were identified as emerging chemicals of concern because of their high or increasing global use rates, detection frequency in surface waters, or likely persistence in the environment. A review of the literature revealed significant sublethal effects of fungicides on fish, aquatic invertebrates, and ecosystems, including zooplankton and fish reproduction, fish immune function, zooplankton community composition, metabolic enzymes, and ecosystem processes, such as leaf decomposition in streams, among other biological effects. Some of these effects can occur at fungicide concentrations well below single-species acute lethality values (48- or 96-hour concentration that effects a response in 50 percent of the organisms, that is, effective concentration killing 50 percent of the organisms in 48 or 96 hours) and chronic sublethal values (for example, 21-day no observed adverse effects concentration), indicating that single-species toxicity values may dramatically underestimate the toxic potency of some fungicides. Fungicide modes of toxic action in fungi can sometimes reflect the biochemical and (or) physiological effects of fungicides observed in vertebrates and invertebrates; however, far more studies are needed to explore the potential to predict effects in nontarget organisms based on specific fungicide modes of toxic action. Fungicides can also have additive and (or) synergistic effects when used with other fungicides and insecticides, highlighting the need to study pesticide mixtures that occur in surface waters. For fungicides that partition to

  18. Influence of extra training means on effectiveness of fencers’ technical tactic actions

    Lopatenko G.O.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine influence of the worked out extra training means’ complex on effectiveness of realization of elite sportsmen’s competition functioning components. Material: in the research 12 fencers participated. The researches were conducted in the morning, against the background of organism’s recreation. Before sportsmen’s duel we applied two types of pre-competition warming up: traditional and experimental. Video recording was fulfilled with video camera Samsung HMX-S15. Results: we calculated volume, effectiveness and efficiency of sportsmen’s actions in fights with different opponents and in different situations of duel. We showed possibility of extra training complexes’ application, oriented on mobilization of workability in the process of direct pre-start preparation of elite sportsmen. Such exercises considered main actions and organism’s typical responses in the process of competition functioning. Conclusions: Consideration of typolical (for fencing organism’s responses and peculiarities of competition functioning structure influence positively on indicators of sportsmen’s competition functioning.

  19. In the Search of Singularity-Free Cosmological Models in Effective Actions

    Fabris, J C

    2001-01-01

    Fundamental theories, like strings, supergravity, Kaluza-Klein, lead after dimensional reduction and a suitable choice of field configurations, to an effective action in four dimensions where gravity is coupled non-mininally to one scalar field, and minimally to another scalar field. These scalar fields couple non-trivially between themselves. A radiation field is also considered in this effective action. All the possibilities connected to those fundamental theories are labeled by two parameters $n$ (related to the non-trivial coupling of the scalar fields) and $\\omega$, connected to the coupling of the Brans-Dicke like field to gravity. Exact solutions are found, exhibiting a singulariy-free behaviour, from the four dimensional point of view, for some values of those parameter. The flatness and horizon problems for these solutions are also analyzed. It is discussed to which extent the solutions found are non-singular from the point of view of the original frames. This reveals to be a much complex problem.

  20. EFFECTIVENESS OF A PARTICIPATORY ACTION ORIENTED TRAINING INTERVENTION APPROACH AMONG HARVESTERS IN OIL PALM PLANTATION

    Ng Yee Guan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Consistent with the global demand for palm oil, the intensified upstream harvesting activities of oil palms’ fresh fruit bunches, despite the harvesters evidences of various ergonomics risk factors leading to musculoskeletal disorders should be a cause for concern. Thus, this study describes the effectiveness of a modified and locally adapted Participatory Action-Oriented Training intervention program in improving the working environment of the harvesters. A training program modified and customized to the harvesters’ working in oil palm plantation consist of 3 primary instrument (awareness video, interactive lecture and action checklist with 3 reinforcing activities (to increase knowledge, enhance understanding and practical application. Based on the result of post-intervention assessment, the self-reported prevalence of MSD and KAP score among Intervention Group (IG did not significantly differ from Control Group (CG. Instead of decreasing, the prevalence of MSD in the past 12 months and 7 days increased within IG. Qualitative findings in this research show that the negative psychosocial and organizational climate has severely affected the implementation of PAOT rendering the effect of the intervention approach. The interventions were ineffective on the IG as this study suffers from various situational barriers as obstacles to benefit the full extent of PAOT advantages.

  1. Hypotensive effect and endothelium-dependent vascular action of leaves of Alpinia purpurata (Vieill K. Schum

    Alessandra Tesch da Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the chemical profile, vascular reactivity, and acute hypotensive effect (AHE of the ethanolic extract of leaves of Alpinia purpurata (Vieill K. Schum (EEAP. Its chemical profile was evaluated using HPLC-UV, ICP-OES, and colorimetric quantification of total flavonoids and polyphenols. The vascular reactivity of the extract was determined using the mesenteric bed isolated from WKY. AHE dose-response curves were obtained for both EEAP and inorganic material isolated from AP (IAP in WKY and SHR animals. Cytotoxic and mutagenic safety levels were determined by the micronucleus test. Rutin-like flavonoids were quantified in the EEAP (1.8 ± 0.03%, and the total flavonoid and polyphenol ratios were 4.1 ± 1.8% and 5.1 ± 0.3%, respectively. We observed that the vasodilation action of EEAP was partially mediated by nitric oxide (·NO. The IAP showed the presence of calcium (137.76 ± 4.08 μg mg-1. The EEAP and IAP showed an AHE in WKY and SHR animals. EEAP did not have cytotoxic effects or cause chromosomic alterations. The AHE shown by EEAP could result from its endothelium-dependent vascular action. Rutin-like flavonoids, among other polyphenols, could contribute to these biological activities, and the calcium present in EEAP could act in a synergistic way.

  2. Wess-Zumino-Witten action and photons from the Chiral Magnetic Effect

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) using the chiral Lagrangian. We demonstrate that the electric-current formula of the CME is derived immediately from the contact part of the Wess-Zumino-Witten action. This implies that the CME could be, if observed, a signature for the local parity violation, but a direct evidence for neither quark deconfinement nor chiral restoration. We also discuss the reverse Chiral Magnetic Primakoff Effect, i.e. the real photon production through the vertex associated with the CME, which is kinematically possible for space-time inhomogeneous magnetic field and the strong theta angle. We make a semi-quantitative estimate for the photon yield to find that it could be on the observable level as compared to the thermal photon.

  3. [The effect of blood serum proteins from the seal on the analgetic action of narcotic analgesics].

    Aslaniants, Zh K; Melik-Eganov, G R; Evstratov, A V; Ivanov, M P; Batrakov, S G; Korobov, N V; Iasnetsov, V V

    1991-11-01

    The protein fraction isolated from blood of seal, Phoca groenlandica, has been found to produce hyperalgesic effect on rats exposed to thermic or electrocutaneous nociceptive stimulation, but fail to affect writhes provoked by intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid solution on mice. When combined with morphine, the fraction lowered completely its narcotic analgetic action in the above mentioned tests. On the contrary, these same proteins combined with promedol or fentanil enhanced and prolonged analgetic effect of the latter. Tested in vitro the protein showed neither opioid nor anti-opioid activity. Therefore it is reasonable to suppose that neurophysiological activity of the isolated fraction is due to the peptides formed on enzymatic hydrolysis of proteins in vivo rather than these proteins as such. PMID:1687360

  4. Effect of sampling frequency on the measurement of phase-locked action potentials.

    Go eAshida

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Phase-locked spikes in various types of neurons encode temporal information. To quantify the degree of phase-locking, the metric called vector strength (VS has been most widely used. Since VS is derived from spike timing information, error in measurement of spike occurrence should result in errors in VS calculation. In electrophysiological experiments, the timing of an action potential is detected with finite temporal precision, which is determined by the sampling frequency. In order to evaluate the effects of the sampling frequency on the measurement of VS, we derive theoretical upper and lower bounds of VS from spikes collected with finite sampling rates. We next estimate errors in VS assuming random sampling effects, and show that our theoretical calculation agrees with data from electrophysiological recordings in vivo. Our results provide a practical guide for choosing the appropriate sampling frequency in measuring VS.

  5. Unintended consequences of management actions in salt pond restoration: cascading effects in trophic interactions.

    John Y Takekawa

    Full Text Available Salt evaporation ponds have played an important role as habitat for migratory waterbirds across the world, however, efforts to restore and manage these habitats to maximize their conservation value has proven to be challenging. For example, salinity reduction has been a goal for restoring and managing former salt evaporation ponds to support waterbirds in the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Here, we describe a case study of unexpected consequences of a low-dissolved oxygen (DO event on trophic interactions in a salt pond system following management actions to reduce salinity concentrations. We document the ramifications of an anoxic event in water quality including salinity, DO, and temperature, and in the response of the biota including prey fish biomass, numerical response by California Gulls (Larus californicus, and chick survival of Forster's Tern (Sterna forsteri. Management actions intended to protect receiving waters resulted in decreased DO concentrations that collapsed to zero for ≥ 4 consecutive days, resulting in an extensive fish kill. DO depletion likely resulted from an algal bloom that arose following transition of the pond system from high to low salinity as respiration and decomposition outpaced photosynthetic production. We measured a ≥ 6-fold increase in biomass of fish dropped on the levee by foraging avian predators compared with weeks prior to and following the low-DO event. California Gulls rapidly responded to the availability of aerobically-stressed and vulnerable fish and increased in abundance by two orders of magnitude. Mark-recapture analysis of 254 Forster's Tern chicks indicated that their survival declined substantially following the increase in gull abundance. Thus, management actions to reduce salinity concentrations resulted in cascading effects in trophic interactions that serves as a cautionary tale illustrating the importance of understanding the interaction

  6. Empowering America's Communities to Prepare for the Effects of Climate Change: Developing Actionable Climate Science Under the President's Climate Action Plan

    Duffy, P. B.; Colohan, P.; Driggers, R.; Herring, D.; Laurier, F.; Petes, L.; Ruffo, S.; Tilmes, C.; Venkataraman, B.; Weaver, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Effective adaptation to impacts of climate change requires best-available information. To be most useful, this information should be easily found, well-documented, and translated into tools that decision-makers use and trust. To meet these needs, the President's Climate Action Plan includes efforts to develop "actionable climate science". The Climate Data Initiative (CDI) leverages the Federal Government's extensive, open data resources to stimulate innovation and private-sector entrepreneurship in support of actions to prepare for climate change. The Initiative forges commitments and partnerships from the private, NGO, academic, and public sectors to create data-driven tools. Open data from Federal agencies to support this innovation is available on Climate.Data.gov, initially focusing on coastal flooding but soon to expand to topics including food, energy, water, energy, transportation, and health. The Climate Resilience Toolkit (CRT) will facilitate access to data-driven resilience tools, services, and best practices, including those accessible through the CDI. The CRT will also include access to training and tutorials, case studies, engagement forums, and other information sources. The Climate Action Plan also calls for a public-private partnership on extreme weather risk, with the goal of generating improved assessments of risk from different types of extreme weather events, using methods and data that are transparent and accessible. Finally, the U.S. Global Change Research Program and associated agencies work to advance the science necessary to inform decisions and sustain assessments. Collectively, these efforts represent increased emphasis across the Federal Government on the importance of information to support climate resilience.

  7. Effects of the association of antifungal drugs on the antimicrobial action of endodontic sealers

    Paulo Henrique WECKWERTH

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study aimed to determine the susceptibility of oral specimens and ATCC lineages of Candida albicans for five endodontic sealers, which were pure and associated with two antifungal drugs, and to analyze their effect on the physical properties. For this purpose, 30 lineages of C. albicans, collected from the oral cavity of patients assisted at the endodontics clinic of the Universidade Sagrado Coração, were analyzed. Yeasts susceptibility to the sealers was tested by diffusion on agar plates. Physical properties were evaluated according to the ADA specification no. 57. The pure versions of the Sealer 26, AH Plus, Endofill, Fillapex, and Sealapex demonstrated antifungal activity, with Endofill presenting the greatest inhibition zones. All cements, except for Endofill, had their antifungal actions enhanced by addition of ketoconazole and fluconazole (p < 0.05, and the AH Plus presented the best antifungal activity. The addition of antifungal drugs did not interfere with the setting time and flowability of the sealers. It was concluded that the addition of antifungals to endodontic sealers enhanced the antimicrobial action of most cements tested without altering their physical properties.

  8. Effect of shear connectors on local buckling and composite action in steel concrete composite walls

    Zhang, Kai, E-mail: kai-zh@purdue.edu [School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Varma, Amit H., E-mail: ahvarma@purdue.edu [School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Malushte, Sanjeev R., E-mail: smalusht@bechtel.com [Bechtel Power Corporation, Frederick, MD (United States); Gallocher, Stewart, E-mail: stewart.gallocher@steelbricks.com [Modular Walling Systems Ltd., Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    Steel concrete composite (SC) walls are being used for the third generation nuclear power plants, and also being considered for small modular reactors. SC walls consist of thick concrete walls with exterior steel faceplates serving as reinforcement. These steel faceplates are anchored to the concrete infill using shear connectors, for example, headed steel studs. The steel faceplate thickness (t{sub p}) and yield stress (F{sub y}), and the shear connector spacing (s), stiffness (k{sub s}), and strength (Q{sub n}) determine: (a) the level of composite action between the steel plates and the concrete infill, (b) the development length of steel faceplates, and (c) the local buckling of the steel faceplates. Thus, the shear connectors have a significant influence on the behavior of composite SC walls, and should be designed accordingly. This paper presents the effects of shear connector design on the level of composite action and development length of steel faceplates in SC walls. The maximum steel plate slenderness, i.e., ratio of shear connector spacing-to-plate thickness (s/t{sub p}) ratio to prevent local buckling before yielding is also developed based on the existing experimental database and additional numerical analysis.

  9. Enforcement actions and their effectiveness in securities regulation:Empirical evidence from management earnings forecasts

    Yunling Song; Xinwei Ji

    2012-01-01

    Due to resource constraints,securities regulators cannot find or punish all firms that have conducted irregular or even illegal activities(hereafter referred to as fraud).Those who study securities regulations can only find the instances of fraud that have been punished,not those that have not been punished,and it is these unknown cases that would make the best control sample for studies of enforcement action criteria.China’s mandatory management earnings forecasts solve this sampling problem.In the A-share market,firms that have not forecasted as mandated are likely in a position to be punished by securities regulators or are attempting to escape punishment,and their identification allows researchers to build suitable study and control samples when examining securities regulations.Our results indicate that enforcement actions taken by securities regulators are selective.The probability that a firm will be punished for irregular management forecasting is significantly related to proxies for survival rates.Specifically,fraudulent firms with lower return on assets(ROAs) or higher cash flow risk are more likely to be punished.Further analysis shows that selective enforcement of regulations has had little positive effect on the quality of listed firms’ management forecasts.

  10. Effect of fructose on insulin action in adipose tissue of Wistar rats

    The present study was conducted to examine the effects of dietary fructose, with and without insulin stimulation, on glucose oxidation to carbon dioxide and on fatty acid synthesis in epididymal adipose tissue of rats. Two groups of male weanling Wistar rats were fed ad libitum 54% (W/W) carbohydrate diets containing 27% cornstarch plus either 27% D-fructose (FRU) or 27% D-glucose (GLU) for eleven weeks. Each diet also contained 16% fat and 20% protein. Neither body weights nor epididymal adipose tissue weights were significantly different between groups. Insulin action was assessed by incubating adipose tissue in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) containing 90 μmoles [U-14C]-D-glucose with and without insulin (1 mU/ml) for 1 hour, trapping the 14CO2 on filter paper, and extracting the 14C-lipid with Dole's mixture. Means +/- SEM with identical superscripts are not different at the P < .05 level. These results indicate that FRU feeding stimulated glucose oxidation at a rate higher than that of GLU feeding and comparable to that stimulated by insulin. However, lipogenesis was lower in FRU fed than either in GLU fed rats or with insulin stimulation. FRU feeding does not alter the action of insulin on glucose oxidation or lipogenesis

  11. Effect of shear connectors on local buckling and composite action in steel concrete composite walls

    Steel concrete composite (SC) walls are being used for the third generation nuclear power plants, and also being considered for small modular reactors. SC walls consist of thick concrete walls with exterior steel faceplates serving as reinforcement. These steel faceplates are anchored to the concrete infill using shear connectors, for example, headed steel studs. The steel faceplate thickness (tp) and yield stress (Fy), and the shear connector spacing (s), stiffness (ks), and strength (Qn) determine: (a) the level of composite action between the steel plates and the concrete infill, (b) the development length of steel faceplates, and (c) the local buckling of the steel faceplates. Thus, the shear connectors have a significant influence on the behavior of composite SC walls, and should be designed accordingly. This paper presents the effects of shear connector design on the level of composite action and development length of steel faceplates in SC walls. The maximum steel plate slenderness, i.e., ratio of shear connector spacing-to-plate thickness (s/tp) ratio to prevent local buckling before yielding is also developed based on the existing experimental database and additional numerical analysis

  12. Action Research in Special Education: An Inquiry Approach for Effective Teaching and Learning. Practitioner Inquiry Series

    Bruce, Susan M.; Pine, Gerald J.

    2010-01-01

    This is the first book about action research devoted to the complex issues faced by children with disabilities and their teachers. The authors begin by providing the historical and philosophical underpinnings of action research and then present a framework for conducting action research in special education. In addition, they feature four examples…

  13. Emergency planning. Can the cost of remedial actions be compared to the value of the health effects they save

    When an accidental release of radioactive material occurs the exposure of the people concerned can be reduced only by remedial actions, applied to individuals (evacuation) or their environment (e.g. by land interdiction, by impoundment of contaminated products). The adoption of remedial actions should be based on a balance between the damage they cause and the reduction in health effects they can achieve. In this paper a 'cost-effectiveness' analysis is attempted by comparing the costs of remedial actions with the monetary value of the collective dose avoided by them. Remedial actions are undertaken to prevent non-stochastic effects in the exposed population and to limit stochastic effects therein. The damage caused by the remedial actions is evaluated by taking into account the loss of value of interdicted property, the costs for decontaminating land and structures, the loss of income of evacuated people. The options in remedial actions (interdiction, decontamination, goods removal) which minimize the total costs are supposed to be adopted at every location. The collective effective dose equivalent avoided by the remedial actions is computed by taking into account the external exposure from the cloud and from the contaminated ground, and the internal exposure from material inhaled from the passing cloud or inhaled from matter resuspended after deposition on the ground. The extent of the resulting total damage (both economic and health aspects) is partly determined by the intervention level chosen for defining the time and space features of remedial actions. As a result, the total damage has a lower value for an intervention level of about 0.1 Sv for large and medium releases from a nuclear power plant in a not very highly developed site. For a contained release no value of the intervention level optimizes the balance between health and economic consequences. (author)

  14. Nonlinear effects in infrared action spectroscopy of silicon and vanadium oxide clusters: experiment and kinetic modeling.

    Calvo, Florent; Li, Yejun; Kiawi, Denis M; Bakker, Joost M; Parneix, Pascal; Janssens, Ewald

    2015-10-21

    For structural assignment of gas phase compounds, infrared action spectra are usually compared to computed linear absorption spectra. However, action spectroscopy is highly nonlinear owing to the necessary transfer of the excitation energy and its subsequent redistribution leading to statistical ionization or dissociation. Here, we examine by joint experiment and dedicated modeling how such nonlinear effects affect the spectroscopic features in the case of selected inorganic clusters. Vibrational spectra of neutral silicon clusters are recorded by tunable IR-UV two-color ionization while IR spectra for cationic vanadium oxide clusters are obtained by IR multiphoton absorption followed by dissociation of the bare cluster or of its complex with Xe. Our kinetic modeling accounts for vibrational anharmonicities, for the laser interaction through photon absorption and stimulated emission rates, as well as for the relevant ionization or dissociation rates, all based on input parameters from quantum chemical calculations. Comparison of the measured and calculated spectra indicates an overall agreement as far as trends are concerned, except for the photodissociation of the V3O7(+)-Xe messenger complex, for which anharmonicities are too large and poorly captured by the perturbative anharmonic model. In all systems studied, nonlinear effects are essentially manifested by variations in the intensities as well as spectral broadenings. Differences in some band positions originate from inaccuracies of the quantum chemical data rather than specific nonlinear effects. The simulations further yield information on the average number of photons absorbed, which is otherwise unaccessible information: several to several tens of photons need to be absorbed to observe a band through dissociation, while three to five photons can be sufficient for detection of a band via IR-UV ionization. PMID:26208251

  15. Therapeutic Effects and Mechanisms of Action of Rifaximin in Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    DuPont, Herbert L

    2015-08-01

    Emerging preclinical and clinic evidence described herein suggests that the mechanism of action of rifaximin is not restricted to direct antibacterial effects within the gastrointestinal tract. Data from this study were derived from general and clinical trial-specific PubMed searches of English-language articles on rifaximin available through December 3, 2014. Search terms included rifaximin alone and in combination (using the Boolean operation "AND") with travelers' diarrhea, hepatic encephalopathy, liver cirrhosis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, and Crohn's disease. Rifaximin appears to reduce bacterial virulence and pathogenicity by inhibiting bacterial translocation across the gastrointestinal epithelial lining. Rifaximin was shown to decrease bacterial adherence to epithelial cells and subsequent internalization in a bacteria- and cell type-specific manner, without an alteration in bacterial counts, but with a down-regulation in epithelial proinflammatory cytokine expression. Rifaximin also appears to modulate gut-immune signaling. In animal models of inflammatory bowel disease, rifaximin produced therapeutic effects by activating the pregnane X receptor and thereby reducing levels of the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κB. Therefore, for a given disease state, rifaximin may act through several mechanisms of action to exert its therapeutic effects. Clinically, rifaximin 600 mg/d significantly reduced symptoms of travelers' diarrhea (eg, time to last unformed stool vs placebo [32.0 hours vs 65.5 hours, respectively; P=.001]). For the prevention of hepatic encephalopathy recurrence, data indicate that treating 4 patients with rifaximin 1100 mg/d for 6 months would prevent 1 episode of hepatic encephalopathy. For diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, a significantly greater percentage (40.7%) of patients treated with rifaximin 1650 mg/d for 2 weeks experienced adequate global irritable bowel syndrome symptom

  16. Protective action of low-intensity laser radiation relative to the toxic effect of metals (experimental study in vitro)

    Dejneka, S. Y.

    1997-12-01

    The study of a possible cytotoxic effect of different doses of low-insensitive laser radiation and protective action of low-intensive laser radiation relative to the toxic effect of metals was carried out by means of the alternative method of investigation in vitro on cell cultura Hela. It was established that the investigated doses of low-intensive laser radiation had not produced any toxic effect on cell culture Hela, so the mentioned doses were not cytotoxic. It was revealed that laser radiation reduced the level of the cytotoxic effect of the studied metal salts on the cell culture, and possessed the protective action against the toxic effect of metals. This action has a clear-cut dose- related character.

  17. String states, loops and effective actions in noncommutative field theory and matrix models

    Steinacker, Harold C

    2016-01-01

    Refining previous work by Iso, Kawai and Kitazawa, we discuss bi-local string states as a tool for loop computations in noncommutative field theory and matrix models. Defined in terms of coherent states, they exhibit the stringy features of noncommutative field theory. This leads to a closed form for the 1-loop effective action in position space, capturing the long-range non-local UV/IR mixing for scalar fields. The formalism applies to generic fuzzy spaces. The non-locality is tamed in the maximally supersymmetric IKKT or IIB model, where it gives rise to supergravity. The linearized supergravity interactions are obtained directly in position space at one loop using string states on generic noncommutative branes.

  18. String states, loops and effective actions in noncommutative field theory and matrix models

    Steinacker, Harold C.

    2016-09-01

    Refining previous work by Iso, Kawai and Kitazawa, we discuss bi-local string states as a tool for loop computations in noncommutative field theory and matrix models. Defined in terms of coherent states, they exhibit the stringy features of noncommutative field theory. This leads to a closed form for the 1-loop effective action in position space, capturing the long-range non-local UV/IR mixing for scalar fields. The formalism applies to generic fuzzy spaces. The non-locality is tamed in the maximally supersymmetric IKKT or IIB model, where it gives rise to supergravity. The linearized supergravity interactions are obtained directly in position space at one loop using string states on generic noncommutative branes.

  19. Nonlinear refractive index measurements and self-action effects in Roselle-Hibiscus Sabdariffa solutions

    Henari, F. Z.; Al-Saie, A.

    2006-12-01

    We report the observation of self-action phenomena, such as self-focusing, self-defocusing, self-phase modulation and beam fanning in Roselle-Hibiscus Sabdariffa solutions. This material is found to be a new type of natural nonlinear media, and the nonlinear reflective index coefficient has been determined using a Z-scan technique and by measuring the critical power for the self-trapping effect. Z-scan measurements show that this material has a large negative nonlinear refractive index, n 2 = 1 × 10-4 esu. A comparison between the experimental n 2 values and the calculated thermal value for n 2 suggests that the major contribution to nonlinear response is of thermal origin.

