WorldWideScience

Sample records for 10bn alpha7li irradiation

  1. Cross-section measurement for the 10B(n, alpha)7Li reaction at 4.0 and 5.0 MeV.

    Zhang, Guohui; Guo, Li'an; Cao, Rongtai; Zhang, Jiaguo; Chen, Jinxiang

    2008-10-01

    Cross-sections of the (10)B(n, alpha)(7)Li reaction were measured at En=4.0 and 5.0 MeV. A gridded ionization chamber (GIC) was used as charged particle detector. Neutrons were produced through the D(d, n)(3)He reaction with a deuterium gas target. Experiments were performed at the 4.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of Peking University. Cross-section data of the (238)U(n, f) reaction were employed as standard. The measured cross-sections of the (10)B(n, alpha)(7)Li reaction at 4.0 and 5.0 MeV are 211+/-17 and 169+/-14 mb, respectively, and they are compared with existing results of measurements and evaluations. PMID:18387305

  2. Angular correlations and decay branching ratio for excited state of 7Li*(7,45 MeV) in reactions 7Li(alpha, alpha)7Li*

    Measurements of differential cross-sections of alpha-particle inelastic scattering by 7Li nuclei and 7Li(alpha, alpha 6Li)n, 7Li(alpha, alpha alpha)t reactions have been performed at the energy Ea = 27,2 MeV. Probability of 7Li*(7,45 MeV) decay into 6Li + n channel has been determined from the ratio of cross-sections measured in kinematically complete and incomplete experiments. The large discrepancy of this value (P 0,49 ± 0,06) and of those obtained at the study of 7Li*(7,45 MeV) decay in binary reactions can be explained by the influence of Coulomb field of accompanied alpha-particle on the decay of near-threshold resonances in three-particle reactions

  3. Food irradiation

    Food irradiation is a promising technology in which food products are exposed to a controlled amount of radiant energy to eliminate disease-causing bacteria. The process can also control parasites and insects, reduce spoilage and inhibit ripening and sprouting. Food irradiation is endorsed by the most important health organisations (WHO, CDC, USDA, FDA, EFSA, etc.) and allowed in nearly 40 Countries. It is to remember that irradiation is not a substitute either for comprehensive food safety programs or for good food-handling practices. Irradiated foods must be labelled with either the statement treated with radiation or treated by irradiation and the international symbol for irradiation, the radura. Some consumer associations suppose negative aspects of irradiation, such as increase of the number of free radicals in food and decrease of antioxidant vitamins that neutralize them

  4. Irradiated planets

    We present models for the spectra emitted by irradiated planets and discuss the numerical methods used in the modeling. In addition, we show results of simple 3D calculations that are designed as a first step toward detailed multi-dimensional models of irradiated planets

  5. Food irradiation

    The paper discusses the need for effective and efficient technologies in improving the food handling system. It defines the basic premises for the development of food handling. The application of food irradiation technology is briefly discussed. The paper points out key considerations for the adoption of food irradiation technology in the ASEAN region (author)

  6. Food irradiation

    The author reviews in outline the present status of industrial gamma irradiation plants for food and medical sterilization and in particular lists commercial irradiation plants currently operating in the U.K., considering briefly plant design, efficiency, costs and dose control. (UK)

  7. Irradiation damage

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  8. Food irradiation

    Food irradiation can have a number of beneficial effects, including prevention of sprouting; control of insects, parasites, pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, moulds and yeasts; and sterilization, which enables commodities to be stored for long periods. It is most unlikely that all these potential applications will prove commercially acceptable; the extend to which such acceptance is eventually achieved will be determined by practical and economic considerations. A review of the available scientific literature indicates that food irradiation is a thoroughly tested food technology. Safety studies have so far shown no deleterious effects. Irradiation will help to ensure a safer and more plentiful food supply by extending shelf-life and by inactivating pests and pathogens. As long as requirement for good manufacturing practice are implemented, food irradiation is safe and effective. Possible risks of food irradiation are not basically different from those resulting from misuse of other processing methods, such as canning, freezing and pasteurization. (author)

  9. Irradiation damage

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  10. Food irradiation

    Food treatment by means of ionizing energy, or irradiation, is an innovative method for its preservation. In order to treat important volumes of food, it is necessary to have industrial irradiation installations. The effect of radiations on food is analyzed in the present special work and a calculus scheme for an Irradiation Plant is proposed, discussing different aspects related to its project and design: ionizing radiation sources, adequate civil work, security and auxiliary systems to the installations, dosimetric methods and financing evaluation methods of the project. Finally, the conceptual design and calculus of an irradiation industrial plant of tubercles is made, based on the actual needs of a specific agricultural zone of our country. (Author)

  11. Fruits irradiation

    The objectives of this project in food irradiation are two-fold, to study the effect of irradiation in prolongation of useful storage life of fruits and to evaluate irradiation as a means of preserving fruits. However radiation is not intended to replace existing preservation processes but may be used in conjunction with current methods such as refrigeration, drying, fermentation etc. In fact radiation should combine with proper storage and packaging techniques in order to ensure maximum benefits. Ripening retardation of fruits by irradiation kinds of fruits: papaya, mango, rambutan, longan and durian. Changes in organoleptic properties of fruit flavor and taste, texture changes by taste panel estimation of significance level of results by statistical mathematical methods, chemical changes determination of climacteric peak in fruits by estimation of carbon dioxide evolution, vitamin C determination by Tillmann's method, carotenoid separation by thin layer chromatography, reducing sugars and acidity determination, volatile components of durian by gas-chromatography

  12. Food irradiation

    The preservation of food using irradiation may replace or be used in combination with traditional or conventional food preservation techniques. Studies have shown that the irradiation technique which uses less energy than other preservation methods is a potential way for reducing post harvest losses. However, economic feasibility among other constraints is the core factor to determine the success of the technique at commercial scale. The need and importance for considering this new technique in Malaysia are discussed here. (author)

  13. Food irradiation

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and The World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19 MeV, 1 kW) and industrial unit Electronika (10 MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permissions for irradiation for; spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables. (author)

  14. Commercial irradiator

    Commercial irradiation, the treatment of products with gamma radiation principally using a Cobalt-60 source, had its beginnings in Europe and Australia 25 years ago. To date the most successful application of the process is the sterilization of medical products and, for a variety of reasons, gamma sterilization is now becoming dominant in this important field. Many other applications have been evaluated over the years and the most exciting is undoubtedly food irradiation for which there is a vast potential. The commercial feasibility of setting up and irradiation facility is a complex subject and the selection of Cobalt-60 gamma plant depends on a number of technical and economic considerations. The parameters which determine the design and capacity of the optimum plant include throughput, product size and dose requirements; a balance has to be struck between plant flexibility and overall economy. The Ansell irradiators are designed primarily for the sterilization of medical products although some experimental food irradiation has been done, particularly in Australia. (author)

  15. Vinca irradiator

    The development programme of the VINCA radiosterilisation centre involves plans for an irradiator capable of working in several ways. Discontinuous operation. The irradiator is loaded for a certain period then runs automatically until the moment of unloading. This method is suitable as long as the treatment capacity is relatively small. Continuous operation with permanent batch loading and unloading carried out either manually or automatically (by means of equipment to be installed later). Otherwise the design of the apparatus is highly conventional. The source is a vertical panel submersible in a pool. The conveyor is of the 'bucket' type, with 4 tiers to each bucket. The batches pass successively through all possible irradiation positions. Transfert into and out of the cell take place through a maze, which also provides access to the cell when the sources are in storage at the bottom of the pool

  16. Food irradiation

    The colloquium has been held on the occasion of the commissioning of a new linear electron accelerator. The 17 papers presented by the experts give a survey of the present status of food irradiation and related aspects. Every paper has been analysed and prepared for retrieval from the database. (orig.)

  17. Food irradiation: An update

    Recent regulatory and commercial activity regarding food irradiation is highlighted. The effects of irradiation, used to kill insects and microorganisms which cause food spoilage, are discussed. Special attention is given to the current regulatory status of food irradiation in the USA; proposed FDA regulation regarding the use of irradiation; pending irradiation legislation in the US Congress; and industrial applications of irradiation

  18. Food irradiation

    Various aspects of food treatment by cobalt 60 or caesium 137 gamma radiation are reviewed. One of the main applications of irradiation on foodstuffs lies in its ability to kill micro-organisms, lethal doses being all the lower as the organism concerned is more complex. The effect on parasites is also spectacular. Doses of 200 to 300 krad are recommended to destroy all parasites with no survival period and no resistance phenomenon has ever been observed. The action of gamma radiation on macromolecules was also investigated, the bactericide treatment giving rise to side effects by transformation of food components. Three examples were studied: starch, nucleic acids and a whole food, the egg. The organoleptic aspect of irradiation was examined for different treated foods, then the physical transformations of unpasteurized, heat-pasteurized and radio-pasteurized eggs were compared. The report ends with a brief analysis of the toxicity and conditions of application of the treatment

  19. Food irradiation

    Radiation processing of food is based on irradiation by gamma radiation from a 60Co source or X-ray with energy < 5 MeV or electron beam with energy < 10 MeV. This technique is now completely mastered. About 30 countries use this technique to extend the storage life of food but the total quantity processed is weak, only 30000 tons a year for France. Some countries like Morocco or Tunisia have launched technical programmes about the radiation processing of dates and vegetable oil. These programmes may lead to the creation of a quality label. A joint laboratory between CEA and the Aix-Marseille-3 university is working on the detection of food irradiation in order to fight the fraud. 3 techniques are being investigated: thermoluminescence, electronic paramagnetism resonance and a chemical method. (A.C.)

  20. Endolymphatic irradiation

    The authors analysed the clinical evolution and the result of renal transplantation some years after irradiation in 24 patients (group I) who received endolymphatic 131I as a pre-transplantation immunesuppresive measure. The control group (group II) consisted of 24 non-irradiated patients comparable to group I in age, sex, primary disease, type of donor and immunesuppressive therapy. Significant differences were observed between the two groups regarding such factors a incidence and reversibility of rejection crises in the first 60 post-transplantation days, loss of kidney due to rejection, and dosage of azathioprine. The authors conclude that this method, besides being harmless, has prolonged immunesuppressive action, its administration being advised for receptores of cadaver kidneys, mainly those who show positive cross-match against HLA antigens for painel. (Author)

  1. Food irradiation

    The first part of this data is relative to the study of chemical modifications induced by gamma radiations (60Co, 137Cs) on macromolecules of food and their contaminates with the help of two examples: starch and nucleic acids. Then the second part shows what are the consequences of irradiation on food and their preservation; we make distinction between useful effects (for instance germination inhibition of tubercules, destruction of insects or micro-organisms) and the results which are contingently bad for nutritional, technological and above all toxicologic aspects. The last part is relative to a short restatement of the problems inherent in the industrialization of this treatment

  2. Is food irradiation harmful

    The paper reports on a seminar on 'The irradiation of food', held in London, 1987, and organised by the Royal Society and the Association of British Science Writers. A description is given of the food irradiation techniques. Problems with food irradiation are discussed with respect to the nutritional value of food, killing of microorganisms, survival of fungi following treatment, mutation of irradiated bacteria, and chemical changes produced in the food. Monitoring and controls of food that has been irradiated is discussed. A personal opinion of irradiated food by the author is given, including a verdict on irradiated food. (UK)

  3. Detection of irradiated liquor

    D-2,3-butanediol is formed by irradiation processes in irradiated liquors. This radiolytic product is not formed in unirradiated liquors and its presence can therefore be used to identify whether a liquor has been irradiated or not. The relation meso/dl∼1 for 2,3-butanediol and the amount present in irradiated liquors may therefore be used as an indication of the dose used in the irradiation. (author)

  4. Irradiation of goods

    The necessary dose and the dosage limits to be observed depend on the kind of product and the purpose of irradiation. Product density and density distribution, product dimensions, but also packaging, transport and storage conditions are specific parameters influencing the conditions of irradiation. The kind of irradiation plant - electron accelerator or gamma plant - , its capacity, transport system and geometric arrangement of the radiation field are factors influencing the irradiation conditions as well. This is exemplified by the irradiation of 3 different products, onions, deep-frozen chicken and high-protein feed. Feasibilities and limits of the irradiation technology are demonstrated. (orig.)

  5. Food irradiation in China

    In this paper, the author discussed the recent situation of food irradiation in China, its history, facilities, clearance, commercialization, and with emphasis on market testing and public acceptance of irradiated food. (author)

  6. Economics of food irradiation

    Economic aspects of food irradiation and direct economic benefits accruing from the application of food irradiation are discussed. A formula is presented to estimate the net economic benefit due to radiation processing of food. (M.G.B .)

  7. JMTR irradiation handbook

    A wide variety of nuclear irradiation and post-irradiation experiments are available using the JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor, 50 MW) and the multi-cell hot laboratory associated with the JMTR. In this Handbook, an application manual for conducting irradiation and post-irradiation experiments using those facilities is provided. The Handbook is primarily designed to aid the experimenter and to serve as a reference for communications between the experimenter and the Division of JMTR Project. (author)

  8. JMTR irradiation handbook

    A wide variety of nuclear irradiation and post-irradiation experiments are available using the Japan Materials Testing Reactor, 50 MW (JMTR) and the multi-cell hot laboratory associated with the JMTR. In this Handbook, an application manual for conducting irradiation and post-irradiation experiments using those facilities is provided. The Handbook is primarily designed to aid the experimenter and to serve as a reference for communications between the experimenter and the Department of JMTR Project. (author)

  9. Containers in food irradiation

    The preservation of food by irradiation is promising technology which increases industrial application. Packaging of irradiated foods is an integral part of the process. Judicious selection of the package material for successful trade is essential. In this paper is presented a brief review of important aspects of packaging in food irradiation

  10. Canadian Food Irradiation Facilities

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) began work on the irradiation of potatoes in 1956, using spent fuel rods as the radiation source. In 1958 the first Gammacell 220, a self-contained irradiator, was designed and manufactured by AECL, and cobalt-60 was then used exclusively in the food irradiation programme. In 1960 the first food and drug clearance was obtained for potatoes. The next stage was to demonstrate to the potato industry that cobalt-60 was a safe, simple and reliable tool, and that irradiation would inhibit sprouting under field conditions. A mobile irradiator was designed and produced by AECL in 1961 to carry out this pilot-plant programme. The irradiator was mounted on a fully-equipped road trailer and spent the 1961/1962 season irradiating one million pounds of potatoes at various points in Eastern Canada. In 1965 the first commercial food irradiator was designed and built by AECL for Newfield Products, Ltd. Whilst the potato programme was under way, AECL initiated co-operative programmes with Canadian food research laboratories, using additional Gammacells. In 1960, AECL constructed an irradiation facility in a shielded room at its own plant in Ottawa for the irradiation of larger objects, such as sides of pork and stems of bananas. During 1963 the mobile irradiator, already a most useful tool, was made more versatile when its source strength was increased and it was equipped with a product cooling system and van air conditioning. Following these modifications, the unit was employed in California for the irradiation of a wide spectrum of fruits at the United States Department of Agriculture Station in Fresno. The Gammacell, mobile irradiator, shielded-room facility, the commercial food irradiator and some of the main food programmes are described in detail. There is an increasing amount of interest in irradiation by the food industry, and prospects are encouraging for future installations. (author)

  11. Welding irradiated stainless steel

    Conventional welding processes produced severe underbead cracking in irradiated stainless steel containing 1 to 33 appm helium from n,a reactions. A shallow penetration overlay technique was successfully demonstrated for welding irradiated stainless steel. The technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel that contained 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at the same and lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking was minimal compared to conventional welding methods. However, cracking in the irradiated material was greater than in tritium charged and aged material at the same helium concentrations. The overlay technique provides a potential method for repair or modification of irradiated reactor materials

  12. Irradiation effects on polycaprolactone

    The structure and some physical properties of γ-irradiated polycaprolactone (PCL), a semi-crystalline linear saturated polyester, were studied as function of the irradiation dose level. The critical dose level for gel formation is 26 Mrad and above this irradiation dose the number of scission events is similar to the number of crosslinking events. G.p.c. results show that the initial rather narrow molecular weight distribution gradually widens with increasing dose in the pre-gelation region. A significant difference between first and second d.s.c. scans of irradiated PCL is shown and explained. Scission and crosslinking reactions associated with the irradiation process occur preferentially in the non-ordered regions. Small irradiation doses, 2 to 5 Mrad, are shown to have a dramatic effect on the tensile elongation at break by converting ductile PCL samples into brittle materials. (author)

  13. Identification of irradiated chicken

    Frozen chicken and chicken parts were irradiated at a dose of 5 kGy with Co-60. The irradiated chicken and chicken parts were identified by determination of three radiation-induced hydrocarbons from the lipid fraction. Isolation was carried out by high-vacuum distillation with a cold-finger apparatus. The detection of the hydrocarbons was possible in all irradiated samples by gaschromatography/mass spectrometry. (orig.)

  14. Gamma irradiation devices

    The main parameters and the preparation procedures of the gamma radiation sources frequently applied for irradiation purposes are discussed. In addition to 60Co and 137Cs sources also the nuclear power plants offer further opportunities: spent fuel elements and products of certain (n,γ) reactions can serve as irradiation sources. Laboratory scale equipments, pilot plant facilities for batch or continuous operation, continuous industrial irradiators and special multipurpose, mobile and panorama type facilities are reviewed including those in Canada, USA, India, the Soviet Union, Hungary, UK, Japan and Australia. For irradiator design the source geometry dependence of the spatial distribution of dose rates can be calculated. (V.N.)

  15. Irradiation of food

    A committee has on instructions from the swedish government made an inquiry into the possible effects on health and working environment from irradition of food. In this report, a review is presented on the known positiv and negative effects of food irradiation Costs, availabilty, shelf life and quality of irradiated food are also discussed. According to the report, the production of radiolysis products during irradiation is not easily evaluated. The health risks from irradiation of spices are estimated to be lower than the risks associated with the ethenoxid treatment presently used. (L.E.)

  16. Food irradiation. An alternative

    In order to start a food irradiation program, one needs to perform some tests, such as: local handling problems, consumer acceptance and government licenses. At this point the cost of a special food irradiator can be considered a too high investment. It is proposed that for the irradiation of a few tons of several food items, a commercial irradiator for medical products sterilization be employed. With the use of an ''experimental loop'' and some special positions inside the irradiation chamber, it is possible to irradiate even potatoes and onions, at doses ranging from 100 Gy to 200 Gy. The quantities, depending on the source activity, can be around 300 kg per hour. For doses near 10 kGy, the normal procedure used for sterilization of medical products can be employed, while changing the cycle on the machine. In the case of an experimental loop within a JS-7400 (AECC) irradiator at a dose rate of 20 Gy per minute, around 200 kg of potatoes per hour can be irradiated. The experimental positions inside the chamber have a dose rate of 60 Gy per hour, and the batch capacity is 250 kg, so that 250 kg can be irradiated each 1,5 hour

  17. Facts about food irradiation: Chemical changes in irradiated foods

    This fact sheet addresses the safety of irradiated food. The irradiation process produces very little chemical change in food, and laboratory experiments have shown no harmful effects in animals fed with irradiated milk powder. 3 refs

  18. Mobile irradiation robot - computer modelling of the irradiation process

    For irradiation of cultural objects, which are damaged by wood-destroying insects or fungi, with the automatized irradiation robot, the computer code MOBROB1 for irradiation planning was developed and is presented. (author)

  19. Irradiation damage in superconductors

    Most superconductors are quite sensitive to irradiation defects. Critical temperatures may be depressed, critical currents may be increased, by irradiation, but other behaviours may be encountered. In compounds, the sublattice in which defects are created is of significant importance. 24 refs

  20. Materials modified by irradiation

    Application of radiation in pharmaceutical sciences and cosmetology, polymer materials, food industry, environment, health camre products and packing production is described. Nanotechnology is described more detailed, because it is less known as irradiation using technology. Economic influence of the irradiation on the materials value addition is shown

  1. Materials modified by irradiation

    Application of radiation in pharmaceutical sciences and cosmetology, polymer materials, food industry, environment, health camre products and packing production is described. Nano-technology is described more detailed, because it is less known as irradiation using technology. Economic influence of the irradiation on the materials value addition is shown

  2. Food irradiation control

    A brief review is given of the control and monitoring of food irradiation with particular emphasis on the UK situation. After describing legal aspects, various applications of food irradiation in different countries are listed. Other topics discussed include code of practice for general control for both gamma radiation and electron beam facilities, dose specification, depth dose distribution and dosimetry. (U.K.)

  3. Food Irradiation in Japan

    Since 1967 research activities on food irradiation in Japan have been carried out under the National Food Irradiation Programme by the Japanese Atomic Energy Commission. The programme has been concentrated on the technological and economical feasibility and wholesomeness testings of seven irradiated food items of economic importance to the country, i.e. potatoes, onions, wheat, rice, “kamaboko” (fish-paste products), “Vienna” sausages and mandarin oranges. By now most studies, including wholesomeness testings of these irradiated food items, have been completed. In Japan, all foods or food additives for sale are regulated by the Food Sanitation Law enforced in 1947. Based on studies made by the national programme, irradiated potatoes were given “unconditional acceptance” for human consumption in 1972. At present, irradiated potatoes are the only food item which has so far been approved by the Minister of Health and Welfare. Unless the Minister of Health and Welfare has declared that items are not harmful to human health on obtaining comments from the Food Sanitation Investigation Council, no irradiated food can be processed or sold. In addition, the import of irradiated foodstuffs other than potatoes from foreign countries is prohibited by law.