  20. NKT cells: their development, mechanisms and effects of action 

    Agnieszka Bojarska-Junak

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available NKT cells are a heterogeneous subset of T lymphocytes that share surface markers and functional characteristics with both conventional T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Most NKT cells express a semi-invariant T cell receptor that reacts with glycolipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. NKT cells can modulate the immune response against infectious agents, autoantigens, tumors, tissue grafts and allergens. NKT cells mediate the activities through their ability to express pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines that influence the type and magnitude of the immune response. The manuscript summarizes current views on development of NKT cells as well as mechanisms and effects of their action

  1. Effective action of heterotic compactification on K3 with non-trivial gauge bundles

    Schasny, Martin

    2012-10-15

    In this thesis we study the heterotic string compactified on K3 with non-trivial gauge bundles. We focus on two backgrounds, the well-known standard embedding and abelian line bundles. Using a Kaluza-Klein reduction, the six-dimensional effective action is computed up to terms of order {alpha}'{sup 2} with special attention on the hypermultiplet sector. We compute the moduli dependent couplings of the matter fields and analyze the geometry of the hyperscalar sigma model. Moreover, we prove the consistency with six-dimensional supergravity and derive the appropriate D-term scalar potential. For the line bundle backgrounds we show that the gauge flux stabilizes some geometrical moduli and renders some abelian vector multiplets massive.

  2. Effective action of heterotic compactification on K3 with non-trivial gauge bundles

    In this thesis we study the heterotic string compactified on K3 with non-trivial gauge bundles. We focus on two backgrounds, the well-known standard embedding and abelian line bundles. Using a Kaluza-Klein reduction, the six-dimensional effective action is computed up to terms of order α'2 with special attention on the hypermultiplet sector. We compute the moduli dependent couplings of the matter fields and analyze the geometry of the hyperscalar sigma model. Moreover, we prove the consistency with six-dimensional supergravity and derive the appropriate D-term scalar potential. For the line bundle backgrounds we show that the gauge flux stabilizes some geometrical moduli and renders some abelian vector multiplets massive.

  3. Two-particle irreducible effective actions versus resummation: analytic properties and self-consistency

    Brown, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Approximations based on two-particle irreducible (2PI) effective actions (also known as $\\Phi$-derivable, Cornwall-Jackiw-Tomboulis or Luttinger-Ward functionals depending on context) have been widely used in condensed matter and non-equilibrium quantum/statistical field theory because this formalism gives a robust, self-consistent, non-perturbative and systematically improvable approach which avoids problems with secular time evolution. The strengths of 2PI approximations are often described in terms of a selective resummation of Feynman diagrams to infinite order. However, the Feynman diagram series is asymptotic and summation is at best a dangerous procedure. Here we show that, at least in the context of a toy model where exact results are available, the true strength of 2PI approximations derives from their self-consistency rather than any resummation. This self-consistency allows truncated 2PI approximations to capture the branch points of physical amplitudes where adjustments of coupling constants can t...

  4. Auxiliary field loop expansion of the effective action for a class of stochastic partial differential equations

    Cooper, Fred; Dawson, John F.

    2016-02-01

    We present an alternative to the perturbative (in coupling constant) diagrammatic approach for studying stochastic dynamics of a class of reaction diffusion systems. Our approach is based on an auxiliary field loop expansion for the path integral representation for the generating functional of the noise induced correlation functions of the fields describing these systems. The systems we consider include Langevin systems describable by the set of self interacting classical fields ϕi(x , t) in the presence of external noise ηi(x , t) , namely (∂t - ν∇2) ϕ - F [ ϕ ] = η, as well as chemical reaction annihilation processes obtained by applying the many-body approach of Doi-Peliti to the Master Equation formulation of these problems. We consider two different effective actions, one based on the Onsager-Machlup (OM) approach, and the other due to Janssen-deGenneris based on the Martin-Siggia-Rose (MSR) response function approach. For the simple models we consider, we determine an analytic expression for the Energy landscape (effective potential) in both formalisms and show how to obtain the more physical effective potential of the Onsager-Machlup approach from the MSR effective potential in leading order in the auxiliary field loop expansion. For the KPZ equation we find that our approximation, which is non-perturbative and obeys broken symmetry Ward identities, does not lead to the appearance of a fluctuation induced symmetry breakdown. This contradicts the results of earlier studies.

  5. Antispasmodic Effects and Action Mechanism of Essential Oil of Chrysactinia mexicana A. Gray on Rabbit Ileum.

    Zavala-Mendoza, Daniel; Grasa, Laura; Zavala-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Salud; Murillo, María Divina

    2016-01-01

    The Chrysactinia mexicana A. Gray (C. mexicana) plant is used in folk medicine to treat fever and rheumatism; it is used as a diuretic, antispasmodic; and it is used for its aphrodisiac properties. This study investigates the effects of the essential oil of C. mexicana (EOCM) on the contractility of rabbit ileum and the mechanisms of action involved. Muscle contractility studies in vitro in an organ bath to evaluate the response to EOCM were performed in the rabbit ileum. EOCM (1-100 µg·mL(-1)) reduced the amplitude and area under the curve of spontaneous contractions of the ileum. The contractions induced by carbachol 1 µM, potassium chloride (KCl) 60 mM or Bay K8644 1 µM were reduced by EOCM (30 µg·mL(-1)). Apamin 1 µM and charybdotoxin 0.01 µM decreased the inhibition induced by EOCM. The d-cAMP 1 µM decreased the inhibition induced by EOCM. l-NNA 10 µM, Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS 1 µM, d,l-propargylglycine 2 mM, or aminooxyacetic acid hemihydrochloride 2 mM did not modify the EOCM effect. In conclusion, EOCM induces an antispasmodic effect and could be used in the treatment of intestinal spasms or diarrhea processes. This effect would be mediated by Ca(2+), Ca(2+)-activated K⁺ channels and cAMP. PMID:27322223

  6. Inhibitory effect of progesterone on the lactogenic and abortive action of prostaglandin F2alpha.

    Vermouth, N T; Deis, R P

    1975-07-01

    The effect of ovariectomy, progesterone and prolactin treatment on the action of prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) was determined in pregnant rats. PGF2alpha (150 mug times 2) injected i.p. on day 1. or 18 of pregnancy induced lactogenesis about 25 h later and abortion on days 20 and 21 of pregnancy. Treatment with PGF2alpha (100 mug times 2 or 50 mug times 2) on day 19 induced lactogenesis around 22 or 38 h later, respectively, and abortion on day 21. PHF2alpha treatment on day 17 was less effective. Unilateral ovariectomy on day 17 of pregnancy induced lactogenesis 32 h later but not abortion. PGF2alpha (150 mug times 2) given on the day of surgery advanced lactogenesis 12 h and rats aborted on day 19. Bilateral overiectomy on day 17 induced abortion between days 20 to 21, but if a single dose of PGF2alpha (300 mug) was injected on day 18. all the ovariectomized rats aborted on day 19. Progesterone (10 mg) injected into rats treated with PGF2alpha (150 mug times 2) on day 18, prevented abortion and delayed lactogenesis. Prolactin (1 mg times 4) treatment delayed only abortion. Serum prolactin levels were significantly higher 12 h after the last dose of PGF2alpha (150 mug times 2) in rats treated on days 17, 18 or 19 of pregnancy. Pretreatment with progesterone prevented the rise in prolactin concentration. These result suggest that the lactogenic and abortive action of PGF2alpha may be dependent on the uterine and plasma concentration of progesterone. PMID:1165437

  7. Effects of covert subject actions on percent body fat by air-displacement plethsymography.

    Tegenkamp, Michelle H; Clark, R Randall; Schoeller, Dale A; Landry, Greg L

    2011-07-01

    Air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) is used for estimation of body composition, however, some individuals, such as athletes in weight classification sports, may use covert methods during ADP testing to alter their apparent percent body fat. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of covert subject actions on percent body fat measured by ADP. Subjects underwent body composition analysis in the Bod Pod following the standard procedure using the manufacturer's guidelines. The subjects then underwent 8 more measurements while performing the following intentional manipulations: 4 breathing patterns altering lung volume, foot movement to disrupt air, hand cupping to trap air, and heat and cold exposure before entering the chamber. Increasing and decreasing lung volume during thoracic volume measurement and during body density measurement altered the percent body fat assessment (p fat by 3.7 ± 2.1 percentage points. Lowered lung volume during body volume measures overestimated body fat by an additional 2.2 ± 2.1 percentage points. The heat and cold exposure, tapping, and cupping treatments provided similar estimates of percent body fat when compared with the standard condition. These results demonstrate the subjects were able to covertly change their estimated ADP body composition value by altering breathing when compared with the standard condition. We recommend that sports conditioning coaches, athletic trainers, and technicians administering ADP should be aware of the potential effects of these covert actions. The individual responsible for administering ADP should remain vigilant during testing to detect deliberate altered breathing patterns by athletes in an effort to gain a competitive advantage by manipulating their body composition assessment. PMID:21499137

  8. Structual Effects of Cytidine 2^' Ribose Modifications as Determined by Irmpd Action Spectroscopy

    Hamlow, Lucas; He, Chenchen; Fan, Lin; Wu, Ranran; Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M. T.; Berden, Giel; Oomens, J.

    2015-06-01

    Modified nucleosides, both naturally occurring and synthetic play an important role in understanding and manipulating RNA and DNA. Naturally occurring modified nucleosides are commonly found in functionally important regions of RNA and also affect antibiotic resistance or sensitivity. Synthetic modifications of nucleosides such as fluorinated and arabinosyl nucleosides have found uses as anti-virals and chemotherapy agents. Understanding the effect that modifications have on structure and glycosidic bond stability may lend insight into the functions of these modified nucleosides. Modifications such as the naturally occurring 2^'-O-methylation and the synthetic 2^'-fluorination are believed to help stabilize the nucleoside through the glycosidic bond stability and intramolecular hydrogen bonding. Changing the sugar from ribose to arabinose alters the stereochemistry at the 2^' position and thus shifts the 3D orientation of the 2^'-hydroxyl group, which also affects intramolecular hydrogen bonding and glycosidic bond stability. The structures of 2^'-deoxy-2^'-fluorocytidine, 2^'-O-methylcytidine and cytosine arabinoside are examined in the current work by measuring the infrared spectra in the IR fingerprint region using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy. The structures accessed in the experiments were determined via comparison of the measured IRMPD action spectra to the theoretical linear IR spectra determined by density functional theory and molecular modeling for the stable low-energy structures. Although glycosidic bond stability cannot be quantitatively determined from this data, complementary TCID studies will establish the effect of these modifications. Comparison of these modified nucleosides with their RNA and DNA analogues will help elucidate differences in their intrinsic chemistry.

  9. Effect of selected anti-inflammatory drugs on the lethal actions of Leiurus quinquestriatus venom

    N. A. Abdoon

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The cumulative actions of scorpion neurotoxins are complex and may be traced to activation of different ion channels with subsequent release of various transmitters and modulators including inflammatory mediators. This could lead to various pathological manifestations such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, and multiple organ failure (MOF. Several approaches have been advocated to treat the multitude of scorpion-venom-elicited pathological changes. However, few have tried to combat the venom-induced effects on the inflammatory process, which manifest as ARDS, SIDS and MOF. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the capability of inhibitors of different steps of the inflammatory sequence of events in scorpion envenomation to ameliorate the detrimental action of the venom and prolong survival of mice injected with Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus (LQQ venom. Animals were divided into groups (n = 10 and given montelukast (10 or 20 mg.kg-1, orally, hydrocortisone (5 or 10 mg.kg-1, intravenously or indomethacin (10 or 20 mg kg-1, intravenously. Then, all animals were subcutaneously injected with either 0.25 or 0.3 mg.kg-1 LQQ venom. Signs and symptoms of envenomation were recorded and survival percentages after 24 hours as well as survival time were determined in each group. To analyze data, we utilized Covariance Wilcoxon survival statistics and survival distribution curves. In general, when compared to venom alone, administration of montelukast (p<0.001, hydrocortisone (p<0.05 and indomethacin (p<0.05 prolonged survival time and increased the percentage of surviving animals per group, with montelukast exhibiting the greatest protecting power. Thus, anti-inflammatory drugs may play an important role in protection against the lethal effects of scorpion venoms.

  10. Infrared divergences and harmonic anomalies in the two-loop superstring effective action

    Pioline, Boris

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the pertubative contributions to the $D^4 R^4$ and $D^6 R^4$ couplings in the low-energy effective action of type II string theory compactified on a torus $T^d$, with particular emphasis on two-loop corrections. In general, it is necessary to introduce an infrared cut-off $\\Lambda$ to separate local interactions from non-local effects due to the exchange of massless states. We identify the degenerations of the genus-two Riemann surface which are responsible for power-like dependence on $\\Lambda$, and give an explicit prescription for extracting the $\\Lambda$-independent effective couplings. These renormalized couplings are then shown to be eigenmodes of the Laplace operator with respect to the torus moduli, up to computable anomalous source terms arising in the presence of logarithmic divergences, in precise agreement with predictions from U-duality. Our results for the two-loop $D^6 R^4$ contribution also probe essential properties of the Kawazumi-Zhang invariant

  11. The action of mimetic peptides on connexins protects fibroblasts from the negative effects of ischemia reperfusion

    Glass, Beverley J.; Hu, Rebecca G.; Phillips, Anthony R. J.; Becker, David L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Connexins have been proposed as a target for therapeutic treatment of a variety of conditions. The main approaches have been by antisense or small peptides specific against connexins. Some of these peptides enhance communication while others interfere with connexin binding partners or bind to the intracellular and extracellular loops of connexins. Here, we explored the mechanism of action of a connexin mimetic peptide by evaluating its effect on gap junction channels, connexin protein levels and hemichannel activity in fibroblast cells under normal conditions and following ischemia reperfusion injury which elevates Cx43 levels, increases hemichannel activity and causes cell death. Our results showed that the effects of the mimetic peptide were concentration-dependent. High concentrations (100-300 μM) significantly reduced Cx43 protein levels and GJIC within 2 h, while these effects did not appear until 6 h when using lower concentrations (10-30 μM). Cell death can be reduced when hemichannel opening and GJIC were minimised. PMID:26471768

  12. The action of mimetic peptides on connexins protects fibroblasts from the negative effects of ischemia reperfusion

    Beverley J. Glass

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Connexins have been proposed as a target for therapeutic treatment of a variety of conditions. The main approaches have been by antisense or small peptides specific against connexins. Some of these peptides enhance communication while others interfere with connexin binding partners or bind to the intracellular and extracellular loops of connexins. Here, we explored the mechanism of action of a connexin mimetic peptide by evaluating its effect on gap junction channels, connexin protein levels and hemichannel activity in fibroblast cells under normal conditions and following ischemia reperfusion injury which elevates Cx43 levels, increases hemichannel activity and causes cell death. Our results showed that the effects of the mimetic peptide were concentration-dependent. High concentrations (100-300 μM significantly reduced Cx43 protein levels and GJIC within 2 h, while these effects did not appear until 6 h when using lower concentrations (10-30 μM. Cell death can be reduced when hemichannel opening and GJIC were minimised.

  13. [NEW MECHANISM OF HYPOGLYCEMIC ACTION OF EMBRYONIC ANTITUMOR MODULATOR MKRTCHYAN BY ACTIVATION OF IT'S MEMBRANOPROTECTIVE EFFECT].

    Aghajanova, E

    2015-12-01

    As a new means of prevention and treatment of diabetes can be considered Embryonic antitumor modulator Mkrtchyan (EATM). According to our data on the STZ model of diabetes in rats EATM revealed hypoglycemic effect. Moreover, EATM prevented the development of oxidative stress. It is shown that EATM having immunomodulatory action, realizes its effect by regulating the Nox (NAPH oxidase) system. Inactivation of Nox, including the pancreas, is one of the factors determining the safety of the organ responsible for the development of diabetes. The release of the Nox is increased ex vivo and in the patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes. Mechanism for enhancing of the Nox isoforms release from erythrocyte membranes and blood serum exosomes in the presence of ferriHb in diabetes may be due to destabilizing of the cell membranes. It is established that the glucose at low concentrations bound to isoforms of Nox at the membrane surface due to increasing their stability, and at high concentrations, on the contrary, it lowers their stability. Thus, we have demonstrated a new mechanism of destabilization of cell membranes in diabetes mellitus. Suppression of the release of the pancreas Nox membrane cells in this pathology by means of EATM is perhaps a new mechanism of stabilization of these membranes, which explains the antidiabetic effect of the preparation. PMID:26719557

  14. Effective action and electromagnetic response of topological superconductors and Majorana-mass Weyl fermions

    Stone, Michael; Lopes, Pedro L. e. S.

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by an apparent paradox in [X.-L. Qi, E. Witten, and S.-C. Zhang, Phys. Rev. B 87, 134519 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.134519], we use the method of gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten functionals to construct an effective action for a Weyl fermion with a Majorana mass that arises from coupling to a charged condensate. We obtain expressions for the current induced by an external gauge field and observe that the topological part of the current is only one-third of that that might have been expected from the gauge anomaly. The anomaly is not changed by the induced mass gap, however. The topological current is supplemented by a conventional supercurrent that provides the remaining two-thirds of the anomaly once the equation of motion for the Goldstone mode is satisfied. We apply our formula for the current to resolve the apparent paradox and also to the chiral magnetic effect (CME), where it predicts a reduction of the CME current to one-third of its value for a free Weyl gas in thermal equilibrium. We attribute this reduction to a partial cancellation of the CME by a chiral vortical effect current arising from the persistent rotation of the fluid induced by the external magnetic field.

  15. Effects of terpineol on the compound action potential of the rat sciatic nerve

    M.R. Moreira

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Terpineol, a volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity, is widely used in the perfumery industry. It is an important chemical constituent of the essential oil of many plants with widespread applications in folk medicine and in aromatherapy. The effects of terpineol on the compound action potential (CAP of rat sciatic nerve were studied. Terpineol induced a dose-dependent blockade of the CAP. At 100 µM, terpineol had no demonstrable effect. At 300 µM terpineol, peak-to-peak amplitude and conduction velocity of CAP were significantly reduced at the end of 180-min exposure of the nerve to the drug, from 3.28 ± 0.22 mV and 33.5 ± 7.05 m/s, respectively, to 1.91 ± 0.51 mV and 26.2 ± 4.55 m/s. At 600 µM, terpineol significantly reduced peak-to-peak amplitude and conduction velocity from 2.97 ± 0.55 mV and 32.8 ± 3.91 m/s to 0.24 ± 0.23 mV and 2.72 ± 2.72 m/s, respectively (N = 5. All these effects developed slowly and were reversible upon 180-min washout.

  16. Multinational corporations and health care in the United States and Latin America: strategies, actions, and effects.

    Jasso-Aguilar, Rebeca; Waitzkin, Howard; Landwehr, Angela

    2004-01-01

    In this article we analyze the corporate dominance of health care in the United States and the dynamics that have motivated the international expansion of multinational health care corporations, especially to Latin America. We identify the strategies, actions, and effects of multinational corporations in health care delivery and public health policies. Our methods have included systematic bibliographical research and in-depth interviews in the United States, Mexico, and Brazil. Influenced by public policy makers in the United States, such organizations as the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization have advocated policies that encourage reduction and privatization of health care and public health services previously provided in the public sector. Multinational managed care organizations have entered managed care markets in several Latin American countries at the same time as they were withdrawing from managed care activities in Medicaid and Medicare within the United States. Corporate strategies have culminated in a marked expansion of corporations' access to social security and related public sector funds for the support of privatized health services. International financial institutions and multinational corporations have influenced reforms that, while favorable to corporate interests, have worsened access to needed services and have strained the remaining public sector institutions. A theoretical approach to these problems emphasizes the falling rate of profit as an economic motivation of corporate actions, silent reform, and the subordination of polity to economy. Praxis to address these problems involves opposition to policies that enhance corporate interests while reducing public sector services, as well as alternative models that emphasize a strengthened public sector PMID:15779471

  17. Lowering the UK domestic radon Action Level to prevent more lung cancers-is it cost-effective?

    Case studies have shown that radon gas can accumulate within domestic properties at sufficiently high levels that it can cause lung cancer, and recent studies have suggested that this risk remains significant below the UK domestic Action Level of 200 Bq m-3. Raised radon levels can be reduced by engineering measures, and it has been shown that domestic radon remediation programmes in UK Affected Areas can result in reduced risks to the population and can be cost-effective. We consider here the benefits and costs of the domestic radon remediation programme in Northamptonshire, UK, and consider the implications for that programme of reducing the UK Action Level below its present value. A radon remediation programme based on an Action Level above 200 Bq m-3 will cost less and will target those most at risk, but will be less cost-effective and will lead to higher residual dose and greater risk of cancer in the remaining population. Reducing the Action Level below 200 Bq m-3 will prevent more cancers, but at significantly higher cost. It will also be less cost-effective, because remediation of a significant number of houses with moderate radon levels will provide only a modest health benefit to occupants. Overall, a completed radon remediation programme of the type implemented in Northamptonshire is most cost-effective for an Action Level between 200 and 300 Bq m-3. The implications for future health policy are discussed

  18. Effects and mechanisms of action of sildenafil citrate in human chorionic arteries.

    Maharaj, Chrisen H

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Sildenafil citrate, a specific phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, is increasingly used for pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy. Sildenafil is also emerging as a potential candidate for the treatment of intra-uterine growth retardation and for premature labor. Its effects in the feto-placental circulation are not known. Our objectives were to determine whether phosphodiesterase-5 is present in the human feto-placental circulation, and to characterize the effects and mechanisms of action of sildenafil citrate in this circulation. STUDY DESIGN: Ex vivo human chorionic plate arterial rings were used in all experiments. The presence of phosphodiesterase-5 in the feto-placental circulation was determined by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. In a subsequent series of pharmacologic studies, the effects of sildenafil citrate in pre-constricted chorionic plate arterial rings were determined. Additional studies examined the role of cGMP and nitric oxide in mediating the effects of sildenafil. RESULTS: Phosphodiesterase-5 mRNA and protein was demonstrated in human chorionic plate arteries. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated phosphodiesterase-5 within the arterial muscle layer. Sildenafil citrate produced dose dependent vasodilatation at concentrations at and greater than 10 nM. Both the direct cGMP inhibitor methylene blue and the cGMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS significantly attenuated the vasodilation produced by sildenafil citrate. Inhibition of NO production with L-NAME did not attenuate the vasodilator effects of sildenafil. In contrast, sildenafil citrate significantly enhanced the vasodilation produced by the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. CONCLUSION: Phosphodiesterase-5 is present in the feto-placental circulation. Sildenafil citrate vasodilates the feto-placental circulation via a cGMP dependent mechanism involving increased responsiveness to NO.

  19. Effect of action observation therapy on daily activities and motor recovery in stroke patients

    Mei-Hong Zhu

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Action observation therapy significantly improves upper extremity motor function and performance of activities of daily living, and alleviates upper limb spasticity in patients with stroke.

  20. Minding one's P's and Q's: From the one loop effective action in quantum field theory to classical transport theory

    The one loop effective action in quantum field theory can be expressed as a quantum mechanical path integral over world lines, with internal symmetries represented by Grassmanian variables. In this paper, we develop a real time, many body, world line formalism for the one loop effective action. In particular, we study hot QCD and obtain the classical transport equations which, as Litim and Manuel have shown, reduce in the appropriate limit to the non-Abelian Boltzmann-Langevin equation first obtained by Boedeker. In the Vlasov limit, the classical kinetic equations are those that correspond to the hard thermal loop effective action. We also discuss the imaginary time world line formalism for a hot φ4 theory, and elucidate its relation to classical transport theory. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  1. Derivative expansion of the effective action for quantum electrodynamics in 2+1 and 3+1 dimensions

    The derivative expansion of the one-loop effective action in QED3 and QED4 (quantum electrodynamics) is considered. The first term in such an expansion is the effective action for a constant electromagnetic field. An explicit expression for the next term containing two derivatives of the field strength Fμν, but exact in the magnitude of the field strength, is obtained. The general results for both fermion and scalar electrodynamics are presented. The cases of pure electric and pure magnetic external fields are considered in detail. The Feynman technique for the perturbative expansion of the one-loop effective action in the number of derivatives is developed. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  2. Minding one's P's and Q's from the one loop effective action in quantum field theory to classical transport theory

    Jalilian-Marian, J; Venugopalan, R; Wirstam, J; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal; Jeon, Sangyong; Venugopalan, Raju; Wirstam, Jens

    2000-01-01

    The one loop effective action in quantum field theory can be expressed as a quantum mechanical path integral over world lines, with internal symmetries represented by Grassmanian variables. In this paper, we develop a real time, many body, world line formalism for the one loop effective action. In particular, we study hot QCD and obtain the classical transport equations which, as Litim and Manuel have shown, reduce in the appropriate limit to the non-Abelian Boltzmann-Langevin equation first obtained by Bödeker. In the Vlasov limit, the classical kinetic equations are those that correspond to the hard thermal loop effective action. We also discuss the imaginary time world line formalism for a hot $\\phi^4$ theory, and elucidate its relation to classical transport theory.

  3. Two-particle irreducible effective actions versus resummation: Analytic properties and self-consistency

    Michael Brown

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Approximations based on two-particle irreducible (2PI effective actions (also known as Φ-derivable, Cornwall–Jackiw–Tomboulis or Luttinger–Ward functionals depending on context have been widely used in condensed matter and non-equilibrium quantum/statistical field theory because this formalism gives a robust, self-consistent, non-perturbative and systematically improvable approach which avoids problems with secular time evolution. The strengths of 2PI approximations are often described in terms of a selective resummation of Feynman diagrams to infinite order. However, the Feynman diagram series is asymptotic and summation is at best a dangerous procedure. Here we show that, at least in the context of a toy model where exact results are available, the true strength of 2PI approximations derives from their self-consistency rather than any resummation. This self-consistency allows truncated 2PI approximations to capture the branch points of physical amplitudes where adjustments of coupling constants can trigger an instability of the vacuum. This, in effect, turns Dyson's argument for the failure of perturbation theory on its head. As a result we find that 2PI approximations perform better than Padé approximation and are competitive with Borel–Padé resummation. Finally, we introduce a hybrid 2PI–Padé method.

  4. Androgen actions in mouse wound healing: Minimal in vivo effects of local antiandrogen delivery.

    Wang, Yiwei; Simanainen, Ulla; Cheer, Kenny; Suarez, Francia G; Gao, Yan Ru; Li, Zhe; Handelsman, David; Maitz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this work were to define the role of androgens in female wound healing and to develop and characterize a novel wound dressing with antiandrogens. Androgens retard wound healing in males, but their role in female wound healing has not been established. To understand androgen receptor (AR)-mediated androgen actions in male and female wound healing, we utilized the global AR knockout (ARKO) mouse model, with a mutated AR deleting the second zinc finger to disrupt DNA binding and transcriptional activation. AR inactivation enhanced wound healing rate in males by increasing re-epithelialization and collagen deposition even when wound contraction was eliminated. Cell proliferation and migration in ARKO male fibroblasts was significantly increased compared with wild-type (WT) fibroblasts. However, ARKO females showed a similar healing rate compared to WT females. To exploit local antiandrogen effects in wound healing, while minimizing off-target systemic effects, we developed a novel electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold wound dressing material for sustained local antiandrogen delivery. Using the antiandrogen hydroxyl flutamide (HF) at 1, 5, and 10 mg/mL in PCL scaffolds, controlled HF delivery over 21 days significantly enhanced in vitro cell proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts and human keratinocytes. HF-PCL scaffolds also promoted in vivo wound healing in mice compared with open wounds but not to PCL scaffolds. PMID:26873751

  5. Effects of melatonin on pethidine-induced physical dependence and its antioxidative action

    LI Shu-hui; LI Xiao-hui

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of melatonin on pethidine-induced physical dependence and its antioxidative action. Methods A trauma-pain model was established in Wistar rats by combining right limb amputation with 50 ℃ tail-flick test. The contents of MDA and the activity of the total superoxide dismutase(SOD) in the brain tissue of trauma-pain rats were detected by thiobarbituric acid method and the xanthine oxidase method. A physical dependence model in mice was reproduced by subcutaneous injection of pethidine and the withdrawal syndromes were induced by intraperitoneal injection of naloxone. Results The contents of MDA enhanced, but the activity of SOD decreased greatly in brain tissues postinjury in rats. Melatonin (30, 60,120 mg·kg-1) i. p. reduced the contents of MDA and enhanced the activity of SOD dose-depen-dently. Melatonin alone showed no withdrawal syndrome when it was given until the dosage of 840 mg· kg-1. Moreover, Melatonin (5, 15, 20 mg·kg-1)obviously inhibited the withdrawal jumpings of mice in pethidine-treated groups dose-dependently (P<0.01 ), the jumping rates of mice were decreased 61.4%, 72.8 %, 84.8 %, respectively. Conclusions The present results indicated that melatonin has good antioxidatire effects on the trauma rats. In addiction, melatonin might inhibit withdrawal syndromes in pethidine-dependent mice.

  6. ANTINUTRITIONAL FACTORS IN SORGHUM: CHEMISTRY, MODE OF ACTION AND EFFECTS ON LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY

    E.B. ETUK

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Sorghum basically contains two major anti-nutritional factors; tannin, a polyphenolic compound located in the grain and, dhurrin a cyanogenic glucoside located mainly in the aerial shoot and sprouted seeds. Tannins are high in sorghum with brown pericarp and no testa and very low in unpigmented grains. The main anti-nutritional effects of tannins are: reduction in voluntary feed intake due to reduced palatability, diminished digestibility and utilisation of nutrients, adverse effects upon metabolism and toxicity. The level of tannins present in sorghum seems to be the predominant factor that influences its nutritional value. Drying, soaking, grinding and pelleting appear to reduce tannin content in feedstuffs while diet supplementation with methyl group donors like choline and methionine reduce the problems associated with tannins in livestock. Dhurrin, on enzyme action readily yields hydrogen cyanide (HCN. The quantity of HCN in sorghum varies with cultivar and the growth condition but diminishes with age. Excess cyanide ion can quickly produce anoxia of the central nervous system through inactivating the cytochrome oxidase system and death can result within a few seconds. Making fodder into hay or silage however, destroys the poison.

  7. The 2PI effective action at four loop order in $\\varphi^4$ theory

    Carrington, M E; Pickering, D

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that perturbative pressure calculations show poor convergence. Calculations using a two particle irreducible (2PI) effective action show improved convergence at the 3 loop level, but no calculations have been done at 4 loops. We consider the 2PI effective theory for a symmetric scalar theory with quartic coupling in 4-dimensions. We calculate the pressure and two different non-perturbative vertices as functions of coupling and temperature. Our results show that the 4 loop contribution can become larger than the 3 loop term when the coupling is large. This indicates a breakdown of the 2PI approach, and the need for higher order $n$PI approximations. In addition, our results demonstrate the renormalizability of 2PI calculations at the 4 loop level. This is interesting because the counterterm structure of the 2PI theory at 4 loops is different from the structure at $n\\le 3$ loops. Two vertex counterterms are required at the 4 loop level, but not at lower loop order. This unique feature of the 2P...

  8. Modulatory Effects and Action Mechanisms of Tryptanthrin on Murine Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Hoi-Ling Chan; Hon-Yan Yip; Nai-Ki Mak; Kwok-Nam Leung

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia is the disorder of hematopoietic cell development and is characterized by an uncoupling of cell proliferation and differentiation. There is a pressing need for the development of novel tactics for leukemia therapy as conventional treatments often have severe adverse side effects. Tryptanthrin (6,12-dihydro-6,12-dioxoindolo-(2,1-b)-quinazoline) is a naturally-occurring, weakly basic alkaloid isolated from the dried roots of medicinal indigo plants (Ban-Lan-Gen). It has been reported to have various biological and pharmacological activities, including anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects. However, its modulatory effects and action mechanisms on myeloid cells remain poorly understood. In this study, tryptanthrin was shown to suppress the proliferation of the murine myeloid leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also significantly reduced the growth of WEHI-3B JCS cells in vivo in syngeneic BALB/c mice. However, it exhibited no significant direct cytotoxicity on normal murine peritoneal macrophages. Flow cytometric analysis showed an obvious cell cycle arrest of the tryptanthrin-treated WEHI-3B JCS cells at the G0/G1 phase. The expression of cyclin D2,D3, Cdk 2, 4 and 6 genes in WEHI-3B JCS cells was found to be down-regulated at 24 h as measured by RT-PCR. Morphological and functional studies revealed that tryptanthrin could induce differentiation in WEHI-3B JCS cells, as shown by the increases in vacuolation, cellular granularity and NBT-reducing activity in tryptanthrin-treated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that tryptanthrin might exert its anti-tumor effect on the murine myelomonocytic leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells by causing cell cycle arrest and by triggering cell differentiation. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2009;6(5):335-342.

  9. Effectiveness of atp, antibiotics and vitamins as protective agents against action of prolonged irradiation of monkeys

    In the experiments on 27 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) subjected to prolonged irradiation (dose-rate 1 R/min) an adequate therapeutic action of a complex of vitamines (groups B, C and P) and antibiotics (kanamycin, oletetrin, oxacillin and ampicillin) has been detected. A double prescription of ATP, in addition to a therapeutic complex, enhanced significantly a positive action of antibiotics and vitamins

  10. Effect and Functional Mechanism of the Action of Exogenous Gibberellin on Flowering of Peach

    AN Li-jun; JIN Liang; YANG Chun-qin; LI Tian-hong

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the effect of gibberellin and its possible mechanism of action on peach flower formation. At flower induction, 100 mg L-1 of gibberellic acid 3 (GA3) was sprayed on the leaves of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch.] cv. Bayuecui. Using anatomy, immunohistochemistry, and semi-quantitation, the in situ distribution of GAs and the expression of the key genes involved in peach flower formation in the apical meristem were studied during flowering differentiation. The results showed that induction of flowering in the Bayuecui peach occurred prior to 10 July in Beijing, China. Flower induction and further differentiation of the peach flower organs were significantly inhibited by leaf-spraying of GA3 at a concentration of 100 mg L-1 during the induction stage. The flowering rate was only 11.67% after treatment. The distribution of GA1 in the apical meristem varied during the process of flower bud differentiation. From 13 June to 25 July, the GA1 signal from control plants was detected mainly in the vascular bundles at the base of the flower buds. No GA1 signal was detected in the apical meristem. After treatment with GA3, the distribution was similar to that of the control from 13 June to 3 July. On 13 July, a GA1 signal was detected in the apical meristem accompanied by an increase in the GA1 signal in the vascular bundles at the base of the flower buds. The GAI signal weakened significantly in both the vascular bundles and the apical meristem on 25 July. The expression of the genes PpLEAFY and MADS6 in flower buds could be detected only on 10 October in the GA3-treated plants. The critical period for flower induction of Bayuecui peach in Beijing was in early July, during which time, leaf-spraying with 100 mg L-1 GA3 could effectively inhibit flower induction and further differentiation of the flower buds. GA1 in the gibberellin family was the suppressor for flower induction in peach. Its action was affected by the stage of flower bud

  11. The effect of behavioral preferences on skill acquisition in determining unspecified, suitable action patterns to control humanoid robots.

    Takayama, Taiki; Watanabe, Tetsuyou

    2015-08-01

    This research investigated the effect of behavioral preferences on learning efficiency when attempting to determine unspecified, but suitable action sequences for unfamiliar tasks. The goal of this research was to develop a skill acquisition support system for the elderly to aid them in using unfamiliar IT products, particularly those of welfare systems. Here, behavioral preference is defined as the type of action sequences that people would prefer to adopt for completing unfamiliar tasks. To achieve this goal, this research investigated the action sequences of participants when they attempt to control the posture of an unfamiliar humanoid robot with an unfamiliar controller. The participants were assigned the task of making the humanoid stand on one foot. Machine-learning-based methods were presented for analyzing the behavioral preferences. The analysis results indicate that participants having behavioral preferences of adopting random action sequences can complete the task in a much shorter time, compared to participants having a behavioral preference of adopting action sequences similar to those of previous actions. PMID:26738048

  12. Effects of estragole on the compound action potential of the rat sciatic nerve

    J.H. Leal-Cardoso

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Estragole, a relatively nontoxic terpenoid ether, is an important constituent of many essential oils with widespread applications in folk medicine and aromatherapy and known to have potent local anesthetic activity. We investigated the effects of estragole on the compound action potential (CAP of the rat sciatic nerve. The experiments were carried out on sciatic nerves dissected from Wistar rats. Nerves, mounted in a moist chamber, were stimulated at a frequency of 0.2 Hz, with electric pulses of 50-100-µs duration at 10-20 V, and evoked CAP were monitored on an oscilloscope and recorded on a computer. CAP control parameters were: peak-to-peak amplitude (PPA, 9.9 ± 0.55 mV (N = 15, conduction velocity, 92.2 ± 4.36 m/s (N = 15, chronaxy, 45.6 ± 3.74 µs (N = 5, and rheobase, 3.9 ± 0.78 V (N = 5. Estragole induced a dose-dependent blockade of the CAP. At 0.6 mM, estragole had no demonstrable effect. At 2.0 and 6.0 mM estragole, PPA was significantly reduced at the end of 180-min exposure of the nerve to the drug to 85.6 ± 3.96 and 13.04 ± 1.80% of control, respectively. At 4.0 mM, estragole significantly altered PPA, conduction velocity, chronaxy, and rheobase (P <= 0.05, ANOVA; N = 5 to 49.3 ± 6.21 and 77.7 ± 3.84, 125.9 ± 10.43 and 116.7 ± 4.59%, of control, respectively. All of these effects developed slowly and were reversible upon a 300-min wash-out. The data show that estragole dose-dependently blocks nerve excitability.

  13. Effect of temperature on isoprenaline- and barium-induced slow action potentials in guinea-pig ventricular strips.

    Manzini, S; Parlani, M; Martucci, E; Maggi, C A; Meli, A

    1986-01-01

    The effect of variation in temperature (37-32 and 27 degrees C) on electrical and mechanical activity of depolarized and isoprenaline- or barium-reactivated guinea pig ventricular strips was studied. Lowering the temperature brings a marked prolongation of isoprenaline-induced slow action potentials. In addition the maximal rate of depolarization was strongly reduced at lower temperatures. These effects were observed at an extracellular Ca2+ concentration of either 0.9 or 2.5 mM. The accompanying mechanical activities was significantly increased by reduction in temperature. Barium-induced slow action potentials were similarly affected by temperature variations. These observations suggest that hypothermia exert a sort of calcium antagonistic action probably coupled to a reduction of repolarizing outward potassium currents. PMID:2430855

  14. Effects of the bleaching sequence on the optical brighteners action in eucalyptus kraft pulp

    Mauro Manfredi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During the bleaching process the pulp is treated with chemical reagents that can be retained in the pulp and interfere in the action of the optical brighteners. Different bleaching sequences can produce pulps at the same brightness but with different potential to whiteness increase when treated with optical brighteners. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the bleaching sequence on the efficiency of disulphonated and tetrasulphonated optical brighteners. Eucalyptus kraft pulp was bleached using four different bleaching sequences. For each pulp three brightness targets were aimeds. For each bleaching sequence mathematical model was generated for predicting the final pulp whiteness according to the initial brightness and the optical brightener charge applied. The presence of organochlorine residues in the pulp reduced the effectiveness of the optical brighteners. Therefore, bleaching sequences that use low chlorine dioxide charge favors for greater gains in whiteness with the application of optical brighteners. The replacement of the final chlorine dioxide bleaching stage with a hydrogen peroxide one in the sequence increased the efficiency of the optical brightening agents.

  15. Effects of ration size and hypoxia on specific dynamic action in the cod

    Jordan, Anders D; Steffensen, John F

    2007-01-01

    We present the first data on the effect of hypoxia on the specific dynamic action (SDA) in a teleost fish. Juvenile cod (Gadus morhua) were fed meals of 2.5% and 5% of their wet body mass (BM) in normoxia (19.8 kPa Po(2)) and 5% BM in hypoxia (6.3 kPa Po(2)). Reduced O(2) availability depressed the...... postprandial peaks of oxygen consumption, and to compensate for this, the total SDA duration lasted 212.0+/-20 h in hypoxia, compared with 95.1+/-25 h in normoxia. The percentage of energy associated with the meal digestion and assimilation (SDA coefficient) was equivalent between the different feeding rations...... but higher for fish exposed to hypoxia. Comparing peak oxygen consumption during the SDA course with maximum metabolic rates showed that food rations of 2.5% and 5% BM reduced the scope for activity by 40% and 55%, while ingestion of 5% BM in hypoxia occupied 69% of the aerobic scope, leaving little...

  16. Effects of Action Video Game on Attention Distribution: A Cognitive Study

    Zhang, Xuemin; Yan, Bin; Shu, Hua

    Based on the previous researches, Flanker compatibility effect paradigm was applied to explore the degree where people process the visual information presented on to-be-ignored locations. In present study, this paradigm was used to investigate attention distribution of Video Game Players (VGPs) and Non Video Game Players (NVGPs). The results suggested, under low perceptual load, VGPs tried to focus their attention on the task at-hand whereas the NVGPs tried to explore the adjacent locations with the left-over resources from the research task; however, under high perceptual load, the players would process the visual information at the adjacent locations of the target with the left-over resources, because they had comparatively greater attention capability, whereas the non-players focused their attention on the target locations to finish the search task. To conclude, the present study suggested that action video game play could not only enhance the attention capacity but also cause a different way of attention distribution in different perceptual load situations.

  17. COST 271 Action - Effects of the upper atmosphere on terrestrial and Earth-space communications: introduction

    L. R. Cander

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The COST 271 ActionEffects of the Upper Atmosphere on Terrestrial and Earth-space Communications » within the European ionospheric community has the objectives, embodied in the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU: to study the influence of upper atmospheric conditions on terrestrial and Earth-space communications, to develop methods and techniques to improve ionospheric models over Europe for telecommunication and navigation applications and to transfer the results to the appropriate Radiocommunication Study Groups of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU-R and other national and international organizations dealing with the modern communication systems. This introductory paper summarises briefly the background and historical context of COST 271 and outlines the main objectives, working methods and structure. It also lists the participating countries and institutions, the Management Committee (MC Meetings, Workshops and Short-term Scientific Missions. In addition, the paper discusses the dissemination of the results and the collaboration among the participating institutions and researchers, before outlining the content of the Final Report.

  18. Inhibitory effects of sanguinarine against the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-843 and possible mechanisms of action

    Shao, Jihai [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Farmland Pollution Control and Agricultural Resources Use, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Liu, Deming [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Crop Germplasm Innovation and Resource Utilization, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Gong, Daoxin; Zeng, Qingru; Yan, Zhiyong [College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Gu, Ji-Dong, E-mail: jdgu@hku.hk [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Farmland Pollution Control and Agricultural Resources Use, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology and Toxicology, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Sanguinarine was found as a strong algicidal biologically derived substance. •Sanguinarine can induce oxidative stress in the cells of Microcystis aeruginosa. •Photosystem is a target of toxicity of sanguinarine on M. aeruginosa. •Sanguinarine can induce DNA damage and inhibit cell division. -- Abstract: Sanguinarine showed strong inhibitory effect against Microcystis aeruginosa, a typical water bloom-forming and microcystins-producing cyanobacterium. The EC50 of sanguinarine against the growth of M. aeruginosa NIES-843 was 34.54 ± 1.17 μg/L. Results of chlorophyll fluorescence transient analysis indicated that all the electron donating side, accepting side, and the reaction center of the Photosystem II (PS II) were the targets of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa NIES-843. The elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in the cells of M. aeruginosa NIES-843 upon exposure indicated that sanguinarine induced oxidative stress in the active growing cells of M. aeruginosa NIES-843. Further results of gene expression analysis indicated that DNA damage and cell division inhibition were also involved in the inhibitory action mechanism of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa NIES-843. The inhibitory characteristics of sanguinarine against M. aeruginosa suggest that the ecological- and public health-risks need to be evaluated before its application in cyanobacterial bloom control to avoid devastating events irreversibly.

  19. Effective action approach to cosmological perturbations in dark energy and modified gravity

    In light of upcoming observations modelling perturbations in dark energy and modified gravity models has become an important topic of research. We develop an effective action to construct the components of the perturbed dark energy momentum tensor which appears in the perturbed generalized gravitational field equations, δGμν = 8πGδTμν+δUμν for linearized perturbations. Our method does not require knowledge of the Lagrangian density of the dark sector to be provided, only its field content. The method is based on the fact that it is only necessary to specify the perturbed Lagrangian to quadratic order and couples this with the assumption of global statistical isotropy of spatial sections to show that the model can be specified completely in terms of a finite number of background dependent functions. We present our formalism in a coordinate independent fashion and provide explicit formulae for the perturbed conservation equation and the components of δUμν for two explicit generic examples: (i) the dark sector does not contain extra fields, L = L(gμν) and (ii) the dark sector contains a scalar field and its first derivative L = L(gμν,φ,∇μφ). We discuss how the formalism can be applied to modified gravity models containing derivatives of the metric, curvature tensors, higher derivatives of the scalar fields and vector fields

  20. Field theoretic treatment of an effective action for a model of catalyzed autoamplification.

    Tchernookov, Martin; Warmflash, Aryeh; Dinner, Aaron R

    2010-01-01

    Reaction-diffusion models can exhibit continuous phase transitions in behaviors, and their dynamics at criticality often exhibit scalings with key parameters that can be characterized by exponents. While models with only a single field that transitions between absorbing and nonabsorbing states are well characterized and typically fall in the directed percolation universality class, the effects of coupling multiple fields remain poorly understood. We recently introduced a model which has three fields: one of which relaxes exponentially, one of which displays critical behavior, and one of which has purely diffusive dynamics but exerts an influence on the critical field [Tchernookov, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 134906 (2009)]. Simulations suggested that this model is in a universality class distinct from other reaction-diffusion systems studied previously. Although the three fields give rise to interesting physics, they complicate analysis of the model with renormalization-group methods. Here, we show how to systematically simplify the action for this model such that analytical expressions for the exponents of this universality class can be obtained by standard means. We expect the approach taken here to be of general applicability in reaction-diffusion systems with coupled order parameters that display qualitatively different behaviors close to criticality. PMID:20365328

  1. Immunomodulatory effects of fluoxetine: A new potential pharmacological action for a classic antidepressant drug?

    Di Rosso, María Emilia; Palumbo, María Laura; Genaro, Ana María

    2016-07-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are frequently used antidepressants. In particular, fluoxetine is usually chosen for the treatment of the symptoms of depression, obsessive-compulsive, panic attack and bulimia nervosa. Antidepressant therapy has been associated with immune dysfunction. However, there is contradictory evidence about the effect of fluoxetine on the immune system. Experimental findings indicate that lymphocytes express the serotonin transporter. Moreover it has been shown that fluoxetine is able to modulate the immune function through a serotonin-dependent pathway and through a novel independent mechanism. In addition, several studies have shown that fluoxetine can alter tumor cell viability. Thus, it was recently demonstrated in vivo that chronic fluoxetine treatment inhibits tumor growth by increasing antitumor T-cell activity. Here we briefly review some of the literature referring to how fluoxetine is able to modify, for better or worse, the functionality of the immune system. These results of our analysis point to the relevance of the novel pharmacological action of this drug as an immunomodulator helping to treat several pathologies in which immune deficiency and/or deregulation is present. PMID:26644208

  2. Low-energy effective action for pions and a dilatonic meson

    Golterman, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations of QCD-like theories in which the number of flavors is adjusted so that the beta function is very small, but confinement and chiral symmetry breaking nevertheless take place, appear to reveal the presence of a flavor-singlet scalar meson which can be as light as the pions. Because the breaking of dilatation symmetry, quantified by the beta function, is small relative to QCD, a possible explanation is that the scalar meson is a pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson associated with the approximate dilatation symmetry. We use this observation to systematically develop a low-energy effective action that accounts for both the pions and the "dilatonic" scalar meson. In order to justify the power counting that controls the couplings of the dilatonic meson we invoke the Veneziano limit, in which the number of fundamental-representation flavors $N_f$ grows in proportion with the number of colors $N_c$, while the ratio $N_f/N_c$ is kept close to, but below, the critical value where the conformal window is ...

  3. Effects of diphosphonic acid on ilmenorutile collecting property and research of action mechanism

    2002-01-01

    The effects of several collectors and their dosage on pure ilmenorutile at different pH values were studied and the collecting strength of several representative collectors was investigated. The experimental results indicate that diphosphonic acid is a good collector for ilmenorutile and the recovery of ilmenorutile ranges from 90.87% to 91.70% when the pulp pH value is 2.0-4.0 and the dosage is 75mg/L. Thesequence of collecting ability for several collectors is as follows: diphosphonic acid > TF279 > cyclic alkyl hydroximic acid > benzyl arsenic acid > salicylic hydroximic acid > alkyl hydroximic acid. Meanwhile, IAS (infrared absorption spectrum) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) were used to detect and analyze the action mechanism of diphosphonic acid on ilmenorutile. IAS results showed that the characterid between wave numeber and cm, and diphosphonic acid had adsorbed on the surface of ilmenorutile. XPS results indicated that the binding energy of P2P peak of ilmenorutile had changed 0.45eV after treated by diphosphonic acid. This proves that the adsorption is mainly chemical adsorption.

  4. The effective action of D6-branes in mathcal{N} = 1 type IIA orientifolds

    Kerstan, Max; Weigand, Timo

    2011-06-01

    We use a Kaluza-Klein reduction to compute the low-energy effective action for the massless modes of a spacetime-filling D6-brane wrapped on a special Lagrangian 3-cycle of a type IIA Calabi-Yau orientifold. The modifications to the characteristic data of the mathcal{N} = 1 bulk orientifold theory in the presence of a D6-brane are analysed by studying the underlying Type IIA supergravity coupled to the brane world volume in the democratic formulation and performing a detailed dualisation procedure. The mathcal{N} = 1 chiralcoordinates are found to be in agreement with expectations from mirror symmetry. We work out the Kähler potential for the chiral superfields as well as the gauge kinetic functions for the bulk and the brane gauge multiplets including the kinetic mixing between the two. The scalar potential resulting from the dualisation procedure can be formally interpreted in terms of a superpotential. Finally, the gauging of the Peccei-Quinn shift symmetries of the complex structure multiplets reproduces the D-term potential enforcing the calibration condition for special Lagrangian 3-cycles.