  4. Phase stability under irradiation

    Experimental evidences of radiation induced instability are described then it is shown what theoretical approaches are relevant. Radiation induced segregation and precipitation in alloys irradiated at constant chemical composition, precipitate re-solution, order-disorder transition under irradiation and amorphization are examined

  5. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  6. Issues in food irradiation

    This discussion paper has two goals: first, to raise public awareness of food irradiation, an emerging technology in which Canada has the potential to build a new industry, mainly oriented to promising overseas markets; and second, to help build consensus among government and private sector decision makers about what has to be done to realize the domestic and export potential. The following pages discuss the potential of food irradiation; indicate how food is irradiated; outline the uses of food irradiation; examine questions of the safety of the equipment and both the safety and nutritional value of irradiated food; look at international commercial developments; assess the current and emerging domestic scene; and finally, draw some conclusions and offer suggestions for action

  7. Irradiation of goods

    Mechanical handling apparatus is adapted to handle goods, such as boxed fruit, during a process of irradiation, in palletized form. Palletized goods are loaded onto wheeled vehicles in a loading zone. Four vehicles are wheeled on a track into an irradiation zone via a door in a concrete shield. The vehicles are arranged in orthogonal relationship around a source of square section. Turntables are positioned at corners of the square shaped rail truck around the source selectively to turn the vehicles to align then with track sections. Mechanical manipulating devices are positioned in the track sections opposed to sides of the source. During irradiation, the vehicles and their palletized goods are cylically moved toward the source to offer first sides of the goods for irradiation and are retraced from the source and are pivoted through 900 to persent succeeding sides of the goods for irradiation

  8. Onion irradiation - a case study

    Onion irradiation prevents sprouting associated with long term storage. Under the climatic conditions of Central Europe, only that part of onions should be irradiated which is needed to supply the domestic market during the months of May to July. Two types of irradiation plants, a bulk-irradiation and a multipurpose large-scale irradiation plant are used for onion irradiation. Technical data, throughput, cost-related parameters of onion irradiation are discussed. Onion irradiation for long term storage is beneficial to the national economy as well as to the business management. (author) 13 refs.; 11 tabs

  9. Irradiation of fusion materials

    In collaboration with the EFDA (European Fusion Development Agreement), SCK-CEN irradiates several materials in the BR2 reactor at different temperatures and up to different doses to study their mechanical and physical properties during and after the irradiation. These materials are candidates for the construction of different parts of the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) fusion reactor and of the long-term DEMO (DEMOnstration) reactor. The objectives of research at SCK-CEN in this area are: (1) to irradiate RAFM (Reduced Activity Ferritic Martensitic) steel joints and RAFM ODS (Oxide Dispersion Strengthening) at 300 degrees Celsius up to 2 dpa; (2) to irradiate RAFM steel and different FeCr alloys at 300 degrees C above 1.5 dpa; (3) to irradiate Beryllium and Tungsten specimen at 300 degress C up to 0.75 dpa; (4) to irradiate copper/stainless steel joints at 150 degrees C up to 0.1 dpa; (5) to perform in-situ creep-fatigue tests with CuCrZr specimens under neutron irradiation

  10. Food irradiation 2009

    Food irradiation principles; its main applications, advantages and limitations; wholesomeness, present activities at Ezeiza Atomic Centre; research coordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency; capacity building; and some aspects on national and international regulations, standards and commercialization are briefly described. At present 56 countries authorize the consumption of varied irradiated foods; trade is performed in 32 countries, with about 200 irradiation facilities. Argentina pioneered nuclear energy knowledge and applications in Latin America, food irradiation included. A steady growth of food industrial volumes treated in two gamma facilities can be observed. Food industry and producers show interest towards new facilities construction. However, a 15 years standstill in incorporating new approvals in the Argentine Alimentary Code, in spite of consecutive request performed either by CNEA or some food industries restricts, a wider industrial implementation, which constitute a drawback to future regional commercialization in areas such as MERCOSUR, where Brazil since 2000 freely authorize food irradiation. Besides, important chances in international trade with developed countries will be missed, like the high fresh fruits and vegetables requirements United States has in counter-season, leading to convenient sale prices. The Argentine food irradiation facilities have been designed and built in the country. Argentina produces Cobalt-60. These capacities, unusual in the world and particularly in Latin America, should be protected and enhanced. Being the irradiation facilities scarce and concentrated nearby Buenos Aires city, the possibilities of commercial application and even research and development are strongly limited for most of the country regions. (author)

  11. Economics of Food Irradiation

    This paper reviews and evaluates current developments relating to the prospects for commercial food irradiation within the United States. The study, recognizes that one cannot generalize about the prospects for food irradiation either by process or product. Both technical and economic potentials vary widely for different food products subjected to the same or different types of treatment. Food irradiation processes and products are evaluated. Recent studies concerned with the economics of food irradiation are briefly reviewed and evaluated and findings and conclusions relating to economic potentials summarized. Industry reactions to a proposed pilot plant meat irradiator, sponsored by the U.S. Army and U.S. AEC and coordinated by the Department of Commerce, are discussed and factors which will determine the future direction, extent and commercial success of food preservation by ionizing irradiation are analysed. Developments in all these categories are essential for success, and if not achieved would be limiting factors. Nevertheless, the successful and profitable marketing of irradiated foods must finally be dependent upon customer acceptance and favourable cost versus benefit relations. Benefits will include lower costs and higher profits through spoilage reductions, extensions of shelf-life and shipping distances, market expansions, and quality Improvements. Ultimately, the economic success of this new technology must depend upon the clear demonstration that these benefits will exceed the additional processing costs by a margin sufficient to induce the necessary private investments and willingness to accept related risks in this new field. (author)

  12. Irradiation-Induced Nanostructures

    Birtcher, R.C.; Ewing, R.C.; Matzke, Hj.; Meldrum, A.; Newcomer, P.P.; Wang, L.M.; Wang, S.X.; Weber, W.J.

    1999-08-09

    This paper summarizes the results of the studies of the irradiation-induced formation of nanostructures, where the injected interstitials from the source of irradiation are not major components of the nanophase. This phenomena has been observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in a number of intermetallic compounds and ceramics during high-energy electron or ion irradiations when the ions completely penetrate through the specimen. Beginning with single crystals, electron or ion irradiation in a certain temperature range may result in nanostructures composed of amorphous domains and nanocrystals with either the original composition and crystal structure or new nanophases formed by decomposition of the target material. The phenomenon has also been observed in natural materials which have suffered irradiation from the decay of constituent radioactive elements and in nuclear reactor fuels which have been irradiated by fission neutrons and other fission products. The mechanisms involved in the process of this nanophase formation are discussed in terms of the evolution of displacement cascades, radiation-induced defect accumulation, radiation-induced segregation and phase decomposition, as well as the competition between irradiation-induced amorphization and recrystallization.

  13. Irradiation in action

    The extent to which food irradiation takes place and the regulations governing the process in America, Brazil, Chile, and European countries is reported. The development and operation of a pilot plant built in Holland to test the application of the process to the sterilization of medical supplies and certain foods and the setting up and operation, by Gammester, of a special food irradiation plant in 1982, is described. In this plant 36 foods, mainly dry ingredients such as spices, dried vegetables, egg powder and blood proteins are irradiated. Research looks promising for the future. The implementation of international legal acceptance and more public information is stressed. (U.K.)

  14. Alaskan Commodities Irradiation Project

    The ninety-ninth US Congress commissioned a six-state food irradiation research and development program to evaluate the commercial potential of this technology. Hawaii, Washington, Iowa, Oklahoma and Florida as well as Alaska have participated in the national program; various food products including fishery products, red meats, tropical and citrus fruits and vegetables have been studied. The purpose of the Alaskan study was to review and evaluate those factors related to the technical and economic feasibility of an irradiator in Alaska. This options analysis study will serve as a basis for determining the state's further involvement in the development of food irradiation technology. 40 refs., 50 figs., 53 tabs

  15. Facts about food irradiation: Irradiated foods and the consumer

    This fact sheet discusses market testing of irradiate food, consumer response to irradiated products has always been positive, and in some countries commercial quantities of some irradiated food items have been sold on a regular basis. Consumers have shown no reluctance to buy irradiated food products. 4 refs

  16. Packing for food irradiation

    Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee approved the use of radiation treatment of foods. Nowadays food packaging are mostly made of plastics, natural or synthetic, therefore effect of irradiation on these materials is crucial for packing engineering for food irradiation technology. By selecting the right polymer materials for food packaging it can be ensured that the critical elements of material and product performance are not compromised. When packaging materials are in contact with food at the time of irradiation that regulatory approvals sometimes apply. The review of the R-and-D and technical papers regarding material selection, testing and approval is presented in the report. The most information come from the USA where this subject is well elaborated, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reports are reviewed as well. The report can be useful for scientists and food irradiation plants operators. (author)

  17. Food irradiation : ACA inquiry

    The executive summary of the report on food irradiation by the Australian Consumers' Association is presented. The key issues which emerged during the inquiry are summarised including safety controls, wholesomeness, the environment, consumer rights and economic considerations

  18. Sterilization by gamma irradiation

    Since 1980 the National Institute of Nuclear Research counts with an Industrial Gamma Irradiator, for the sterilization of raw materials and finished products. Through several means has been promoted the use of this technology as alternative to conventional methods of sterilization as well as steam treatment and ethylene oxide. As a result of the made promotion this irradiator has come to its saturation limit being the sterilization irradiation one of the main services that National Institute of Nuclear Research offers to producer enterprises of disposable materials of medical use also of raw materials for the elaboration of cosmetic products and pharmaceuticals as well as dehydrated foods. It is presented the trend to the sterilization service by irradiation showed by the compilation data in a survey made by potential customers. (Author)

  19. Economics of food irradiation.

    Deitch, J

    1982-01-01

    This article examines the cost competitiveness of the food irradiation process. An analysis of the principal factors--the product, physical plant, irradiation source, and financing--that impact on cost is made. Equations are developed and used to calculate the size of the source for planned product throughput, efficiency factors, power requirements, and operating costs of sources, radionuclides, and accelerators. Methods of financing and capital investment are discussed. A series of tables show cost breakdowns of sources, buildings, equipment, and essential support facilities for both a cobalt-60 and a 10-MeV electron accelerator facility. Additional tables present irradiation costs as functions of a number of parameters--power input, source size, dose, and hours of annual operation. The use of the numbers in the tables are explained by examples of calculations of the irradiation costs for disinfestation of grains and radicidation of feed. PMID:6759046

  20. Food irradiation in perspective

    Food irradiation already has a long history of hopes and disappointments. Nowhere in the world it plays the role that it should have, including in the much needed prevention of foodborne diseases. Irradiated food sold well wherever consumers were given a chance to buy them. Differences between national regulations do not allow the international trade of irradiated foods. While in many countries food irradiation is still illegal, in most others it is regulated as a food additive and based on the knowledge of the sixties. Until 1980, wholesomeness was the big issue. Then the ''prerequisite'' became detection methods. Large amounts of money have been spent to design and validate tests which, in fact, aim at enforcing unjustified restrictions on the use of the process. In spite of all the difficulties, it is believed that the efforts of various UN organizations and a growing legitimate demand for food safety should in the end lead to recognition and acceptance. (Author)

  1. Food irradiation in perspective

    Henon, Y. M.

    1995-02-01

    Food irradiation already has a long history of hopes and disappointments. Nowhere in the world it plays the role that it should have, including in the much needed prevention of foodborne diseases. Irradiated food sold well wherever consumers were given a chance to buy them. Differences between national regulations do not allow the international trade of irradiated foods. While in many countries food irradiation is still illegal, in most others it is regulated as a food additive and based on the knowledge of the sixties. Until 1980, wholesomeness was the big issue. Then the "prerequisite" became detection methods. Large amounts of money have been spent to design and validate tests which, in fact, aim at enforcing unjustified restrictions on the use of the process. In spite of all the difficulties, it is believed that the efforts of various UN organizations and a growing legitimate demand for food safety should in the end lead to recognition and acceptance.

  2. Innovations in irradiator design

    In the past few years industry has demanded certain changes in irradiator design to meet the needs of the medical manufacturers, and as well service the requirements of new applications for irradiation. The medical manufacturers have, in certain cases, been tending toward larger capacity machines with higher efficiencies to take advantage of economies of scale. Other parts of the industry have been demanding a truly ''Multipurpose'' facility which can process many varied types of products. Coupled with these machine changes there has been an increase in demand for more comprehensive logging of the irradiation process. This has spawned development of several styles of computer monitoring, control and logging systems. This paper will discuss these topics in more detail in order to give some insight into the ''state of the art'' within the irradiator design industry. (author)

  3. Dosimetry for food irradiation

    A Manual of Food Irradiation Dosimetry was published in 1977 under the auspices of the IAEA as Technical Reports Series No. 178. It was the first monograph of its kind and served as a reference in the field of radiation processing and in the development of standards. While the essential information about radiation dosimetry in this publication has not become obsolete, other publications on radiation dosimetry have become available which have provided useful information for incorporation in this updated version. There is already a Codex General Standard for Irradiated Foods and an associated Code of Practice for Operation of Irradiation Facilities used for Treatment of Food, issued in 1984 by the Codex Alimentarius Commission of the FAO/WHO Food Standard Programme. The Codex Standard contains provisions on irradiation facilities and process control which include, among other requirements, that control of the processes within facilities shall include the keeping of adequate records including quantitative dosimetry. Appendix A of the Standard provides an explanation of process control and dosimetric requirements in compliance with the Codex Standard. By 1999, over 40 countries had implemented national regulations or issued specific approval for certain irradiated food items/classes of food based on the principles of the Codex Standard and its Code of Practice. Food irradiation is thus expanding, as over 30 countries are now actually applying this process for the treatment of one or more food products for commercial purposes. Irradiated foods are being marketed at retail level in several countries. With the increasing recognition and application of irradiation as a sanitary and phytosanitary treatment of food based on the provisions of the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures of the World Trade Organization, international trade in irradiated food is expected to expand during the next decade. It is therefore essential that proper dosimetry

  4. Irradiation of chilled lamb

    Chilled, vacuum-packed New Zealand lamb loins have been irradiated at doses between 1-8 kGy. The report outlines the methods used and provides dosimetry details. An appendix summarises the results of a taste trial conducted on the irradiated meat by the Meat Industry Research Institute of New Zealand. This showed that, even at 1 kGy, detectable flavours were induced by the radiation treatment

  5. Food irradiation in Malaysia

    Food irradiation has recently been visited as a technology that can contribute to the solution of problems associated with food preservation of Malaysia's agriculture produce and products thereby improving the economic status of the rural sector. However, the history of food irradiation in Malaysia is very recent. Research carried out on food irradiation only began in 1974 as a result of the installation of a 60Co facility (initially 10,000 Ci) at the National University of Malaysia. Since its installation several studies have been carried out pertaining to the food irradiation. Presently its development has been slow. Research in this area has been confined to laboratory scale and purely academic. This limitation is due to a number of reasons, among others are: a) limited number of facilities; b) lack of expertise to conduct its research; c) other preservation methods can be improved with lower capital output. An important step towards its development was made when Malaysia actively participated in the RCA/IAEA food irradiation project, viz. the irradiation of pepper which was carried out at the National University of Malaysia in the 80's. As a result of this venture, research and development activities in food irradiation have been geared toward semi-plot scale with the view ot commercialization in the future. In 1982, a group of researchers was formed to conduct feasibility studies using irradiation techniques in trying to overcome several problems associated with our local paddy and rice. Another group is being organized by the National University of Malaysia to look into the problems associated with the preservation of frozen shrimps. (author)

  6. Fully portable blood irradiator

    A fully portable blood irradiator was developed using the beta emitter thulium-170 as the radiation source and vitreous carbon as the body of the irradiator, matrix for isotope encapsulation, and blood interface material. These units were placed in exteriorized arteriovenous shunts in goats, sheep, and dogs and the effects on circulating lymphocytes and on skin allograft retention times measured. The present work extends these studies by establishing baseline data for skin graft rejection times in untreated animals

  7. Proton irradiation of EMCCDs

    Smith, DR; Ingley, R.; Holland, AD

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the irradiation of 95 electron multiplication charge coupled devices (EMCCDs) at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland, to investigate the effects of proton irradiation on the operational characteristics of CCDs featuring electron multiplication technology for space use. This work was carried out in support of the CCD development for the radial velocity spectrometer (RVS) instrument of the European Space Agency's cornerstone Gaia mission. Previous proton irradia...

  8. Irradiation Defects in Silicon Crystal

    2003-01-01

    The application of irradiation in silicon crystal is introduced.The defects caused by irradiation are reviewed and some major ways of studying defects in irradiated silicon are summarized.Furthermore the problems in the investigation of irradiated silicon are discussed as well as its properties.

  9. Irradiated produce reaches Midwest market

    In March 1992, the Chicago-area store gave its shoppers a choice between purchasing irradiated and nonirradiated fruits. The irradiated fruits were treated at Vindicator Inc., the first U.S. food irradiation facility (starting up on January 10, 1992). The plant, located in Mulberry, Fla., then shipped the fruits in trucks to the store where they were displayed under a hand-lettered sign describing the irradiated fruits and showing the irradiation logo

  10. Irradiation of cane sugar spirit

    The present study deals with the effect of irradiation on the gas-chromatographic profile of irradiated cane sugar spirit irradiated in glass containers in the presence of oak chops with doses of 0-10 kGy. Volatile constituents were analyzed in a CG gas chromatographer with a flame ionization detector using a Megabore CG-745 column. The results are discussed considering the contribution of irradiation to the quality of the spirit and the contribution of the irradiated oak wood. (author)

  11. Consumer response to irradiated foods

    Apart from the safety and nutritional adequacy of irradiated foods, consumer acceptance would be a major factor in the successful commercialization of irradiation technology. One way to remove the misconceptions about irradiated foods is to serve the food items prepared from irradiated foods to consumers and gauge their response. To evaluate the public perception on irradiated foods, a survey was conducted in various scientific symposia and Bhabha Atomic Research Centre canteens covering a wide spectrum of consumers

  12. Longevity of irradiated burros

    During the course of external radiation exposures of burros to establish a dose-response curve for acute mortality after total irradiation, some of the animals at the three lowest exposures to gamma photons survived. These groups of 10, 9, and 10 burros were exposed to 320, 425, and 545 R, respectively. There were 10 unirradiated controls. In 1953, 20 burros were exposed to 375 R (gamma) in 25-R/week increments without acute mortality and were added to the life-span study. In 1957, 33 burros were exposed to mixed neutron-gamma radiation from nuclear weapons, and 14 controls were added. The total number of irradiated burros in the study was increased to 88 by the addition of 6 animals irradiated with 180 rads of neutron and gamma radiation (4:1) in a Godiva-type reactor in 1959. In this experiment two acute deaths occurred which were not included in the analysis. In the first 4 years after the single gamma exposures, there were deaths from pancytopenia and thrombocytopenia, obviously related to radiation-induced bone-marrow damage. After that period, however, deaths were from common equine diseases; no death has resulted from a malignant neoplasm. Of the original 112 burros, 15 survive (10 irradiated and 5 controls). Survival curves determined for unirradiated and neutron-gamma- and gamma-irradiated burros showed significant differences. The mean survival times were: controls, 28 years; gamma irradiation only, 26 years; and neutron-gamma irradiation, 23 years. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  13. Gamma Irradiation does not Cause Carcinogenesis of Irradiated Herbs

    Full text: Microbial contamination of medicinal herbs can be effectively reduced by gamma irradiation. Since irradiation may cause carcinogenicity of the irradiated herbs, the objective of this research is to study the effect of gamma irradiation (10 and 25 kGy) from cobalt-60 on carcinogenicity. The herbs studied were Pueraria candollei Grah., Curcuma longa Linn. Zingiber montanum, Senna alexandrina P. Miller, Eurycoma Longifolia Jack, Gymnostema pentaphylum Makino, Ginkgo biloba, Houttuynia cordata T., Andrographis paniculata, Thunbergia laurifolia L., Garcinia atroviridis G., and Cinnamomum verum J.S.Presl. The results showed that gamma irradiation at the dose of 10 and 25 kGy did not cause carcinogenicity of the irradiated herbs

  14. ORNL irradiation creep facility

    A machine was developed at ORNL to measure the rates of elongation observed under irradiation in stressed materials. The source of radiation is a beam of 60 MeV alpha particles from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). This choice allows experiments to be performed which simulate the effects of fast neutrons. A brief review of irradiation creep and experimental constraints associated with each measurement technique is given. Factors are presented which lead to the experimental choices made for the Irradiation Creep Facility (ICF). The ICF consists of a helium-filled chamber which houses a high-precision mechanical testing device. The specimen to be tested must be thermally stabilized with respect to the temperature fluctuations imposed by the particle beam which passes through the specimen. Electrical resistance of the specimen is the temperature control parameter chosen. Very high precision in length measurement and temperature control are required to detect the small elongation rates relevant to irradiation creep in the test periods available (approx. 1 day). The apparatus components and features required for the above are presented in some detail, along with the experimental procedures. The damage processes associated with light ions are discussed and displacement rates are calculated. Recent irradiation creep results are given, demonstrating the suitability of the apparatus for high resolution experiments. Also discussed is the suitability of the ICF for making high precision thermal creep measurements

  15. Post-irradiation diarrhea

    In radiotherapy of pelvic cancers, the X-ray dose to be delivered to the tumour is limited by the tolerance of healthy surrounding tissue. In recent years, a number of serious complications of irradiation of pelvic organs were encountered. Modern radiotherapy necessitates the acceptance of a calculated risk of complications in order to achieve a better cure rate. To calculate these risks, one has to know the radiation dose-effect relationship of normal tissues. Of the normal tissues most at risk when treating pelvic tumours only the bowel is studied. In the literature regarding post-irradiation bowel complications, severe and mild complications are often mixed. In the present investigation the author concentrated on the group of patients with relatively mild symptoms. He studied the incidence and course of post-irradiation diarrhea in 196 patients treated for carcinoma of the uterine cervix or endometrium. The aims of the present study were: 1) to determine the incidence, course and prognostic significance of post-irradiation diarrhea; 2) to assess the influence of radiotherapy factors; 3) to study the relation of bile acid metabolism to post-irradiation diarrhea; 4) to investigate whether local factors (reservoir function) were primarily responsible. (Auth.)

  16. ORNL irradiation creep facility

    Reiley, T.C.; Auble, R.L.; Beckers, R.M.; Bloom, E.E.; Duncan, M.G.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    A machine was developed at ORNL to measure the rates of elongation observed under irradiation in stressed materials. The source of radiation is a beam of 60 MeV alpha particles from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). This choice allows experiments to be performed which simulate the effects of fast neutrons. A brief review of irradiation creep and experimental constraints associated with each measurement technique is given. Factors are presented which lead to the experimental choices made for the Irradiation Creep Facility (ICF). The ICF consists of a helium-filled chamber which houses a high-precision mechanical testing device. The specimen to be tested must be thermally stabilized with respect to the temperature fluctuations imposed by the particle beam which passes through the specimen. Electrical resistance of the specimen is the temperature control parameter chosen. Very high precision in length measurement and temperature control are required to detect the small elongation rates relevant to irradiation creep in the test periods available (approx. 1 day). The apparatus components and features required for the above are presented in some detail, along with the experimental procedures. The damage processes associated with light ions are discussed and displacement rates are calculated. Recent irradiation creep results are given, demonstrating the suitability of the apparatus for high resolution experiments. Also discussed is the suitability of the ICF for making high precision thermal creep measurements.

  17. Irradiation of grains and spices

    The efficacy of food irradiation to extend the storage life and improve the hygienic quality of rice, mungbean and spices was tested by direct involvement with related food industries. The test consisted of storage trials of irradiated rice under commercial conditions, market testing of irradiated food, and a trial irradiation of commercial products. A consumer acceptance test was conducted using a group of educated people from 3 universities. To prove the safety of food irradiation conducted under appropriately controlled conditions, additional data on vitamin B content and the physico-chemical properties of irradiated rice, as well as free radical activity in irradiated rice, mungbean and spices were collected during this study. The results indicated that rice packaged in polyethylene pouch and irradiated up to 1 kGy could be stored for more than 1 year without insect damage. The colour of irradiated rice was slightly darker than that of unirradiated control, but was still acceptable. The vitamin B content of rice irradiated with such a dose was not significantly changed. Many food companies have recognized the ability of food irradiation, but this technology is not well understood by the general public. An irradiation dose of 3 kGy can be recommended as maximum dose to decontaminate rice of certain bacteria. Free radicals produced in irradiated rice, mungbean and spice will disappear within 1 month following irradiation. (author). 10 refs, 2 figs, 10 tabs

  18. Dosimetry of neutron irradiations

    Biological dosimetry of neutron irradiation appears to be of great difficulty due to the multiparametric aspect of the relative biological effectiveness and the heterogeneity of the neutron dose distribution. Dosimetry by sodium 24 activation which can be performed by means of portable radiameters appears to be very useful for early triage within the 3 h following neutron irradiation, whereas hematological dosimetry by slope and level analysis of the lymphocyte drop cannot be used in this case. Chromosomic aberration analysis allows to evaluate the neutron dose heterogeneity by the frequency measurement of acentric fragments not originating from the formation of dicentrics or rings. Finally, recent experimental data on large primate models (baboons) have shown that some plasma hemostasia factors appear to be reliable biological indicators and noticeable markers of the prognosis of neutron irradiation

  19. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1×1 cm2) silicon sensors

  20. Neutron irradiation of seeds

    Neutrons are a valuable type of ionizing radiation for seed irradiation and radiobiological studies and for inducing mutations in crop plants. In experiments where neutrons are used in research reactors for seed irradiation it is difficult to measure the dose accurately and therefore to establish significant comparisons between experimental results obtained in various reactors and between repeated experiments in the same reactor. A further obstacle lies in the nature and response of the seeds themselves and the variety of ways in which they are exposed in reactors. The International Atomic Energy Agency decided to initiate international efforts to improve and standardize methods of exposing seeds in research reactors and of measuring and reporting the neutron dose. For this purpose, an International Neutron Seed Irradiation Programme has been established. The present report aims to give a brief but comprehensive picture of the work so far done in this programme. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    Dervan, P; Hodgson, P; Marin-Reyes, H; Wilson, J

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS [1] will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1 x 1 cm^2 ) silicon sensors.

  2. Irradiation induced kyphosis

    Eighty-one patients with Wilms tumor treated by irradiation and chemotherapy were studied. Despite the fact that multiple portals for irradiation were used, each crossing the midline, the amount of irradiation delivered to different parts of the vertebral body varied and it was this variation in delivered dose which produced axial skeletal deformities in 70% of the patients. Of the 57 patients with these deformities, 32 had scoliosis, 22 kyphoscoliosis and 3 patients pure kyphosis; 12 patients had a kyphotic deformity of over 25 degrees, 7 patients requiring surgical correction. A high incidence of pseudarthrosis following posterior fusion has led to the preference of a 2-stage procedure, anterior interbody fusion followed by a posterior fusion with Harrington rods after 2 weeks of correction in halo femoral traction

  3. Irradiation induced kyphosis

    Riseborough, E.J.

    1977-10-01

    Eighty-one patients with Wilms tumor treated by irradiation and chemotherapy were studied. Despite the fact that multiple portals for irradiation were used, each crossing the midline, the amount of irradiation delivered to different parts of the vertebral body varied and it was this variation in delivered dose which produced axial skeletal deformities in 70% of the patients. Of the 57 patients with these deformities, 32 had scoliosis, 22 kyphoscoliosis and 3 patients pure kyphosis; 12 patients had a kyphotic deformity of over 25 degrees, 7 patients requiring surgical correction. A high incidence of pseudarthrosis following posterior fusion has led to the preference of a 2-stage procedure, anterior interbody fusion followed by a posterior fusion with Harrington rods after 2 weeks of correction in halo femoral traction.

  4. Food irradiation - general aspects

    This paper describes research and development experience in food irradiation followed by commercial utilisation of multi-purpose plants. The main design objectives should be high efficiency and uniform dose. Particular care must be given to dosimetry and the use of plastic dosimeters is described. Capital outlay for a 1 MCi Cobalt 60 irradiator is estimated to be 2.5 million dollars giving a unit processing cost of 0.566 dollars/ft3 of throughput for 8000 hour/year use at a dose of 25 kGy. (2.5 Mrad). The sale of irradiated food for human consumption in Britain is not yet permitted but it is expected that enabling legislation will be introduced towards the end of 1985

  5. Food irradiation and the chemist

    Food Irradiation and the Chemist reviews the chemical challenges facing the food industry regarding food irradiation, especially in the key area of detection methodology. The book looks at the most promising techniques currently available for the detection of irradiated foods and discusses their suitability to different food groups. It also covers the latest work on the effect of irradiation on polymer additives, potential taint from irradiated food contact plastics, the effects of irradiation on micro-organisms and their biochemistry, and much more... (author)

  6. Effects of irradiation

    The midday depression of CO2 assimilation in leaves of two cultivars of hazelnut. Effect of UV-B radiation on decay kinetics of long-term delayed luminiscence of green algae Scenedesmus quadricuda. Effects of irradiance on biomass allocation and needle photosynthetic capacity in silver fir seedlings originating from different localities. Chlorophyll fluorescence of UV-B irradiated bean leaves subjected to chilling in light. Preliminary studies on susceptibility of selected varieties of oats to high UV-B radiation dose. Influence of light conditions on oxidative stress in maize callus

  7. Irradiation of dehydrated vegetables

    The reason for radurization was to decreased the microbial count of dehydrated vegetables. The average absorbed irradiation dose range between 2kGy and 15kGy. The product catagories include a) Green vegetables b) White vegetables c) Powders of a) and b). The microbiological aspects were: Declining curves for the different products of T.P.C., Coliforms, E. Coli, Stap. areus, Yeast + Mold at different doses. The organoleptical aspects were: change in taste, flavour, texture, colour and moisture. The aim is the marketing of irradiated dehydrated vegetables national and international basis

  8. Irradiated cocoa beans

    Groups of 40 male and 40 female CD rats were fed powdered rodent diet containing 25% (w/w) of either non-irradiated, irradiated or fumigated cocoa beans. The diets were supplemented with certain essential dietary constituents designed to satisfy normal nutritional requirements. An additional 40 male and 40 female rats received basal rodent diet alone (ground) and acted as an untreated control. After 70 days of treatment, 15 male and 15 female rats from each group were used to assess reproductive function of the F0 animals and growth and development of the F1 offspring up to weaning; the remaining animals were killed after 91 days of treatment. (orig.)

  9. Materials response to irradiation

    Radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of metals, e.g. due to the embrittlement necessitate irradiation experiments with HTR-specific neutron spectra. These experiments help to determine materials behaviour and establish basic data for design and safety testing, especially with a view to the high fluence and temperature loads on absorber cans. The experiments are carried out up to maximum operational fluence (>= 1022nsub(th)/cm2). Results so far have shown the importance of the materials structure for assurance of sufficient residual ductility after irradiation. Secondary experiments, e.g. on He implantation and radiation response of the absorber material B4C, are mentioned. (orig.)

  10. Food irradiation processing

    An international symposium on food irradiation processing dealing with issues which affect the commercial introduction of the food irradiation process was held in Vienna in 1985. The symposium, which attracted close to 300 participants, was planned to interest not only scientists and food technologists, but also representatives of government agencies, the food industry, trade associations and consumer organizations. The symposium included a discussion of the technological and economic feasibility of applying ionizing energy for the preservation of food, and focused on the specific needs of developing countries. Separate abstracts were prepared for the various presentations at this meeting

  11. Serum magnesium and irradiation

    Serum magnesium determinations were obtained on 10 dogs and 11 patients undergoing fractionated irradiation to the pelvis and lower abdomen. Five of the dogs received oral prednisone during irradiation. There was no significant change in magnesium concentration in either the control dogs or the patients, but there was a significant increase in stool frequency in both the dogs and patients. A significant increase in magnesium concentration was noted in the dogs receiving prednisone. It is concluded that radiation-induced diarrhea is not caused by reduced serum magnesium concentration

  12. Canadian Irradiation Centre

    The Canadian Irradiation Centre is a non-profit cooperative project between Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Radiochemical Company and Universite du Quebec, Institut Armand-Frappier, Centre for Applied Research in Food Science. The Centre's objectives are to develop, demonstrate and promote Canada's radiation processing technology and its applications by conducting applied research; training technical, professional and scientific personnel; educating industry and government; demonstrating operational and scientific procedures; developing processing procedures and standards, and performing product and market acceptance trials. This pamphlet outlines the history of radoation technology and the services offered by the Canadian Irradiation Centre

  13. Facts about food irradiation: Nutritional quality of irradiated foods

    This fact sheet briefly considers the nutritional value of irradiated foods. Micronutrients, especially vitamins, are sensitive to any food processing method, but irradiation does not cause any special nutritional problems in food. 4 refs

  14. Consumer opinions in Argentina on food irradiation: irradiated onions

    Two surveys were carried out in Buenos Aires of consumer attitudes towards irradiated onions [no data given]. The first investigated the general level of consumer knowledge concerning food irradiation, whilst the second (which covered consumers who had actually bought irradiated onions) examined reasons for purchase and consumer satisfaction. Results reveal that more than 90% of consumers surveyed had a very limited knowledge of food irradiation

  15. Economics of gamma irradiation processing

    The gamma-ray irradiation business started at the Takasaki Laboratory of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The irradiation facilities were constructed thereafter at various sites. The facilities must accept various types of irradiation, and must be constructed as multi-purpose facilities. The cost of irradiation consists of the cost of gamma sources, construction expense, personnel expense, management expense, and bank interest. Most of the expenses are considered to be fixed expense, and the amount of irradiation treatment decides the original costs of work. The relation between the irradiation dose and the construction expense shows the larger facility is more economical. The increase of amount of treatment reduces the original cost. The utilization efficiency becomes important when the amount of treatment and the source intensity exceed some values. The principal subjects of gamma-ray irradiation business are the sterilization of medical tools and foods for aseptic animals, the improvement of quality of plastic goods, and the irradiation of foods. Among them, the most important subject is the sterilization of medical tools. The cost of gamma irradiation per m3 in still more expensive than that by ethylene oxide gas sterilization. However, the demand of gamma-ray irradiation is increasing. For the improvement of quality of plastic goods, electron irradiation is more favourable than the gamma irradiation. In near future, the economical balance of gamma irradiation can be achieved. (Kato, T.)

  16. Food irradiation and consumer values

    A mail survey technique was used to determine if value hierarchy, locus of control, innovativeness, and demographic parameters could distinguish between subjects expressing different levels of concern and willingness to buy irradiated food. Concern toward irradiated food was lower than concern for other food safety issues, probably because many expressed uncertainty regarding irradiation. Those ranking the value “an ecologically balanced world” expressed the greatest irradiation concern. Factors which could predict high irradiation concern were being highly concerned about the use of chemical sprays on food, completing more formal education and being female; those believing that life was controlled by luck were less concerned. Irradiation concern was a principal factor determining willingness to buy irradiated foods. Innovative consumers were more likely to try irradiated foods than noninnovative. Implications for consumer education are presented

  17. Regulatory aspect of food irradiation

    Interest in the process of food irradiation is reviewed once again internationally. Although food irradiation has been thoroughly investigated, global acceptance is still lacking. Factors which impede the progress of the technology are discussed here. (author)

  18. Phytosanitary Applications of Irradiation

    Phytosanitary treatments are used to disinfest agricultural commodities of quarantine pests so that the commodities can be shipped out of quarantined areas. Ionizing irradiation is a promising phytosanitary treatment that is increasing in use worldwide. Almost 19 000 metric tons of sweet potatoes and several fruits plus a small amount of curry leaf are irradiated each year in 6 countries, including the United States, to control a number of plant quarantine pests. Advantages over other treatments include tolerance by most fresh commodities, ability to treat in the final packaging and in pallet loads, and absence of pesticide residues. Disadvantages include lack of acceptance by the organic food industries and logistical bottlenecks resulting from current limited availability of the technology. A regulatory disadvantage is lack of an independent verification of treatment efficacy because pests may be found alive during commodity inspection, although they will not complete development or reproduce. For phytosanitary treatments besides irradiation, the pests die shortly after the treatment is concluded. This disadvantage does not hamper its use by industry, but rather makes the treatment more difficult to develop and regulate. Challenges to increase the use of phytosanitary irradiation (PI) are cost, because commercial use has not yet reached an optimum economy of scale, lack of facilities, because of their cost and current inability to feasibly locate them in packing facilities, lack of approved treatments for some quarantine pests, and concern about the process by key decision makers, such as packers, shippers, and retailers. Methods for overcoming these challenges are discussed. (author)

  19. Irradiation of spices

    The problem faced by spice producing countries and by the food industry using these spices as ingredients are facing the problem of their high contamination with pathogenic and non pathogenic microorganisms, which create public health and product-deterioration problems. After discussing the conventional methods of decontamination, which result either in organoleptic losses (heat and extracts) or in toxic residues (fumigants), the advantages of the irradiation treatment are presented. This procedure is direct, simple to administer and control, and highly efficient. Doses of 3-7 kGy have been proven to reduce the microbial load to satisfactory levels, without affecting the organoleptic characteristics, whereas the surviving microflora is more sensitive to the subsequent food processing treatments. Irradiation can be administered in the commercial packages, which leads to considerable energy and personnel savings, while preventing subsequent recontamination. The increasing demand for high microbial quality in spices makes it easier for the food industry to afford the irradiation treatment costs. The wholesomeness of irradiated spices has been demonstrated by a group of experts of WHO, FAO and IAEA, and the treatment has been promulgated by Codex Alimentarius and been cleared by a number of national health authorities, including the U.S. F.D.A. The number of clearances is steadily increasing and so is the commercial use

  20. Solar Irradiance Variability

    Solanki, Sami K

    2012-01-01

    The Sun has long been considered a constant star, to the extent that its total irradiance was termed the solar constant. It required radiometers in space to detect the small variations in solar irradiance on timescales of the solar rotation and the solar cycle. A part of the difficulty is that there are no other constant natural daytime sources to which the Sun's brightness can be compared. The discovery of solar irradiance variability rekindled a long-running discussion on how strongly the Sun affects our climate. A non-negligible influence is suggested by correlation studies between solar variability and climate indicators. The mechanism for solar irradiance variations that fits the observations best is that magnetic features at the solar surface, i.e. sunspots, faculae and the magnetic network, are responsible for almost all variations (although on short timescales convection and p-mode oscillations also contribute). In spite of significant progress important questions are still open. Thus there is a debat...

  1. Irradiation effects on zircaloy

    In a water cooled reactor, the neutron effect on zirconium base alloys which are used in the core, is a twofold one: - indirect effect, by means of modifications to the alloy environment; - direct effect occurence of irradiation defects in the material. The indirect effect results in an increase of the water corrosion, as a consequence of the water radiolysis and in stress-corrosion, due to fission products such as iodine, cesium, cadmium... The paper will describe the consequence of these phenomena and the means used to remedy their harmfull effects. The occurence of irradiation defects has three consequence: - Material strenghening: the yield and ultimate stresses are increased by 45 and 35% respectively for the cold worked and stress-relieved zircaloy while the uniform elongation, rather low before irradiation, practically does not decrease (fluence 5.1021 n/cm2). Yield and ultimate stresses of annealed zircaloy are increased by about 150% while uniform elongation decreases from 8 to 1% in the same conditions. - Material growing it is a change in dimensions in the absence of any applied stress. It depends on the cristallography texture, metallurgical state of the material and irradiation temperature. - Material creeping: in the normal working conditions of a reactor, it is the main source of deformation. It depends on temperature, stress, neutron flux and metallurgical state of the material

  2. Wholesomeness of irradiated food

    Raica, Nicholas; McDowell, Marion E.; Darby, William J.

    1963-01-15

    The wholesomeness of irradiated foods was evaluated in mice, rats, dogs, and monkeys over a 2-year period, or 4 generations. Data are presented on the effects of a diet containing radiation-processed foods on growth, reproduction, hematology, histopathology, carcinogenicity, and life span. (86 references) (C.H.)

  3. Photochromism in irradiated diamond

    Photochromism exhibited at low temperatures in the absorption line at 1.521 eV in electron-irradiated type IIb diamond is described and understood in terms of a simple model. Energy and temperature dependences of the photoconversion process are discussed briefly. (author)

  4. Profitability of irradiation plants

    In any industrial process it is seek an attractive profit from the contractor and the social points of view. The use of the irradiation technology in foods allows keep their hygienically, which aid to food supply without risks for health, an increment of new markets and a losses reduction. In other products -cosmetics or disposable for medical use- which are sterilized by irradiation, this process allows their secure use by the consumers. The investment cost of an irradiation plant depends mainly of the plant size and the radioactive material reload that principally is Cobalt 60, these two parameters are in function of the type of products for irradiation and the selected doses. In this work it is presented the economic calculus and the financial costs for different products and capacities of plants. In general terms is determined an adequate utility that indicates that this process is profitable. According to the economic and commercial conditions in the country were considered two types of credits for the financing of this projects. One utilizing International credit resources and other with national sources. (Author)

  5. Update on meat irradiation

    The irradiation of meat and poultry in the United States is intended to eliminate pathogenic bacteria from raw product, preferably after packaging to prevent recontamination. Irradiation will also increase the shelf life of raw meat and poultry products approximately two to three times the normal shelf life. Current clearances in the United States are for poultry (fresh or frozen) at doses from 1.5 to 3.0 kGy and for fresh pork at doses from 0.3 to 1.0 kGy. A petition for the clearance of all red meat was submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 1994. The petition is for clearances of fresh meat at doses from 1.5 to 4.5 kGy and for frozen meat at ∼2.5 to 7.5 kGy. Clearance for red meat is expected before the end of 1997. There are 28 countries that have food irradiation clearances, of which 18 countries have clearances for meat or poultry. However, there are no uniform categories or approved doses for meat and poultry among the countries that could hamper international trade of irradiated meat and poultry

  6. Radiation irradiation test method

    The present invention provides a method of irradiating radiation (rays) to a test piece by using an actual powder of nuclear fuel material. Namely, the test piece is sealed in an inner and outer double-walled bag of a radiation-permeable polymer film to form an irradiation specimen. The irradiation specimen is placed at a predetermined position of a glove box for a predetermined period of time, and necessary irradiation is performed. The outer bag is cut out, and the test piece in the inner bag not deposited with radioactive material is obtained. This is transported out of the glove box by using a bag-out method. The test piece sealed in the inner bag can be taken out by cutting out the inner bag in an operation hood capable of preventing scattering of radioactive materials. The bag-out method mentioned herein is a method of taking out radioactive materials or materials contaminated by the radioactive materials in the glove box after sealing them in a vinyl chloride bag by welding. (I.S.)

  7. Pituitary irradiation program

    The alpha particle pituitary irradiation program continues to be a major research project at Donner Pavilion. A study to determine the incidence of hyperprolactinemia in a large series of acromegalic subjects was undertaken. The relationships between plasma levels of growth hormone and prolactin, sellar volume, duration of acromegaly, and age at time of evaluation were investigated

  8. Irradiated uranium reprocessing

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products

  9. NSUF Irradiated Materials Library

    Cole, James Irvin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Science User Facilities has been in the process of establishing an innovative Irradiated Materials Library concept for maximizing the value of previous and on-going materials and nuclear fuels irradiation test campaigns, including utilization of real-world components retrieved from current and decommissioned reactors. When the ATR national scientific user facility was established in 2007 one of the goals of the program was to establish a library of irradiated samples for users to access and conduct research through competitively reviewed proposal process. As part of the initial effort, staff at the user facility identified legacy materials from previous programs that are still being stored in laboratories and hot-cell facilities at the INL. In addition other materials of interest were identified that are being stored outside the INL that the current owners have volunteered to enter into the library. Finally, over the course of the last several years, the ATR NSUF has irradiated more than 3500 specimens as part of NSUF competitively awarded research projects. The Logistics of managing this large inventory of highly radioactive poses unique challenges. This document will describe materials in the library, outline the policy for accessing these materials and put forth a strategy for making new additions to the library as well as establishing guidelines for minimum pedigree needed to be included in the library to limit the amount of material stored indefinitely without identified value.

  10. Process for irradiation of polyethylene

    Irradiation of polyethylene affects its processabiltiy in the fabrication of products and affects the properties of products already fabricated. The present invention relates to a process for the irradiation of polyethylene, and especially to a process for the irradiation of homopolymers of ethylene and copolymers of ethylene and higher α-olefins, in the form of granules, with low levels of electron or gamma irradiation in the presence of an atomsphere of steam

  11. Economics of Food Irradiation

    To-day very reliable irradiation equipment is available, and for an industrialist it is largely an economic consideration whether he should go in for an otherwise acceptable irradiation processing. In Denmark an industrial concern has now found it economically justifiable to establish a multi-purpose industrial plant, equipped with an American linac, and this facility will be able to process food.l To date, few plants in the world have recorded actual cost experiences for industrial food processing, but cost figures from other fields may serve as a guide. In practical calculations it is convenient to divide the work into certain typical groups, e.g. facilities for ''bulk'', ''medium'', ''thin'', and ''multi-purpose'', but food products may come under any of these headings. Costs of irradiation depend on product properties, type of plant, annual and monthly quantities, doses, control standards, special requirements for re-packing or other additional handling, etc. Definite figures for a particular case must be based on an exact calculation, but for a preliminary judgement many general price-range indications are available to the industrialist, and for a variety of purposes it is already evident that irradiation processing is economically sound. Apart from plant economy it is advisable for the industrialist to study some general commercial problems also, such as consumer preference and marketing structure, for the commodity in question. This can often best be done by marketing a pilot production of some quantity, before final decisions are taken regarding major investments in highly-specialized equipment. For some products market testing has already been done with good results by existing research or production facilities, and indeed actual commercial marketing has been reported. In conclusion, many food irradiation processes seem to be promising from an economic point of view. (author)

  12. Food irradiation technology

    Trade in food and agricultural products is important to all countries, the economies of many developing countries would be significantly improved if they were able to export more food and agricultural products. Unfortunately, many products can not be traded because they are infested with, or hosts to, harmful pests, contaminated with microorganisms, or spoil quickly. Foods contaminated with microorganisms cause economic losses, widespread illness and death. Several technologies and products have been developed to resolve problems in trading food and to improve food safety, but none can provide all the solutions. Irradiation is an effective technology to resolve technical problems in trade of many food and agricultural products, either as a stand- alone technology or in combination with others. As a disinfestation treatment it allows different levels of quarantine security to be targeted and it is one of few methods to control internal pests. The ability of irradiation virtually to eliminate key pathogenic organisms from meat, poultry, and spices is an important public health advantage. In addition to controlling pests and eliminating harmful bacteria, irradiation also extends the storage life of many foods. In the laboratories of Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, many research projects were completed on the effects of gamma irradiation to the storage life of chicken meat, anchovy, Turkish fermented sausage, dried and fresh fruits and vegetables and also research projects were conducted on the effects of gamma irradiation on microorganisms (Salmonella, Campylo-bacteria, E.coli and S.aureus in white and red meat) and parasites (food-borne, trichostrongylus spp. and Nematodes spp.)