  5. The effective action of D6-branes in N=1 type IIA orientifolds

    Kerstan, Max

    2011-01-01

    We use a Kaluza-Klein reduction to compute the low-energy effective action for the massless modes of a spacetime-filling D6-brane wrapped on a special Lagrangian 3-cycle of a type IIA Calabi-Yau orientifold. The modifications to the characteristic data of the N=1 bulk orientifold theory in the presence of a D6-brane are analysed by studying the underlying Type IIA supergravity coupled to the brane worldvolume in the democratic formulation and performing a detailed dualisation procedure. The N=1 chiral coordinates are found to be in agreement with expectations from mirror symmetry. We work out the Kahler potential for the chiral superfields as well as the gauge kinetic functions for the bulk and the brane gauge multiplets including the kinetic mixing between the two. The scalar potential resulting from the dualisation procedure can be formally interpreted in terms of a superpotential. Finally, the gauging of the Peccei-Quinn shift symmetries of the complex structure multiplets reproduces the D-term potential e...

  6. Intracellular recordings of action potentials by an extracellular nanoscale field-effect transistor

    Duan, Xiaojie; Gao, Ruixuan; Xie, Ping; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Qing, Quan; Choe, Hwan Sung; Tian, Bozhi; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Lieber, Charles M.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to make electrical measurements inside cells has led to many important advances in electrophysiology. The patch clamp technique, in which a glass micropipette filled with electrolyte is inserted into a cell, offers both high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution. Ideally, the micropipette should be as small as possible to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the invasiveness of the measurement, but the overall performance of the technique depends on the impedance of the interface between the micropipette and the cell interior, which limits how small the micropipette can be. Techniques that involve inserting metal or carbon microelectrodes into cells are subject to similar constraints. Field-effect transistors (FETs) can also record electric potentials inside cells, and because their performance does not depend on impedance, they can be made much smaller than micropipettes and microelectrodes. Moreover, FET arrays are better suited for multiplexed measurements. Previously, we have demonstrated FET-based intracellular recording with kinked nanowire structures, but the kink configuration and device design places limits on the probe size and the potential for multiplexing. Here, we report a new approach in which a SiO2 nanotube is synthetically integrated on top of a nanoscale FET. This nanotube penetrates the cell membrane, bringing the cell cytosol into contact with the FET, which is then able to record the intracellular transmembrane potential. Simulations show that the bandwidth of this branched intracellular nanotube FET (BIT-FET) is high enough for it to record fast action potentials even when the nanotube diameter is decreased to 3 nm, a length scale well below that accessible with other methods. Studies of cardiomyocyte cells demonstrate that when phospholipid-modified BIT-FETs are brought close to cells, the nanotubes can spontaneously penetrate the cell membrane to allow the full-amplitude intracellular action potential to be

  7. One-loop and D-instanton corrections to the effective action of open string models

    Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Maximilian

    2009-07-02

    Methods for the calculation of certain corrections to effective actions, which comprehend the low-energy physics of string compactifications with open strings, are explained. First the shape of such actions is describes and some examples for compactifications are presented, especially a type I string model to which a dual model on the base of the heterotic string is known. Then corrections on the gauge coupling constant and on the gauge-kinetic function are discussed. general procedures for their calculation are sketched and applied to some models. The explicitly determinded corrections depend non-holomorphically on the moduli of the compactification manifold. It is explained that this is not in disagreement on the holomorphy of the gauge-kinetic function and how the latter can be extracted from the calculated results. Next D-instantons and their influence on the low-energy action are detailedly analyzed, whereby the zero modes of the instantons and global Abelian symmetries play a central role. A formula for the caclulation of scattering matrix elements in instanton sectors is given. It is to be expected that the considered instantons contribute to the superpotential of the low-energy action. However from the formula it becomes not immediately clear, how far this is possible. The mentioned formula seems to lead to expressions, which are in disagreement to the holomorphy of the superpotential. It is shown that non-holomorphic terms partly simplify, partly are so composed that the result is in accordance with the holomorphy of the superpotential. The D-instanton calculus is then used in order to derive the ADS superpotential, which is known from field theory. That this is possible is to be considered as successful test of the instanton calculus. D-instanton corrections to the gauge-kinetic functions are considered. S duality between the type I and the heterotic string is used in order to determine how the structure of the zero modes of the relevant instantons looks

  8. Fine-tuning and vacuum stability in the Wilsonian effective action

    Krajewski, Tomasz; Lalak, Zygmunt

    2015-10-01

    We have computed the Wilsonian effective action in a simple model with a spontaneously broken chiral parity. The Wilsonian running of relevant parameters makes it possible to discuss in a consistent manner the issues of fine-tuning and the stability of the scalar potential. This has been compared with the standard picture based on a Gell-Mann-Low running. Since the Wilsonian running automatically includes integration of heavy degrees of freedom, the running differs markedly from the Gell-Mann-Low version. Similar behavior can be observed: the scalar mass-squared parameter and the quartic coupling can change sign from a positive to a negative one, due to the running which causes a spontaneous symmetry breaking or an instability in the renormalizable part of the potential for a given range of scales. However, care must be taken when drawing conclusions, because of the truncation of higher-dimension operators. Taking the scalar field's amplitude near the cutoff Λ may cancel the suppression due to the scale, and only the suppression due to small couplings partially justifies the truncation in this region. Also, when taking the cutoff higher, to include larger amplitudes of the fields, the higher-order irrelevant operators, whose coefficients grow with the scale, may affect the conclusion about the stability. The Gell-Mann-Low running allows one to resume relatively easily a class of operators corresponding to large logarithms to the form of the renormalization group equation improved effective potential which is valid over a huge range of scales. In the Wilsonian approach this would correspond to following the running of a large number of irrelevant operators, which is technically problematic. As for the issue of the fine-tuning, since in the Wilsonian approach power-law terms are not subtracted, one can clearly observe the quadratic sensitivity of a fine-tuning measure to the change of the cutoff scale. The Wilsonian version of the radiative symmetry

  9. Superselective Particle Embolization Enhances Efficacy of Radiofrequency Ablation: Effects of Particle Size and Sequence of Action

    Purpose. To evaluate the effects of particle size and course of action of superselective bland transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) on the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods. Twenty pigs were divided into five groups: group 1a, 40-μm bland TAE before RFA; group 1b, 40-μm bland TAE after RFA; group 2a, 250-μm bland TAE before RFA; group 2b, 250-μm bland TAE after RFA and group 3, RFA alone. A total of 40 treatments were performed with a combined CT and angiography system. The sizes of the treated zones were measured from contrast-enhanced CTs on days 1 and 28. Animals were humanely killed, and the treated zones were examined pathologically. Results. There were no complications during procedures and follow-up. The short-axis diameter of the ablation zone in group 1a (mean ± standard deviation, 3.19 ± 0.39 cm) was significantly larger than in group 1b (2.44 ± 0.52 cm; P = 0.021), group 2a (2.51 ± 0.32 cm; P = 0.048), group 2b (2.19 ± 0.44 cm; P = 0.02), and group 3 (1.91 ± 0.55 cm; P 3). At histology, 40-μm microspheres were observed to occlude smaller and more distal arteries than 250-μm microspheres. Conclusion. Bland TAE is more effective before RFA than postablation embolization. The use of very small 40-μm microspheres enhances the efficacy of RFA more than the use of larger particles.

  10. Escalation of Commitment to an Ineffective Course of Action: The Effect of Feedback Having Negative Implications for Self-Identity.

    Brockner, Joel; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examines entrapment, the process by which organizational decision makers escalate commitment to an ineffective course of action to justify allocation of previous resources. Two laboratory experiments exploring individuals' perceptions of entrapment and its effect on their self identity are described. Also discusses practical theoretical…

  11. Full mass range analysis of the QED effective action for an O(2)xO(3) symmetric field

    Ahmadiniaz, Naser; Raya, Alfredo; Schubert, Christian

    2013-01-01

    An interesting class of background field configurations in quantum electrodynamics (QED) are the O(2)xO(3) symmetric fields, originally introduced by S.L. Adler in 1972. Those backgrounds have some instanton-like properties and yield a one-loop effective action that is highly nontrivial, but amenable to numerical calculation. Here, we use the recently developed "partial-wave-cutoff method" for a full mass range numerical analysis of the effective action for the "standard" O(2)xO(3) symmetric field, modified by a radial suppression factor. At large mass, we are able to match the asymptotics of the physically renormalized effective action against the leading two mass levels of the inverse mass expansion. For small masses, with a suitable choice of the renormalization scheme we obtain stable numerical results even in the massless limit. We analyze the N - point functions in this background and show that, even in the absence of the radial suppression factor, the two-point contribution to the effective action is t...

  12. Parent Drug Education: A Participatory Action Research Study into Effective Communication about Drugs between Parents and Unrelated Young People

    Mallick, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Parent drug education is considered a key aspect of drug prevention. Effective communication acts as protective factor for drug misuse in young people. This study is a Participatory Action Research study of "Drugsbridge", a drug education programme that has an emphasis on facilitating intergenerational communication about drugs between parents and…

  13. Reading between the Lines of Online Course Evaluations: Identifiable Actions That Improve Student Perceptions of Teaching Effectiveness and Course Value

    Jones, Stephanie J.

    2012-01-01

    Students continue to demand and enroll in online courses, but are not always satisfied with their experiences. The purpose of this study was to determine if students' responses to evaluations for online courses could be used to identify faculty actions that could lead to improved evaluation scores in teaching effectiveness and overall course…

  14. The glucagonostatic and insulinotropic effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 contribute equally to its glucose-lowering action

    Hare, Kristine J; Vilsbøll, Tina; Asmar, Meena; Deacon, Carolyn F; Knop, Filip K; Holst, Jens Juul

    2010-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) exerts beneficial antidiabetic actions via effects on pancreatic beta- and alpha-cells. Previous studies have focused on the improvements in beta-cell function, while the inhibition of alpha-cell secretion has received less attention. The aim of this research was to...

  15. New two-dimensional effective actions for non-singular black holes

    Kunstatter, Gabor; Taves, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We construct a two-dimensional action that is an extension of spherically symmetric Einstein-Lanczos-Lovelock gravity. The action contains arbitrary functions of the areal radius and the norm squared of its gradient, but the field equations are second order and obey a generalized Birkhoff's theorem. Since the field equations are derived from an action invariant under coordinate transformations preserving spherical symmetry, the diffeomorphism algebra closes. In complete analogy with spherically symmetric Einstein-Lanczos-Lovelock gravity, the Hamiltonian constraint can be written in terms of a generalized Misner-Sharp mass function that determines the form of the vacuum solution. The arbitrary functions in the action allow for vacuum solutions that describe a larger class of interesting non-singular black-hole spacetimes than previously available. These theories can therefore be used to study the dynamics of non-singular black-hole formation and evaporation, thereby shedding light on alternative resolutions o...

  16. Effect of metal complexation to anti-inflammatory over the action against oxidative and free radicals: ketoprofen action; Efeito da complexacao de metais aos antiinflamatorios na acao contra agentes oxidativos e radicais livres: acao do cetoprofeno

    Manente, Francine Alessandra; Mello, Lucas Rosolen de Almeida; Vellosa, Jose Carlos Rebuglio [UEPG, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Departamento de Analises Clinicas eToxicologicas, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Khalil, Omar Arafat Kdudsi [IFG, Instituto Federal de Goias, Campus de Formosa, Formosa - GO (Brazil); Carvalho, Claudio Teodoro de [UFGD, Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados, Faculdade de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologias, Dourados-MS (Brazil); Bannach, Gilbert [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho, Faculdade de Ciencias de Bauru, Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Free radicals are highly reactive species generated in living organisms for the purpose of protection. However, in some circumstances, they are responsible for the occurrence or aggravation of tissue damage. Many anti-inflammatory drugs have a direct effect on free radicals and not radical reactive species, which contributes to its actions against inflammation. Ketoprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent that generates free radicals by photo irradiation and has an important hemolytic effect with that. The complexation of metals to different drugs has been used as a strategy to improve the pharmacological action of different molecules and reduce their side effects. This paper presents the results of ketoprofen and their metallic complexes action on erythrocytes and free radicals. It was observed that the cerium enhances the scavenger properties of ketoprofen on free radicals, while copper enhances its action over non-radical oxidants. Copper also reduced the hemolytic effect presented by ketoprofen meanwhile its cerium derivative maintained it. (author)

  17. The Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness and the Accra Agenda for Action

    OECD Development Co-operation Directorate, DCD-DAC

    2008-01-01

    The Paris Declaration, endorsed on 2 March 2005, is an international agreement to which over one hundred Ministers, Heads of Agencies and other Senior Officials adhered and committed their countries and organisations to continue to increase efforts in harmonisation, alignment and managing aid for results with a set of monitorable actions and indicators. The Accra Agenda for Action (AAA) was drawn up in 2008 and builds on the commitments agreed in the Paris Declaration.

  18. The effect of action video game experience on task-switching

    Green, C. Shawn; Sugarman, Michael A.; Medford, Katherine; Klobusicky, Elizabeth; Daphne Bavelier,

    2012-01-01

    There is now a substantial body of work demonstrating that action video game experience results in enhancements in a wide variety of perceptual skills. More recently, several groups have also demonstrated improvements in abilities that are more cognitive in nature, in particular, the ability to efficiently switch between tasks. In a series of four experiments, we add to this body of work, demonstrating that the action video game player advantage is not exclusively due to an ability to map man...

  19. Time for actions in lucid dreams: effects of task modality, length, and complexity.

    Erlacher, Daniel; Schädlich, Melanie; Stumbrys, Tadas; Schredl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between time in dreams and real time has intrigued scientists for centuries. The question if actions in dreams take the same time as in wakefulness can be tested by using lucid dreams where the dreamer is able to mark time intervals with prearranged eye movements that can be objectively identified in EOG recordings. Previous research showed an equivalence of time for counting in lucid dreams and in wakefulness (LaBerge, 1985; Erlacher and Schredl, 2004), but Erlacher and Schredl (2004) found that performing squats required about 40% more time in lucid dreams than in the waking state. To find out if the task modality, the task length, or the task complexity results in prolonged times in lucid dreams, an experiment with three different conditions was conducted. In the first condition, five proficient lucid dreamers spent one to three non-consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. Participants counted to 10, 20, and 30 in wakefulness and in their lucid dreams. Lucidity and task intervals were time stamped with left-right-left-right eye movements. The same procedure was used for the second condition where eight lucid dreamers had to walk 10, 20, or 30 steps. In the third condition, eight lucid dreamers performed a gymnastics routine, which in the waking state lasted the same time as walking 10 steps. Again, we found that performing a motor task in a lucid dream requires more time than in wakefulness. Longer durations in the dream state were present for all three tasks, but significant differences were found only for the tasks with motor activity (walking and gymnastics). However, no difference was found for relative times (no disproportional time effects) and a more complex motor task did not result in more prolonged times. Longer durations in lucid dreams might be related to the lack of muscular feedback or slower neural processing during REM sleep. Future studies should explore factors that might be associated with prolonged durations. PMID:24474942

  20. Time for actions in lucid dreams: Effects of task modality, length, and complexity

    Daniel eErlacher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between time in dreams and real time has intrigued scientists for centuries. The question if actions in dreams take the same time as in wakefulness can be tested by using lucid dreams where the dreamer is able to mark time intervals with prearranged eye movements that can be objectively identified in EOG recordings. Previous research showed an equivalence of time for counting in lucid dreams and in wakefulness (Erlacher & Schredl, 2004; LaBerge, 1985, but Erlacher and Schredl (2004 found that performing squats required about 40 % more time in lucid dreams than in the waking state. To find out if the task modality, the task length, or the task complexity results in prolonged times in lucid dreams, an experiment with three different conditions was conducted.In the first condition, five proficient lucid dreamers spent one to three non-consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. Participants counted to 10, 20 and 30 in wakefulness and in their lucid dreams. Lucidity and task intervals were time stamped with left-right-left-right eye movements. The same procedure was used for the second condition where eight lucid dreamers had to walk 10, 20 or 30 steps. In the third condition, eight lucid dreamers performed a gymnastics routine, which in the waking state lasted the same time as walking 10 steps.Again, we found that performing a motor task in a lucid dream requires more time than in wakefulness. Longer durations in the dream state were present for all three tasks, but significant differences were found only for the tasks with motor activity (walking and gymnastics. However, no difference was found for relative times (no disproportional time effects and a more complex motor task did not result in more prolonged times. Longer durations in lucid dreams might be related to the lack of muscular feedback or slower neural processing during REM sleep. Future studies should explore factors that might be associated with prolonged durations.

  1. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons.

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-08-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca(2+) entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca(2+) buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca(2+)-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca(2+) elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377724

  2. Different mechanisms for role relations versus verb-action congruence effects: evidence from ERPs in picture-sentence verification.

    Knoeferle, Pia; Urbach, Thomas P; Kutas, Marta

    2014-10-01

    Extant accounts of visually situated language processing do make general predictions about visual context effects on incremental sentence comprehension; these, however, are not sufficiently detailed to accommodate potentially different visual context effects (such as a scene-sentence mismatch based on actions versus thematic role relations, e.g., (Altmann & Kamide, 2007; Knoeferle & Crocker, 2007; Taylor & Zwaan, 2008; Zwaan & Radvansky, 1998)). To provide additional data for theory testing and development, we collected event-related brain potentials (ERPs) as participants read a subject-verb-object sentence (500 ms SOA in Experiment 1 and 300 ms SOA in Experiment 2), and post-sentence verification times indicating whether or not the verb and/or the thematic role relations matched a preceding picture (depicting two participants engaged in an action). Though incrementally processed, these two types of mismatch yielded different ERP effects. Role-relation mismatch effects emerged at the subject noun as anterior negativities to the mismatching noun, preceding action mismatch effects manifest as centro-parietal N400s greater to the mismatching verb, regardless of SOAs. These two types of mismatch manipulations also yielded different effects post-verbally, correlated differently with a participant's mean accuracy, verbal working memory and visual-spatial scores, and differed in their interactions with SOA. Taken together these results clearly implicate more than a single mismatch mechanism for extant accounts of picture-sentence processing to accommodate. PMID:25216075

  3. Combined effects of estrogenic chemicals with the same mode of action using an estrogen receptor binding bioassay.

    Yang, Rong; Li, Na; Ma, Mei; Wang, Zijian

    2014-11-01

    The increasing amounts of various estrogenic chemicals coexisting in the aquatic environment may pose environmental risks. While the concept of estradiol equivalent (EEQ) has been frequently applied in studying estrogenic mixtures, few experiments have been done to prove its reliability. In this study, the reliability of EEQ and the related model concentration addition (CA) was verified based on the two-hybrid recombinant yeast bioassay when all mixture components had the same mode of action and target of action. Our results showed that the measured estrogenic effects could be well predicted by CA and EEQ for all laboratory-made mixtures using two designs, despite the varying estrogenic activity, concentration levels and ratios of the test chemicals. This suggests that when an appropriate endpoint and its relevant bioassay are chosen, CA should be valid and the application of EEQ in predicting the effect of non-equi-effect mixtures is feasible. PMID:25461542

  4. Defining soldier equipment trade space: load effects on combat marksmanship and perception-action coupling.

    Palmer, Christopher J; Bigelow, Carol; Van Emmerik, Richard E A

    2013-01-01

    Soldier equipment compromises task performance as temporal constraints during critical situations and load increase inertial and interactive forces during movement. Methods are necessary to optimise equipment that relate task performance to underlying coordination and perception-action coupling. Employing ecological task analysis and methods from dynamical systems theory, equipment load and coordination was examined during two sub-tasks embedded in combat performance, threat discrimination and dynamic marksmanship. Perception-action coupling was degraded with load during threat discrimination, leading to delays in functional reaction time. Reduced speed and accuracy during dynamic marksmanship under load was related to disrupted segmental coordination and adaptability during postural transitions between targets. These results show how reduced performance under load relates to coordination changes and perception-action coupling. These changes in functional capability are directly related to soldier survivability in combat. The methods employed may aid equipment design towards more optimised performance by modifying equipment or its distribution on humans. PMID:24028557

  5. HiRITER - An evaluation tool to reduce the adverse effect of inappropriate human actions in nuclear power plants

    From end-users to regulatory bodies, it is widely recognized that human-induced events including inappropriate human actions are one of the most crucial sources degrading the overall safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs). This means that a systematic framework through which inappropriate human actions can be effectively identified is necessary to enhance the safety of NPPs. For this reason, HiRITER (High Risk Inducible Task Evaluator) has been developed, which is able to evaluate the effect of inappropriate human actions on risk as well as performance. To this end, HiRITER integrates three modules that have distinctive roles: human error prediction module that is able to determine the types of failure modes resulting from inappropriate human actions with the associated daily task, performance evaluation module that computes the loss of electric power due to the change of component configurations caused by human error and risk evaluation module that clarifies whether or not the propagation of human error can trigger an unexpected shutdown of NPPs. In addition, a couple of real events that had occurred in domestic NPPs are simulated in order to validate the feasibility of HiRITER. As a result, it is observed that the results of HiRITER are largely congruent with those of real events. Therefore, although a huge amount of additional effort is indispensable to enhance the overall accuracy of estimated results, it is expected that HiRITER could be a good starting point to reduce the adverse effect of inappropriate human actions in NPPs

  6. Effects of action planning and coping planning within the theory of planned behaviour

    Pakpour, Amir H.; Zedi, Isa mohammadi; Chatzisarantis, Nikos;

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Patients on dialysis have low physical activity levels. The aim of the study was to examine the validity of action planning and coping planning within the theory of planned behaviour framework, for predicting physical activity behaviour of patients on hemodialysis. Methods: One hundred...... and forty four patients who were undergoing emodialysis were selected from dialysis centers. The mean age of the patients was 56.61 (SD= 11.38) years. The patients completed a questionnaire including variables from the theory of planned behaviour, action planning and coping planning. Physical activity...

  7. Reinvigorating International Climate Policy: A Comprehensive Framework for Effective Nonstate Action

    Chan, Sander; Asselt, van Harro; Hale, Thomas; Hoehne, N.E.

    2015-01-01

    As countries negotiate a new climate agreement for the United Nations climate conference in December 2015, a groundswell of climate actions is emerging as cities, regions, businesses and civil society groups act on mitigation and adaptation, independently, with each other and with national governmen

  8. Effect of ethanol on action potential in ventricular cardiomyocytes: experimental and computational approach

    Pásek, Michal; Bébarová, M.; Christé, G.; Šimurdová, M.; Šimurda, J.

    London: The Physiological Society, 2014. 208P. [Physiology 2014. 30.06.2014-02.07.2014, London] R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14301-3/2013 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : rat ventricular cardiomyocyte * action potential * ethanol * rat ventricular cell model Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  9. From primed concepts to action: A meta-analysis of the behavioral effects of incidentally presented words.