  13. Onion irradiation - a case study

    The irradiation of onions (Allium cepa L.) serves to prevent sprouting associated with long-term storage or transport and storage of onions in climatic conditions which stimulate sprouting. JECFI the Joint Expert Committee for Food Irradiation of FAO/IAEA/WHO, recommended the application of an irradiation dose of up to 150 Gy for sprout inhibition with onions. (author)

  14. Market trials of irradiated chicken

    The potential market for irradiated chicken breasts was investigated using a mail survey and a retail trial. Results from the mail survey suggested a significantly higher level of acceptability of irradiated chicken than did the retail trial. A subsequent market experiment involving actual purchases showed levels of acceptability similar to that of the mail survey when similar information about food irradiation was provided

  15. Post-irradiation effects in polyethylenes irradiated under various atmospheres

    If a large amount of polymer free radicals remain trapped after irradiation of polymers, the post-irradiation effects may result in a significant alteration of physical properties during long-term shelf storage and use. In the case of polyethylenes (PEs) some failures are attributed to the post-irradiation oxidative degradation initiated by the reaction of residual free radicals (mainly trapped in crystal phase) with oxygen. Oxidation products such as carbonyl groups act as deep traps and introduce changes in carrier mobility and significant deterioration in the PEs electrical insulating properties. The post-irradiation behaviour of three different PEs, low density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) was studied; previously, the post-irradiation behaviour of the PEs was investigated after the irradiation in air (Suljovrujic, 2010). In this paper, in order to investigate the influence of different irradiation media on the post-irradiation behaviour, the samples were irradiated in air and nitrogen gas, to an absorbed dose of 300 kGy. The annealing treatment of irradiated PEs, which can substantially reduce the concentration of free radicals, is used in this study, too. Dielectric relaxation behaviour is related to the difference in the initial structure of PEs (such as branching, crystallinity etc.), to the changes induced by irradiation in different media and to the post-irradiation changes induced by storage of the samples in air. Electron spin resonance (ESR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infra-red (IR) spectroscopy and gel measurements were used to determine the changes in the free radical concentration, crystal fraction, oxidation and degree of network formation, respectively. - Highlights: • The post-irradiation behaviour of three different PEs, LDPE, LLDPE and HDPE, was studied. • In order to investigate influence of different irradiation media on post-irradiation behaviour, samples

  16. Storage of pork by irradiation

    In this paper the study of storage of pork, irradiated with Co-60 gamma rays, is recommended. The changes of the appearance and the main qualitative indexes of pork, irradiated with 1.5 M rad radiation and after two month's storage, were analysed. The evaluation of storage, transportation and nutritional acceptability of the two kinds of irradiated pork products was made. Systematic toxicological tests of rats and dogs, fed with irradiated pork, were given. The comparison of the economic facilitation of refrigerated pork and irradiated pork was made. (author)

  17. Safety aspects of irradiated foods

    The toxicological and microbiological safety of irradiated foods has been established after extensive research over a period of 30 years. No radioactivity can be induced in foods with the radioisotopes used to irradiate produce. The lethal effects of gamma irradiation on spoilage and pathogenic bacteria as well as insects and parasites, ensure a product of superior quality with regard to maintaining quality and hygiene. Feeding studies of unprecedented scope in the history of food research also proved the toxicological safety of irradiated foods. These findings are supported by recent short-term studies on toxicity and mutagenicity. The production and marketing of irradiated foods are therefore warranted and have indeed started worldwide

  18. Industrial application of food irradiation

    In the past three years the author has been irradiating foodstuffs with the Gammaster facility which was originally designed for the sterilization of medical equipment. A great diversity of products have been irradiated. In spite of some limitations of the facility, the process has proved to be very satisfactory. The technology for medical sterilization is directly applicable. At present, besides the sterilization of medical equipment, an average of twenty tonnes of foodstuffs, mainly spices, grains, herbs and fish products, are being irradiated every week. The Pilot Plant for Food Irradiation handles a similar quantity. The construction of the JS 7200, the JS 8500, and the JS 9000 irradiator is discussed. (Auth.)

  19. Commercial food irradiation in practice

    Dutch research showed great interest in the potential of food irradiation at an early stage. The positive research results and the potential applications for industry encouraged the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries to construct a Pilot Plant for Food Irradiation. In 1967 the Pilot Plant for Food Irradiation in Wageningen came into operation. The objectives of the plant were: research into applications of irradiation technology in the food industry and agricultural industry; testing irradiated products and test marketing; information transfer to the public. (author)

  20. Market Trials of Irradiated Spices

    Full text: The objectives of the experiment were to disseminate irradiated retail foods to the domestic publics and to test consumer acceptance on irradiated ground chilli and ground pepper. Market trials of irradiated ground chilli and ground pepper were carried out at 2 local markets and 4 in Bangkok and Nontaburi in 2005-2007. Before the start of the experiment, processing room, gamma irradiation room and labels of the products were approved by Food and Drug Administration, Thailand. 50 grams of irradiated products were packaged in plastic bags for the market trials. 688 and 738 bags of ground chilli and ground pepper were sold, respectively. Questionnaires distributed with the products were commented by 59 consumers and statistically analyzed by experimental data pass program. 88.1 and 91.4 percents of the consumers were satisfied with the quality and the price, respectively. 79.7% of the consumers chose to buy irradiated ground chilli and ground pepper because they believed that the quality of irradiated products were better than that of non-irradiated ones. 91.5% of the consumers would certainly buy irradiated chilli and pepper again. Through these market trials, it was found that all of the products were sold out and the majority of the consumers who returned the questionnaires was satisfied with the irradiated ground chilli and ground pepper and also had good attitude toward irradiated foods

  1. Biological Effects of Irradiated Fats

    Rats were fed with a diet containing 20% of irradiated oils. If the oils were irradiated with 2.5 Mrad, there was no indication of detrimental effects during the course of 80 weeks. Oils irradiated with 10 Mrad, however, caused an increase in lethality after a lag period of 9 to 12 months. Irradiation with 50 Mrad caused weight losses after 24 weeks, disturbed liver function, and hypoproteinaemia, with a relative increase in gamma globulins. No animal of this group exceeded a life-span of 75 weeks. Irradiation with 100 Mrad caused immediate toxic symptoms and a high lethality. There is no indication that peroxides are responsible for the toxicity of the irradiated oils. Because of the high content of dimeric products in the irradiated oils, it is assumed that dimerization of fatty acids is the cause of damage. (author)

  2. Vitamin A in irradiated foodstuffs

    Vitamin A losses induced by 10 MeV electrons in cream cheese, calf liver sausage, pig liver, whole egg powder and magarine continued to increase during storage for 4-8 weeks in presence of air. Thus, vitamin A loss in sausage irradiated with 5 Mrad was 22% on the day after irradiation, 61% after 4 weeks. Irradiation and storage at 00C instead of ambient temperature reduced these losses considerably. Exclusion of air (vacuum, nitrogen) or irradiation on dry ice (approx. -800C) were even more effective in preventing destruction of vitamin A. After 4 weeks of storage, cream cheese irradiated at 5 Mrad had lost 60% when irradiated and stored in air at ambient temperature, 20% in nitrogen atmosphere, 5% in vacuum package, and 5% when irradiated on dry ice and stored at ambient temperature. (orig.)

  3. Vitamin A in irradiated foodstuffs

    Vitamin A losses induced by 10 MeV electrons in cream cheese, calf liver sausage, pig liver, whole egg powder and margarine continued to increase during storage for 4-8 weeks in presence of air. Thus, vitamin A loss in sausage irradiated with 5 Mrad was 22% on the day after irradiation, 61% after 4 weeks. Irradiation and storage at 00C instead of at ambient temperature reduced these losses considerably. Exclusion of air (vacuum, nitrogen) or irradiation on dry ice (approx. -800C) were even more effective in preventing destruction of vitamin A. After 4 weeks of storage, cream cheese irradiated at 5 Mrad had lost 60% when irradiated and stored in air at ambient temperature, 20% in nitrogen atmosphere, 5% in vacuum package, and 5% when irradiated on dry ice and stored at ambient temperture. (orig.)

  4. Irradiated brown dwarfs

    Casewell, S L; Lawrie, K A; Maxted, P F L; Dobbie, P D; Napiwotzki, R

    2014-01-01

    We have observed the post common envelope binary WD0137-349 in the near infrared $J$, $H$ and $K$ bands and have determined that the photometry varies on the system period (116 min). The amplitude of the variability increases with increasing wavelength, indicating that the brown dwarf in the system is likely being irradiated by its 16500 K white dwarf companion. The effect of the (primarily) UV irradiation on the brown dwarf atmosphere is unknown, but it is possible that stratospheric hazes are formed. It is also possible that the brown dwarf (an L-T transition object) itself is variable due to patchy cloud cover. Both these scenarios are discussed, and suggestions for further study are made.

  5. Thermoluminescence of irradiated foods

    This report describes developments and applications of the thermoluminescence (TL) analysis of mineral contaminants in foods. Procedures are presented to obtain minerals from most different products such as pepper, mangos, shrimps and mussels. The effect of light exposure during the storage of foods on the TL intensity of minerals is examined and corresponding conclusions for routine control are drawn. It is also shown that the normalization of TL intensities - the essential step to identify irradiated samples - can not only be achieved by γ, X or β rays but also by UV radiation. The results allow the conclusion that a clear identification of any food which has been irradiated with more than 1 kGy is possible if enough minerals can be isolated. (orig.)

  6. Identification of irradiated seafood

    Interest in the use of ionising radiation for the treatment and preservation of food is increasing throughout the world. Foods are treated with ionising radiation to decrease microbial and insect infestations, inhibit maturation and extend shelf-life. Ionising radiation can be used in place of, or in conjunction with, chemical treatment and other processes currently used to preserve foods. The treatment of food by ionising radiation is accepted for specific purposes in several countries, although in other countries the sale of irradiated food for human consumption is prohibited. It would be advantageous if a method was available to determine whether a commercial food has been treated with ionising radiation and is within regulatory limitations for permissible food types and maximum allowable absorbed dose. Because of differences in the composition of the food commodities that potentially could be treated by irradiation, several analytical procedures will probably have to be developed. (author)

  7. Safety of irradiated foods

    Iwahara, Shigeo (Foods Medicines Safety Center (Japan)); Kobayashi, Kazuo

    1983-01-01

    The safety of 7 irradiated foods (potato, onion, rice, wheat, vienna sausage, fish paste and mandarine orange), in terms of 2-year long-term toxic effect, reproductive physiology and possible teratogenesis, was studied using 3 generations of rats, mice and monkeys. The genetic toxicity was studied by means of various mutagenicity tests. The details of the studies conducted by the authors to date and some overseas data were reported. The available data showed no toxic effect.

  8. Safety of irradiated foods

    The safety of 7 irradiated foods (potato, onion, rice, wheat, vienna sausage, fish paste and mandarine orange), in terms of 2-year long-term toxic effect, reproductive physiology and possible teratogenesis, was studied using 3 generations of rats, mice and monkeys. The genetic toxicity was studied by means of various mutagenicity tests. The details of the studies conducted by the authors to date and some overseas data were reported. The available data showed no toxic effect. (Chiba, N.)

  9. Analysis of irradiated materials

    Papers presented at the UKAEA Conference on Materials Analysis by Physical Techniques (1987) covered a wide range of techniques as applied to the analysis of irradiated materials. These varied from reactor component materials, materials associated with the Authority's radwaste disposal programme, fission products and products associated with the decommissioning of nuclear reactors. An invited paper giving a very comprehensive review of Laser Ablation Microprobe Mass Spectroscopy (LAMMS) was included in the programme. (author)

  10. Food Irradiation. Standing legislation

    The standing legislation in Mexico on food irradiation matter has its basis on the Constitutional Policy of the Mexican United States on the 4 Th. article by its refers to Secretary of Health, 27 Th. article to the Secretary of Energy and 123 Th. of the Secretary of Work and Social Security. The laws and regulations emanated of the proper Constitution establishing the general features which gives the normative frame to this activity. The general regulations of Radiological Safety expedited by the National Commission for Nuclear Safety and Safeguards to state the specifications which must be fulfill the industrial installations which utilizing ionizing radiations, between this line is founded, just as the requirements for the responsible of the radiological protection and the operation of these establishments. The project of Regulation of the General Health Law in matter of Sanitary Control of Benefits and Services, that in short time will be officialized, include a specific chapter on food irradiation which considers the International Organizations Recommendations and the pertaining harmonization stated for Latin America, which elaboration was in charge of specialized group where Mexico was participant. Additionally, the Secretary of Health has a Mexican Official Standard NOM-033-SSA1-1993 named 'Food irradiation; permissible doses in foods, raw materials and support additives' standing from the year 1995, where is established the associated requirements to the control registers, service constancies and dose limits for different groups of foods, moreover of the specific guidelines for its process. This standard will be adequate considering the updating Regulation of Benefits and Services and the limits established the Regulation for Latin America. The associated laws that cover in general terms it would be the requirements for food irradiation although such term is not manageable. (Author)

  11. Phytosanitary applications of irradiation

    Phytosanitary treatments are used to disinfest agricultural commodities of quarantine pests so that the commodities can be shipped out of quarantined areas. Ionizing irradiation is a promising phytosanitary treatment that is in- creasing in use worldwide. Almost 19000 metric tons of sweet potatoes and several fruits plus a small amount of curry leaf are irradiated each year in 6 countries, including the United States, to control a number of plant quarantine pests. Advantages over other treatments include tolerance by most fresh commodities, ability to treat in the final packaging and in pallet loads, and absence of pesticide residues. A regulatory disadvantage is lack of an independent verification of treatment efficacy because pests may be found alive during commodity inspection, although they will not complete development or reproduce. High-energy X-rays generated by electron beam are ideal for sterilizing large packages and pallet loads of food. The directional concentration and high penetration capability as well as excellent dose uniformity of X-rays allows disinfest efficiently. Application of irradiation phytosanitary in China still in its infancy. (authors)

  12. Genomic instability following irradiation

    Hacker-Klom, U.B.; Goehde, W. [Inst. fuer Strahlenbiologie, Muenster Univ. (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Ionising irradiation may induce genomic instability. The broad spectrum of stress reactions in eukaryontic cells to irradiation complicates the discovery of cellular targets and pathways inducing genomic instability. Irradiation may initiate genomic instability by deletion of genes controlling stability, by induction of genes stimulating instability and/or by activating endogeneous cellular viruses. Alternatively or additionally it is discussed that the initiation of genomic instability may be a consequence of radiation or other agents independently of DNA damage implying non nuclear targets, e.g. signal cascades. As a further mechanism possibly involved our own results may suggest radiation-induced changes in chromatin structure. Once initiated the process of genomic instability probably is perpetuated by endogeneous processes necessary for proliferation. Genomic instability may be a cause or a consequence of the neoplastic phenotype. As a conclusion from the data available up to now a new interpretation of low level radiation effects for radiation protection and in radiotherapy appears useful. The detection of the molecular mechanisms of genomic instability will be important in this context and may contribute to a better understanding of phenomenons occurring at low doses <10 cSv which are not well understood up to now. (orig.)

  13. Genomic instability following irradiation

    Ionising irradiation may induce genomic instability. The broad spectrum of stress reactions in eukaryontic cells to irradiation complicates the discovery of cellular targets and pathways inducing genomic instability. Irradiation may initiate genomic instability by deletion of genes controlling stability, by induction of genes stimulating instability and/or by activating endogeneous cellular viruses. Alternatively or additionally it is discussed that the initiation of genomic instability may be a consequence of radiation or other agents independently of DNA damage implying non nuclear targets, e.g. signal cascades. As a further mechanism possibly involved our own results may suggest radiation-induced changes in chromatin structure. Once initiated the process of genomic instability probably is perpetuated by endogeneous processes necessary for proliferation. Genomic instability may be a cause or a consequence of the neoplastic phenotype. As a conclusion from the data available up to now a new interpretation of low level radiation effects for radiation protection and in radiotherapy appears useful. The detection of the molecular mechanisms of genomic instability will be important in this context and may contribute to a better understanding of phenomenons occurring at low doses <10 cSv which are not well understood up to now. (orig.)

  14. Control of food irradiation facilities and good irradiation practices

    Expansion of irradiation facilities employing commercial scale processes is evident in several countries. The list compiled by the Food Preservation Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division, Vienna (April 1988) showed that 34 counties have approved the use of irradiation process for more than 40 food commodities. In Asia and the Pacific Region, the main commercial application of irradiation process is still the sterilization of medical devices but applications to food processing are on the rise. To ensure the safety of irradiated foods, laws and regulations have to be promulgated to govern the facilities, the operations and the products. In most cases, there may be more than one governmental agency involved in regulatory control. The control activities include licensing/registration of a food irradiation premises as a food processing plant, registration of irradiated food in accordance with prescribed standards and regulating labelling practice as well as regularly conducting a comprehensive inspection of the facilities. The quality control programme must cover all aspects of treatment, handling, and distribution. It is emphasized that, as with all food technologies, effective quality control systems needs to be installed and adequately monitored at critical control points at the irradiation facility. Foods should be handled, stored, and transported according to GMP before, during, and after irradiation. Only foods meeting microbiological criteria and other quality standards should be accepted for irradiation. Besides, good irradiation practice (GIP) is also a fundamental principle of practice required specifically for food irradiation. With this recognition, the International Consultative Group on Food Irradiation (ICGFI) has elaborated a set of eight codes of GIP. The quality control system would also include proper packaging suitable for the product. Additional use of a logo to identify irradiated food should be permitted and may even become recognized as a symbol

  15. Estimation of irradiation temperature within the irradiation program Rheinsberg

    Stephan, I; Prokert, F; Scholz, A

    2003-01-01

    The temperature monitoring within the irradiation programme Rheinsberg II was performed by diamond powder monitors. The method bases on the effect of temperature on the irradiation-induced increase of the diamond lattice constant. The method is described by a Russian code. In order to determine the irradiation temperature, the lattice constant is measured by means of a X-ray diffractometer after irradiation and subsequent isochronic annealing. The kink of the linearized temperature-lattice constant curves provides a value for the irradiation temperature. It has to be corrected according to the local neutron flux. The results of the lattice constant measurements show strong scatter. Furthermore there is a systematic error. The results of temperature monitoring by diamond powder are not satisfying. The most probable value lays within 255 C and 265 C and is near the value estimated from the thermal condition of the irradiation experiments.

  16. Estimation of irradiation temperature within the irradiation program Rheinsberg

    The temperature monitoring within the irradiation programme Rheinsberg II was performed by diamond powder monitors. The method bases on the effect of temperature on the irradiation-induced increase of the diamond lattice constant. The method is described by a Russian code. In order to determine the irradiation temperature, the lattice constant is measured by means of a X-ray diffractometer after irradiation and subsequent isochronic annealing. The kink of the linearized temperature-lattice constant curves provides a value for the irradiation temperature. It has to be corrected according to the local neutron flux. The results of the lattice constant measurements show strong scatter. Furthermore there is a systematic error. The results of temperature monitoring by diamond powder are not satisfying. The most probable value lays within 255 C and 265 C and is near the value estimated from the thermal condition of the irradiation experiments. (orig.)

  17. Food irradiation - the retailer's view

    During October-November 1978 consignments of irradiated and non-irradiated strawberries were offered for sale in three branches of OK Bazaars. Samples were also subjected to simulated store conditions and the shelf life of both irradiated and non-irradiated packs determined. Irradiated packs were unaffected by decay until the 15th day of storage while the non-irradiated packs started to show signs of decay on the 7th day and were totally contaminated with fungus by the 14th day. In general, the response from the public was one of extreme interest and was to a large extent reflected in the encouraging sales. In March 1979, storage trials were carried out on green and ripe Keitt mangoes. The results of the trials show a marked increase in the shelf life of irradiated mangoes. The problems which exist with regard to the quality of fresh mangoes, namely anthracnose, soft brown rot and mango weevil, were all effectively controlled by irradiation. It must be realised that irradiation is no panacea and is not a substitute for other methods of food preservation. Any future marketing trials must be carried out using exclusively irradiated fruit. The customer must have the opportunity of 'seeing' the better fruit and not comparing it with other fruit which may be so near over-ripening on display that the price may have been reduced. The trials are to be continued on a much larger scale

  18. The wholesomeness of irradiated food

    It is apparent that there is a need for protection of the consumer and a need for governmental authorities to insure a safe and wholesome food supply for the population. Based on objective and scientific evidence regarding the safety of food irradiation, national and international health authorities are able to determine whether irradiated food is acceptable for human consumption. Following a thorough review of all available data, the Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee unconditionally approved wheat and ground wheat products and papaya irradiated for disingestation at a maximum dose of 100 krad, potatoes irradiated for sprout control at a maximum dose not exceeding 15 krad, and chicken irradiated at a maximum dose of 700 krad to reduce microbiological spoilage. Lastly, it unconditionally approved strawberries irradiated at a maximum dose of 300 krad to prolong storage. Onions at irradiated for sprout control at a maximum dose of 15 krad were temporarily approved, subject to preparation of further data on multigeneration reproduction studies on rats. Codfish and redfish eviscerated after irradiation at a maximum dose of 220 krad to reduce microbiological spoilage were also approved, based on the results of various studies in progress. Temporary, conditional approval of rice irradiated for insect disinfestation at a maximum dose of 100 krad was based on results of long-term studies on rats and monkies, available in the next review. Due to insufficient data, no decision regarding irradiated mushrooms was made. (Bell, E.)

  19. Consumer acceptance of irradiated foods

    Although the first experiments on food irradiation were carried out in 1916 in Sweden, food irradiation, is for consumers, a relatively new technology. From the sixties food irradiation has been applied more and more, so that the consumer movement has become alert to this technology. Since then a lot of controversies have arisen in the literature about wholesomeness, safety, effects, etc. Food irradiation is currently permitted on a small scale in about 30 countries; in some countries or states food irradiation has been put under a ban (e.g. Australia, New Zealand, New Jersey). The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) have, however, chosen food irradiation as a safe and sound method for preserving and improving the safety of food. Reactions on the part of the consumer organizations of many countries are however not in favour of or are even opposed to food irradiation. In this chapter consumer acceptance related to technological developments is described, then the convergence of the consumer movement on public opinion and concern on food irradiation is discussed. The need for labelling of irradiated food products is discussed and finally recommendations are given of ways to change consumers attitudes to food irradiation. (author)

  20. Gemstone dedicated gamma irradiation development

    The gemstones gamma irradiation process to enhance the color is widely accepted for the jewelry industry. These gems are processed in conventional industrial gamma irradiation plant which are optimized for other purposes, using underwater irradiation devices with high rejection rate due to its poor dose uniformity. A new conception design, which states the working principles and manufacturing ways of the device, was developed in this work. The suggested device's design is based on the rotation of cylindrical baskets and their translation in circular paths inside and outside a cylindrical source rack as a planetary system. The device is meant to perform the irradiation in the bottom of the source storage pool, where the sources remain always shielded by the water layer. The irradiator matches the Category III IAEA classification. To verify the physical viability of the basic principle, tests with rotating cylindrical baskets were performed in the Multipurpose Irradiator constructed in the CTR, IPEN. Also, simulations using the CADGAMMA software, adapted to simulate underwater irradiations, were performed. With the definitive optimized irradiator, the irradiation quality will be enhanced with better dose control and the production costs will be significantly lower than market prices due to the intended treatment device's optimization. This work presents some optimization parameters and the expected performance of the irradiator. (author)

  1. Gemstone dedicated gamma irradiation development

    Omi, Nelson M.; Rela, Paulo R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: nminoru@ipen.br; prela@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    The gemstones gamma irradiation process to enhance the color is widely accepted for the jewelry industry. These gems are processed in conventional industrial gamma irradiation plant which are optimized for other purposes, using underwater irradiation devices with high rejection rate due to its poor dose uniformity. A new conception design, which states the working principles and manufacturing ways of the device, was developed in this work. The suggested device's design is based on the rotation of cylindrical baskets and their translation in circular paths inside and outside a cylindrical source rack as a planetary system. The device is meant to perform the irradiation in the bottom of the source storage pool, where the sources remain always shielded by the water layer. The irradiator matches the Category III IAEA classification. To verify the physical viability of the basic principle, tests with rotating cylindrical baskets were performed in the Multipurpose Irradiator constructed in the CTR, IPEN. Also, simulations using the CADGAMMA software, adapted to simulate underwater irradiations, were performed. With the definitive optimized irradiator, the irradiation quality will be enhanced with better dose control and the production costs will be significantly lower than market prices due to the intended treatment device's optimization. This work presents some optimization parameters and the expected performance of the irradiator. (author)

  2. Food Irradiation Development in Japan

    In Japan, the first food irradiation research was carried out on the preservation of fish and fishery products. In 1966, the Atomic Energy Commission of the Japanese Government (JAEC) decided to promote the National Project on Food Irradiation and, in 1967, the Steering Committee on food irradiation research in the Atomic Energy Bureau, Science and Technology-Agency, selected the following food items as of economic importance to the country, i.e., potatoes, onions, rice, wheat, ''Vienna'' sausage, ''kamaboko'' (fish meat jelly products) and mandarin oranges. The National Project is expected, to finish at the end of the 1981 fiscal year. Based on the studies by the National Project, irradiated potatoes were given ''unconditional acceptance'' for human consumption in 1972. Already in 1973, a commercial potato irradiator was built at Shihoro, Hokkaido. In 1980, the Steering Committee submitted a final report on the effectiveness and wholesomeness studies on irradiated onions to the JAEC. This paper gives a brief explanation of the legal aspects of food irradiation in Japan, and the present status of wholesomeness studies on the seven items of irradiated foods. In addition, topics concerning food irradiation research on ''kamaboko'', especially on the effectiveness and a new detecting method for the irradiation treatment of these products, are outlined. (author)

  3. Food irradiation development in Japan

    In Japan, the first food irradiation research was carried out on the preservation of fish and fishery products. In 1966, the Atomic Energy Commission of the Japanese Government (JAEC) decided to promote the National Project on Food Irradiation and, in 1967, the Steering Committee on food irradiation research in the Atomic Energy Bureau, Science and Technology Agency, selected the following food items as of economic importance to the country, i.e., potatoes, onions, rice, wheat, ''Vienna'' sausage, ''kamaboko'' (fish meat jelly products) and mandarin oranges. The National Project is expected to finish at the end of the 1981 fiscal year. Based on the studies by the National Project, irradiated potatoes were given ''unconditional acceptance'' for human consumption in 1972. Already in 1973, a commercial potato irradiator was built at Shihoro, Hokkaido. In 1980, the Steering Committee submitted a final report on the effectiveness and wholesomeness studies on irradiated onions to the JAEC. This paper gives a brief explanation of the legal aspects of food irradiation in Japan, and the present status of wholesomeness studies on the seven items of irradiated foods. In addition, topics concerning food irradiation research on ''kamaboko'', especially on the effectiveness and a new detecting method for the irradiation treatment of these products, are outlined. (author)

  4. Facts about food irradiation: Microbiological safety of irradiated food

    This fact sheet considers the microbiological safety of irradiated food, with especial reference to Clostridium botulinum. Irradiated food, as food treated by any ''sub-sterilizing'' process, must be handled, packaged and stored following good manufacturing practices to prevent growth and toxin production of C. botulinum. Food irradiation does not lead to increased microbiological hazards, nor can it be used to save already spoiled foods. 4 refs

  5. General description of irradiation and post irradiation examination in JMTR

    The JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) was designed to provide suitable facilities for conducting nuclear irradiation experiments necessary for the research and development of power reactor in Japan. The JMTR consists of a 50 MW high flux reactor, irradiation facilities and a multi-cell hot laboratory. The available irradiation facilities are various kinds of capsules, hydraulic rabbit facilities, high temperature and high pressure water loop, and high temperature and high pressure gas loop. The aim of this publication is a representation of the information concerned with the irradiation facilities. (author)

  6. Irradiation probe and laboratory for irradiated material evaluation

    The survey and assessment are given of the tasks carried out in the years 1971 to 1975 within the development of methods for structural materials irradiation and of a probe for the irradiation thereof in the A-1 reactor. The programme and implementation of laboratory tests of the irradiation probe are described. In the actual reactor irradiation, the pulse tube length between the pressure governor and the irradiation probe is approximately 20 m, the diameter is 2.2 mm. Temperature reaches 800 degC while the pressure control system operates at 20 degC. The laboratory tests (carried out at 20 degC) showed that the response time of the pressure control system to a stepwise pressure change in the irradiation probe from 0 to 22 at. is 0.5 s. Pressure changes were also studied in the irradiation probe and in the entire system resulting from temperature changes in the irradiation probe. Temperature distribution in the body of the irradiation probe heating furnace was determined. (B.S.)

  7. Market testing of irradiated food

    Viet Nam has emerged as one of the three top producers and exporters of rice in the world. Tropical climate and poor infrastructure of preservation and storage lead to huge losses of food grains, onions, dried fish and fishery products. Based on demonstration irradiation facility pilot scale studies and marketing of irradiated rice, onions, mushrooms and litchi were successfully undertaken in Viet Nam during 1992-1998. Irradiation technology is being used commercially in Viet Nam since 1991 for insect control of imported tobacco and mould control of national traditional medicinal herbs by both government and private sectors. About 30 tons of tobacco and 25 tons of herbs are irradiated annually. Hanoi Irradiation Centre has been continuing open house practices for visitors from school, universities and various different organizations and thus contributed in improved public education. Consumers were found to prefer irradiated rice, onions, litchi and mushrooms over those nonirradiated. (author)

  8. Food irradiation scenario in India

    Over 3 decades of research and developmental effort in India have established the commercial potential for food irradiation to reduce post-harvest losses and to ensure food safety. Current regulations permit irradiation of onions, potatoes and spices for domestic consumption and operation of commercial irradiators for treatment of food. In May 1997 draft rules have been notified permitting irradiation of several additional food items including rice, wheat products, dry fruits, mango, meat and poultry. Consumers and food industry have shown a positive attitude to irradiated foods. A prototype commercial irradiator for spices set up by Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) is scheduled to commence operation in early 1998. A commercial demonstration plant for treatment of onions is expected to be operational in the next 2 years in Lasalgaon, Nashik district. (author)

  9. Gamma irradiation service in Mexico

    In 1980 it was installed in Mexico, on the National Institute of Nuclear Research, an irradiator model J S-6500 of a canadian manufacture. Actually, this is the greatest plant in the Mexican Republic that offers a gamma irradiation process at commercial level to diverse industries. However, seeing that the demand for sterilize those products were not so much as the irradiation capacity it was opted by the incursion in other types of products. During 17 years had been irradiated a great variety of products grouped of the following form: dehydrated foods, disposable products for medical use, cosmetics, medicaments, various. Nowadays the capacity of the irradiator is saturated virtue of it is operated the 24 hours during the 365 days of the year and only its operation is suspended by the preventive and corrective maintenance. However, the fresh food market does not be attended since this irradiator was designed for doses greater than 10 kGy (1.0 Mrad)

  10. Irradiation of fruit and vegetables

    There is likely to be less economic incentive to irradiate fruits and vegetables compared with applications which increase the safety of foods such as elimination of Salmonella or decontamination of food ingredients. Of the fruit and vegetable applications, irradiation of mushrooms may offer the clearest economic benefits in North-Western Europe. The least likely application appears to be sprout inhibition in potatoes and onions, because of the greater efficiency and flexibility of chemical sprout inhibitors. In the longer-term, combinations between irradiation/MAP/other technologies will probably be important. Research in this area is at an early stage. Consumer attitudes to food irradiation remain uncertain. This will be a crucial factor in the commercial application of the technology and in the determining the balance between utilisation of irradiation and of technologies which compete with irradiation. (author)

  11. CEFR Irradiation Test and Application

    China Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR) has completed physics start-up tests in 2010 and connected the grid on 40%FP in 2011. During start-up tests, the special irradiation test subassembly has been developed for measurement of distribution of reaction rate, spectrum index and neutron spectrum by using activation method in lower power. Characteristic of neutron field for irradiation in CEFR has been researched by calculation and experiments. In future, CEFR will been operated as an irradiation test facility for fuel, material and other application, and some irradiation projects, such as irradiation of cladding material, MOX fuel and (U, Np)O2 pellet have been planned. Now some irradiation rigs have been developed. (author)

  12. Status of irradiation capsule design

    For the irradiation test after the restart of JMTR, further precise temperature control and temperature prediction are required. In the design of irradiation capsule, particularly sophisticated irradiation temperature prediction and evaluation are urged. Under such circumstance, among the conventional design techniques of irradiation capsule, the authors reviewed the evaluation method of irradiation temperature. In addition, for the improvement of use convenience, this study examined and improved FINAS/STAR code in order to adopt the new calculation code that enables a variety of analyses. In addition, the study on the common use of the components for radiation capsule enabled the shortening of design period. After the restart, the authors will apply this improved calculation code to the design of irradiation capsule. (A.O.)

  13. Food irradiation: chemistry and applications

    Food irradiation is one of the most extensively and thoroughly studied methods of food preservation. Despite voluminous data on safety and wholesomeness of irradiated foods, food irradiation is still a “process in waiting.” Although some countries are allowing the use of irradiation technology on certain foods, its full potential is not recognized. Only 37 countries worldwide permit the use of this technology. If used to its full potential, food irradiation can save millions of human lives being lost annually due to food‐borne diseases or starvation and can add billions of dollars to the world economy. This paper briefly reviews the history and chemistry of food irradiation along with its main applications, impediments to its adoption, and its role in improving food availability and health situation, particularly in developing countries of the world

  14. Gamma irradiation of fruits

    At a Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee on Food Irradiation (JECFI) meeting held in 1976, recommendations were made to rationalize the unnecessarily elaborate wholesomeness evaluation procedures for irradiated foodstuffs. Irradiation at the commercially recommended doses did not adversely affect the constituents of mangoes, papayas, litchis and strawberries at the edible-ripe stage. These favourable radiation-chemical results justified the development of a theoretical model mango which could be used for extrapolation of wholesomeness data from an individual fruit species to all others within the same diet class. Several mathematical models of varying orders of sophistication were evolved. In all of them, it was assumed that the radiant energy entering the system reacted solely with water. The extent of the reaction of the other components of the model fruit with the primary water radicals was then determined. No matter which mathematical treatment was employed, it was concluded that the only components which would undergo significant modification would be the sugars. In order to extrapolate these data from the mango to other fruits, mathematical models of three fruits containing less sugar than the mango, viz. the strawberry, tomato and lemon, were compiled. With these models, the conclusion was reached that the theoretical degradation spectra of these fruits were qualitatively similar to the degradation pattern of the model mango. Theory was again substantiated by the practical demonstration of the protective effect of the sugars in the tomato and lemon. The decrease in radiation damage was enhanced by the mutual protection of the components of the whole synthetic fruits with ultimate protection being afforded by the biological systems of the real fruits

  15. Detection of irradiated chestnuts

    Full text: Ionizing radiation treatment of food is growing acceptance and application to ever increasing variety of products. The method has indeed proved efficient in reducing food losses and in improving safety of products. Among vegetable products of interest for radiation treatment, chestnuts have recently been considered. Irradiation treatment of chestnuts has been authorized in countries such as Korea as a valid and safe alternative to the widespread use of fumigants. At the Italian level, Montella chestnut is a typical variety recognized as a PGI (Protected Geographical Indication) product and widely used in confectionery industry. In view of an extension of radiation treatment to this kind of product, to permit legal controls and meet consumer consensus, reliable methods for detecting irradiated chestnuts have to be proposed and validated. The task of finding detection methods for irradiated chestnuts can be in principle afforded with different methods. The cellulose and sugar contained in the skin and pulp, respectively, might suggest the use of the protocol EN 1787 and EN 13708, relative to ESR spectroscopy. In particular, the protocol EN 1787, based on ESR technique, is applied to detect cellulose radicals radio-induced in outer shell part of the sample as well as in the seed present in the inner part of the fruit. It is known that ionizing radiation may induce two different ESR signals: cellulose signal and a single line signal centered at g = 2. The protocol EN 1787 uses the low intensity cellulose signal for identification. In the present study, in case of low cellulose content, even the g = 2 is analyzed for setting up an alternative identification procedure. Protocol EN 13708, used to identify food containing crystalline sugar by ESR spectroscopy, is applied to the pulp of fruit. As for luminescence measurements, mineral isolation of silicates and TL measurements is done according to European Standard EN 1788. Preliminary test showed that the

  16. Craniospinal irradiation techniques

    Scarlatescu, Ioana, E-mail: scarlatescuioana@gmail.com; Avram, Calin N. [Faculty of Physics, West University of Timisoara, Bd. V. Parvan 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Virag, Vasile [County Hospital “Gavril Curteanu” - Oradea (Romania)

    2015-12-07

    In this paper we present one treatment plan for irradiation cases which involve a complex technique with multiple beams, using the 3D conformational technique. As the main purpose of radiotherapy is to administrate a precise dose into the tumor volume and protect as much as possible all the healthy tissues around it, for a case diagnosed with a primitive neuro ectoderm tumor, we have developed a new treatment plan, by controlling one of the two adjacent fields used at spinal field, in a way that avoids the fields superposition. Therefore, the risk of overdose is reduced by eliminating the field divergence.

  17. Development of blood irradiators

    Over a period of several years, a small, fully portable blood irradiator has been developed for ultimate use in suppressing early rejection of organ transplants in humans. It could also be useful for other medical problems, e.g., treating some forms of leukemia or arthritis. The units have been successfully evaluated in several animal species, resulting in sharply reduced lymphocyte levels and prolonged skin-graft retention. Work during the past year was directed toward development of hardware in anticipation of kidney transplant studies, to be performed in dogs in FY 1982, and identifying whether dose fractionation significantly changed lymphocyte response

  18. Neoplasms in irradiated populations

    The paper describes the results of three prospective studies which have been ongoing for 25 years. The study populations include: (1) persons treated with x rays in infancy for alleged enlargement of the thymus gland; (2) persons treated in childhood with x rays and/or radium for lymphoid hyperplasia of the nasopharynx; and (3) women treated with x rays for acute postpartum mastitis. The studies have resulted in the quantification of risk for radiogenic thyroid and breast cancer for periods up to 40 years post irradiation

  19. Microvascular anastomes in irradiated vessels

    The aim of the study was to investigate the healing of microvascular anastomoses in rat common femoral arteries and veins eight to nine months after the vessels had received irradiation. Patency rates in non irradiated arteries and veins were 92% and 100% respectively. The rate in irradiated arteries and veins (all groups together) was 96% and 69% respectively. The venous patency rate in the 5000, 7000 and 9000 rads groups taken together (13 rats) fell to 55%. (Auth.)

  20. Irradiation stability of welded joints

    Results are presented of investigations into the neutron irradiation stability of welded joints in two types of steel used for reactor pressure vessels. Details are given of the materials used, method of welding and tests applied. The effect of irradiation on the notch toughness transition curve is shown. The results of the studies into irradiation embrittlement of all the welded joints and parent materials of the steels for the pressure vessels are summarized. (U.K.)

  1. National symposium on food irradiation

    This report contains abstracts of papers delivered at the National symposium on food irradiation held in Pretoria. The abstracts have been grouped into the following sections: General background, meat, agricultural products, marketing and radiation facilities - cost and plant design. Each abstract has been submutted separately to INIS. Tables listing irradiated food products cleared for human consumption in different countries are given as well as a table listing those irradiated food items that have been cleared in South Africa

  2. Food irradiation facilities at Trombay

    The process parameters for radiation preservation of foods including grain, fruits, vegetables and seafoods are being evaluated with the experimental cobalt-60 and caesium-137 irradiators. The design features of three irradiators that are being used were considered mainly on the basis of obtaining variable throughputs and variable dose rates, making these facilities flexible for operation for a variety of purposes and the products. The paper highlights certain aspects of these irradiators, modifications carried out, dosimetry and maintenance requirements. (auth.)

  3. Desinfestation of soybeans by irradiation

    The effect of irradiation with the doses 0.5 and 1.0 kGy on desinfestation of soy beans and on important chemical compounds of this product was studied in this paper. The results showed the effectiveness of applied doses in the control of insect pests of soy beans during its storage and total proteins, fat and moisture and also the identity and quality characteristics of oil extrated from irradiated product which were not change by irradiation

  4. JRR-4 medical irradiation facility

    Torii, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Hori, N.; Kumada, H.; Horiguchi, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-11-01

    JAERI started Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) at JRR-2 in 1990. JRR-2 was performed 33 BNCT until 1996 when JRR-2 operation was terminated for decommissioning the reactor. JRR-4 was constructed to research the reactor shielding of the first Japanese nuclear ship ''Mutsu'' in 1965. JRR-4 was modified for reducing fuel enrichment and constructing a new medical irradiation facility at 1997 when after the terminating operation of JRR-2. The medical irradiation facility is especially using for BNCT of brain cancer. JRR-4 medical irradiation facility was designed for both using of thermal neutron beam and epi-thermal neutron. Thermal neutron is using for conventional Japanese BNCT as inter operative irradiation therapy. Epi-thermal neutron beam will be using advanced BNCT for deep cancer and without craniotomy operation for irradiation at the facility. The first medical irradiation for BNCT of JRR-4 was carried out on October 25, 1999. Since then, seven times of irradiation was performed by the end of June 2000. In BNCT irradiation, boron concentration and thermal flux measurements were performed by JAERI. Boron concentration of patient brood was measured using prompt gamma ray analysis technique. Thermal neutron flux was measured by gold wire activation method using beta - gamma coincidence counting system. There data were furnished to medical doctor for determination the irradiation time of BNCT. (author)

  5. Hepatopathy following irradiation and adriamycin

    This report describes two cases of hepatopathy following irradiation and adriamycin at doses and volumes of irradiation ordinarily considered within the tolerance of hepatic function. In one case, fatal hepatopathy followed 2400 rad/17 fractions/28 days to the entire liver with preceding and concurrent adriamycin. In the second case moderate clinical changes occurred after treatment in which much of the right lobe of the liver was shielded following 2500 rad/23 fractions/32 days with adriamycin administered before, during, and after irradiation. The locally enhancing effects of adriamycin on hepatic tolerance to irradiation are discussed

  6. Societal benefits of food irradiation

    Food irradiation has a direct impact on society by reducing the occurrence of food-borne illness, decreasing food spoilage and waste, and facilitating global trade. Food irradiation is approved in 40 countries around the world to decontaminate food of disease and spoilage causing microorganisms, sterilize insect pests, and inhibit sprouting. A recent estimate suggests that 500,000 metric of food is currently irradiated worldwide, primarily to decontaminate spices. Since its first use in the 1960s the use of irradiation for food has grown slowly, but it remains the major technology of choice for certain applications. The largest growth sector in recent years has been phytosanitary irradiation of fruit to disinfest fruit intended for international shipment. For many countries which have established strict quarantine standards, irradiation offers as an effective alternative to chemical fumigants some of which are being phased out due to their effects on the ozone layer. Insects can be sterilized at very low dose levels, thus quality of fruit can be maintained. Irradiation is also highly effective in destroying microbial pathogens such as Salmonella spp., E. coli, and Listeria, hence its application for treatment of spices, herbs, dried vegetables, frozen seafood, poultry, and meat and its contribution to reducing foodborne illnesses. Unfortunately the use of irradiation for improving food safety has been under-exploited. This presentation will provide details on the use, benefits, opportunities, and challenges of food irradiation. (author)

  7. International Developments of Food Irradiation

    Loaharanu, P. [Head, Food Preservation Section, Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Wagramerstr. 5, A-1400, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-12-31

    Food irradiation is increasingly accepted and applied in many countries in the past decade. Through its use, food losses and food-borne diseases can be reduced significantly, and wider trade in many food items can be facilitated. The past five decades have witnessed a positive evolution on food irradiation according to the following: 1940`s: discovery of principles of food irradiation; 1950`s: initiation of research in advanced countries; 1960`s: research and development were intensified in some advanced and developing countries; 1970`s: proof of wholesomeness of irradiated foods; 1980`s: establishment of national regulations; 1990`s: commercialization and international trade. (Author)

  8. International Developments of Food Irradiation

    Food irradiation is increasingly accepted and applied in many countries in the past decade. Through its use, food losses and food-borne diseases can be reduced significantly, and wider trade in many food items can be facilitated. The past five decades have witnessed a positive evolution on food irradiation according to the following: 1940's: discovery of principles of food irradiation; 1950's: initiation of research in advanced countries; 1960's: research and development were intensified in some advanced and developing countries; 1970's: proof of wholesomeness of irradiated foods; 1980's: establishment of national regulations; 1990's: commercialization and international trade. (Author)

  9. Generic phytosanitary irradiation treatments

    The history of the development of generic phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is discussed beginning with its initial proposal in 1986. Generic PI treatments in use today are 150 Gy for all hosts of Tephritidae, 250 Gy for all arthropods on mango and papaya shipped from Australia to New Zealand, 300 Gy for all arthropods on mango shipped from Australia to Malaysia, 350 Gy for all arthropods on lychee shipped from Australia to New Zealand and 400 Gy for all hosts of insects other than pupae and adult Lepidoptera shipped to the United States. Efforts to develop additional generic PI treatments and reduce the dose for the 400 Gy treatment are ongoing with a broad based 5-year, 12-nation cooperative research project coordinated by the joint Food and Agricultural Organization/International Atomic Energy Agency Program on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. Key groups identified for further development of generic PI treatments are Lepidoptera (eggs and larvae), mealybugs and scale insects. A dose of 250 Gy may suffice for these three groups plus others, such as thrips, weevils and whiteflies. - Highlights: ► The history of phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is given. ► Generic PI treatments in use today are discussed. ► Suggestions for future research are presented. ► A dose of 250 Gy for most insects may suffice.

  10. Food irradiation and sterilization

    Josephson, Edward S.

    Radiation sterilization of food (radappertization) requires exposing food in sealed containers to ionizing radiation at absorbed doses high enough (25-70 kGy) to kill all organisms of food spoilage and public health significance. Radappertization is analogous to thermal canning is achieving shelf stability (long term storage without refrigeration). Except for dry products in which autolysis is negligible, the radappertization process also requires that the food be heated to an internal temperature of 70-80°C (bacon to 53°C) to inactivate autolytic enzymes which catalyze spoilage during storage without refrigeration. To minimize the occurence of irradiation induced off-flavors and odors, undesirable color changes, and textural and nutritional losses from exposure to the high doses required for radappertization, the foods are vacuum sealed and irradiated frozen (-40°C to -20°C). Radappertozed foods have the characteristic of fresh foods prepared for eating. Radappertization can substitute in whole or in part for some chemical food additives such as ethylene oxide and nitrites which are either toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic. After 27 years of testing for "wholesomeness" (safety for consumption) of radappertized foods, no confirmed evidence has been obtained of any adverse effecys of radappertization on the "wholesomeness" characteristics of these foods.

  11. Food irradiation and sterilization

    Radiation sterilization of food (radappertization) requires exposing food in sealed containers to ionizing radiation at absorbed doses high enough (25 to 70 kGy) to kill all organisms of food spoilage and public health significance. Radappertization is analogous to thermal canning in achieving shelf stability (long term storage without refrigeration). Except for dry products in which autolysis is negligible, the radappertization process also requires that the food be heated to an internal temperature of 70 to 800C (bacon to 530C) to inactivate autolytic enzymes which catalyze spoilage during storage without refrigeration. To minimize the occurrence of irradiation induced off-flavors and odors, undesirable color changes, and textural and nutritional losses from exposure to the high doses required for radappertization, the foods are vacuum sealed and irradiated frozen (-400C to -200C). Radappertized foods have the characteristic of fresh foods prepared for eating. Radappertization can substitute in whole or in part for some chemical food additives such as ethylene oxide and nitrites which are either toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic. After 27 years of testing for 'wholesomeness' (safety for consumption) of radappertized foods, no confirmed evidence has been obtained of any adverse effects of radappertization on the 'wholesomeness' characteristics of these foods. (author)

  12. Irradiation of food

    Processing of food with ionizing radiation is a method suitable to enhance shelf-life and hygienic quality. Up to a dose of 10 kGy the method is considered wholesome. In many countries the practical use of food irradiation is increasing, however, in the Federal Republic of Germany the process is strictly forbidden. Applications and methods for radiation processing of food are compiled, limits and prospects are explained, and advantages and disadvantages are compared with traditional methods. Identification of irradiated foods and dosimetry and process control for radiation processing of food are areas where further research is needed. Continuous processing of particulate foods in bulk is an application where electron accelerators might be profitable. Beam parameters and velocity distribution of food particles in the treatment area can be matched for an effective result. Thus, dose distribution can be adjusted for homogeneous treatment and at the same time radiation energy is absorbed almost completely. An example of an experimental plant for radiation processing of grain and spices is shown. Decontamination of spices by radiation processing is an alternative to chemical fumigation, which now is widely forbidden. (orig.)