    Weingarten, Evan; Chen, Qijia; McAdams, Maxwell; Yi, Jessica; Hepler, Justin; Albarracín, Dolores

    2016-05-01

    A meta-analysis assessed the behavioral impact of and psychological processes associated with presenting words connected to an action or a goal representation. The average and distribution of 352 effect sizes (analyzed using fixed-effects and random-effects models) was obtained from 133 studies (84 reports) in which word primes were incidentally presented to participants, with a nonopposite control group, before measuring a behavioral dependent variable. Findings revealed a small behavioral priming effect (dFE = 0.332, dRE = 0.352), which was robust across methodological procedures and only minimally biased by the publication of positive (vs. negative) results. Theory testing analyses indicated that more valued behavior or goal concepts (e.g., associated with important outcomes or values) were associated with stronger priming effects than were less valued behaviors. Furthermore, there was some evidence of persistence of goal effects over time. These results support the notion that goal activation contributes over and above perception-behavior in explaining priming effects. In summary, theorizing about the role of value and satisfaction in goal activation pointed to stronger effects of a behavior or goal concept on overt action. There was no evidence that expectancy (ease of achieving the goal) moderated priming effects. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26689090

  10. An integrated approach for prospectively investigating a mode-of-action for rodent liver effects

    LeBaron, Matthew J., E-mail: MJLeBaron@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Geter, David R., E-mail: dave.geter@gmail.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Rasoulpour, Reza J. [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Gollapudi, B. Bhaskar, E-mail: BBGollapudi@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Thomas, Johnson, E-mail: JThomas4@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Murray, Jennifer, E-mail: AMurray@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Kan, H. Lynn, E-mail: HLKan@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Wood, Amanda J., E-mail: AJWood@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Elcombe, Cliff, E-mail: CliffElcombe@cxrbiosciences.com [CXR Biosciences, 2 James Lindsay Place, Dundee Technopole, Dundee, DD1 5JJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Vardy, Audrey, E-mail: audrey_vardy@europe.bd.com [CXR Biosciences, 2 James Lindsay Place, Dundee Technopole, Dundee, DD1 5JJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); McEwan, Jillian, E-mail: jillian.mcewan@rtmcewan.co.uk [CXR Biosciences, 2 James Lindsay Place, Dundee Technopole, Dundee, DD1 5JJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Terry, Claire, E-mail: CTerry@dow.com [Dow AgroSciences, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Billington, Richard, E-mail: RBillington@dow.com [Dow AgroSciences, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    Registration of new plant protection products (e.g., herbicide, insecticide, or fungicide) requires comprehensive mammalian toxicity evaluation including carcinogenicity studies in two species. The outcome of the carcinogenicity testing has a significant bearing on the overall human health risk assessment of the substance and, consequently, approved uses for different crops across geographies. In order to understand the relevance of a specific tumor finding to human health, a systematic, transparent, and hypothesis-driven mode of action (MoA) investigation is, appropriately, an expectation by the regulatory agencies. Here, we describe a novel approach of prospectively generating the MoA data by implementing additional end points to the standard guideline toxicity studies with sulfoxaflor, a molecule in development. This proactive MoA approach results in a more robust integration of molecular with apical end points while minimizing animal use. Sulfoxaflor, a molecule targeting sap-feeding insects, induced liver effects (increased liver weight due to hepatocellular hypertrophy) in an initial palatability probe study for selecting doses for subsequent repeat-dose dietary studies. This finding triggered the inclusion of dose-response investigations of the potential key events for rodent liver carcinogenesis, concurrent with the hazard assessment studies. As predicted, sulfoxaflor induced liver tumors in rats and mice in the bioassays. The MoA data available by the time of the carcinogenicity finding supported the conclusion that the carcinogenic potential of sulfoxaflor was due to CAR/PXR nuclear receptor activation with subsequent hepatocellular proliferation. This MoA was not considered to be relevant to humans as sulfoxaflor is unlikely to induce hepatocellular proliferation in humans and therefore would not be a human liver carcinogen. - Highlights: • We prospectively generated MoA data into standard guideline toxicity studies. • A proactive MoA approach

  11. An integrated approach for prospectively investigating a mode-of-action for rodent liver effects

    Registration of new plant protection products (e.g., herbicide, insecticide, or fungicide) requires comprehensive mammalian toxicity evaluation including carcinogenicity studies in two species. The outcome of the carcinogenicity testing has a significant bearing on the overall human health risk assessment of the substance and, consequently, approved uses for different crops across geographies. In order to understand the relevance of a specific tumor finding to human health, a systematic, transparent, and hypothesis-driven mode of action (MoA) investigation is, appropriately, an expectation by the regulatory agencies. Here, we describe a novel approach of prospectively generating the MoA data by implementing additional end points to the standard guideline toxicity studies with sulfoxaflor, a molecule in development. This proactive MoA approach results in a more robust integration of molecular with apical end points while minimizing animal use. Sulfoxaflor, a molecule targeting sap-feeding insects, induced liver effects (increased liver weight due to hepatocellular hypertrophy) in an initial palatability probe study for selecting doses for subsequent repeat-dose dietary studies. This finding triggered the inclusion of dose-response investigations of the potential key events for rodent liver carcinogenesis, concurrent with the hazard assessment studies. As predicted, sulfoxaflor induced liver tumors in rats and mice in the bioassays. The MoA data available by the time of the carcinogenicity finding supported the conclusion that the carcinogenic potential of sulfoxaflor was due to CAR/PXR nuclear receptor activation with subsequent hepatocellular proliferation. This MoA was not considered to be relevant to humans as sulfoxaflor is unlikely to induce hepatocellular proliferation in humans and therefore would not be a human liver carcinogen. - Highlights: • We prospectively generated MoA data into standard guideline toxicity studies. • A proactive MoA approach

  12. Concentration addition, independent action and generalized concentration addition models for mixture effect prediction of sex hormone synthesis in vitro

    Hadrup, Niels; Taxvig, Camilla; Pedersen, Mikael;

    2013-01-01

    of the concentration addition (CA), independent action (IA) and generalized concentration addition (GCA) models. First we measured effects of single chemicals and mixtures thereof on steroid synthesis in H295R cells. Then single chemical data were applied to the models; predictions of mixture effects were calculated...... and compared to the experimental mixture data. Mixture 1 contained environmental chemicals adjusted in ratio according to human exposure levels. Mixture 2 was a potency adjusted mixture containing five pesticides. Prediction of testosterone effects coincided with the experimental Mixture 1 data. In contrast...

  13. Effects of nerve growth factor on the action potential duration and repolarizing currents in a rabbit model of myocardial infarction

    Yun-Feng Lan; Yang Li; Jian-Cheng Zhang; Jin-Lao Gao; Xue-Ping Wang; Zhou Fang; Yi-Cheng Fu; Mei-Yan Chen; Min Lin; Qiao Xue

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on the action potential and potassium currents of non-infarcted myocardium in the myocardial infarcted rabbit model. Methods Rabbits with occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery were prepared and allowed to recover for eight weeks (healed myocardial infarction, HMI). During ligation surgery of the left coronary artery, a polyethylene tube was placed near the left stellate ganglion in the subcutis of the neck for the purpose of administering NGF 400 U/d for eight weeks (HMI + NGF group). Cardiomyocytes were isolated from regions of the non-infarcted left ventricular wall and the action potentials and ion currents in these cells were recorded using whole-cell patch clamps. Results Compared with HMI and control cardiomyocytes, significant prolongation of APD50 or APD90 (Action potential duration (APD) measured at 50% and 90% of repolarization) in HMI + NGF cardiomyocytes was found. The results showed that the 4-aminopyridine sensitive transient outward potassium current (Ito), the rapidly activated omponent of delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr), the slowly activated component of delayed rectifier potassium current (IKs), and the L-type calcium current (ICaL) were significantly altered in NGF + HMI cardiomyocytes compared with HMI and control cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that NGF treatment significantly prolongs APD in HMI cardiomyocytes and that a decrease in outward potassium currents and an increase of inward Ca2+ current are likely the underlying mechanism of action.

  14. Maggot therapy´s modes of action: effect of maggot secretions on microbiological, haematological and immunological processes

    Plas, Maartje Jeriena Adriana van der

    2009-01-01

    The work described in this thesis focussed on the modes of action of maggot therapy in chronic wounds, especially related to the inflammatory phase of wound healing. For this purpose, the effect of maggot excretions and/or secretions on microbiological, haematological and immunological processes was investigated. The results showed that maggot excretions/secretions breakdown biofilms of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, exposing them to the immune system, antibiotics, and ingesti...

  15. Effects of the restoration actions to combat desertification on soils: the practice project study site in Pula (Sardinia, Italy)

    Zucca, Claudio; FIORI, Valeria; Cucca, Carlo; Musinu, Silvia; Campus, Sergio Francesco; MADRAU, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    Land Degradation and Desertification affect much of the world’s drylands, resulting in a significant loss of biological and economic productivity. Responding to desertification by improving the efficiency of land and resource management represents a crucial step towards social welfare in drylands. However, the evaluation of the actions to combat desertification remains limited. The PRACTICE EC-FP7 project develops and tests integrated evaluation protocols to assess the effectiveness of res...

  16. A survey of the effective factors in students' adherence to university dress code policy, using the theory of reasoned action

    MOHAMMAD HOSSEIN KAVEH; LEILA MORADI; MARYAM HESAMPOUR; JAFAR HASAN ZADEH

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Recognizing the determinants of behavior plays a major role in identification and application of effective strategies for encouraging individuals to follow the intended pattern of behavior. The present study aimed to analyze the university students’ behaviors regarding the amenability to dress code, using the theory of reasoned action (TRA). Methods: In this cross sectional study, 472 students were selected through multi-stage random sampling. The data were ...

  17. Key Issues in the Modes of Action and Effects of Trichloroethylene Metabolites for Liver and Kidney Tumorigenesis

    Caldwell, Jane C.; Keshava, Nagalakshmi

    2006-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure has been associated with increased risk of liver and kidney cancer in both laboratory animal and epidemiologic studies. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 2001 draft TCE risk assessment concluded that it is difficult to determine which TCE metabolites may be responsible for these effects, the key events involved in their modes of action (MOAs), and the relevance of these MOAs to humans. In this article, which is part of a mini-monograph on key issues in ...

  18. A frame-dependent gravitational effective action mimics a cosmological constant, but modifies the black hole horizon

    Adler, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    A frame dependent effective action motivated by the postulates of three-space general coordinate invariance and Weyl scaling invariance exactly mimics a cosmological constant in Robertson-Walker spacetimes. However, in a static spherically symmetric Schwarzschild-like geometry it modifies the black hole horizon structure within microscopic distances of the nominal horizon, in such a way that $g_{00}$ never vanishes. This could have important implications for the black hole "information paradox".

  19. Computational modeling of voltage-gated Ca channels inhibition: identification of different effects on uterine and cardiac action potentials

    Wing Chiu eTong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The uterus and heart share the important physiological feature whereby contractile activation of the muscle tissue is regulated by the generation of periodic, spontaneous electrical action potentials (APs. Preterm birth arising from premature uterine contractions is a major complication of pregnancy and there remains a need to pursue avenues of research that facilitate the use of drugs, tocolytics, to limit these inappropriate contractions without deleterious actions on cardiac electrical excitation. A novel approach is to make use of mathematical models of uterine and cardiac APs, which incorporate many ionic currents contributing to the AP forms, and test the cell-specific responses to interventions. We have used three such models – of uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC, cardiac sinoatrial node cells (SAN and ventricular cells – to investigate the relative effects of reducing two important voltage-gated Ca currents – the L-type (ICaL and T-type (ICaT Ca currents. Reduction of ICaL (10% alone, or ICaT (40% alone, blunted USMC APs with little effect on ventricular APs and only mild effects on SAN activity. Larger reductions in either current further attenuated the USMC APs but with also greater effects on SAN APs. Encouragingly, a combination of ICaL and ICaT reduction did blunt USMC APs as intended with little detriment to APs of either cardiac cell type. Subsequent overlapping maps of ICaL and ICaT inhibition profiles from each model revealed a range of combined reductions of ICaL and ICaT over which an appreciable diminution of USMC APs could be achieved with no deleterious action on cardiac SAN or ventricular APs. This novel approach illustrates the potential for computational biology to inform us of possible uterine and cardiac cell-specific mechanisms. Incorporating such computational approaches in future studies directed at designing new, or repurposing existing, tocolytics will be beneficial for establishing a desired uterine

  20. Protective Effect of Flos Lonicerae against Experimental Gastric Ulcers in Rats: Mechanisms of Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Action

    Kang, Jung-Woo; Yun, Nari; Han, Hae-Jung; Kim, Jeom-Yong; Kim, Joo-Young; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2014-01-01

    Flos Lonicerae is one of the oldest and most commonly prescribed herbs in Eastern traditional medicine to treat various inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ethyl acetate fraction of Flos Lonicerae (GC-7101) on experimental gastric ulcer models and its mechanisms of action in gastric ulcer healing. The pharmacological activity of GC-7101 was investigated in rats on HCl/EtOH, indomethacin, water immersion restraint stress induced acute gastric ulcer, and ...

  1. UV action spectra for mammalian systems: their implications for the predicted effects of ozone depletion of skin cancer incidence

    A reasonable first step in the evaluation of the biological effects of UV-B radiation and of depletion of stratospheric ozone is to assume that cellular DNA is the most-important target. Recent experimental work has concentrated to obtain action spectra for vertebrate cells for a number of different endpoints. If skin cancer arises from the effects of UV-B on DNA, the action spectrum must be multiplied by the appropriate transmission spectrum of the skin. A 1% change in ozone will result in an approximate 2.3% change in UV damage corresponding to a DNA action spectrum. Data on the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer in the USA show clear trends as a function of latitude or UV-B exposure. A prediction of the change of incidence as a function of ozone concentration must consider the many variables involved. The National Research Council report 1982 presents two calculations of the effects of ozone depletion on skin cancer incidence, which are presented and discussed. (MG)

  2. Transforming Conflict into Effective Action: A Case Study on the Effects of Anthropogenic Sound on Marine Mammals

    Lewandowski, Jill K.

    Like many wicked environmental problems of our time, marine sound and its potential effects on marine mammals is characterized by high levels of scientific uncertainty, diversified values across many stakeholder groups, political and regulatory complexities, and a continually evolving ecological and social environment. Further, the history of conflict and the relationships between major actors has rooted the issue firmly in identity conflict where prejudices lead to avoidance of working together. What results is continuing controversy, failed management decisions, litigation and an increasing frustration by all parties on why a better solution cannot be found. Ultimately, the intractability of the issue is not about the science, nor will the science ever tame the issue on its own. Rather, the issue is intractable because of the conflict between people about the most appropriate path forward. It is then imperative to understand, address, and transform this conflict in order to move off the decision carousel toward improved conservation outcomes and sustainable decisions for all. This research used an explanatory case study approach to quantitatively and qualitatively investigate the context and reasoning underlying conflict on this issue. Three methods were used in order to triangulate the data, and thus add rigor, including: (1) a document review of 230 publications: (2) exploratory interviews with 10 collaborative action experts and semi-structured interviews with 58 marine mammals and sound stakeholders; and (3) participant review of selected analyses. Data elucidate how different stakeholder groups define the problem and potential solutions, how they see their role and view the role of other stakeholders, specific experiences that increased or decrease conflict, and design preferences for a collaborative effort. These data are combined with conflict transformation principles to provide recommendations for a collaborative, transformative framework designed to

  3. Time for actions in lucid dreams: Effects of task modality, length, and complexity

    Daniel eErlacher; Melanie eSchädlich; Tadas eStumbrys; Michael eSchredl

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between time in dreams and real time has intrigued scientists for centuries. The question if actions in dreams take the same time as in wakefulness can be tested by using lucid dreams where the dreamer is able to mark time intervals with prearranged eye movements that can be objectively identified in EOG recordings. Previous research showed an equivalence of time for counting in lucid dreams and in wakefulness (Erlacher & Schredl, 2004; LaBerge, 1985), but Erlacher and Schred...

  4. Motivating Exercise: The Interactive Effect of General Action Goals and Past Behavior on Physical Activity

    Hepler, Justin; Wang, Wei; Albarracin, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Although exercise is recognized as a powerful tool to combat obesity, remarkably few US adults pursue adequate amounts of exercise, with one major impediment being a lack of motivation for active behaviors. Recent empirical work has demonstrated that behavior can be guided by goals to be generally active or inactive. In the present paper, an experiment is presented in which participants played or observed a video game, were primed with action or inaction goals, and practiced a stretching exer...

  5. Policies, Actions and Effects for China s Forestry Response to Global Climate Change

    2008-01-01

    Climate change is a great concern of various countries, the public and science community, and forest plays an important role in mitigating climate change. The paper made a comprehensive analysis regarding the policy selections of China to promote forestry response to the global climate change, and elaborated the concrete actions and achievements in this regard. Policy selections include: 1) Reinforce tree planting and afforestation, increase the forested area and enhance the capacity of carbon sequestration...

  6. Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2012

    Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Jeff; Skalski, J. R.; Teel, D. J.; Brewer, Taylor; Bryson, Amanda J.; Dawley, Earl M.; Kuligowski, D. R.; Whitesel, T.; Mallette, Christine

    2013-11-30

    The study reported herein was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), University of Washington (UW), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). The goal of the study was to evaluate the ecological benefits of restoration actions for juvenile salmon in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; rkm 0–234).

  7. Effect and mechanism of action of aphidicolin on yeast deoxyribonucleic acid polymerases.

    Plevani, P; Badaracco, G; Ginelli, E; Sora, S

    1980-01-01

    The antibiotic aphidicolin inhibited in vitro deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis catalyzed by crude yeast extracts and by partially purified yeast deoxyribonucleic acid polymerases. The mechanism of action of aphidicolin on yeast deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase I was noncompetitive with deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate, deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate, and deoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate and was of the mixed type with deoxycytidine 5'-triphosphate. The relative ratio of enzyme to the template-initi...

  8. Effect of ethanol on action potential and ionic membrane currents in rat ventricular myocytes

    Bébarová, M.; Matejovič, P.; Pásek, Michal; Ohlídalová, D.; Jansová, D.; Šimurdová, M.; Šimurda, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 200, č. 4 (2010), s. 301-314. ISSN 1748-1708 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : action potential * ethanol * rat ventricular myocyte Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.138, year: 2010 http:// apps .isiknowledge.com/full_record.do?product=UA&search_mode=GeneralSearch&qid=15&SID=Y1pmpi@7k2HPEc8ehEE&page=1&doc=1&colname=WOS

  9. Effects of mass action equilibria on fixed-bed multicomponent ion-exchange dynamics

    A generalized parallel pore and surface diffusion model and associated dynamic simulation program have been developed for multicomponent fixed-bed ion-exchange processes. Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium mass action laws are used to describe stoichiometric ion exchange. Model equations are solved numerically for frontal, pulse, or sequential loading processes. Analytical solutions obtained from a local equilibrium theory for binary systems and experimental data of two multicomponent systems served as benchmarks for the numerical solutions. The results indicate that the parallel pore and surface diffusion model should be considered for nonlinear large-particle systems. A parametric study shows that a major difference in fixed-bed dynamics between mass action and Langmuir systems lies in the propagation of diffuse waves of multivalent ions. Generally, the higher the valence or mass action equilibrium constant, the more pronounced the tailing of diffuse waves, which results in apparent adsorption hysteresis in a loading and washing cycle. The apparently irreversibly adsorbed multivalent ions can be eluted by concentrated solutions of lower valence ions, as a result of the relative selectivities of the higher valence against lower valence ions decreasing with increasing total solution phase concentration. This can lead to changes from favorable to unfavorable isotherms and self-sharpening eaves to diffuse waves, or vice versa. Other results show that elution order can be reversed for heterovalent ions in elution and displacement chromatography

  10. Intentional Action and Action Slips.

    Heckhausen, Heinz; Beckmann, Jurgen

    1990-01-01

    An explanation of action slips is offered that examines controlled actions in the context of an intentional behavior theory. Actions are considered guided by mentally represented intentions, subdivided into goal intentions and contingent instrumental intentions. Action slips are categorized according to problem areas in the enactment of goal…

  11. The Effects of Action and Violence in Television Programs on the Social Behavior and Imaginative Play of Preschool Children.

    Huston-Stein, Aletha; And Others

    The independent contributions of action and violence in television programs to children's attention and social behavior were investigated. Pairs of preschool children were assigned to one of four television conditions (1) high action-high violence, (2) high action-low violence, (3) low action-low violence, or (4) no television. Action was defined…

  12. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of selective phenolic acids on T47D human breast cancer cells: potential mechanisms of action

    The oncoprotective role of food-derived polyphenol antioxidants has been described but the implicated mechanisms are not yet clear. In addition to polyphenols, phenolic acids, found at high concentrations in a number of plants, possess antioxidant action. The main phenolic acids found in foods are derivatives of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxycinnamic acid. This work concentrates on the antiproliferative action of caffeic acid, syringic acid, sinapic acid, protocatechuic acid, ferulic acid and 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylacetic acid (PAA) on T47D human breast cancer cells, testing their antioxidant activity and a number of possible mechanisms involved (interaction with membrane and intracellular receptors, nitric oxide production). The tested compounds showed a time-dependent and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell growth with the following potency: caffeic acid > ferulic acid = protocatechuic acid = PAA > sinapic acid = syringic acid. Caffeic acid and PAA were chosen for further analysis. The antioxidative activity of these phenolic acids in T47D cells does not coincide with their inhibitory effect on tumoral proliferation. No interaction was found with steroid and adrenergic receptors. PAA induced an inhibition of nitric oxide synthase, while caffeic acid competes for binding and results in an inhibition of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-induced CYP1A1 enzyme. Both agents induce apoptosis via the Fas/FasL system. Phenolic acids exert a direct antiproliferative action, evident at low concentrations, comparable with those found in biological fluids after ingestion of foods rich in phenolic acids. Furthermore, the direct interaction with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, the nitric oxide synthase inhibition and their pro-apoptotic effect provide some insights into their biological mode of action

  13. A3 Adenosine Receptor Allosteric Modulator Induces an Anti-Inflammatory Effect: In Vivo Studies and Molecular Mechanism of Action

    Shira Cohen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR is overexpressed in inflammatory cells and in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of individuals with inflammatory conditions. Agonists to the A3AR are known to induce specific anti-inflammatory effects upon chronic treatment. LUF6000 is an allosteric compound known to modulate the A3AR and render the endogenous ligand adenosine to bind to the receptor with higher affinity. The advantage of allosteric modulators is their capability to target specifically areas where adenosine levels are increased such as inflammatory and tumor sites, whereas normal body cells and tissues are refractory to the allosteric modulators due to low adenosine levels. LUF6000 administration induced anti-inflammatory effect in 3 experimental animal models of rat adjuvant induced arthritis, monoiodoacetate induced osteoarthritis, and concanavalin A induced liver inflammation in mice. The molecular mechanism of action points to deregulation of signaling proteins including PI3K, IKK, IκB, Jak-2, and STAT-1, resulting in decreased levels of NF-κB, known to mediate inflammatory effects. Moreover, LUF6000 induced a slight stimulatory effect on the number of normal white blood cells and neutrophils. The anti-inflammatory effect of LUF6000, mechanism of action, and the differential effects on inflammatory and normal cells position this allosteric modulator as an attractive and unique drug candidate.

  14. On the Reduction of Vector and Axial-Vector Fields in a Meson Effective Action at O(p4)

    Starting from an effective NJL-type quark interaction we have derived an effective meson action for the pseudoscalar sector. The vector and axial-vector degrees of freedom have been integrated out, applying the static equations of motion. As the results we have found a (reduced) pseudoscalar meson Lagrangian of the Gasser-Leutwyler type with modified structure coefficients Li. This method has been also used to construct the reduced weak and electromagnetic-weak currents. The application of the reduced Lagrangian and currents has been considered in physical processes. 36 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  15. The two-loop effective action and some symmetries of the Riemann tensor and the Kalb-Ramond H field

    Ozkurt, S S

    2003-01-01

    Sometimes ago, it has been proposed in a paper by N.Kaloper and K.A.Meissner (\\PR {\\bf D56} (1997) 7940) that if one makes local redefinitions of fields, it does not change the equations of motion (in the redefined fields); however, this comment has not generally been accepted, namely, the redefined fields satisfy different equations of motion. For this reason, the whole action will be written in terms of the zeroth-order field equations in this paper. In this study, we also observe that N.Kaloper and K.A.Meissner's effective action (\\PR {\\bf D56} (1997) 7940)which has a duality symmetry beyond the first loop, can be written in terms of the zeroth-order field equations if the Riemann tensor and the Kalb-Ramond field have some symmetries. For example, K\\"{a}hler manifolds have these symmetries.

  16. Image registration of a moving target phantom with helical tomotherapy: effect of the CT acquisition technique and action level proposal

    Woodford, Curtis; Yartsev, Slav; Van Dyk, Jake

    2008-09-01

    This study aims to quantify the effects of target motion and resultant motion artifacts in planning and megavoltage CT (MVCT) studies on the automatic registration processes of helical tomotherapy. Clinical and experimental data were used to derive an action level for patient repositioning on helical tomotherapy. Planning CT studies of a respiratory motion phantom were acquired using conventional and four-dimensional CT (4D CT) techniques. MVCT studies were acquired on helical tomotherapy in the presence and absence of target motion and were registered with different planning CT studies. The residual errors of the registration process were calculated from the registration values to quantify the ability of the process to detect 5 or 10 mm translations of the phantom in two directions. Twenty-seven registration combinations of MVCT inter-slice spacing, technique and resolution were investigated. The residual errors were used as an estimate of the localization error of the registration process, and the accuracy of couch repositioning was determined from couch position measurements during 866 treatment fractions. These two parameters were used to calculate the action level for patient repositioning on helical tomotherapy. Automatic registration of an MVCT study with 0% breathing phase, average intensity and maximum intensity 4D CT projections did not differ from that of an MVCT study with a conventional planning CT. Motion artifacts in the MVCT or planning CT studies changed the accuracy of the automatic registration process by less than 2.0%. The action level for patient repositioning using MVCT studies of 6 mm inter-slice spacing was determined to be 0.7, 1.1 and 0.6 mm in the x-, y- and z-directions, respectively. These action levels have the greatest effect on treatments for disease sites in the brain.