  13. Facts about food irradiation: Irradiation and food safety

    This fact sheet focusses on the question of whether irradiation can be used to make spoiled food good. No food processing procedures can substitute for good hygienic practices, and good manufacturing practices must be followed in the preparation of food whether or not the food is intended for further processing by irradiation or any other means. 3 refs

  14. Facts about food irradiation: Packaging of irradiated foods

    This fact sheet considers the effects on packaging materials of food irradiation. Extensive research has shown that almost all commonly used food packaging materials toted are suitable for use. Furthermore, many packaging materials are themselves routinely sterilized by irradiation before being used. 2 refs

  15. Storage tests with irradiated and non-irradiated onions

    The results of several test series on the storage of irradiated and non-irradiated German grown onion are reported. Investigated was the influence of the irradiation conditions such as time and dose and of the storage conditions on sprouting, spoilage, browning of the vegetation centres, composition of the onions, strength and sensorial properties of seven different onion varieties. If the onions were irradiated during the dormancy period following harvest, a dose of 50 Gy (krad) was sufficient to prevent sprouting. Regarding the irradiated onions, it was not possible by variation of the storage conditions within the limits set by practical requirements to extend the dormancy period or to prevent browning of the vegetation centres, however. (orig.) 891 MG 892 RSW

  16. Consumer acceptance of irradiated poultry

    A simulated supermarket setting (SSS) test was conducted to determine whether consumers (n = 126) would purchase irradiated poultry products, and the effects of marketing strategies on consumer purchase of irradiated poultry products. Consumer preference for irradiated poultry was likewise determined using a home-use test. A slide program was the most effective educational strategy in changing consumers' purchase behavior. The number of participants who purchased irradiated boneless, skinless breasts and irradiated thighs after the educational program increased significantly from 59.5 and 61.9% to 83.3 and 85.7% for the breasts and thighs, respectively. Using a label or poster did not increase the number of participants who bought irradiated poultry products. About 84% of the participants consider it either 'somewhat necessary' or 'very necessary' to irradiate raw chicken and would like all chicken that was served in restaurants or fast food places to be irradiated. Fifty-eight percent of the participants would always buy irradiated chicken if available, and an additional 27% would buy it sometimes. About 44% of the participants were willing to pay the same price for irradiated chicken as for nonirradiated. About 42% of participants were willing to pay 5% or more than what they were currently paying for nonirradiated chicken. Seventy-three percent or more of consumers who participated in the home-use test (n = 74) gave the color, appearance, and aroma of the raw poultry products a minimum rating of 7 (= like moderately). After consumers participated in a home-use test, 84 and 88% selected irradiated thighs and breasts, respectively, over nonirradiated in a second SSS test

  17. Consumer acceptance of irradiated poultry.

    Hashim, I B; Resurreccion, A V; McWatters, K H

    1995-08-01

    A simulated supermarket setting (SSS) test was conducted to determine whether consumers (n = 126) would purchase irradiated poultry products, and the effects of marketing strategies on consumer purchase of irradiated poultry products. Consumer preference for irradiated poultry was likewise determined using a home-use test. A slide program was the most effective educational strategy in changing consumers' purchase behavior. The number of participants who purchased irradiated boneless, skinless breasts and irradiated thighs after the educational program increased significantly from 59.5 and 61.9% to 83.3 and 85.7% for the breasts and thighs, respectively. Using a label or poster did not increase the number of participants who bought irradiated poultry products. About 84% of the participants consider it either "somewhat necessary" or "very necessary" to irradiate raw chicken and would like all chicken that was served in restaurants or fast food places to be irradiated. Fifty-eight percent of the participants would always buy irradiated chicken if available, and an additional 27% would buy it sometimes. About 44% of the participants were willing to pay the same price for irradiated chicken as for nonirradiated. About 42% of participants were willing to pay 5% or more than what they were currently paying for nonirradiated chicken. Seventy-three percent or more of consumers who participated in the home-use test (n = 74) gave the color, appearance, and aroma of the raw poultry products a minimum rating of 7 (= like moderately). After consumers participated in a home-use test, 84 and 88% selected irradiated thighs and breasts, respectively, over nonirradiated in a second SSS test. PMID:7479506

  18. Food irradiation development: Malaysian perspective

    Malaysia recognised the potential of food irradiation as a technology that can contribute to solving some preservation problems associated with local agricultural produce. Research studies in this technology were initiated in late 1970s and since 1985, all activities pertaining to R and D applications, adoption and technology transfer of food irradiation were coordinated by The National Working Committee on Food Irradiation which comprises of members from research institutes, universities, regulatory agencies and consumer association. To date, technical feasibility studies conducted on 7 food items / agricultural commodities of economic importance demonstrated the efficacy of irradiation in extending shelf-life, improving hygienic quality and overcoming quarantine barriers in trade. Presently, 1 multipurpose Co-60 irradiator (I MCi), 2 gammacells and an electron beam machine (3 MeV) are available at MINT for research and commercial runs. The Malaysian Standards on Guidelines for Irradiation of Food was formulated in 1992 to facilitate application by local food industries. However, Malaysia has not yet commercially adopt the technology. Among many factors contributing to the situation is the apparent lack of interest by food industries and consumers. Consumer attitude study indicated majority of consumers are still unaware of the benefits of the technology and expressed concern for the safety of process and irradiated products due to limited knowledge and adverse publicity by established consumer groups. Although the food processors indicate positive attitude towards food irradiation, there remain many factors delaying its commercial application such as limited knowledge, cost-benefit, logistics and consumer acceptance. On the regulatory aspect, approval is required from the Director-General of Ministry of Health prior to application of irradiation on food and sale of irradiated food but efforts are being geared towards approving irradiation of certain food

  19. Detection methods of irradiated foodstuffs

    Full text: Food irradiation has, in certain circumstances, an important role to play both in promoting food safety and in reducing food losses. The safety and availability of nutritious food are essential components of primary health care. WHO actively encourages the proper use of food irradiation in the fight against foodborne diseases and food losses. To this end, it collaborates closely with FAO and IAEA. Food irradiation can have a number of beneficial effects, including delay of ripening and prevention of sprouting; control of insects, parasites, helminths, pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, moulds and yeasts; and sterilization, which enables commodities to be stored unrefrigerated for long periods. The 1990s witnessed a significant advancement in food irradiation processing. As a result, progress has been made in commercialization of the technology, culminating in greater international trade in irradiated foods and the implementation of differing regulations relating to its use in many countries. Codex General Standard for Irradiated Foodstuffs and Recommended International Code of Practice for the Operation of Irradiation Facilities Used for the Treatment of Foods regulate food irradiation at international level. At European Union level there are in power Directive 1999/2/EC and Directive1999/3/EC. Every particular country has also its own regulations regarding food irradiation. In Romania, since 2002 the Norms Regarding Foodstuffs and Food Ingredients Treated by Ionizing Radiation are in power. These Norms are in fact the Romanian equivalent law of the European Directives 1999/2/EC and 1999/3/EC. The greater international trade in irradiated foods has led to the demand by consumers that irradiated food should be clearly labeled as such and that methods capable of differentiating between irradiated and nonirradiated products should be available. Thus a practical basis was sought to allow consumers to exercise a free choice as to which food they purchase. If a

  20. National symposium on food irradiation

    This report contains proceedings of papers delivered at the national symposium on food irradiation held in Pretoria. The proceedings have been grouped into the following sections: general background; meat; agricultural products; marketing; and radiation facilities - cost and plant design. Each paper has been submitted separately to INIS. Tables listing irradiated food products cleared for human consumption in different countries are given

  1. Neutron irradiation effect of silicon

    Several kinds of silicon wafers were irradiated at four neutron fields with different energy spectra. Electrical resistivity and deep level defect concentrations after the neutron irradiation, and their changes against number of displacement atoms (DPA's) for different neutron fields were compared. The number of DPA's was calculated by N. Yamano's data. (author)

  2. Craniospinal irradiation using Rapid Arc

    Fandino, J. M.; Silva, M. C.; Marino, A.; Candal, A.; Diaz, I.; Fernandez, C.; Gesto, C.; Izquierdo, P.; Losada, C.; Poncet, M.; Soto, M.; Triana, G.

    2013-07-01

    Cranio-Spinal Irradiation is technically very challenging, historically field edge matching is needed because of the mechanical limitations of standard linear accelerators. The purpose of this study is to assess the Volumetric Arc Therapy as a competitive technique for Cranio-Spinal Irradiation compared to the conventional 3D Conformal Radiotherapy technique. (Author)

  3. The safety of irradiated foods

    This state of the art outline review written for 'Food Manufacture' looks at the wholesomeness of irradiated foods, and makes a comparison with conventionally treated products. Topics mentioned are doses, radioresistance of microorganisms especially clostudium botulinum and the problem of bacterial toxins, storage conditions, nutrition, especially vitamin loss, and detection of irradiation. (U.K.)

  4. Food irradiation: a Queensland perspective

    The National Farmers Federation is satisfied that all safety issues associated with food irradiation have been adequately addressed. It recommends that the Codex Alimentarius standard of 120 kilogray treatment be adopted in Australia. Economic arguments are advanced for the irradiation of horticultural products, fish, seafoods, red meat and chicken meat

  5. Consumer attitude toward food irradiation

    Consumer attitudes toward food irradiation were evaluated. The influence of educational efforts on consumer concern for the safety of irradiated products and willingness to buy irradiated foods were measured. Demographic and psychological factors were studied in relation to attitudes. An educational leaflet describing current scientific information regarding the safety, advantages, and disadvantages of food irradiation was developed and used in two studies evaluating attitude change. In the first study, attitude change among two groups of consumers with different philosophic orientations was measured. In a second study, the effectiveness of an educational leaflet received through the mail and a poster display were examined. In a third study response to food irradiation was related to value hierarchy, locus of control, innovativeness, and demographic parameters. Initially, subjects showed a higher concern for other areas of food safety, particularly the use of chemicals and sprays on food, than toward food irradiation. After educational efforts, conventional consumers expressed minor concern toward irradiation whereas ecologically sensitive alternative consumers obtained from a food cooperative expressed major concern. A knowledgeable discussion leader lowered irradiation concern among conventional consumers. In contrast, concern among alternative consumers did not diminish when given the opportunity to discuss safety issues with a knowledgeable person

  6. Nutritional aspects of irradiated shrimp

    Data available in the literature on the nutritional aspects of irradiated shrimp are reviewed and the indication is that irradiation of shrimp at doses up to about 3.2 kGy does not significantly affect the levels of its protein, fat, carbohydrate and ash. There are no reports on the effect of irradiation of shrimp above 3.2 kGy on these components. Limited information available indicates that there are some minor changes in the fatty acid composition of shrimp as a result of irradiation. Irradiation also causes some changes in the amino acid composition of shrimp; similar changes occur due to canning and hot-air drying. Some of the vitamins in shrimp, such as thiamine, are lost as a result of irradiation but the loss is less extensive than in thermally processed shrimp. Protein quality of shrimp, based on the growth of rats as well as that of Tetrahymena pyriformis, is not affected by irradiation. No adverse effects attributed to irradiation were found either in short-term or long-term animal feeding tests

  7. Food irradiation and bacterial toxins

    The authors' findings indicate that irradiation confers no advantage over heat processing in respect of bacterial toxins (clostridium botulinum, neurotoxin A and staphylococcal enterotoxin A). It follows that irradiation at doses less than the ACINF recommended upper limit of 10 kGy could not be used to improve the ambient temperature shelf life on non-acid foods. (author)

  8. Irradiation damage in lithium ceramics

    The irradiation response of two candidate tritium-breeding materials, LiAlO2 and Li2ZrO3, was investigated using electron irradiation to produce atomic displacements, and EPR and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to detect damage responses. In a first set of experiments, single crystals and sintered polycrystals of γ-LiAlO2 were irradiated with 2.5 MeV electrons at a temperature of 20 K. EPR measurements made at 4 K on samples kept at 77 K after electron irradiation confirm that paramagnetic defects are created during irradiation, and that most of these defects disappear at about 100 K. TEM observations at room temperature indicate, however, that annealing of these defects does not result in visible defect aggregates. In a second set of experiments, sintered polycrystalline LiAlO2 and Li2ZrO3 samples were thinned to electron transparency and heavily irradiated in situ with 200 keV electrons. In LiAlO2, laths of LiAl5O8 grew intragranularly under irradiation. Li2ZrO3 showed little or no aggregate damage after extensive irradiation near room temperature. (orig.)

  9. Economic aspects of food irradiation

    Currently there is a movement towards commercial use of food irradiation. As with other commercial operations, the objective of commercial food irradiation is to process foods to obtain a particular beneficial effect and to market such foods to obtain a profit. Using economic analysis, business management evaluates benefits and risks in order to estimate the profitability of a contemplated venture employing food irradiation. If an economic analysis indicates that an adequate return on the required investment can be obtained, management has a proper basis on which to proceed with the venture. A procedure for obtaining an appropriate economic analysis for commercial use of food irradiation is considered herewith in detail. It covers the use of either a contract service, free standing type of irradiation facility or an integrated in-plant irradiator. The kinds of information needed for the economic analysis are indicated, including those for estimating capital and operating costs. It is emphasized that specific information relevant to the venture under consideration is required. Since commercial use of food irradiation requires that it be profitable, and since profitability is the incentive for a business to undertake it, a number of uses of food irradiation are identified and listed as those that have the potential for yielding cost-benefits. (author). 7 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  10. Commercial implementation of food irradiation

    Welt, M. A.

    In July 1981, the first specifically designed multi-purpose irradiation facility for food irradiation was put into service by the Radiation Technology, Inc. subsidiary Process Technology, Inc. in West Memphis, Arkansas. The operational experience gained, resulted in an enhanced design which was put into commercial service in Haw River, North Carolina, by another subsidiary, Process Technology (N.C.), Inc. in October 1983. These facilities have enabled the food industry to assess the commercial viability of food irradiation. Further impetus towards commercialization of food irradiation was gained in March 1981 with the filing in the Federal Register, by the FDA, of an Advanced Proposed Notice of Rulemaking for Food Irradiation. Two years later in July 1983, the FDA approved the first food additive regulation involving food irradiation in nineteen years, when they approved the Radiation Technology, Inc. petition calling for the sanitization of spices, onion powder and garlic powder at a maximum dosage of 10 kGy. Since obtaining the spice irradiation approval, the FDA has accepted four additional petitions for filing in the Federal Register. One of the petitions which extended spice irradiation to include insect disinfestation has issued into a regulation while the remaining petitions covering the sanitization of herbs, spice blends, vegetable seasonings and dry powdery enzymes as well as the petition to irradiate hog carcasses and pork products for trichinae control at 1 kGy, are expected to issue either before the end of 1984 or early in 1985. More recently, food irradiation advocates in the United States received another vote of confidence by the announcement that a joint venture food irradiation facility to be constructed in Hawaii by Radiation Technology, is backed by a contractual committment for the processing of 40 million pounds of produce per year. Another step was taken when the Port of Salem, New Jersey announced that the Radiation Technology Model RT-4104

  11. Food irradiation seminar: Asia and the Pacific

    The report covers the Seminar for Asia and the Pacific on the practical application of food irradiation. The seminar assessed the practical application of food irradiation processes, commercial utilisation and international trade of irradiated food

  12. Safer food means food irradiation

    In this article the author presents the sanitary advantages that are brought by food irradiation. OMS experts state that this technique is safe and harmless for any average global dose between 10 KGy and 100 KGy. Whenever a seminar is held on the topic, it is always concluded that food irradiation should be promoted and favoured. In France food irradiation is authorized for some kinds of products and exceptionally above a 10 KGy dose. Historically food irradiation has been hampered in its development by its classification by American Authorities as food additives in 1958 (Delanay clause). The author draws a parallel between food irradiation and pasteurization or food deep-freezing in their beginnings. (A.C.)

  13. Eatability of the irradiated food

    A food is eatable and innocuous when it has an acceptable nutritional quality, it is toxicological and microbiologically safe for the human consumption. Not one preservation treatment allows to assure this in absolute form. As it happens with other conservation methods, the irradiation produce biological, chemical and physical changes in the treated food. For to check if such changes could cause damages to the health of the consumer, its have been carried out extensive studies to evaluate the inoculate of the irradiated foods. Analyzing diverse toxicity studies to prove the eatability of the irradiated foods, in this work those are presented but important in chronological order. In summary, until today it exists a great heap of tests that they demonstrate without place to doubts that the foods irradiated with a dose up to 10 KGy its are capable for the human consumption, for what can to be concluded that a safety margin exists to consume foods irradiated. (Author)

  14. Consumer acceptance of irradiated food

    There was a widely held opinion during the 1970's and 1980's that consumers would be reluctant to purchase irradiated food, as it was perceived that consumers would confuse irradiated food with food contaminated by radionuclides. Indeed, a number of consumer attitude surveys conducted in several western countries during these two decades demonstrated that the concerns of consumers on irradiated food varied from very concerned to seriously concerned.This paper attempts to review parameters conducting in measuring consumer acceptance of irradiated food during the past three decades and to project the trends on this subject. It is believed that important lessons learned from past studies will guide further efforts to market irradiated food with wide consumer acceptance in the future. (Author)

  15. Indication method of irradiated meat

    An injury of Chromosome DNA of irradiated meat was indicated by mitochondria DNA (mt DNA) method. Sample was irradiated by 60Co-γ ray at 6 kGy/h of dose rate at 0degC. Mitochondria DNA was obtained by the mitochondria partition method and analyzed by an electrophoresis method. mt DNA of irradiated ox liver can be indicated by PCR method, restriction enzyme method and supercoil/ring opening comparative method. However, the other meat such as chicken and other parts of meat could not be indicated depends on large fat content. About 4 kGy irradiation on liver can indicate whether it was irradiated or not. (S.Y.)

  16. Consumer acceptance of irradiated food

    Loaharanu, P. [Head, Food Preservation Section, Joint FAO/ IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Wagramerstr. 5, A-1400, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-12-31

    There was a widely held opinion during the 1970`s and 1980`s that consumers would be reluctant to purchase irradiated food, as it was perceived that consumers would confuse irradiated food with food contaminated by radionuclides. Indeed, a number of consumer attitude surveys conducted in several western countries during these two decades demonstrated that the concerns of consumers on irradiated food varied from very concerned to seriously concerned.This paper attempts to review parameters conducting in measuring consumer acceptance of irradiated food during the past three decades and to project the trends on this subject. It is believed that important lessons learned from past studies will guide further efforts to market irradiated food with wide consumer acceptance in the future. (Author)

  17. Irradiation environment and materials behavior

    Irradiation environment is unique for materials used in a nuclear energy system. Material itself as well as irradiation and environmental conditions determine the material behaviour. In this review, general directions of research and development of materials in an irradiation environment together with the role of materials science are discussed first, and then recent materials problems are described for energy systems which are already existing (LWR), under development (FBR) and to be realized in the future (CTR). Topics selected are (1) irradiation embrittlement of pressure vessel steels for LWRs, (2) high fluence performance of cladding and wrapper materials for fuel subassemblies of FBRs and (3) high fluence irradiation effects in the first wall and blanket structural materials of a fusion reactor. Several common topics in those materials issues are selected and discussed. Suggestions are made on some elements of radiation effects which might be purposely utilized in the process of preparing innovative materials. (J.P.N.) 69 refs

  18. Irradiated mandibular autografts

    The cosmetic and functional disability associated with mandibular resection has been a major problem to the patient with direct invasion of the mandible by oral cancer. Marginal resections with combined postoperative radiation therapy have frequently been substituted for the more preferred segmental resections and resultant deformities. Presented are 15 cases of oral cavity cancer involving resection of the mandible, immediate radiation to 10,000 rad, and primary reconstruction as irradiated mandibular autografts. The longest following is 4 years and 3 months, with a success rate of 66%. Morbidity is minimal as compared to autogenous bone grafting. Tumor size, previous radiation, or use of regional flaps have not been a factor in the success of this method in reconstruction of the mandible primarily

  19. Irradiation effects in glasses

    The deposition of irradiation energy can alter the physical properties of glasses through bond-breaking (energetic photons; fast particles) and atomic displacements (Coulombic and collisional: n0, e, ions). These processes can alter UV-visible optical properties via electron-hole trapping and IR-spectra as a result of network damage. The movement of network atoms results in volume dilatation which change the hardness, refractive index, and dissolution rates. All of these changes can be realized with ion implantation and, in addition, implantation of chemically active species can lead to compound formation in the implanted regions. For this reason, emphasis will be placed on the implantation-induced surface modifications of glasses (mostly silicates). The paper includes crystallization, surface stress, refractive index changes and optoelectronic application and chemical reactivity

  20. Irradiation preservation of Korean shellfish

    Pacific oyster, hard clam and mussel were irradiated at doses up to 0.5 Mrad, the optimum dose rather than the maximum permissible was sought for in each species and post-irradiation storage characteristics studied at 00 and 50C. No shellfish meat irradiated at doses as high as 0.5 Mrad produced any adverse odor. However the organoleptic quality of each sample irradiated at lower doses was superior to those irradiated at the higher during the early storage period. The optimum dose was determined to be 0.2 Mrad for Pacific oyster and mussel and 0.1 Mrad for hard clam. By irradiating at the optimum dose, the storage life of Pacific oyster could be extended from less than 14 days to 35 days at 00C and from only 3 days to 21 days at 50C. A similar storage extension was observed from 7 days to 14 days at 00C and from 3 days to 12 days at 50C. The hard clam meats were particularly susceptible to tissue softening by irradiation; an earlier onset and more extensive softening were observed with increasing dose. (author)

  1. Gamma Irradiation of Polyesters Film

    Experimental investigations on the effects of gamma irradiation in air of aromatic polyesters are carried out, in order to evaluate the influence of aromatic density and the role of oxygen on the radiation resistance. The thermoplastic polyesters PolyEthyleneTerephthalate (PET), PolyButylene Terephthalate (PBT), PolyEthyleneNaphthalate (PEN), Poly1,4-cyclohexanedimethylen terephthalate-co-ethyleneterephthalate (PCT-co-ET) are moulded in thin films of 50 micron and irradiated at different absorbed doses, ranging from 0 to 1000 kGy, using a Co-60 gamma source. The structural changes in the polymers are studied by means of several physical-chemical and nuclear techniques. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance analyses are carried out to detect the radicals induced by irradiation and to follow their decay by oxygen permeation. Viscometric measurements show a similar trend for the different irradiated polyesters: in particular, chain scission induced by irradiation depends on the aromatic density contained in the polymer and shows a saturation effect at the highest doses. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy points out a decrease of the ortho-positronium signal caused by the production of oxidized species inhibiting the positronium formation. Finally, the experimental results obtained on the irradiated films are compared with previous studies carried out on the same polyesters moulded in sheets of 1-2 mm of thickness and γ-irradiated at the same adsorbed doses

  2. Gamma-irradiation of tomatoes

    The influence of gamma-ray on tomatoes picked in a pink-red ripening stage, good for consumption, is studied. For that purpose tomatoes of ''Pioneer 2'' variety packed in perforated 500 g plastic bags were irradiated on a gamma device (Cobalt-60) at a dose power of 1900 rad/min with doses 200 or 300 krad. Samples were stored after irradiation at room temperature (20 - 22sup(o)C). Microbiological studies demonstrated that 44 resp. 99.96 per cent of the initial number of microorganisms was destroyed after irradiation with 200 resp. 300 krad. The time required for the number of microorganisms to be restored was accordingly increased. Irradiation delayed tomato ripening by 4 to 6 days, demonstrable by the reduced content of the basic staining substances - carotene and licopine. Immediately after irradiation the ascorbic acid content was reduced by an average of 13 per cent. After 18 days the amount of ascorbic acid in irradiated tomatoes was increased to a higher than the starting level, this is attributed to reductone formation during irradiation. The elevated total sugar content shown to be invert sugar was due to further tomato ripening. (Ch.K.)

  3. Method of detecting irradiated pepper

    Spices represented by pepper are generally contaminated by microorganisms, and for using them as foodstuffs, some sterilizing treatment is indispensable. However, heating is not suitable to spices, accordingly ethylene oxide gas sterilization has been inevitably carried out, but its carcinogenic property is a problem. Food irradiation is the technology for killing microorganisms and noxious insects which cause the rotting and spoiling of foods and preventing the germination, which is an energy-conserving method without the fear of residual chemicals, therefore, it is most suitable to the sterilization of spices. In the irradiation of lower than 10 kGy, the toxicity test is not required for any food, and the irradiation of spices is permitted in 20 countries. However, in order to establish the international distribution organization for irradiated foods, the PR to consumers and the development of the means of detecting irradiation are the important subjects. The authors used pepper, and examined whether the hydrogen generated by irradiation remains in seeds and it can be detected or not. The experimental method and the results are reported. From the samples without irradiation, hydrogen was scarcely detected. The quantity of hydrogen generated was proportional to dose. The measuring instrument is only a gas chromatograph. (K.I.)

  4. Nanoindentation on ion irradiated steels

    Radiation induced mechanical property changes can cause major difficulties in designing systems operating in a radiation environment. Investigating these mechanical property changes in an irradiation environment is a costly and time consuming activity. Ion beam accelerator experiments have the advantage of allowing relatively fast and inexpensive materials irradiations without activating the sample but do in general not allow large beam penetration depth into the sample. In this study, the ferritic/martensitic steel HT-9 was processed and heat treated to produce one specimen with a large grained ferritic microstructure and further heat treated to form a second specimen with a fine tempered martensitic lath structure and exposed to an ion beam and tested after irradiation using nanoindentation to investigate the irradiation induced changes in mechanical properties. It is shown that the HT-9 in the ferritic heat treatment is more susceptible to irradiation hardening than HT-9 after the tempered martensitic heat treatment. Also at an irradiation temperature above 550 deg. C no detectable hardness increase due to irradiation was detected. The results are also compared to data from the literature gained from the fast flux test facility.

  5. Microbiological Principles in Food Irradiation

    This paper reviews the important microbiological objectives of irradiation treatments, with special reference to the definitions of the proposed new terms, radappertization, radicidation and radurization. Emphasis is placed on the nature of the food in determining the microbiological requirements of the irradiation treatment. It is suggested that, just as with heat-processed foods, classifications into the major groups of ''acid'' or ''cured'' foods will remain valid with the irradiation process, and that different microbiological criteria will apply to these different classes of foods. The differences depend in part on the influence which the nature of the food has on the effectiveness of the irradiation treatment itself, but more especially on the way in which the nature of the food affects the activities of those microorganisms which might survive irradiation. The principles used to calculate the appropriate doses of radiation are discussed, with comments on the reliability of the fundamental assumptions or the need for further experimentation. The microbiological characteristics of irradiated foods are compared with those of corresponding heat- processed foods, to emphasize points of difference, with special reference to the appropriateness of suggested classifications for heat-processed foods. Finally, some general difficulties are considered, such as uncertainty about the significance and behaviour of food-borne viruses, and about the significance of the mutations which might conceivably be induced in microorganisms surviving-an irradiation process. (author)

  6. Detection of some irradiated foods

    This study was performed to investigate the possibility of using two rapid methods namely Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) and Direct Solvent Extraction (DSE) methods for extraction and isolation of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) followed by detecting this chemical marker by Gas chromatography technique and used this marker for identification of irradiated some foods containing fat (beef meat, chicken, camembert cheese and avocado) post irradiation, during cold and frozen storage. Consequently, this investigation was designed to study the following main points:- 1- The possibility of applying SFE-GC and DSE-GC rapid methods for the detection of 2-DCB from irradiated food containing fat (beef meat, chicken, camembert cheese and avocado fruits) under investigation.2-Studies the effect of gamma irradiation doses on the concentration of 2-DCB chemical marker post irradiation and during frozen storage at -18 degree C of chicken and beef meats for 12 months.3-Studies the effect of gamma irradiation doses on the concentration of 2-DCB chemical marker post irradiation and during cold storage at 4±1 degree C of camembert cheese and avocado fruits for 20 days.

  7. Irradiation's potential for preserving food

    The first experimental studies on the use of ionizing radiation for the preservation of foods were published over thirty years ago (1, 2) . After a period of high expectations and perhaps exaggerated optimism a series of disappointments occurred in the late '60s .The first company specifically created to operate a food irradiation plant, Newfield Products Inc, ran into financial difficulties and had to close its potato irradiation facility in 1966. The irradiator, designed to process 15,000t of potatoes per month for inhibition of sprouting, was in operation during one season only. In 1968 the US Food an Drug Administration refused approval for radiation-sterilisation of ham and withdrew the approval it had granted in 1963 for irradiated bacon. An International Project on the Irradiation of Fruit and Fruit juices, created in 1965 at Seibersdorf, Austria, with the collaboration or 9 countries, ended with general disappointment after three years. The first commercial grain irradiator, built in the Turkish harbour town of Iskenderun by the International Atomic Energy Agency with funds from the United Nations Development Program, never received the necessary operating licence from the Turkish Government and had to be dismantled in 1968. The US Atomic Energy Commission terminated its financial support to all research programmes on food irradiation in 1970. For a number of years, little chance seemed to remain that the new process would ever be practically used. However, research and development work was continued in a number of laboratories all over the world, and it appears that the temporary setbacks now have been overcome. Growing quantities of irradiated foods are being marketed in several countries and indications are that irradiated foods will eventually be as generally accepted as are frozen, dried or heatsterilised foods

  8. Pork fat peroxidation by gamma-irradiation

    In this paper, pork fat peroxidation by γ-irradiation and the possible effects of oxygen, UV-irradiation and storage after the γ-irradiation have been investigated. It has been found that the level of peroxides in irradiated pork increases linearly with the increasing absorbed dose. The chemical yield of peroxides formed in the irradiated fat is about 4.2 and independent on the sample temperature or absorbed dose rate, but dependent on storage time of sample before γ-irradiation. The irradiated pork exhibits some unusual features as following: 1) the peroxide content in irradiated pork is higher than that in unirradiated one; 2) the peroxide content in irradiated pork increases gradually on storage and is essentially constant in unirradiated one, which is very useful for the detection of irradiated pork; 3) the further peroxidation in irradiated pork is much more susceptible to UV radiation than that in unirradiated pork

  9. Facts about food irradiation: Irradiation and food additives and residues

    This fact sheet considers the issue of the irradiation of food containing food additives or pesticide residues. The conclusion is that there is no health hazard posed by radiolytic products of pesticides or food additives. 1 ref

  10. New facility for post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi [Oarai Research Establishment, Ibaraki-Ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium is expected as a neutron multiplier and plasma facing materials in the fusion reactor, and the neutron irradiation data on properties of beryllium up to 800{degrees}C need for the engineering design. The acquisition of data on the tritium behavior, swelling, thermal and mechanical properties are first priority in ITER design. Facility for the post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium was constructed in the hot laboratory of Japan Materials Testing Reactor to get the engineering design data mentioned above. This facility consist of the four glove boxes, dry air supplier, tritium monitoring and removal system, storage box of neutron irradiated samples. Beryllium handling are restricted by the amount of tritium;7.4 GBq/day and {sup 60}Co;7.4 MBq/day.

  11. Irradiation a boon to farmers

    Irradiation sterilization is emerging as a process of tremendous value to the food marketing industry. Much of the latest research has been done by the Atomic Energy Board at Pelindaba, using the strong gamma rays produced by cobalt-60 to kill the pathogens, microprobes, small insects and other food destroying agents usually found in food and fruit. Irradiation also helps delay ripening and ageing to a slight degree, a property of great value to food and fruit exporters. The advantages of various irradiated food are shortly discussed

  12. Irradiation services for crops improvement

    As an effort to pioneer and promote the use of nuclear technology in plant breeding in Malaysia, MINT has developed the procedures, methodology and service for the irradiation of ornamental plants, food and industrial crops. This paper discusses the issues related to the irradiation services for plant samples for the period of 15 years since the service was started. The main issues include the procedures for sample irradiation, statistics for the services that have been provided, problems and the solutions in providing the services. (Author)

  13. Nutritional Value of Irradiated Potatoes

    Rats received dried potatoes, irradiated with 10 krad, in an amount of 72% of the diet. Control groups received the same amount of non-irradiated potatoes. The experiment began on 7 May 1965 and is still running. To date, there is no difference between the groups fed with irradiated potatoes and the controls as far as weight gain and protein efficiency are concerned. Another experiment has been running for 12 weeks under the same conditions, except that the radiation dose was 100 krad. Here, too, no difference to the control groups can be observed. (author)

  14. International status of food irradiation

    Recent international moves that are likely to result in an increasing acceptance of irradiated foods are reviewed. Particular attention is given to the activities of the FAO, WHO, Codex Alimentarius and to attitudes in the United States and the Asian-Pacific region. In 1979, the Codex Alimentarius Commission adopted a Recommended General Standard for Irradiated Food. A resume is given of a revised version of the standard that is presently under consideration. However, remaining barriers to trade in irradiated food are briefly discussed, such as legal and regulatory problems, labelling, public acceptance and economic viability

  15. AFIP-4 Irradiation Summary Report

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-4 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. The AFIP-4 test further examine the fuel/clad interface and its behavior under extreme conditions. After irradiation, fission gas retention measurements will be performed during post irradiation (PIE). The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-4 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  16. Methodology for RPV steels irradiations

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. The methodology for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels irradiations is elaborated. Irradiation in a materials test reactor and surveillance of the state of embrittlement in 'typical' plant specific materials are considered

  17. Food irradiation, profits and limitations

    The utility of the irradiation to overcome diverse problems of lost nutritious, it has been demonstrated in multiple investigation works, that its have confirmed the value and the inoculation of the irradiated foods. The quantity of energy applied to each food, is in function of the wanted effect. In this document a guide with respect to the practical application and the utility of the irradiation process in different foods, as well as the suggested dose average is shown. Among the limitations of the use of this technology, its are the costs and not being able to apply it to some fresh foods. (Author)

  18. Food irradiation dispelling the doubts

    Irradiation processing of the food item eliminates the use of harmful chemicals for treatment of food items and the produce can be conserved fresh. Another important aspect of this process is that it can help to stabilize the prices and give better remuneration to the farmer and hygienic product to the consumer. The already growing Indian nuclear industry can provide the source as well as the pros and cons of food technology for installation of irradiation facilities. The pros and cons of irradiation process are described. (M.K.V.)

  19. Growing acceptance of food irradiation

    In the table are listed food products treated by irradiation which have been cleared for human consumption in a number of Member States of the Agency. The details are based on information up to 1 February 1968. Two words already known to food experts investigating nuclear techniques for preserving food and preventing wastage but perhaps unfamiliar as yet to others, appear in the table. They are radappertization and radurization. The first means sterilization by irradiation and the second extension of market life, also by irradiation. (author)

  20. Therapeutic postprostatectomy irradiation.

    Youssef, Emad; Forman, Jeffrey D; Tekyi-Mensah, Samuel; Bolton, Susan; Hart, Kim

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the outcome of patients receiving external beam radiation for an elevated postprostatectomy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Between December 1991 and September 1998, 108 patients received definitive radiation therapy for elevated postprostatectomy PSA levels. The median dose of irradiation was 68 Gy (range, 48-74 Gy). During treatment, the PSA levels were checked an average of 5 times (range, 3-7 times). Prostate-specific antigen values were judged to decline or increase during treatment if they changed by more than 0.2 ng/mL. After treatment, biochemical failure was defined as a measurable or rising PSA > 0.2 ng/mL. Median follow-up was 51 months (range, 3-112 months). Fifty-eight patients (54%) had evidence of biochemical failure. The 3- and 5-year actuarial biochemical relapse-free (bNED) survivals for all patients were 55% and 39%, respectively. Upon univariate analysis, intratreatment PSA and preradiation PSA were significant predictors of bNED survival. Patients with a PSA level that decreased during treatment had a 5-year bNED survival of 43% compared to 10% in patients with an increasing PSA level (P = 0.0002). Using the preradiation therapy PSA value as a continuous variable, higher preradiation therapy PSA levels were associated with an increased risk of failure (P = 0.004). Cut points of pretreatment PSA were derived at 0.9 ng/mL and 4.2 ng/mL using the Michael Leblanc recursive partitioning algorithm. The 5-year bNED rate for patients with a preradiation therapy PSA or = 4.2 ng/mL (P = 0.0003). Patients with a Gleason score of 7 (P = 0.27). Other factors examined individually that did not reach statistical significance included time from surgery to radiation therapy, race, seminal vesicle involvement, pathological stage, surgical margin, and perineural invasion. Upon multivariate analysis, only preradiation therapy PSA (P < 0.001) and the PSA trend during radiation therapy (P < 0.001) were significant

  1. Currently developing opportunities in food irradiation and modern irradiation facilities

    I. Factor currently influencing advancing opportunities for food irradiation include: heightened incidence and awareness of food borne illnesses and causes. Concerns about ensuring food safety in international as well as domestic trade. Regulatory actions regarding commonly used fumigants/pesticides e.g. Me Br. II. Modern irradiator design: the SteriGenics Mini Cell. A new design for new opportunities. Faster installation of facility. Operationally and space efficient. Provides local onsite control. Red meat: a currently developing opportunity. (Author)

  2. Facts about food irradiation: Safety of irradiation facilities

    This fact sheet considers the safety of industrial irradiation facilities. Although there have been accidents, none of them has endangered public health or environmental safety, and the radiation processing industry is considered to have a very good safety record. Gamma irradiators do not produce radioactive waste, and the radiation sources at the facilities cannot explode nor in any other way release radioactivity into the environment. 3 refs

  3. (Irradiation creep of graphite)

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1990-12-21

    The traveler attended the Conference, International Symposium on Carbon, to present an invited paper, Irradiation Creep of Graphite,'' and chair one of the technical sessions. There were many papers of particular interest to ORNL and HTGR technology presented by the Japanese since they do not have a particular technology embargo and are quite open in describing their work and results. In particular, a paper describing the failure of Minor's law to predict the fatigue life of graphite was presented. Although the conference had an international flavor, it was dominated by the Japanese. This was primarily a result of geography; however, the work presented by the Japanese illustrated an internal program that is very comprehensive. This conference, a result of this program, was better than all other carbon conferences attended by the traveler. This conference emphasizes the need for US participation in international conferences in order to stay abreast of the rapidly expanding HTGR and graphite technology throughout the world. The United States is no longer a leader in some emerging technologies. The traveler was surprised by the Japanese position in their HTGR development. Their reactor is licensed and the major problem in their graphite program is how to eliminate it with the least perturbation now that most of the work has been done.

  4. Generic phytosanitary irradiation treatments

    The history of the development of generic phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is discussed beginning with its initial proposal in 1986. Generic PI treatments in use today are 150 Gy for all hosts of Tephritidae, 250 Gy for all arthropods on mango and papaya shipped from Australia to New Zealand, 300 Gy for all arthropods on mango shipped from Australia to Malaysia, 350 Gy for all arthropods on lychee shipped from Australia to New Zealand and 400 Gy for all hosts of insects other than pupae and adult Lepidoptera shipped to the United States. Efforts to develop additional generic PI treatments and reduce the dose for the 400 Gy treatment are ongoing with a broad based 5-year, 12-nation cooperative research project coordinated by the joint Food and Agricultural Organization/International Atomic Energy Agency Program on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. Key groups identified for further development of generic PI treatments are Lepidoptera (eggs and larvae), mealybugs and scale insects. A dose of 250 Gy may suffice for these three groups plus others, such as thrips, weevils and whiteflies. (author)

  5. Economics of Grain Irradiation

    After three years, in which preliminary designs were prepared, a grain irradiation plant has been designed and is being built into an existing silo installation. From this experience actual costs of plant construction are available for a plant using cobalt-60 and this experience is incorporated in estimates for machine installations for high grain throughput. Costs are compared for plants of comparable complexity and they indicate those areas in which each type of plant is pre-eminently suitable and those areas where either type may be best, dependent upon local site conditions, the standard of local technology and methods of operation. The two plants compared are described in sufficient detail to enable the precise extent of the equipment supply covered by the costs to be appreciated. The accounting methods employed have been discussed with industrial accountants to ensure that they are acceptable to the potential users. The methods employed are explained so that they can be applied to problems of a similar nature. (author)

  6. Development of blood irradiators

    The fully portable, vitreous-carbon/thulium-170 (VCTm) irradiators were previously developed and tested in goats, sheep and dogs for effects on circulating lymphocytes and on skin graft rejection. This past year the testing was extended to include studies of effects on kidney transplants in dogs. Six pairs of beagle dogs were tested. One of each pair was treated with an activated VCTm (i.e., containing 170Tm); the other was treated comparably, but had an inactive unit (containing 169Tm). Kidney donors were selected for maximum disparity in cellular immune (DLA) type between donor and host. The host's own kidneys were removed so that survival depended on the functioning of the transplanted kidney. The untreated dogs survived 9 to 23 days (mean = 15) after transplant; treated dogs survived 16 to 45 days (mean = 27 days). Histological examination showed that there was a distinct depletion of cells in all lymphoid tissues and a reduced cellular involvement in kidney tissues of treated animals

  7. Irradiation of food - the facts

    The author outlines the history of the process for the interest of the baking industry, and discusses the difficulties concerning public relations in this field, before the introduction of irradiation to the British food industry. (U.K.)

  8. Finely divided, irradiated tetrafluorethylene polymers

    Dry non-sticky fine lubricant powders are made by γ-irradiation of unsintered coagulated dispersion grade tetrafluoroethylene polymers. These powders may also be dispersed in an organic medium for lubricating purposes

  9. Gamma irradiators for radiation processing

    Radiation technology is one of the most important fields which the IAEA supports and promotes, and has several programmes that facilitate its use in the developing Member States. In view of this mandate, this Booklet on 'Gamma Irradiators for Radiation Processing' is prepared which describes variety of gamma irradiators that can be used for radiation processing applications. It is intended to present description of general principles of design and operation of the gamma irradiators available currently for industrial use. It aims at providing information to industrial end users to familiarise them with the technology, with the hope that the information contained here would assist them in selecting the most optimum irradiator for their needs. Correct selection affects not only the ease of operation but also yields higher efficiency, and thus improved economy. The Booklet is also intended for promoting radiation processing in general to governments and general public

  10. URAM-2 Cryogenic Irradiation Facility

    Shabalin, E P; Kulikov, S A; Kulagin, E N; Melihov, V V; Belyakov, A A; Golovanov, L B; Borzunov, Yu T; Konstantinov, V I; Androsov, A V

    2002-01-01

    The URAM-2 irradiation facility has been built and mounted at the channel No. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor. It was constructed for study of radiolysis effects by fast neutron irradiation in some suitable for effective cold neutron production materials (namely: solid methane, methane hydrate, water ice, etc.). The facility cooling system is based on using liquid helium as a coolant material. The original charging block of the rig allows the samples to be loaded by condensing gas into irradiation cavity or by charging beads of ice prepared before. Preliminary tests for each facility block and assembling them at the working position were carried out. Use of the facility for study accumulation of chemical energy under irradiation at low temperature in materials mentioned above and its spontaneous release was started.