  17. Image registration of a moving target phantom with helical tomotherapy: effect of the CT acquisition technique and action level proposal

    This study aims to quantify the effects of target motion and resultant motion artifacts in planning and megavoltage CT (MVCT) studies on the automatic registration processes of helical tomotherapy. Clinical and experimental data were used to derive an action level for patient repositioning on helical tomotherapy. Planning CT studies of a respiratory motion phantom were acquired using conventional and four-dimensional CT (4D CT) techniques. MVCT studies were acquired on helical tomotherapy in the presence and absence of target motion and were registered with different planning CT studies. The residual errors of the registration process were calculated from the registration values to quantify the ability of the process to detect 5 or 10 mm translations of the phantom in two directions. Twenty-seven registration combinations of MVCT inter-slice spacing, technique and resolution were investigated. The residual errors were used as an estimate of the localization error of the registration process, and the accuracy of couch repositioning was determined from couch position measurements during 866 treatment fractions. These two parameters were used to calculate the action level for patient repositioning on helical tomotherapy. Automatic registration of an MVCT study with 0% breathing phase, average intensity and maximum intensity 4D CT projections did not differ from that of an MVCT study with a conventional planning CT. Motion artifacts in the MVCT or planning CT studies changed the accuracy of the automatic registration process by less than 2.0%. The action level for patient repositioning using MVCT studies of 6 mm inter-slice spacing was determined to be 0.7, 1.1 and 0.6 mm in the x-, y- and z-directions, respectively. These action levels have the greatest effect on treatments for disease sites in the brain

  18. Reflecting on mirror mechanisms: motor resonance effects during action observation only present with low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Michela Loporto

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS studies indicate that the observation of other people's actions influences the excitability of the observer's motor system. Motor evoked potential (MEP amplitudes typically increase in muscles which would be active during the execution of the observed action. This 'motor resonance' effect is thought to result from activity in mirror neuron regions, which enhance the excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1 via cortico-cortical pathways. The importance of TMS intensity has not yet been recognised in this area of research. Low-intensity TMS predominately activates corticospinal neurons indirectly, whereas high-intensity TMS can directly activate corticospinal axons. This indicates that motor resonance effects should be more prominent when using low-intensity TMS. A related issue is that TMS is typically applied over a single optimal scalp position (OSP to simultaneously elicit MEPs from several muscles. Whether this confounds results, due to differences in the manner that TMS activates spatially separate cortical representations, has not yet been explored. In the current study, MEP amplitudes, resulting from single-pulse TMS applied over M1, were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI and abductor digiti minimi (ADM muscles during the observation of simple finger abductions. We tested if the TMS intensity (110% vs. 130% resting motor threshold or stimulating position (FDI-OSP vs. ADM-OSP influenced the magnitude of the motor resonance effects. Results showed that the MEP facilitation recorded in the FDI muscle during the observation of index-finger abductions was only detected using low-intensity TMS. In contrast, changes in the OSP had a negligible effect on the presence of motor resonance effects in either the FDI or ADM muscles. These findings support the hypothesis that MN activity enhances M1 excitability via cortico-cortical pathways and highlight a methodological framework by which the

  19. Effects of bacterial action on waste rock producing acid drainage in the Brazilian first uranium mine

    This work is an evolution of the methodology showed in the paper 'Study of waste of waste rock piles producing acid drainage in the Brazilian first uranium mine', also submitted for INAC2009. Therefore, the present work also related to the determination of chemical species leaching from waste rock pile 4 (WRP4) of the Uranium Mine and Milling Facility located in the Pocos de Caldas Plateau, as well as the generation of acid waters. With the previous experimental setup, it has been observed that not only water and available oxygen are significant to pyrite oxidation reaction, but bacterial activity as well. As a first approach, the present work addresses the same experiment, but now testing without the influence of bacterial action. Therefore, the new methodology and experimental setup is now capable of determining the acidity of water in contact with material from the WRP4 and the concentration of chemical species dissolved as function of time. Such would also show the extent of bacterial action interference on the pyrite oxidation reaction. Results are based on mass balances comparing concentrations of chemical species in the waste rock before the experiment and in the waste rock plus the remaining water after the experiment. In addition, the evolution of the pH and EMF (electromotive force) values along with chemical species quantified through the experiment are presented through graphics. That is followed by discussions on the significance of such results in terms of concentration of the involved chemical species. The present work has also shown the need of improving the injection of air into the system. A more sophisticated experimental setup should be assembled in the near future, which would allow the quantification of differences between experimental tests with and without bacterial action. (author)

  20. EFFECTS OF CHANGES IN HIP POSITION ON ACTIONS OF SPINAL INHIBITORY INTERNEURONS IN HUMANS

    Knikou, Maria

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish whether in healthy human subjects the actions of group I muscle afferents arising from the same spinal segments as the soleus innervation (e.g., common peroneal nerve; CPN) or from more proximal spinal segments (femoral nerve; FN) on the soleus H-reflex are modified by changes in hip position. Control and conditioned soleus H-reflexes were elicited and recorded via conventional methods. In seated subjects, CPN and FN stimulation resulted in simila...

  1. Effects of ionizing-radiation and post-radiation action of some plant growth regulators on the seed germination and seedling growth of Scotch pine

    Leszek Michalski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of small doses of gamma irradiation on the seed germination and seedling growth of Scotch pine and post-radiation action of water solutions of IAA, GA3 and kinetin have been investigated. Changes in the destructive action of ionizing-radiation toy gibberellic acid and its intensifying by IAA and kinetin has been found.

  2. Effects of ionizing-radiation and post-radiation action of some plant growth regulators on the seed germination and seedling growth of Scotch pine

    The effects of small doses of gamma irradiation on the seed germination and seedling growth of Scotch pine and post-radiation action of water solutions of IAA, GA3 and kinetin have been investigated. Changes in the destructive action of ionizing-radiation by gibberellic acid and its intensifying by IAA and kinetin has been found. (author)

  3. An antagonist of lipid A action in mammals has complex effects on lipid A induction of defence responses in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    Erbs, Gitte; Jensen, Tina Tandrup; Silipo, Alba;

    2008-01-01

    perception that underpin these effects in plants are, however, unknown. Here, lipid A from Halomonas magadiensis, which is an antagonist of lipid A action in human cells, was used to investigate lipid A action in plants. Our findings offer an insight into the different structural requirements for direct...

  4. Joint Action of a Pair of Rowers in a Race: Shared Experiences of Effectiveness Are Shaped by Interpersonal Mechanical States

    R’Kiouak, Mehdi; Saury, Jacques; Durand, Marc; Bourbousson, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how a single pair of expert individual rowers experienced their crew functioning in natural conditions when asked to practice a joint movement for the first time. To fulfill this objective, we conducted a field study of interpersonal coordination that combined phenomenological and mechanical data from a coxless pair activity, to analyze the dynamics of the (inter)subjective experience compared with the dynamics of the team coordination. Using an enactivist approach to social couplings, these heterogeneous data were combined to explore the salience (and accuracy) of individuals’ shared experiences of their joint action. First, we determined how each rower experienced the continuous crew functioning states (e.g., feelings of the boat’s glide). Second, the phenomenological data helped us to build several categories of oar strokes (i.e., cycles), experienced by the rowers as either detrimentally or effectively performed strokes. Third, the mechanical signatures that correlated with each phenomenological category were tracked at various level of organization (i.e., individual-, interpersonal-, and boat-levels). The results indicated that (a) the two rowers did not pay attention to their joint action during most of the cycles, (b) some cycles were simultaneously lived as a salient, meaningful experience of either a detrimental (n = 15 cycles) or an effective (n = 18 cycles) joint action, and (c) the mechanical signatures diverged across the delineated phenomenological categories, suggesting that the way in which the cycles were experienced emerged from the variance in some mechanical parameters (i.e., differences in peak force level and mean force). Notably, the mechanical measures that helped to explain differences within the phenomenological categories were found at the interpersonal level of analysis, thus suggesting an intentional inter-personal mode of regulation of their joint action. This result is further challenged

  5. Joint action of a pair of rowers in a race: Shared experiences of effectiveness are shaped by interpersonal mechanical states

    Mehdi eR'kiouak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to understand how a single pair of expert individual rowers experienced their crew functioning in natural conditions when asked to practice a joint movement for the first time. To fulfill this objective, we conducted a field study of interpersonal coordination that combined phenomenological and mechanical data from a coxless pair activity, to analyze the dynamics of the (intersubjective experience compared with the dynamics of the team coordination. Using an enactivist approach to social couplings, these heterogeneous data were combined to explore the salience (and accuracy of individuals’ shared experiences of their joint action. First, we determined how each rower experienced the continuous crew functioning states (e.g., feelings of the boat’s glide. Second, the phenomenological data helped us to build several categories of oar strokes (i.e., cycles, experienced by the rowers as either detrimentally or effectively performed strokes. Third, the mechanical signatures that correlated with each phenomenological category were tracked at various level of organization (i.e., individual-, interpersonal-, and boat-levels. The results indicated that (a the two rowers did not pay attention to their joint action during most of the cycles, (b some cycles were simultaneously lived as a salient, meaningful experience of either a detrimental (n= 15 cycles or an effective (n=18 cycles joint action, and (c the mechanical signatures diverged across the delineated phenomenological categories, suggesting that the way in which the cycles were experienced emerged from the variance in some mechanical parameters (i.e., differences in peak force level and mean force. Notably, the mechanical measures that helped to explain differences within the phenomenological categories were found at the interpersonal level of analysis, thus suggesting an intentional inter-personal mode of regulation of their joint action. This result is further

  6. Exploring perception-action relations in music production: The asymmetric effect of tonal class.

    Jebb, Andrew T; Pfordresher, Peter Q

    2016-05-01

    When playing musical passages, performers integrate the pitch content of auditory feedback with current action plans. However, this process depends on the degree to which the musical structure of the feedback melody is perceived as similar to the structure of what is planned. Four experiments reported here explored the relationship between the tonal class of planned melodies (tonal or atonal) and the sequence of events formed by auditory feedback. Participants produced short melodies from memory that were either tonal (Experiments 1 and 3) or atonal (Experiments 2 and 4). Auditory feedback matched the planned melody with respect to contour but could vary in tonal class. The results showed that when participants planned a tonal melody, atonal feedback was treated as unrelated to the planned sequence. However, when planning an atonal melody, tonal feedback was still treated as similar to the planned sequence. This asymmetric similarity mirrors findings found within the music perception literature and implies that schematic musical knowledge is highly active in determining perception-action relations during music performance. PMID:26594878

  7. Deleterious effects of lard-enriched diet on tissues fatty acids composition and hypothalamic insulin actions.

    Dornellas, A P S; Watanabe, R L H; Pimentel, G D; Boldarine, V T; Nascimento, C M O; Oyama, L M; Ghebremeskel, K; Wang, Y; Bueno, A A; Ribeiro, E B

    2015-12-01

    Altered tissue fatty acid (FA) composition may affect mechanisms involved in the control of energy homeostasis, including central insulin actions. In rats fed either standard chow or a lard-enriched chow (high in saturated/low in polyunsaturated FA, HS-LP) for eight weeks, we examined the FA composition of blood, hypothalamus, liver, and retroperitoneal, epididymal and mesenteric adipose tissues. Insulin-induced hypophagia and hypothalamic signaling were evaluated after intracerebroventricular insulin injection. HS-LP feeding increased saturated FA content in adipose tissues and serum while it decreased polyunsaturated FA content of adipose tissues, serum, and liver. Hypothalamic C20:5n-3 and C20:3n-6 contents increased while monounsaturated FA content decreased. HS-LP rats showed hyperglycemia, impaired insulin-induced hypophagia and hypothalamic insulin signaling. The results showed that, upon HS-LP feeding, peripheral tissues underwent potentially deleterious alterations in their FA composition, whist the hypothalamus was relatively preserved. However, hypothalamic insulin signaling and hypophagia were drastically impaired. These findings suggest that impairment of hypothalamic insulin actions by HS-LP feeding was not related to tissue FA composition. PMID:26525379

  8. Pretest and posttest calculations of Semiscale Test S-07-10D with the TRAC computer program

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was used to predict the behavior of the small-break experiment designated Semiscale S-07-10D. This test simulates a 10 per cent communicative cold-leg break with delayed Emergency Core Coolant injection and blowdown of the broken-loop steam generator secondary. Both pretest calculations that incorporated measured initial conditions and posttest calculations that incorporated measured initial conditions and measured transient boundary conditions were completed. The posttest calculated parameters were generally between those obtained from pretest calculations and those from the test data. The results are strongly dependent on depressurization rate and, hence, on break flow

  9. Action Effects and Task Knowledge: The Influence of Anticipatory Priming on the Identification of Task-Related Stimuli in Experts.

    William M Land

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine the extent to which anticipation of an action's perceptual effect primes identification of task-related stimuli. Specifically, skilled (n = 16 and novice (n = 24 tennis players performed a choice-reaction time (CRT test in which they identified whether the presented stimulus was a picture of a baseball bat or tennis racket. Following their response, auditory feedback associated with either baseball or tennis was presented. The CRT test was performed in blocks in which participants predictably received the baseball sound or tennis sound irrespective of which stimulus picture was displayed. Results indicated that skilled tennis players responded quicker to tennis stimuli when the response was predictably followed by the tennis auditory effect compared to the baseball auditory effect. These findings imply that, within an individual's area of expertise, domain-relevant knowledge is primed by anticipation of an action's perceptual effect, thus allowing the cognitive system to more quickly identify environmental information. This finding provides a more complete picture of the influence that anticipation can have on the cognitive-motor system. No differences existed for novices.

  10. DAPs: Deep Action Proposals for Action Understanding

    Escorcia, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Object proposals have contributed significantly to recent advances in object understanding in images. Inspired by the success of this approach, we introduce Deep Action Proposals (DAPs), an effective and efficient algorithm for generating temporal action proposals from long videos. We show how to take advantage of the vast capacity of deep learning models and memory cells to retrieve from untrimmed videos temporal segments, which are likely to contain actions. A comprehensive evaluation indicates that our approach outperforms previous work on a large scale action benchmark, runs at 134 FPS making it practical for large-scale scenarios, and exhibits an appealing ability to generalize, i.e. to retrieve good quality temporal proposals of actions unseen in training.

  11. Local Actions in the Post-carbon Transition: A Simulation of the Macroeconomic Effects

    In 2009 a programme -'Re-thinking Society in a Post-carbon Society'- steered jointly by the Foresight Department of the French Ecology Ministry and the French Environment and Energy Management Agency (ADEME), was launched in France. It is still ongoing and aims to produce a final report in 2013. The idea of a transition towards a 'post- carbon' society includes four main objectives: reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 to one quarter of what they were in 1990; near-autonomy with regard to carbon energies (petrol, gas, coal); an adequate capacity to adapt to climate change and, lastly, greater attention to situations of 'energy precariousness'. As part of the dossier Futuribles is devoting to this programme this month, Cedric Allio, Henri Waisman and Jean-Charles Hourcade present here the study carried out by CIRED (International Research Center on Environment and Development) on the role played by local action in the post-carbon transition . The authors begin by reminding us of the importance of the transport sector in the increase in energy demand and in greenhouse gas emissions, and the need to bring about significant changes in individuals' mobility behaviours if a post-carbon transition on a substantial scale is to be achieved. To do this, local initiatives could be crucial, given their impact on the spatial organization of territories, and could complement the measures put in place at higher levels (national, European or global). This is what clearly emerges from the model developed by CIRED to study the interactions between local and global levels in the post-carbon transition and to provide a macro-economic frame for the scenarios envisaged in the 'Post-carbon Cities' programme. The authors offer a comparison of two scenarios for reducing greenhouse gas emissions by half by 2050, but doing so by very different transition processes, and they show how, in these two contexts, local and global actions are interconnected and how that connection and a correct

  12. On D-brane anti D-brane effective actions and their corrections to all orders in alpha-prime

    Hatefi, Ehsan, E-mail: ehatefi@ictp.it [International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste (Italy)

    2013-09-01

    Based on a four point function, the S-matrix elements at disk level of the scattering amplitude of one closed string Ramond-Ramond field (C) and two tachyons and one scalar field, we find out new couplings in brane anti brane effective actions for p = n, p+2 = n cases. Using the infinite corrections of the vertex of one RR, one gauge and one scalar field and applying the correct expansion, it is investigated in detail how we produce the infinite gauge poles of the amplitude for p = n case. By discovering new higher derivative corrections of two tachyon-two scalar couplings in brane anti brane systems to all orders in α', we also obtain the infinite scalar poles in (t'+s'+u)-channel in field theory. Working with the complete form of the amplitude with the closed form of the expansion and comparing all the infinite contact terms of this amplitude, we derive several new Wess-Zumino couplings with all their infinite higher derivative corrections in the world volume of brane anti brane systems. In particular, in producing all the infinite scalar poles of < V{sub C}V{sub φ}V{sub T}V{sub T} > , one has to consider the fact that scalar's vertex operator in (-1)-picture must carry the internal σ{sub 3} Chan-Paton matrix. The symmetric trace effective action has a non-zero coupling between Dφ{sup (1)i} and Dφ{sup (2)}{sub i} while this coupling does not exist in ordinary trace effective action.

  13. Improving regulatory effectiveness in federal/state siting actions: water supplies and the nuclear licensing process

    The Interstate Conference on Water Problems (ICWP) is a national association of State, intrastate, and interstate officials concerned with water resources administration and related matters. The Conference was established in 1959 as an outgrowth of regional conferences on water problems as recognized in the same year by action of the General Assembly of the States. This report was produced by the Interstate Conference on Water Problems in an effort to provide a compilation and summary of the views of selected States regarding relationships of water supplies to the nuclear power plant licensing process. This publication does not represent the official position of the U.S Water Resources Council, or the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, nor does it represent the position of any single state or the ICWP

  14. Is a generalized NJL model the effective action of massless QCD?

    de Oca, Alejandro Cabo Montes

    2015-01-01

    A local and gauge invariant alternative version of QCD for massive fermions introduced in previous works, is considered here to just propose a theory which includes Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) terms in its defining action in a renormalizable form. The Lagrangian includes a special kind of new vertices which at first sight, look as breaking power counting renormalizability. However, these terms also modify the quark propagators, to become more decreasing that the Dirac propagator at large momenta, indicating that the theory is renormalizable. Therefore, it follows the surprising conclusion that the added NJL four fermions terms does not break renormalizability. The approach, can also be interpreted as a slightly generalized renormalization procedure for massless QCD, which seems able to incorporate the mass generating properties for the quarks of the NJL model, in a renormalizable way. The structure of the free propagator, given by the substraction between a massive and a massless Dirac one in the Lee-Wick form, ...

  15. The effect of action video game playing on sensorimotor learning: Evidence from a movement tracking task.

    Gozli, Davood G; Bavelier, Daphne; Pratt, Jay

    2014-10-12

    Research on the impact of action video game playing has revealed performance advantages on a wide range of perceptual and cognitive tasks. It is not known, however, if playing such games confers similar advantages in sensorimotor learning. To address this issue, the present study used a manual motion-tracking task that allowed for a sensitive measure of both accuracy and improvement over time. When the target motion pattern was consistent over trials, gamers improved with a faster rate and eventually outperformed non-gamers. Performance between the two groups, however, did not differ initially. When the target motion was inconsistent, changing on every trial, results revealed no difference between gamers and non-gamers. Together, our findings suggest that video game playing confers no reliable benefit in sensorimotor control, but it does enhance sensorimotor learning, enabling superior performance in tasks with consistent and predictable structure. PMID:25318081

  16. Deformation of a laser plasma corona under the action of a ponderomotive force and accompanying effects

    The pattern of deformation of the density profile of an inhomogeneous laser plasma flow due to the action of a ponderomotive force is identified. The dynamic pattern of generation of non-linear potential fields in the plasma, including caviton-trapped fields, is demonstrated. By isolating the dissipative mechanisms, it was possible to determine the proportion of the energy dissipated in the plasma as a result of the Cherenkov mechanism of interaction between the potential fields and electrons, and thus, the energy which results in the generation of hot electrons. It was shown that a comparatively low plasma flow rate qualitatively alters the pattern of interaction between laser radiation and a plasma. In particular, the formation of cavitons is impeded, the generation of short-wavelength longitudinal fields is suppressed, and the proportion of electromagnetic radiation energy absorbed as a result of the Cherenkov interaction is reduced, i.e., the energy transferred to the fast electrons is reduced. (author)

  17. Propeller effect in action in the ultraluminous accreting magnetar M82 X-2

    Tsygankov, Sergey S; Suleimanov, Valery F; Poutanen, Juri

    2015-01-01

    We present here the first convincing observational manifestation of a magnetar-like magnetic field in an accreting neutron star in binary system - the first pulsating ultra-luminous X-ray source X-2 in the galaxy M82. Using the Chandra X-ray observatory data we show that the source exhibit the bimodal distribution of the luminosity with two well-defined peaks separated by a factor of 40. This behaviour can be interpreted as the action of the "propeller regime" of accretion. The onset of the propeller in a 1.37 s pulsar at luminosity of ~$10^{40}$ erg/s implies the dipole component of the neutron star magnetic field of ~$10^{14}$ G.

  18. Propeller effect in action in the ultraluminous accreting magnetar M82 X-2

    Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Poutanen, Juri

    2016-03-01

    We present here the first convincing observational manifestation of a magnetar-like magnetic field in an accreting neutron star in binary system - the first pulsating ultraluminous X-ray source X-2 in the galaxy M82. Using the Chandra X-ray observatory data, we show that the source exhibit the bimodal distribution of the luminosity with two well-defined peaks separated by a factor of 40. This behaviour can be interpreted as the action of the `propeller regime' of accretion. The onset of the propeller in a 1.37 s pulsar at luminosity of ˜1040 erg s-1 implies the dipole component of the neutron star magnetic field of ˜1014 G.

  19. Research on the influence of action between fin and anti-rolling tank on the integrated stabilization effect

    YU Li-jun; JIN Hong-zhang; WANG Hui; YANG Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Through analyzing the roll model of the integrated system of fin and anti-rolling tank, this paper uses binomial equation to simplify the module and check how the approximate parameters simulate the original function. Based on the simplified module, the influence of fin and anti-rolling tank on the coefficient items of the roll module is discussed, and the influencing factors between fin and anti-rolling tank are analysed. And through simulation, the influence of action between fin and anti-rolling tank on the static characteristics, and the integrated stabilization effect, are analyzed.

  20. Higher-derivative terms in one-loop effective action for general trajectories of D-particles in Matrix theory

    The one-loop effective action for general trajectories of D-particles in Matrix theory is calculated in the expansion with respect to the number of derivatives up to six, which gives the equation of motion consistently. The result shows that the terms with six derivatives vanish for straight-line trajectories, however, they do not vanish in general. This provides a concrete example that non-renormalization of twelve-fermion terms does not necessarily imply that of six-derivative terms

  1. Effects of rapid and slow potassium repolarization currents and calcium dynamics on hysteresis in restitution of action potential duration.

    Wu, Runze; Patwardhan, Abhijit

    2007-04-01

    We used a mathematical model to investigate effects of repolarizing currents I(kr) and I(ks), calcium (Ca) current I(CaL), and Ca dynamics in network sarcoplasmic reticulum and junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (JSR) on hysteresis in restitution of action potential duration. Enhanced I(kr) increased slope of restitution, hysteresis loop thickness, and delay between peaks of diastolic intervals and action potential duration. Increase in I(ks) decreased loop thickness and peak delay. Decrease in I(CaL) had effects similar to increasing I(kr), except slope of restitution decreased markedly. Uptake of Ca into the network sarcoplasmic reticulum had less effect on hysteresis than transfer of Ca into JSR. Faster transfer of Ca into JSR markedly decreased loop thickness and peak delay. Our results provide insight into mechanisms responsible for this newly identified property of restitution. Such information will be valuable in studies where modification of hysteresis is used to investigate its role in arrhythmogenesis. PMID:16895773

  2. The sunk cost effect across species: A review of persistence in a course of action due to prior investment.

    Magalhães, Paula; Geoffrey White, K

    2016-05-01

    The sunk cost effect is the bias or tendency to persist in a course of action due to prior investments of effort, money or time. At the time of the only review on the sunk cost effect across species (Arkes & Ayton, 1999), research with nonhuman animals had been ecological in its nature, and the findings about the effect of past investments on current choice were inconclusive. However, in the last decade a new line of experimental laboratory-based research has emerged with the promise of revolutionizing the way we approach the study of the sunk cost effect in nonhumans. In the present review we challenge Arkes and Ayton's conclusion that the sunk cost effect is exclusive to humans, and describe evidence for the sunk cost effect in nonhuman animals. By doing so, we also challenge the current explanations for the sunk cost effect in humans, as they are not applicable to nonhumans. We argue that a unified theory is called for, because different independent variables, in particular, investment amount, have the same influence on the sunk cost effect across species. Finally, we suggest possible psychological mechanisms shared across different species, contrast and depreciation, that could explain the sunk cost effect. PMID:27151560

  3. Lowering the UK domestic radon action level to reduce radiation-induced lung cancer in general population: when and where is it cost effective?

    Case studies have shown that radon gas can be present within domestic properties at sufficiently high levels that it can significantly increase the risk of lung cancer in occupants. Recently, Darby et al. (2006) have shown that this risk exists at radon concentrations as low as 100 Bq·m-3, which is below the UK domestic Action Level of 200 Bq·m-3. As a result, there have been suggestions that national domestic Action Levels should be reduced. This paper considers the benefits and costs of the domestic radon remediation programmes in the UK, when a range of Action Levels from 125 Bq·m-3 to 600 Bq·m-3 are applied. The variations of total cost, cost-effectiveness, dose reduction and lung cancers saved for each proposed action level, and the proportion of houses over the proposed action level, were estimated. The study shows that, for an Action Level above 200 Bq·m-3, a completed domestic radon remediation programme in Northamptonshire, where 6.3% of existing houses have initial radon levels over 200 Bq·m-3, will cost less and will target those most at risk, but will be less cost effective. In addition, a higher Action Level leaves a higher residual dose and greater risk of cancer in the population living in unremediated homes. Reducing the Action Level below 200 Bq·m-3 will prevent more cancers, but at significantly higher cost. It will be less cost-effective, because a significant number of houses with moderate radon levels will be remediated with modest health benefit to occupants. The study suggests that a completed radon remediation programme is most cost-effective with an action level of around 250 to 300 Bq·m-3. The finding appears to be independent of the percentage of houses over the Action Level. This has clear implications for future health policy. (author)

  4. Optomechanical effects of two-level systems in a back-action evading measurement of micro-mechanical motion

    We show that the two-level systems (TLS) in lithographic superconducting circuits act as a power-dependent dielectric leading to non-linear responses in a parametrically coupled electromechanical system. Driven TLS shift the microwave resonance frequency and modulate the mechanical resonance through the optical spring effect. By pumping with two tones in a back-action evading measurement, these effects produce a mechanical parametric instability which limits single quadrature imprecision to 1.4 xzp. The microwave resonator noise is also consistent to a TLS-noise model. These observations suggest design strategies for minimizing TLS effects to improve ground-state cooling and quantum non-demolition measurements of motion

  5. Effective Actions for Massive Kaluza-Klein States on AdS_3 x S^3 x S^3

    Hohm, O; Hohm, Olaf; Samtleben, Henning

    2005-01-01

    We construct the effective supergravity actions for the lowest massive Kaluza-Klein states on the supersymmetric background AdS_3 x S^3 x S^3. In particular, we describe the coupling of the supergravity multiplet to the lowest massive spin-3/2 multiplet which contains 256 physical degrees of freedom and includes the moduli of the theory. The effective theory is realized as the broken phase of a particular gauging of the maximal three-dimensional supergravity with gauge group SO(4) x SO(4). Its ground state breaks half of the supersymmetries leading to 8 massive gravitinos acquiring mass in a super Higgs effect. The holographic boundary theory realizes the large N=(4,4) superconformal symmetry.

  6. The Antihyperglycemic Effects of Rhizoma Coptidis and Mechanism of Actions: A Review of Systematic Reviews and Pharmacological Research

    Hui Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhizoma Coptidis (Huang Lian in Chinese pinyin is among the most widely used traditional Chinese herbal medicines and has a profound history of more than 2000 years of being used as a therapeutic herb. The antidiabetic effects of Rhizoma Coptidis have been extensively investigated in animal experiments and clinical trials and its efficacy as a promising antihyperglycemic agent has been widely discussed. In the meantime, findings from modern pharmacological studies have contributed the majority of its bioactivities to berberine, the isoquinoline alkaloids component of the herb, and a number of experiments testing the antidiabetic effects of berberine have been initiated. Therefore, we conducted a review of the current evidence profile of the antihyperglycemic effects of Rhizoma Coptidis as well as its main component berberine and the possible mechanism of actions, in order to summarize research evidence in this area and identify future research directions.

  7. Optomechanical effects of two-level systems in a back-action evading measurement of micro-mechanical motion

    Suh, J.; Weinstein, A. J.; Schwab, K. C.

    2013-07-01

    We show that the two-level systems (TLS) in lithographic superconducting circuits act as a power-dependent dielectric leading to non-linear responses in a parametrically coupled electromechanical system. Driven TLS shift the microwave resonance frequency and modulate the mechanical resonance through the optical spring effect. By pumping with two tones in a back-action evading measurement, these effects produce a mechanical parametric instability which limits single quadrature imprecision to 1.4 xzp. The microwave resonator noise is also consistent to a TLS-noise model. These observations suggest design strategies for minimizing TLS effects to improve ground-state cooling and quantum non-demolition measurements of motion.

  8. The effectiveness of community action in reducing risky alcohol consumption and harm: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Anthony Shakeshaft

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization, governments, and communities agree that community action is likely to reduce risky alcohol consumption and harm. Despite this agreement, there is little rigorous evidence that community action is effective: of the six randomised trials of community action published to date, all were US-based and focused on young people (rather than the whole community, and their outcomes were limited to self-report or alcohol purchase attempts. The objective of this study was to conduct the first non-US randomised controlled trial (RCT of community action to quantify the effectiveness of this approach in reducing risky alcohol consumption and harms measured using both self-report and routinely collected data. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cluster RCT comprising 20 communities in Australia that had populations of 5,000-20,000, were at least 100 km from an urban centre (population ≥ 100,000, and were not involved in another community alcohol project. Communities were pair-matched, and one member of each pair was randomly allocated to the experimental group. Thirteen interventions were implemented in the experimental communities from 2005 to 2009: community engagement; general practitioner training in alcohol screening and brief intervention (SBI; feedback to key stakeholders; media campaign; workplace policies/practices training; school-based intervention; general practitioner feedback on their prescribing of alcohol medications; community pharmacy-based SBI; web-based SBI; Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services support for SBI; Good Sports program for sports clubs; identifying and targeting high-risk weekends; and hospital emergency department-based SBI. Primary outcomes based on routinely collected data were alcohol-related crime, traffic crashes, and hospital inpatient admissions. Routinely collected data for the entire study period (2001-2009 were obtained in 2010. Secondary outcomes based on pre

  9. EFFECTS OF DESENSITIZATION AND REBOUND TO ADENOSINE ON ACTION POTENTIAL AND CONTRACTILITY IN ATRIAL CELLS IN GUINEA-PIGS

    张凤杰; 臧伟进; 于晓江; 胡浩; 张春虹; 孙强; 吕军

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of desensitization and rebound to adenosine(Ado) on action potential duration(APD) and contractility in guinea-pig atrial cells. Methods Electrical activity was recorded using standard intracellular microelectrode technique and contractility was recorded using. We studied the effects of adenosine on the action potential and desensitization of contractility and rebound of contractility. Results The results showed that action potential duration were shortened by 1,10,100μmol*L-1Ado, the ratio of shortened APD was (9.58±1.40)%,(13.80±2.26)%,(24.80±3.19)%, respectively. 1μmol*L-1Ado had no desensitization (P>0.05), but the time of desensitization of 10μmol*L-1 Ado and 100μmol*L-1 Ado was 1 minute(P<0.05) and 5 minutes(P<0.05), respectively. The desensitization of contractility of 10*!μmol*L-1 Ado was obvious in atrial cells, the decrease of contractility of 10*!μmol*L-1 Ado was obvious in atrial cells, the decrease of contractility was changed from (31.4±16.04)%(2 minutes) to (50.60±15.87)% (4 minutes), compared with control. After washing out Ado, contractility was shown to rebound, the ratio of increase of contractility by 1,10,100μmol*L-1 Ado was (12.38±7.50)%,(19.00±8.14)% and (27.60±13.44)%, respectively. Conclusion Ado can abbreviate APD in atrial cells. The desensitization of Ado on APD is characterized by concentration-dependent and time-dependent in atrial cells, and the desensitization of contractility of Ado is obvious and contractility was shown to rebound after washing out Ado.

  10. Antagonism in the action of kinetin and actinomycin D on the cytogenetic effect of irradiation

    Relation between radiation protection properties of phytoharmones with the initial processes necessary to prepare cells to replication by DNA has been investigated. Crepis capillaris L. seeds, which cells are synchromized naturally in G1 phase, have been used as a model. Kinetin, which is a stimulator of cell fission has been taken as a radioprotector. Blocking of phytoharmone action on transcription has been carried out by actinomicine D capable to inhibite synthesis of all types of RNA as well as to suppress kinetin activity. Dry C. capillaris seeds with 1.21±0.8% level of spontaneous mutation before irradiation have been treated by kinetin and actinomycin D both separately and in combination with each other. After every treatment the seeds have been washed in running water for 10-15 min and irradiated by X-ray RUM-17 device with 11 Gy dose without a filter. Application of actinomicine D separately and before treatment by kinetin leads to reliable decrease of chromosomal aberration frequency. The level of aberrations was increased in comparison with a test in variants only with kinetic and in cases, when after kinetin actinomycine D was used. Considerable protection was detected when treating seeds macerated in water before irradiation by kinetin. In variants, where treatment by actinomycin D has preceded the treatment by phytohormone partial or full block of radiation protection has been obtained

  11. Effecting change through dialogue: Habermas' theory of communicative action as a tool in medical lifestyle interventions.

    Walseth, Liv Tveit; Schei, Edvin

    2011-02-01

    Adjustments of everyday life in order to prevent disease or treat illness afflict partly unconscious preferences and cultural expectations that are often difficult to change. How should one, in medical contexts, talk with patients about everyday life in ways that might penetrate this blurred complexity, and help people find goals and make decisions that are both compatible with a good life and possible to accomplish? In this article we pursue the question by discussing how Habermas' theory of communicative action can be implemented in decision-making processes in general practice. The theory of deliberative decision-making offers practical guidelines for what to talk about and how to do it. For a decision to be rooted in patients' everyday life it has to take into consideration the patient's practical circumstances, emotions and preferences, and what he or she perceives as ethically right behaviour towards other people. The aim is a balanced conversation, demonstrating respect, consistency and sincerity, as well as offering information and clarifying reasons. Verbalising reasons for one's preferences may increase awareness of values and norms, which can then be reflected upon, producing decisions rooted in what the patient perceives as good and right behaviour. The asymmetry of medical encounters is both a resource and a challenge, demanding patient-centred medical leadership, characterised by empathy and ability to take the patient's perspective. The implementation and adjustments of Habermas' theory in general practice is illustrated by a case story. Finally, applications of the theory are discussed. PMID:20552281

  12. Radiosensitivity of Nicotiana protoplasts. Action on cell; cycle effects of low dose and fractionated irradiations; biological repair

    Leaf protoplasts of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Nicotiana sylvestris demonstrate five main qualities: they can be maintained as haploid lines; they constitute starting populations with a remarkable cytological homogeneity; they show a transient initial lag-phase; they yield very high plating efficiencies and retain permanently a complete differentiation capacity; being derived of a cell wall, they appear well adapted for fusion experiments or enzymatic dosages. The resumption of mitotic activity was followed by cytophotometric measurements, labelling experiments, nuclear sizing and enzymatic assays. The action of 5 Gy gamma-ray irradiations delayed entrance in the S-phase, provoked an otherwise not verified dependency between transcription, translation and protein synthesis, increased nuclear volumes in the G2-phase, and slightly stimulated the activity of a repair enzyme. The plating efficiency was a sensitive end-point which allowed the evaluation of the biological effectiveness of low to medium radiation-doses after gamma-ray and fast neutron irradiations. The neutron dose-RBE relationship increased from 3 to 25 when the dose decreased from 5 Gy to 5 mGy. When fractionated into low single doses only, a neutron dose of 300 mGy markedly increased its biological effectiveness: this phenomenon could not be explained by cell progression, and necessitated additional hypotheses involving other mechanisms in the specific action of low radiation doses. Radiation-induced UDS was measured in presence of aphidicolin. A beta-like DNA-polymerase was shown to be definitely involved in nuclear repair synthesis

  13. The specificity of albumin denaturation on physiological preparations under thermal and gamma-radiation effects (actions)

    Comparative investigation is performed of the alteration in thin structure of absorption spectra of albumin solutions under thermal and radiation effect resulting in protein denaturation. Gamma radiation effect of 57Co on the preparations of bull and man serum albumins was studied as well as a number of serum preparations. Analysis of the results obtained permits to conclude that different qualitative and quantitative mechanisms of denaturation alterations under the temperature and gamma radiation effects on albumin solutions takes place

  14. Differential Cross Sections for the H + D2 → HD(v' = 3, j' = 4-10) + D Reaction above the Conical Intersection.

    Gao, Hong; Sneha, Mahima; Bouakline, Foudhil; Althorpe, Stuart C; Zare, Richard N

    2015-12-17

    We report rovibrationally selected differential cross sections (DCSs) of the benchmark reaction H + D2 → HD(v' = 3, j' = 4-10) + D at a collision energy of 3.26 eV, which exceeds the conical intersection of the H3 potential energy surface at 2.74 eV. We use the PHOTOLOC technique in which a fluorine excimer laser at 157.64 nm photodissociates hydrogen bromide (HBr) molecules to generate fast H atoms and the HD product is detected in a state-specific manner by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. Fully converged quantum wave packet calculations were performed for this reaction at this high collision energy without inclusion of the geometric phase (GP) effect, which takes into account coupling to the first excited state of the H3 potential energy surface. Multimodal structures can be observed in most of the DCSs up to j' = 10, which is predicted by theory and also well-reproduced by experiment. The theoretically calculated DCSs are in good overall agreement with the experimental measurements, which indicates that the GP effect is not large enough that its existence can be verified experimentally at this collision energy. PMID:26090780

  15. Ranolazine: Ion-channel-blocking actions and in vivo electrophysiological effects

    Schram, Gernot; Zhang, Liming; Derakhchan, Katayoun; Ehrlich, Joachim R.; Belardinelli, Luiz; Nattel, Stanley

    2004-01-01

    Ranolazine is a novel anti-ischemic drug that prolongs the QT interval. To evaluate the potential mechanisms and consequences, we studied: (i) Ranolazine's effects on HERG and IsK currents in Xenopus oocytes with two-electrode voltage clamp; (ii) effects of ranolazine, compared to D-sotalol, on effective refractory period (ERP), QT interval and ventricular rhythm in a dog model of acquired long QT syndrome; and (iii) effects on selected native currents in canine atrial myocytes with whole-cel...

  16. The Hawthorne Misunderstanding (and How to Get the Hawthorne Effect in Action Research).

    Gottfredson, Gary D.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the original Hawthorne relay-assembly research. Asserts the "Hawthorne misunderstanding" is common in criminology and criminal justice because authors have failed to properly attribute the explanation of increased work output to the Hawthorne effect. Describes the Hawthorne effect, how it is produced, and ways to achieve the Hawthorne…

  17. Advanced Forward Modeling and Inversion of Stokes Profiles Resulting from the Joint Action of the Hanle and Zeeman Effects

    Ramos, A Asensio; Degl'Innocenti, E Landi

    2008-01-01

    A big challenge in solar and stellar physics in the coming years will be to decipher the magnetism of the solar outer atmosphere (chromosphere and corona) along with its dynamic coupling with the magnetic fields of the underlying photosphere. To this end, it is important to develop rigorous diagnostic tools for the physical interpretation of spectropolarimetric observations in suitably chosen spectral lines. Here we present a computer program for the synthesis and inversion of Stokes profiles caused by the joint action of atomic level polarization and the Hanle and Zeeman effects in some spectral lines of diagnostic interest, such as those of the He I 10830 A and D_3 multiplets. It is based on the quantum theory of spectral line polarization, which takes into account all the relevant physical mechanisms and ingredients (optical pumping, atomic level polarization, Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects). The influence of radiative transfer on the emergent spectral line radiation is taken into account through a...

  18. The law of action and reaction for the effective force in a non-equilibrium colloidal system

    We study a non-equilibrium Langevin many-body system containing two 'test' particles and many 'background' particles. The test particles are spatially confined by a harmonic potential, and the background particles are driven by an external driving force. Using numerical simulations of the model, we formulate an effective description of the two test particles in a non-equilibrium steady state. In particular, we investigate several different definitions of the effective force acting between the test particles. We find that the law of action and reaction does not hold for the total mechanical force exerted by the background particles, but that it does hold for the thermodynamic force defined operationally on the basis of an idea used to extend the first law of thermodynamics to non-equilibrium steady states

  19. Conditions for critical effects in the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis

    Wittman, Richard S.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Smith, Frances N.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.

    2014-12-26

    We report on a subtle global feature of the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis that results in predictions of a critical behavior in H2O2 and associated radical concentrations. While radiolysis kinetics has been studied extensively in the past, it is only in recent years that high speed computing has allowed the rapid exploration of the solution over widely varying dose and compositional conditions. We explore the radiolytic production of H2O2 under various externally fixed conditions of molecular H2 and O2 that have been regarded as problematic in the literature – specifically, “jumps” in predicted concentrations, and inconsistencies between predictions and experiments have been reported for alpha radiolysis. We computationally map-out a critical concentration behavior for alpha radiolysis kinetics using a comprehensive set of reactions. We then show that all features of interest are accurately reproduced with 15 reactions. An analytical solution for steady-state concentrations of the 15 reactions reveals regions in [H2] and [O2] where the H2O2 concentration is not unique – both stable and unstable concentrations exist. The boundary of this region can be characterized analytically as a function of G-values and rate constants independent of dose rate. Physically, the boundary can be understood as separating a region where a steady-state H2O2 concentration exists, from one where it does not exist without a direct decomposition reaction. We show that this behavior is consistent with reported alpha radiolysis data and that no such behavior should occur for gamma radiolysis. We suggest experiments that could verify or discredit a critical concentration behavior for alpha radiolysis and could place more restrictive ranges on G-values from derived relationships between them.

  20. Conditions for critical effects in the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis

    Wittman, Richard S.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Smith, Frances N.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.

    2014-11-25

    We report on a subtle global feature of the mass action kinetics equations for water radiolysis that results in predictions of a critical behavior in H2O2 and associated radical concentrations. While radiolysis kinetics has been studied extensively in the past, it is only in recent years that high speed computing has allowed the rapid exploration of the solution over widely varying dose and compositional conditions. We explore the radiolytic production of H2O2 under various externally fixed conditions of molecular H2 and O2 that have been regarded as problematic in the literature – specifically, “jumps” in predicted concentrations, and inconsistencies between predictions and experiments have been reported for alpha radiolysis. We computationally map-out a critical concentration behavior for alpha radiolysis kinetics using a comprehensive set of reactions. We then show that all features of interest are accurately reproduced with 15 reactions. An analytical solution for steady-state concentrations of the 15 reactions reveals regions in [H2] and [O2] where the H2O2 concentration is not unique – both stable and unstable concentrations exist. The boundary of this region can be characterized analytically as a function of G-values and rate constants independent of dose rate. Physically, the boundary can be understood as separating a region where a steady-state H2O2 concentration exists, from one where it does not exist without a direct decomposition reaction. We show that this behavior is consistent with reported alpha radiolysis data and that no such behavior should occur for gamma radiolysis. We suggest experiments that could verify or discredit a critical concentration behavior for alpha radiolysis and could place more restrictive ranges on G-values from derived relationships between them.

  1. Effect of selenium (Se) deficiency on the anti-malarial action of Qinghaosu (QHS) in mice

    Levander, O.A.; Ager, A.L.; May, R.

    1986-03-01

    QHS is an endoperoxide, so it occurred to the authors that its anti-malarial action might be potentiated by low glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity. Weanling female mice were fed 1 of 4 diets: chow or a Torula yeast-based diet supplemented with 0, 0.1 or 0.5 ppm Se as Na/sub 2/SeO/sub 3/. After 6 weeks, mean hepatic GSH-Px activities and plasma Se levels in these 4 dietary groups were 17.3, 0.1, 5.4, and 14.5 munits/mg protein and 242, 4, 230, and 532 ng/ml, respectively. At this time, all mice were inoculated i.p. with asexual blood stages of Plasmodium yoelii. Then groups of 7 or 8 mice fed each diet were given 0, 4, 16, or 64 mg QHS/kg orally bid at 3, 4, and 5 days post inoculation. On the 6th day, blood films were taken and antimalarial activity was assessed by determining % parasitemia (% PARA). Mice given 0 or 4 mg QHS/kg averaged 47% PARA and this was not affected by diet. Mice receiving 64 mg QHS/kg averaged about 1% PARA irrespective of diet. However, mice given 16 mg QHS/kg had 25% PARA when fed chow but only 8 to 11% PARA when fed the Torula diet, regardless of Se intake. Thus, while Se status did not appear to influence the antimalarial potency of QHS, some factor(s) in the Torula diet enhanced its activity at intermediate doses vs. the chow diet.

  2. Effect of thermal cutaneous stimulation on the gastric motor activity: Study of the mechanism of action

    Ahmed Shafik; Ali A Shafik; Olfat El Sibai; Ismail A Shafik

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism of action of thermal cutaneous stimulation on the gastric motor inhibition.METHODS: The gastric tone of 33 healthy volunteers (20 men, mean age 36.7 ±8.4 years) was assessed by a barostat system consisting of a balloon-ended tube connected to a strain gauge and air-injection system. The tube was introduced into the stomach and the balloon was inflated with 300 mL of air. The skin temperature was elevated in increments of 3℃ up to 49℃ and the gastric tone was simultaneously assessed by recording the balloon volume variations expressed as the percentage change from the baseline volume. The test was repeated after separate anesthetization of the skin and stomach with lidocaine and after using normal saline instead of lidocaine.RESULTS: Thermal cutaneous stimulation resulted in a significant decrease of gastric tone 61.2% ±10.3% of the mean baseline volume. Mean latency was 25.6 ± 1.2 ms.After 20 min of individual anesthetization of the skin and stomach, thermal cutaneous stimulation produced no significant change in gastric tone.CONCLUSION: Decrease in the gastric tone in response to thermal cutaneous stimulation suggests a reflex relationship which was absent on individual anesthetization of the 2 possible arms of the reflex arc:the skin and the stomach. We call this relationship the "cutaneo-gastric inhibitory reflex". This reflex may have the potential to serve as an investigative tool in the diagnosis of gastric motor disorders, provided further studies are performed in this respect.

  3. Chronic effects of resistance exercise using reciprocal muscle actions on functional and proprioceptive performance of young individuals: randomized controlled trial

    Euler Alves Cardoso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies have suggested that benefits from resistance exercise (RE using antagonist muscle pre-activation could be transferred to functional activities. However, chronic studies using pre-activation through reciprocal actions in neuromuscular performance and functional activities are scarce. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of 12 RE sessions using reciprocal muscle actions and a traditional mode on functional and proprioceptive performance of young individuals. Forty eight young subjects were randomized into two groups: 1 reciprocal training (RT, 3 sets; 10 repetitions; knee flexion immediately followed by knee extension, 2 traditional training (TRA, 3 sets. 10 repetitions; knee extension. Pre and post evaluations were characterized by balance tests, hop tests (HT and ”8” shape circuit (RC8. ANOVA 2X2 of mixed model was applied to analyze differences between pre and post-training conditions and between groups. For overall and anterior-posterior balance, no significant differences were found between RT and TRA (p>0.05. Similarly, no post-training differences were found. The medial lateral balance in the dominant limb showed no significant differences in post-training for both groups (p = 0.94, but the non-dominant limb showed significant differences between groups (p<0.01. In HT, significant post-training increases were found within groups (p<0.01, but no differences were found between them (p=0.90. RC8 was different between groups (p=0.03, indicating better post-training running time for TRA. Resistance exercise caused transfers to balance and functional performance, and training with reciprocal muscle actions showed better rates for HT and medial lateral knee balance.

  4. Investigating the effect of clinical governess approach on patients' length of stay in emergency department: an action research study.

    Tahmine Salehi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, clinical governance approach with aims to improve the quality of health services has been proposed in Iran. Considering the obvious problems especially patients' length of stay (LOS in the emergency departments (EDs; the present study has been carried out with the purpose of Investigating the effect of clinical governess approach on patients' LOS in the one of the largest medical centers in the country. After the problem was specified by the 17 interviews with employees and managers of the ED; the emergency clinical governance committee was formed by two academic researchers and seven ED staff (key participants that had the most involvement with the subject of study. The activities of the committee, including planning, acting, observing and reflecting, was organized by using participatory action research approach and action research cycle (Kemmis 1995. During this time, three formal meetings with key participants were held in 6-month intervals. Monthly records of patients' average LOS and interview with ED staff were used to analyze the findings. The research was completed with two cycles in one year. Committee members took the following actions. As a result, the patients' LOS reduced from 2.68 days to 1.73 days. Make regular patients visits by medical groups especially orthopedists and neurologists; Decision making about patients situation by emergency physicians and transferring patients to the relevant units by bed managers; Refusing to admit elective patients during overcrowding times; to regulate the list of patients requiring ICU by anesthesiologists. Prolonged LOS can be due to various causes and a team approach, which is one of the requirements of clinical governance approach, is needed to manage it. The results showed that the multidisciplinary team could make positive changes and reduce LOS in emergency setting.

  5. Modifying action of gibberellin on the cytogenetic effect of radiation in Crepis capillaris L

    Radioprotactive properties of gibberellin were studied during treating the Crepic capillaris seeds before irradiation. The radioprotective effect observed did not depend on the interphase stage. Gibberellin was shown to unduce no chromosome mutations

  6. Nongenomic steroid action: Inhibiting effects on cell-to-cell communication between rat ventricular myocytes

    Verrecchia, Franck; Sarrouilhe, Denis; Hervé, Jean-Claude

    2001-01-01

    Numerous steroids are now believed to possess rapid membrane effects independent of the classical gene activation pathways and are potent modulators of membrane proteins, including voltage-and ligand-operated channels. The effects of steroids on the functional state of the intercellular channels clustered in gap junctions were compared by estimation of either the permeability for a fluorescent dye or the electrical conductance in cardiac myocytes of newborn rat. At 25 μM, the esters of 17β-es...

  7. Effect of Prenatal Exposure to Lead on Estrogen Action in the Prepubertal Rat Uterus

    Tchernitchin, Andrei N.; Leonardo Gaete; Rodrigo Bustamante; Aracelly Báez

    2012-01-01

    Lead is a widely spread environmental pollutant known to affect both male and female reproductive systems in humans and experimental animals and causes infertility and other adverse effects. The present paper investigated the effects of prenatal exposure to lead on different parameters of estrogen stimulation in the uterus of the prepubertal rat. In prenatally and perinatally exposed rats, estrogen-induced endometrial eosinophilia, endometrial stroma edema, and eosinophil migration towards th...

  8. Carcinogenic effects of the combined action of /sup 241/Am and. gamma. -radiation

    Filippova, L.G.; Buldakov, L.A.; Nifatov, A.P. (Institut Biofiziki, Moscow (USSR))

    In experiments on Wistar rats a study was made of the carcinogenic effects of the combined exposure to /sup 241/Am administered intrapertioneally (6.7 to 229.4 kBq/kg body weight) and external ..gamma..-radiation (/sup 137/Cs, 175 cGy). The occurrence of osteosarcoma, leucosis, skin and mammary tumors increased in the exposed animals. The combined irradiation produced an additive carcinogenic effect.

  9. The law of action and reaction for the effective force in a nonequilibrium colloidal system

    Hayashi, Kumiko; Sasa, Shin-ichi

    2005-01-01

    We study a nonequilibrium Langevin many-body system containing two 'test' particles and many 'background' particles. The test particles are spatially confined by a harmonic potential, and the background particles are driven by an external driving force. Employing numerical simulations of the model, we formulate an effective description of the two test particles in a nonequilibrium steady state. In particular, we investigate several different definitions of the effective force acting between t...

  10. Carcinogenic effects of the combined action of 241Am and γ-radiation

    In experiments on Wistar rats a study was made of the carcinogenic effects of the combined exposure to 241Am administered intrapertioneally (6.7 to 229.4 kBq/kg body weight) and external γ-radiation (137Cs, 175 cGy). The occurrence of osteosarcoma, leucosis, skin and mammary tumors increased in the exposed animals. The combined irradiation prodUced an additive carcinogenic effect

  11. Effects and mechanisms of action of sildenafil citrate in human chorionic arteries

    Lynch Tadhg; O'Toole Daniel; Maharaj Chrisen H; Carney John; Jarman James; Higgins Brendan D; Morrison John J; Laffey John G

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Sildenafil citrate, a specific phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, is increasingly used for pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy. Sildenafil is also emerging as a potential candidate for the treatment of intra-uterine growth retardation and for premature labor. Its effects in the feto-placental circulation are not known. Our objectives were to determine whether phosphodiesterase-5 is present in the human feto-placental circulation, and to characterize the effects and mechanisms ...

  12. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  13. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July - September 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  14. Cumulative effects of the regulatory action. Exercise of analysis of the CER consideration of the cumulative effects of regulation in the Rulemaking process in a Spanish NPP

    The NRC, through interaction with the American industry, is aware for several years the concern of the impact of the cumulative effect of regulatory actions. In response to this concern, put clear by the industry, the NRC Staff has carried out several initiatives review of some regulatory requirements, to ensure that regulation and the practices of the NRC does not result in an unnecessary regulatory burden. The above answers to what is coming commonly called the CER: consideration of the cumulative effects of regulation in the Rulemaking process.

  15. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  16. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1990) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  17. Effects of imidapril on heterogeneity of action potential and calcium current of ventriclar myocytes in infarcted rabbits

    YangLI; QiaoXUE; JieMA; Cun-taiZHANG; PingQIU; LinWANG; WeiGAO; ReiCHENG; Zai-yinLU; Shi-wenWANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of chronic treatment with imidapril on the electrophysiologic heterogeneous change of the noninfarcted myocardium of rabbits after myocardial infarction and the mechanism of its antiarrhythmic efficacy. METHODS: Rabbits with left coronary artery ligation were prepared and allowed to recover for 8 weeks. Myocytes were isolated from subendocardial, midmyocardial, and subepicardial regions of the noninfarcted left ventricular wall. Action potentials and calcium current were recorded using whole-cell patch clamp technique. RESULTS: The action potential duration of repolarization 90 % (APD90) was more prolonged in midmyocardium rather than in subepicardium and subendocardium with healed myocardial infarction. The transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) was increased in the three ventricular regions. The amplitude of/Ca-L was enhanced but its density was decreased in noninfarcted ventricular myocytes due to increased cell membrane capacitance. The increased differences of calcium currents among subepicardium, midmyocardium, and subendocardium were also discovered. Normalization of heterogeneous changes in repolarization after treatment with imidapril was observed and decrease of TDR in noninfarcted area was measured. Early after depolarization (EAD) events of noninfarcted midmyocardium were markedly decreased by imidapril. CONCLUSION: Imidapril reduced the electrophysiologic heterogeneities in noninfarcted area in rabbits after myocardial infarction. This ability of imidapril may contribute to its antiarrhythmic efficacy.

  18. Effects of imidapril on heterogeneity of action potential and calcium current of ventriclar myocytes in infarcted rabbits

    Yang LI; Shi-wen WANG; Qiao XUE; Jie MA; Cun-tai ZHANG; Ping QIU; Lin WANG; Wei GAO; Rei CHENG; Zai-ying LU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of chronic treatment with imidapril on the electrophysiologic heterogeneous change of the noninfarcted myocardium of rabbits after myocardial infarction and the mechanism of its antiarrhythmic efficacy. METHODS: Rabbits with left coronary artery ligation were prepared and allowed to recover for 8 weeks.Myocytes were isolated from subendocardial, midmyocardial, and subepicardial regions of the noninfarcted left ventricular wall. Action potentials and calcium current were recorded using whole-cell patch clamp technique.RESULTS: The action potential duration of repolarization 90 % (APD90)was more prolonged in midmyocardium rather than in subepicardium and subendocardium with healed myocardial infarction. The transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) was increased in the three ventricular regions. The amplitude of ICa-L was enhanced but its density was decreased in noninfarcted ventricular myocytes due to increased cell membrane capacitance. The increased differences of calcium currents among subepicardium, midmyocardium, and subendocardium were also discovered. Normalization of heterogeneous changes in repolarization after treatment with imidapril was observed and decrease of TDR in noninfarcted area was measvred. Early after depolarization (EAD) events of noninfarcted midmyocardium were markedly decreased by imidapril. CONCLUSION: Imidapril reduced the electrophysiologic heterogeneities in noninfarcted area in rabbits after myocardial infarction. This ability of imidapril may contribute to its antiarrhythmic efficacy.

  19. Evaluation of neural reflex activation as a mode of action for the acute respiratory effects of ozone.

    Prueitt, Robyn L; Goodman, Julie E

    2016-09-01

    Exposure to elevated levels of ozone has been associated with a variety of respiratory-related health endpoints in both epidemiology and controlled human exposure studies, including lung function decrements and airway inflammation. A mode of action (MoA) for these effects has not been established, but it has been proposed that they may occur through ozone-induced activation of neural reflexes. We critically reviewed experimental studies of ozone exposure and neural reflex activation and applied the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) mode-of-action/human relevance framework to evaluate the biological plausibility and human relevance of this proposed MoA. Based on the currently available experimental data, we found that the proposed MoA of neural reflex activation is biologically plausible for the endpoint of ozone-induced lung function decrements at high ozone exposures, but further studies are needed to fill important data gaps regarding the relevance of this MoA at lower exposures. A role for the proposed MoA in ozone-induced airway inflammation is less plausible, as the evidence is conflicting and is also of unclear relevance given the lack of studies conducted at lower exposures. The evidence suggests a different MoA for ozone-induced inflammation that may still be linked to the key events in the proposed MoA, such that neural reflex activation may have some degree of involvement in modulating ozone-induced neutrophil influx, even if it is not a direct role. PMID:27569521

  20. Antimicrobial effects of copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes provide new insight into their biochemical mode of action.

    Djoko, Karrera Y; Paterson, Brett M; Donnelly, Paul S; McEwan, Alastair G

    2014-04-01

    The copper(II) complexes of bis-thiosemicarbazones (Cu(btsc)) such as Cu(atsm) and Cu(gtsm) are neutral, lipophilic compounds that show promise as therapeutics for the treatment of certain neurological diseases and cancers. Although the effects of these compounds have been described at the cellular level, there is almost no information about their biochemical mode of action. In this work, we showed that Cu(atsm) and Cu(gtsm) displayed antimicrobial activities against the human obligate pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae that were more than 100 times more potent than Cu(NO3)2 salt alone. Treatment with Cu(btsc) also produced phenotypes that were consistent with copper poisoning, but the levels of intracellular copper were undetectable by ICP MS. We observed that Cu(btsc) interacted with proteins in the cell membrane. Systematic measurements of O2 uptake further demonstrated that treatment with both Cu(atsm) and Cu(gtsm) led to dose-dependent inhibition of respiratory electron transfer processes via succinate and NADH dehydrogenases. These dehydrogenases were not inhibited by a non-btsc source of Cu(II). The results led us to conclude that the biochemical mechanism of Cu(btsc) action is likely more complex than the present, simplistic model of copper release into the cytoplasm. PMID:24435165

  1. Facilitation effect of observed motor deviants in a cooperative motor task: Evidence for direct perception of social intention in action.

    Quesque, François; Delevoye-Turrell, Yvonne; Coello, Yann

    2016-08-01

    Spatiotemporal parameters of voluntary motor action may help optimize human social interactions. Yet it is unknown whether individuals performing a cooperative task spontaneously perceive subtly informative social cues emerging through voluntary actions. In the present study, an auditory cue was provided through headphones to an actor and a partner who faced each other. Depending on the pitch of the auditory cue, either the actor or the partner were required to grasp and move a wooden dowel under time constraints from a central to a lateral position. Before this main action, the actor performed a preparatory action under no time constraint, consisting in placing the wooden dowel on the central location when receiving either a neutral ("prêt"-ready) or an informative auditory cue relative to who will be asked to perform the main action (the actor: "moi"-me, or the partner: "lui"-him). Although the task focused on the main action, analysis of motor performances revealed that actors performed the preparatory action with longer reaction times and higher trajectories when informed that the partner would be performing the main action. In this same condition, partners executed the main actions with shorter reaction times and lower velocities, despite having received no previous informative cues. These results demonstrate that the mere observation of socially driven motor actions spontaneously influences the low-level kinematics of voluntary motor actions performed by the observer during a cooperative motor task. These findings indicate that social intention can be anticipated from the mere observation of action patterns. PMID:26288247

  2. Effect of mental challenge induced by movie clips on action potential duration in normal human subjects independent of heart rate

    Child, Nicholas; Hanson, Ben; Bishop, Martin; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Bostock, Julian; Western, David; Cooklin, Michael; O’Neil, Mark; Wright, Matthew; Razavi, Reza; Gill, Jaswinder; Taggart, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental stress and emotion have long been associated with ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death in animal models and humans. The effect of mental challenge on ventricular action potential duration (APD) in conscious healthy humans has not been reported. Methods and Results Activation recovery intervals (ARI) measured from unipolar electrograms as a surrogate for APD (n=19) were recorded from right and left ventricular endocardium during steady state pacing while subjects watched an emotionally charged film clip. To assess the possible modulating role of altered respiration on APD, the subjects then repeated the same breathing pattern they had during the stress, but without the movie clip. Haemodynamic parameters (mean, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure, and rate of pressure increase) and respiration rate increased during the stressful part of the film clip (p=0.001). APD decreased during the stressful parts of the film clip, eg for global RV ARI at end of film clip 193.8ms (SD 14) vs 198.0ms (SD13) during the matched breathing control (end film LV 199.8ms (SD16) vs control 201.6ms (SD15), p=0.004. Respiration rate increased during the stressful part of the film clip (by 2 breaths/minute), and was well matched in the respective control period without any haemodynamic or ARI changes. Conclusions Our results document for the first time direct recordings of the effect of a mental challenge protocol on ventricular action potential duration in conscious humans. The effect of mental challenge on APD was not secondary to emotionally-induced altered respiration or heart rate. PMID:24833641

  3. Mechanism of Action of Rare Earths in High Effective Fe Powder Welding Rods

    Han Yongquan; Li Jianguo; Yao Qinghu; Liu Yan; Huang Lihong

    2007-01-01

    The optimum coating composition of alkali Fe powder welding rods was designed by orthogonal experiment with mix rates. A new kind of effective RE-Fe powder welding rod was prepared which could be used at the condition of direct and indirect current. The arc characteristics and stabilities of effective Fe powder welding rods containing RE were analyzed by HANNOVER analyzer. The efficiency of Fe powder welding rods was tested by weighting method. It wag found that the stability of Fe powder welding rods Wag improved when it was added with rare earths. The results of impact experiment at low temperatures and SEM analysis on impact break showed that the grain was refined, the welding joint was cleaned, and the mechanical properties of joint was enhanced with proper RE content. It was provided with good processing property for this effective RE-Fe powder welding rod, and its efficiency could arrive at 180%.

  4. Color-flavor transformations and QCD low-energy effective action

    The color-flavor transformation is applied in the QCD strong coupling limit to construct the effective chiral Lagrangian. The calculations are performed by placing the fermions onto two different sub-lattices and by making use of the long-distance approximation and gradient expansion. The saddle point approximation could be applied on such a double lattice. In this framework the effect of the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking is described and the numerical values of the chiral condensate, pion decay constant and pion mass are estimated by using the only parameter of model, the lattice spacing a. The effective chiral Lagrangian of QCD is recovered up to the terms of order O(p4)

  5. Effects of Nicotinamide on Mouse Skin Tumor Development and lts Mode of Action

    KRISHNA P. GUPTA

    1999-01-01

    Nicotinamide (NA), a naturally occuring vitamin and a protease inhibitor, has been shown to be effective in treating some skin ailments. It inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell differentiation. This report shows the effects of NA on mouse skin tumor development and on the critical events involved in this process. NA reduced tumor growth, inhibited the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol- 13-acetate (TPA) induced ornithine decarboxylase activity, but induced the transglutaminase activity which was inhibited by TPA under different experimental conditions.The effects of NA on ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and transglutaminase (TG) indicated that nicotinamide (NA) probably programmmed the cells for their death in the natural course of time, I.e. Programed cell death. This observation indicates that NA might be a better agent for the detailed study and for the better use in prevention of cancer alone or in combination with other drugs.

  6. Inhibitory control training for appetitive behaviour change: A meta-analytic investigation of mechanisms of action and moderators of effectiveness.

    Jones, Andrew; Di Lemma, Lisa C G; Robinson, Eric; Christiansen, Paul; Nolan, Sarah; Tudur-Smith, Catrin; Field, Matt

    2016-02-01

    Inhibitory control training (ICT) is a novel intervention in which participants learn to associate appetitive cues with inhibition of behaviour. We present a meta-analytic investigation of laboratory studies of ICT for appetitive behaviour change in which we investigate candidate mechanisms of action, individual differences that may moderate its effectiveness, and compare it to other psychological interventions. We conducted random-effects generic inverse variance meta-analysis on data from 14 articles (18 effect sizes in total). Participants who received ICT chose or consumed significantly less food or alcohol compared to control groups (SMD = 0.36, 95% CIs [0.24, 0.47]; Z = 6.18, p contingency between appetitive cues and the requirement to inhibit. The effect of ICT on cue devaluation (primarily assessed with implicit association tests) was not statistically significant. Our analysis confirms the efficacy of ICT for short-term behaviour change in the laboratory, and we have demonstrated that its effectiveness may depend on pairings between appetitive cues and successful inhibition. We highlight the need for further research to translate these findings outside of the laboratory. PMID:26592707

  7. Learning about goals: development of action perception and action control

    Verschoor, Stephan Alexander

    2014-01-01

    By using innovative paradigms, the present thesis provides convincing evidence that action-effect learning, and sensorimotor processes in general play a crucial role in the development of action- perception and production in infancy. This finding was further generalized to sequential action. Furthermore the thesis suggests that means-selection-, ends-selection information, and action-effect knowledge together feed into a unitary concept of goal. Both these findings have the potential to gener...

  8. "Just out of reach: On the reliability of the action-sentence compatibility effect": Correction to Papesh (2015).

    2016-09-01

    Reports an error in "Just out of reach: On the reliability of the action-sentence compatibility effect" by Megan H. Papesh (, 2015[Dec], Vol 144[6], e116-e141). In the article, the Procedure did not directly state that response options were not visible on the computer screen during Experiments 7 and 8. The first sentence of the Procedure for Experiment 7 should read, "Participants completed a modified button-press version of the experiment described in Experiment 4; unlike Experiment 4, Experiment 7 included no visible on-screen elements apart from the to-be-judged sentences, which came from Glenberg and Kaschak (2002)." (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record .) The action-sentence compatibility effect (ACE; Glenberg & Kaschak, 2002), a hallmark finding in Embodied Cognition, implicates the motor system in language comprehension. In the ACE, people process sentences implying movement toward or away from themselves, responding with actions toward or away from their bodies. These processes interact, implying a linkage between linguistic and motor systems. From a theoretical perspective, the ACE has been extremely influential, being widely cited evidence in favor of embodied cognition. The present study began as an attempt to extend the ACE in a new direction, but eventually became a series of attempts to simply replicate the effect. Across 8 experiments, I tested whether the ACE extends to a novel mouse-tracking method and/or is susceptible to higher-order cognitive influences. In 3 experiments, attempts were made to "disembody" the ACE by presenting participants' names on the computer screen (as in Markman & Brendl, 2005). In each experiment, the ACE could not be disembodied, because the ACE did not occur. In further experiments, the ACE was not observed in reading times, regardless of response mode (mouse movements vs. button-presses) or stimuli, including those from the original research. Similarly, no ACE was observed in physical

  9. Magnetoplastic effect: dislocation structure relaxation under the action of magnetic field in non-magnetic crystals

    A new physical phenomenon - magnetoplastic effect lying in shifting of dislocations under the influence of permanent magnetic field at the absence of mechanical load is detected and studied for some non-magnetic monocrystals (NaCl, LiF, CsI, Zn and Al). Experiments are carried out in B=0.1-2 T magnetic fields within T= 4.2-293 K range. Main properties of the observed effect enabling to introduce a hypothesis about its nature, are determined. 14 refs., 9 figs

  10. Effects of Triclocarban on Intact Immature Male Rat: Augmentation of Androgen Action

    Duleba, Antoni J.; Ahmed, Mohamed I.; Sun, Meng; Gao, Allen C.; Villanueva, Jesus; Conley, Alan J.; Turgeon, Judith L.; Benirschke, Kurt; Gee, Nancy A.; Chen, Jiangang; Green, Peter G.; Lasley, Bill L

    2011-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC; 3,4,4′-trichlorocarbanilide) is an antimicrobial agent used widely in various personal hygiene products including soaps. Recently, TCC has been shown to enhance testosterone-induced effects in vitro and to enlarge accessory sex organs in castrated male rats. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of TCC on intact age-matched male rats and on human prostate LNCaP and C4–2B cells. Seven-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats received either a normal diet or a diet supplem...

  11. Differential Effects of Secretin-fragments imply a dual Mechanism of Action for Secretin

    Kofod, Hans; Thams, P; Holst, J J

    1991-01-01

    The effects of synthetic peptides, representing different parts of the secretin molecule in isolated mouse pancreatic islets have been investigated in perifusion studies. In the presence of 10 mM D-glucose the C-terminal nonapeptide Leu-Gln-Arg-Leu-Leu-Gln-Gly-Leu-Val-NH2 (S19-27) showed a 2-fold...

  12. 14 CFR 1216.321 - Environmental effects abroad of major Federal actions.

    2010-01-01

    ... multilateral environmental studies, or (3) Concise reviews of environmental issues. (e) When informed of the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental effects abroad of major... ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Procedures for Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act...

  13. Using the Dynamic Model of Educational Effectiveness to Design Strategies and Actions to Face Bullying

    Kyriakides, Leonidas; Creemers, Bert P. M.; Muijs, Daniel; Rekers-Mombarg, Lyset; Papastylianou, Dona; Van Petegem, Peter; Pearson, Diana

    2014-01-01

    This project investigates the impact of the dynamic approach to school improvement (DASI) aiming to help schools face and reduce bullying through integrating research on bullying with educational effectiveness research (EER). A network of approximately 15 schools in each participating country (i.e., Belgium, Cyprus, England, Greece, and The…

  14. Using the dynamic model of educational effectiveness to design strategies and actions to face bullying

    Kyriakides, Leonidas; Creemers, Bert P.M.; Muijs, Daniel; Rekers-Mombarg, Lyset; Papastylianou, Donna; Van Petegem, Peter; Pearson, Diana

    2014-01-01

    This project investigates the impact of the dynamic approach to school improvement (DASI) aiming to help schools face and reduce bullying through integrating research on bullying with educational effectiveness research (EER). A network of approximately 15 schools in each participating country (i.e.,

  15. Pharmaceutical residues in aquatic systems: mode of action and effects on mussel physiology

    Buratti, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Pharmaceutical residues contaminate aquatic ecosystems as a result of their widespread human and veterinary usage. Since continuously released and not efficiently removed, certain pharmaceuticals exhibit pseudo-persistence thus generating concerns for the health of aquatic wildlife. This work aimed at assessing on mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis, under laboratory conditions, the effects of three pharmaceuticals, carbamazepine (antiepileptic), propranolol (β-blocker) and oxytetracycline (...

  16. Towards the understanding of non-thermal airplasma action: effects on bacteria and fibroblasts

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Jäger, Aleš; Polívka, Leoš; Syková, Eva; Terebova, N.; Kulikov, A.; Kubinová, Šárka; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 30 (2016), 25286-25292. ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : non-thermal plasma * bactericidal effects * medical applications Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.840, year: 2014

  17. Metabolic action of neuropeptide Y in relation to its effect on feeding.

    Ruffin, M P; Even, P C; El-Ghissassi, M; Nicolaidis, S

    1997-12-01

    Because energy homeostasis depends on a continuous balance between food intake, energy expenditure, and energy storage, it was expected that neuropeptide Y (NPY) could act not only on food intake but also on metabolic parameters. Using an original calorimetric device that allows the computation of the background metabolism (energy expenditure free from the cost of locomotor activity), we assessed the effect of a microinjection of NPY upon the quantitative (background metabolism, thermic effect of food) and qualitative (respiratory quotient) components of energy metabolism. NPY was injected into the juxtafornical hypothalamus at a dose that promotes feeding behavior (1 microg/0.5 microL) and enhances locomotor activity. Although total metabolism was increased proportionally to locomotion, no effect of NPY on background metabolism was observed when no food was available. Only following a calibrated meal given 30 min after the microinjection did NPY induce a delayed decrease in respiratory quotient whereas the postprandial background metabolism remained unaffected. In conclusion, only the new-generation calorimeters can show that the NPY-induced rise in overall metabolic rate is entirely accounted for by the unavoidable enhancement in locomotor activity and that the only metabolic effect of NPY is the delayed postprandial respiratory quotient decrease, suggesting a postabsorptive orientation toward more lipid utilization. PMID:9383111

  18. Effectiveness of elite female basketball players’ technical-tactic actions and ways for their improvement at stage of maximal realization of individual potentials

    Sushko R.A.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: study effectiveness of elite female basketball players’ technical-tactic actions and determine the ways for their improvement at stage of maximal realization of individual potentials. Material: the authors analyzed competition functioning’s indicators of female basketball players of national combined team of Ukraine and their age characteristics. Results: effectiveness of technical-tactic actions in structure of national female basketball players’ combined team of Ukraine competition functioning at European championship. The authors present: indicators of team composition; roles in team; won and lost games; quantity of scored and skipped points; technical-tactic actions; age of sportswomen. Age indicators of elite female basketball players at stage of maximal realization have been given. Conclusions: we have composed a list of the most important technical-tactic actions in competition functioning. We also outlined ways for their perfection at stage of maximal realization of individual potentials of elite female basketball players of different game roles.

  19. Effect of high dose of rays-X on the parasitic action of Plasmodium berghei

    Malaria is responsible for millions of clinical cases and approximately for 655,000 deaths annually. Therefore, the development of strategies for the design of an effective vaccine has become a priority for the Parasitologists worldwide. The aim of the present study was the evaluate the effect of irradiation with X-rays on the merozoite stage of Plasmodium berghei using the BALB/c mice as experimental model. We used doses of ionizing radiation between 80 and 350 Gy in parasitized red blood cells (GRP) from Plasmodium Berghei to determine its effect on merozoite parasites, because in previous research we showed that 50 Gy was still not sufficient to attenuate the parasite. The parasitemia was monitored daily by Giemsa stain and the effect of high dose was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence (IFI) immunological test. Our results show that, with 120 Gy dose, 50% of individuals manage to control the infection entirely and survive. For higher dose it is observed the death of individuals even without producing significant levels of parasitemia in blood (less than 5%). IFI assay showed that for the treatments with 250, 300 and 350 Gy parasites are outside red blood cells even in the 10 day post infection. X-ray radiation dose exceeding the 250 Gy on GRP with P. berghei, diminish the ability of the parasite to invade the red blood of the host. However, the radiation has an adverse effect that causes the death of individuals for reasons unrelated to infection by malaria. Doses of radiation around 120 Gy achieve attenuation parasitic to achieving a percentage of survival of 50% in BALB/c mice

  20. Stereoscopically Observing Manipulative Actions.

    Ferri, S; Pauwels, K; Rizzolatti, G; Orban, G A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereopsis to the processing of observed manipulative actions. To this end, we first combined the factors "stimulus type" (action, static control, and dynamic control), "stereopsis" (present, absent) and "viewpoint" (frontal, lateral) into a single design. Four sites in premotor, retro-insular (2) and parietal cortex operated specifically when actions were viewed stereoscopically and frontally. A second experiment clarified that the stereo-action-specific regions were driven by actions moving out of the frontoparallel plane, an effect amplified by frontal viewing in premotor cortex. Analysis of single voxels and their discriminatory power showed that the representation of action in the stereo-action-specific areas was more accurate when stereopsis was active. Further analyses showed that the 4 stereo-action-specific sites form a closed network converging onto the premotor node, which connects to parietal and occipitotemporal regions outside the network. Several of the specific sites are known to process vestibular signals, suggesting that the network combines observed actions in peripersonal space with gravitational signals. These findings have wider implications for the function of premotor cortex and the role of stereopsis in human behavior. PMID:27252350