  11. Irradiation emerges as processing alternative

    Anticipating that food irradiation may soon become an important addition to the many food processing techniques currently available, this article discusses many aspects of this process. Primarily, the benefits of irradiation for all foods include insect and bacterial control, increasing the potential to reduce incidences of food-borne illnesses, in addition to delaying the deterioration of fruits and vegetables. Currently approved uses of food irradiation in the U.S. and other countries, a summary of the proposed rule for wider application, and the labeling issue encompassed in the proposal are addressed. Additionally, the areas of great consumer concern--safety and public health implications, are talked about with the conclusion that food irradiation has been declared safe

  12. Gamma irradiators: developments in India

    A comprehensive programme for the production of 60Co sources and their applications was initiated at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre in 1970. Initially a series of research irradiators called Gamma Chambers and Panoramic Batch Irradiators (PANBITs) was fabricated for R and D and pilot scale studies. In 1974 the first commercial scale, gamma sterilization plant ISOMED was commissioned with UNDP assistance. Subsequently two more plants were designed and built indigenously, one at Bangalore and the other at Delhi. A radiation plant for sludge hygienisation was built at Baroda and commissioned in 1992. The current interest in radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex (NRL) prompted the development and commissioning of a pilot scale NRL, irradiator at Kottayam, Kerala in 1992. A multipurpose irradiator is built recently at Jodhpur, as an upgraded version of the vintage PANBIT. Salient feature of these plants are presented . (author). 6 figs

  13. URAM-2 cryogenic irradiation facility

    The URAM-2 irradiation facility has been built and mounted at channel No.3 of the IBR-2 reactor. It was constructed for study of radiolysis effects by fast neutron irradiation in some suitable for effective cold neutron production materials (namely: solid methane, methane hydrate, water ice, etc.). The facility cooling system is based on using liquid helium as a coolant material. The original charging block of the rig allows the samples to be loaded by condensing gas into irradiation cavity or by charging beads of ice prepared before. Preliminary tests for each facility block and assembling them at the working position were carried out. Use of the facility for studying accumulation of chemical energy under irradiation at low temperature in materials mentioned above and its spontaneous release was started

  14. Irradiation of spices and herbs

    Changes in the microbiology, chemistry, mutagenicity and sensory of spices due to gamma irradiation are discussed. This process has been shown to be safe and wholesome with no effect on product quality or flavour

  15. HACCP, food quality, food irradiation

    The paper summarizes the principles and purposes of the ''Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points'' (HACCP) system and its application and implementation within the European Union for the purposes of food quality and safety control, including food irradiation. (orig./CB)

  16. Massive allografts sterilised by irradiation

    From 1984 to 1988 we implanted 127 massive allografts irradiated with a dose of 25 000 grays. These were reviewed at a minimum follow-up of three years to determine the effect of irradiation on infection, the complications and the functional result. No bacteriological infection was seen in the 44 patients who had allografts for revision of joint arthroplasty or for a tumour with no adjuvant therapy. For the 83 patients who also had chemotherapy or radiotherapy or both for a bone tumour, the rate of infection was 13%. The major mechanical complications were nonunion in seven grafts (5.5%) and fracture in eight (6%). These rates do not differ greatly from those reported for non-irradiated grafts. Our results suggest that irradiation, which remains the most convenient and acceptable method of sterilisation, does not jeopardise the clinical results. (author)

  17. Detection of irradiated food: Perspectives

    Apart from the administrative monitoring procedures, - documentation by the irradiation facility operators and the documents accompanying irradiated foods -, reliable methods for food testing and post-factum detection of foods treated with ionizing radiation are required. The paper reviews the methods available for this purpose, summarizes results of the interlaboratory comparisons performed for verification, and lists the mandatory procedures required by the law. It is important to note that methods are available today that will detect unauthorized irradiation in almost any of the foods that are suitable for radiation treatment. In addition, the available methods are improved and refined whenever possible. The results of monitoring and testing activities so far according to the food surveillance regime in Germany show that there are only few irradiated foods on the market. (orig./cB)

  18. Food irradiation in South Africa

    The article indicates the necessity for additional methods of food preservation and emphasises that food irradiation is developing into an important method of food preservation because it has been proved scientifically and practically that food irradiation can be applied effectively; also that there is absolute certainty that radiation-processed products are safe and nutritious and that such food is acceptable to the consumer and food trade, also with a view to costs. It discusses the joint food irradiation programme of the AEB and Department of Agriculture and Fisheries and points out that exemption for the irradiation of potatoes was already obtained in 1977 and later for mango's, paw-paws, chicken, onions, garlic and strawberries. Conditional exemption was obtained for avocado's and dried bananas. Other food-kinds on which research is being continued are grapes, melons, mushrooms, stone fruit and spices

  19. Slag recycling of irradiated vanadium

    An experimental inductoslag apparatus to recycle irradiated vanadium was fabricated and tested. An experimental electroslag apparatus was also used to test possible slags. The testing was carried out with slag materials that were fabricated along with impurity bearing vanadium samples. Results obtained include computer simulated thermochemical calculations and experimentally determined removal efficiencies of the transmutation impurities. Analyses of the samples before and after testing were carried out to determine if the slag did indeed remove the transmutation impurities from the irradiated vanadium

  20. The facts behind food irradiation

    In this, the second of a two part article, professor Bert McGill completes his investigation of the process of food irradiation. He looks at some of the literature released on food irradiation and the complications thereof. He shows on half truths, innuendos and statements taken out of context, prepared to present only that picture which it wants to present, as it comes forward in documentation

  1. Preliminary studies on irradiated spirulina

    In the last decades, a special attention is given to study different algae, especially to microscopic ones. Spirulina is one of them being used both nutritive supplement and medicine. The aim of the paper is to study the electron beam irradiated Spirulina by physical and biochemical methods. The UV-Vis and EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) spectra and antioxidant activity are presented for Spirulina irradiated up to 80 kGy. (authors)

  2. Irradiation injury to large arteries

    Four cases of irradiation injury to large arteries following radiotherapy treatment are presented and the literature is reviewed. Three patterns of injury have emerged: 1) intimal damage resulting in mural thrombosis presenting within 5 years of irradiation, 2) fibrotic occlusion presenting within 10 years of injury, and 3) a predisposition to the development of atheroma together with periarterial fibrosis associated with a latent interval of 20 or more years. The treatment of choice is a bypass procedure of the arterial lesion. (author)

  3. A Mobile Irradiator Design Study

    The need for data on the technical and economic feasibility of commercial potato irradiation using Cobalt-60 gamma rays, led to a design and cost study of a mobile irradiator. Investigation of handling and storage of potatoes in major growing areas in Canada and the United States showed that the irradiator should process at least 6,000 lbs. (2,700 kilos) per hour in bulk or in 100 lb. (45 kilo) bags. Tests on irradiated potatoes indicated that a dose of 8,000 rads would effectively inhibit sprouting at a storage temperature of 68oF (20oC). Based on source configurations of other AECL irradiation facilities, calculations and measurements of dosage uniformity were made showing that ±33 per cent variation occurred when using two passes on each side of the line source. The source was designed to have increased activity near the ends. The calculated radiation utilization efficiency was 48 per cent. A truck-mounted irradiator was studied in some detail and was found to be too heavy for easy transportation. An irradiator using a railroad flatcar and weighing 60 tons (54,000 kilos) was then considered. Although its movement is restricted, most potato warehouses are located near railroad sidings and are easily reached by a railroad car. The processing cost, including depreciation, source replacement and operating costs, was estimated to be 0.9 per cent per lb. (2.0 cents per kilo) for 1,200 hours operation per year. A longer operation time per year results in a decrease in this processing cost. The above figure is based on estimated costs for a prototype unit. Somewhat lower costs are indicated for production irradiators. (author)

  4. Studies on the irradiated solids

    The 1988 progress report of the Irradiated Solids laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The Laboratory activities concern the investigations on disordered solids (chemical or structural disorder). The disorder itself, its effects on the material physical properties and the particle-matter interactions, are investigated. The research works are performed in the following fields: solid state physics, irradiation and stoechiometric defects, and nuclear materials. The scientific reviews, the congress communications and the thesis are listed

  5. Nutritional value of irradiated food

    Statements made in 2 reports by the European Parliamentary Commission on the Environment, Public Health and Consumer Protection, chaired on both occasions by members of the German Green Party, that irradiated foods have no nutritional value are challenged. Attempts by the European Commission to regulate food irradiation in the European Community have been turned down by the European Parliament on the basis of these reports

  6. Legislations the field of food irradiation

    An outline is given of the national legislation in 39 countries in the field of food irradiation. Where available the following information is given for each country: form of legislation, object of legislation including information on the irradiation treatment, the import and export trade of irradiated food, the package labelling and the authorization and control of the irradiation procedures

  7. ATLAS Pixel Group - Photo Gallery from Irradiation

    2001-01-01

    Photos 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 - Photos taken before irradiation of Pixel Test Analog Chip and Pmbars (April 2000) Photos 8,9,10,11 - Irradiation of VDC chips (May 2000) Photos 12, 13 - Irradiation of Passive Components (June 2000) Photos 14,15, 16 - Irradiation of Marebo Chip (November 1999)

  8. Study on irradiation treatment to drunk crab

    For guaranteeing the quality of irradiated drunk crab, manufacture method of the dosimeter, sample setting and taking position, irradiation time, asymmetry degree of irradiation dose, contrast of the dosimeter are discussed and some reference datum to commercialization of drunk crab's irradiation are provided

  9. China's move to food irradiation

    The Chinese officials outlined China's past and future directions at a recent international food irradiation seminar in Shanghai sponsored by the FAO and IAEA. The meeting was attended by about 170 participants from China and 22 other countries, primarily from the Asian and Pacific region. Three food irradiation plants currently are operating in the region and 14 more are planned over the next 5 years. It was reported that China continues to suffer high food losses, up to 30% for some commodities, primarily due to preservation and storage problems. In January 1986, the first of five regional irradiation facilities planned in China officially opened in Shanghai. The Shanghai irradiation centre plans to process up to 35,000 tons of vegetables a year, as well as some spices, fruits, and non-food products. The Ministry of Public Health has approved seven irradiated foods as safe human diets: rice, potatoes, onions, garlic, peanuts, mushrooms and pork sausages; approval for apples is expected shortly. The Chinese officials at the Shanghai meeting stressed their openness to foreign participation and cooperation in food irradiation's development

  10. Irradiated vaccines against bovine babesiosis

    Experiments were conducted on non-splenectomized Bos taurus calves to determine the immunogenicity of blood vaccines containing either Babesia bigemina or Babesia bovis parasites irradiated in a 60Co source. Groups of calves between 6 and 10 months of age, found to be free of previous babesial infections by serodiagnosis, were inoculated with B. bigemina ('G' isolate) irradiated at rates ranging from 350 to 500 Gy. These vaccines caused low to moderate reactions on primary inoculation which subsided without treatment. Parasites irradiated at 350 Gy produced a strong immunity against virulent homologous challenge. Vaccinated calves also withstood virulent heterologous B. bigemina ('H' isolate) and B. bovis ('A' isolate) challenges made 85 and 129 days later. It also became evident that the use of babesicides to control reactions should be avoided since early treatment of 'reactor' animals caused breakdown of immunity among vaccinates. B. bovis ('A' isolate) parasites irradiated at dose rates of either 300 Gy or 350 Gy caused mild to moderate reactions in immunized calves, with the reactions in the 300 Gy group being slightly more severe. On challenge with homologous parasites, animals that had previously been inoculated with organisms irradiated at 300 Gy showed better protection than those that had received parasites irradiated at 350 Gy. (author). 28 refs, 5 tabs

  11. Material Irradiation at HANARO, Korea

    The High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor (HANARO: High flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor) is an open-pool type multi-purposed research reactor located at KAERI, in Korea. It was designed to provide a peak thermal and fast flux of 5x1014 n/cm2.s and 2.1x1014 n/cm2.s (E >1.0MeV) respectively at a 30 MW maximum thermal power. A capsule system has been developed for irradiation tests of nuclear materials and fuels in the core region of the HANARO reactor. Extensive efforts have been made to establish the design and manufacturing technology for a capsule and temperature control system, which should be compatible with HANARO's characteristics. A material capsule system consisting of main capsule, fixing, control, cutting, and transport system were developed for an irradiation test of non-fissile materials. This capsule system has been actively utilized for the various material irradiation tests requested by users from research institutes, universities and the industries. More than 7000 specimens have been irradiated at dedicated vertical hole of HANARO by using the developed capsule system since 1995. Based on the accumulated experience and the user's sophisticated requirements, new instrumented capsule technologies for a more precise control of the irradiation condition are being developed at HANARO. A strategic irradiation program at HANARO will place more emphasis on a special-purpose capsule system by focusing on the specific material or fuels for a next generation power reactor. (author)

  12. Identification methods for irradiated wheat

    The effect of irradiation on wheat seeds was examined using various kinds of analytical methods for the identification of irradiated seeds. In germination test, the growth of sprouts was markedly inhibited at 500Gy, which was not affected by storage. The decrease in germination percentage was detected at 3300Gy. The results of enzymatic activity change in the germ measured by Vita-Scope germinator showed that the seeds irradiated at 10kGy could be identified. The content of amino acids in ungerminated and germinated seeds were analyzed. Irradiation at 10kGy caused the decrease of lysine content but the change was small which need very careful operation to detect it. The chemiluminescence intensity increased with radiation dose and decreased during storage. The wheat irradiated at 10kGy could be identified even after 3 months storage. In the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrum analysis, the signal intensity with the g value f 2.0055 of skinned wheat seeds increased with radiation dose. Among these methods, germination test was the most sensitive and effective for identification of irradiated wheat. (author)

  13. The present situation of irradiation services

    The present state of food irradiation in Japan is presented from a point of view of a trustee for irradiation business. Radiation sprout inhibition of potatoes, only approved by Government, and spice treatment, now being applied for, are explained. Existing establishments capable of entrusting irradiation services as business in Japan are outlined including Co-60 gamma ray and X-ray irradiation and electron beam irradiation. Principles of irradiation-induced physical and chemical effects in irradiated materials specifically organic polymers and brief explanation of facilities together with safety devices are also explained. (S. Ohno)

  14. Study on public acceptance of irradiated potatoes

    4,500 kg potatoes of different sorts were irradiated by a 137Cs source with a dose of 10 krad. The potatoes were then stored for several months at a room temperature of 6 to 100C and a humidity of 80 to 85%. 0% of the irradiated potatoes sprouted, as compared to 100% of the non-irradiated potatoes. The percentage of rotting varied in the irradiated potatoes, depending on the variety. Cooking tests showed no difference between irradiated and non-irradiated potatoes. The irradiated potatoes were consumed and accepted by about 4,000 persons in the cafeteria of the institute. (AJ)

  15. Food irradiation newsletter. Vol. 15, no. 2

    This newsletter contains brief summaries of three coordinated research meetings held in 1991: irradiation in combination with other processes for improving food quality; application of irradiation technique for food processing in Africa; and food irradiation programme for Middle East and European countries. The first Workshop on Public Information on Food Irradiation is summarized, and a Coordinated Research Programme on Irradiation as a Quarantine Treatment of Mites, Nematodes and Insects other than Fruit Fly is announced. This issue also contains a report on the status of food irradiation in China, and a supplement lists clearances of irradiated foods. Tabs

  16. Ripening characteristics of light irradiated tomatoes

    Red color development in breaker stage tomatoes was accelerated by 3 min red (R) irradiation and delayed by 3 min far-red (FR) irradiation during the first 4 days of ripening. The effects were reversible and color development effective whether the interval between R and FR treatments was 1 day or 2 days. Firmness values of tomatoes irradiated with R were lower than those irradiated with FR, treated with ethylene, or stored in darkness. Light irradiation had the greatest effect on color development in tomatoes irradiated at the breaker and turning stages of maturity compared to those irradiated at the pink and light red stages

  17. The sensory quality of irradiated mushrooms

    Forced triangle tests indicated some significant differences between unirradiated and irradiated mushrooms. The irradiated mushrooms were significantly stronger flavoured and firmer than unirradiated mushrooms. The panelists showed no significant preference for either the irradiated or unirradiated mushrooms. The combination of irradiation at 2kGy with pre-packing and storage reduced weight loss in mushrooms and prevented excessive stalk elongation. Irradiation inhibited cap opening. Generally pre-packed irradiated mushrooms discoloured more slowly than unirradiated pre-packed samples. The texture of pre-packed irradiated mushrooms tended to be firmer than that of unirradiated samples. (author). 15 refs, 3 figs, 5 tabs

  18. Improvement of irradiation facilities performance in JMTR

    Various kinds of irradiation facilities are installed in the JMTR for the purpose of irradiation tests on fuels and materials and of producing radioisotopes. The irradiation facilities have been improved so far at every opportunity of new irradiation requirements and of renewing them which reached the design lifetime. Of these irradiation facilities, improvements of the power ramping test facility (BOCA/OSF-1 facility) and the hydraulic rabbit No.2 (HR-2 facility) are described here. (author)

  19. Changes of lipids in irradiated chickens

    Chickens were irradiated in a 6deg Co gamma irradiation source. The irradiation has been done to reduce or eliminate Salmonella. The experiments were done to test this decontamination method of chickens if changes of lipids take place. It was to be seen, that peroxidation of lipids was more rapidly as in control. The time of storage of irradiated chickens has to be shorter because of changes in lipids. After irradiation the chickens had trade quality. (orig.)

  20. Chemical aspects of irradiated mangoes

    Mango is an important and very popular tropical fruit. Because of its short shelf life, however, its use is restricted to the areas of production. Since mango is a climacteric fruit, it is possible to extend its shelf life by delaying the ripening process and senescence by irradiation. The ripening process is very complex: it appears that the radiation-induced delay in ripening may be mediated through the inhibition of the enzyme(s) involved in ethylene production. The dose required for shelf-life extension is ≤1.5 kGy. Higher doses can lead to scalding, flesh darkening and development of hollow pockets. This review focuses on the chemical aspects of radiation-induced shelf-life extension of mangoes. At the low irradiation doses required for this shelf-life extension (≤1.5 kGy), the chemical effects are negligible. Irradiation does not affect the carotenoid levels, and has only a minor effect on the vitamin C level in a few mango varieties. No significant differences in the free and total (hydrolyzed) amino acids, or the protein content of Kent mangoes, have been detected between irradiated and unirradiated samples. During ripening of the mangoes the reducing sugar and the total sugar levels increase, but in the majority of the mango varieties these levels remain very similar in irradiated and unirradiated samples. There are some differences in the volatile compounds between irradiated and unirradiated Kent mangoes; however, these differences have no apparent effect on the taste and flavor of the irradiated mangoes

  1. Independent Laboratory for Detection of Irradiated Foods. Detection of the irradiated food in the INCT

    Lecture shows different methods applied for detection of irradiated foods. Structure and equipment of the Independent Laboratory for Detection of Irradiated Foods operating in the INCT is described. Several examples of detection of food irradiation are given in details

  2. Composting of sewage sludge irradiated

    Recently, the development of the techniques to return sewage sludge to forests and farm lands has been actively made, but it is necessary to assure its hygienic condition lest the sludge is contaminated by pathogenic bacteria. The research to treat sewage sludge by irradiation and utilize it as fertilizer or soil-improving material has been carried out from early on in Europe and America. The effects of the irradiation of sludge are sterilization, to kill parasites and their eggs, the inactivation of weed seeds and the improvement of dehydration. In Japan, agriculture is carried out in the vicinity of cities, therefore it is not realistic to use irradiated sludge for farm lands as it is. The composting treatment of sludge by aerobic fermentation is noticed to eliminate the harms when the sludge is returned to forests and farm lands. It is desirable to treat sludge as quickly as possible from the standpoint of sewage treatment, accordingly, the speed of composting is a problem. The isothermal fermentation experiment on irradiated sludge was carried out using a small-scale fermentation tank and strictly controlling fermentation conditions, and the effects of various factors on the fermentation speed were studied. The experimental setup and method are described. The speed of composting reached the maximum at 50 deg C and at neutral or weak alkaline pH. The speed increased with the increase of irradiation dose up to 30 Mrad. (Kako, I.)

  3. Plasmodium falciparum: attenuation by irradiation

    Waki, S.; Yonome, I.; Suzuki, M.

    1983-12-01

    The effect of irradiation on the in vitro growth of Plasmodium falciparum was investigated. The cultured malarial parasites at selected stages of development were exposed to gamma rays and the sensitivity of each stage was determined. The stages most sensitive to irradiation were the ring forms and the early trophozoites; late trophozoites were relatively insensitive. The greatest resistance was shown when parasites were irradiated at a time of transition from the late trophozoite and schizont stages to young ring forms. The characteristics of radiosensitive variation in the parasite cycle resembled that of mammalian cells. Growth curves of parasites exposed to doses of irradiation upto 150 gray had the same slope as nonirradiated controls but parasites which were exposed to 200 gray exhibited a growth curve which was less steep than that for parasites in other groups. Less than 10 organisms survived from the 10(6) parasites exposed to this high dose of irradiation; the possibility exists of obtaining radiation-attenuated P. falciparum.

  4. Food irradiation: Gamma processing facilities

    Kunstadt, P. [MDS Nordion International, 447 March Road. Kanata, Ontario, K2K148 (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The number of products being radiation processed is constantly increasing and today include such diverse items as medical disposable, fruits and vegetables, bulk spices, meats, sea foods and waste effluents. Not only do the products differ but also many products, even those within the same groupings, require different minimum and maximum radiation doses. These variations create many different requirements in the irradiator design. The design of Cobalt-60 radiation processing facilities is well established for a number of commercial applications. Installations in over 40 countries, with some in operation since the early 1960s, are testimony to the fact that irradiator design, manufacture, installation and operation is a well established technology. However, in order to design gamma irradiators for the preservation of foods one must recognize those parameters typical to the food irradiation process as well as those systems and methods already well established in the food industry. This paper discusses the basic design concepts for gamma food irradiators. They are most efficient when designed to handle a limited product density range at an established dose. Safety of Cobalt-60 transport, safe facility operation principles and the effect of various processing parameters on economics, will also be discussed. (Author)

  5. Elective ilioingunial lymph node irradiation

    Henderson, R.H.; Parsons, J.T.; Morgan, L.; Million, R.R.

    1984-06-01

    Most radiologists accept that modest doses of irradiation (4500-5000 rad/4 1/2-5 weeks) can control subclinical regional lymph node metastases from squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck and adenocarcinomas of the breast. There have been few reports concerning elective irradiation of the ilioinguinal region. Between October 1964 and March 1980, 91 patients whose primary cancers placed the ilioinguinal lymph nodes at risk received elective irradiation at the University of Florida. Included are patients with cancers of the vulva, penis, urethra, anus and lower anal canal, and cervix or vaginal cancers that involved the distal one-third of the vagina. In 81 patients, both inguinal areas were clinically negative; in 10 patients, one inguinal area was positive and the other negative by clinical examination. The single significant complication was a bilateral femoral neck fracture. The inguinal areas of four patients developed mild to moderate fibrosis. One patient with moderate fibrosis had bilateral mild leg edema that was questionably related to irradiation. Complications were dose-related. The advantages and dis-advantages of elective ilioinguinal node irradiation versus elective inguinal lymph node dissection or no elective treatment are discussed.

  6. Neutron irradiation of seeds 2

    The irradiation of seeds with the fast neutron of research reactors has been hampered by difficulties in accurately measuring dose and in obtaining repeatable and comparable results. Co-ordinated research under an international program organized by the FAO and IAEA has already resulted in significant improvements in methods of exposing seeds in research reactors and in obtaining accurate dosimetry. This has been accomplished by the development of a standard reactor facility for the neutron irradiation of seeds and standard methods for determining fast-neutron dose and the biological response after irradiation. In this program various divisions of the IAEA and the Joint FAO/IAEA Division co-operate with a number of research institutes and reactor centres throughout the world. Results of the preliminary experiments were reported in Technical Reports Series No. 76, ''Neutron Irradiation of Seeds''. This volume contains the proceedings of a meeting of co-operators in the FAO/IAEA Neutron Seed Irradiation Program and other active scientists in this field. The meeting was held in Vienna from 11 to 15 December 1967. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Food irradiation: Public opinion surveys

    The Canadian government are discussing the legislation, regulations and practical protocol necessary for the commercialization of food irradiation. Food industry marketing, public relations and media expertise will be needed to successfully introduce this new processing choice to retailers and consumers. Consumer research to date including consumer opinion studies and market trials conducted in the Netherlands, United States, South Africa and Canada will be explored for signposts to successful approaches to the introduction of irradiated foods to retailers and consumers. Research has indicated that the terms used to describe irradiation and information designed to reduce consumer fears will be important marketing tools. Marketers will be challenged to promote old foods, which look the same to consumers, in a new light. Simple like or dislike or intention to buy surveys will not be effective tools. Consumer fears must be identified and effectively handled to support a receptive climate for irradiated food products. A cooperative government, industry, health professional, consumer association and retailer effort will be necessary for the successful introduction of irradiated foods into the marketplace. Grocery Products Manufacturers of Canada is a national trade association of more than 150 major companies engaged in the manufacture of food, non-alcoholic beverages and array of other national-brand consumer items sold through retail outlets

  8. Stem cell migration after irradiation

    The survival rate of irradiated rodents could be significantly improved by shielding only the small parts of hemopoietic tissues during the course of irradiation. The populations of circulating stem cells in adult organisms are considered to be of some importance for the homeostasis between the many sites of blood cell formation and for the necessary flexibility of hemopoietic response in the face of fluctuating demands. Pluripotent stem cells are migrating through peripheral blood as has been shown for several mammalian species. Under steady state conditions, the exchange of stem cells between the different sites of blood cell formation appears to be restricted. Their presence in blood and the fact that they are in balance with the extravascular stem cell pool may well be of significance for the surveilance of the integrity of local stem cell populations. Any decrease of stem cell population in blood below a critical size results in the rapid immigration of circulating stem cells in order to restore local stem cell pool size. Blood stem cells are involved in the regeneration after whole-body irradiation if the stem cell population in bone marrows is reduced to less than 10% of the normal state. In the animals subjected to partial-body irradiation, the circulating stem cells appear to be the only source for the repopulation of the heavily irradiated, aplastic sites of hemopoietic organs. (Yamashita, S.)

  9. Food irradiation: Gamma processing facilities

    The number of products being radiation processed is constantly increasing and today include such diverse items as medical disposable, fruits and vegetables, bulk spices, meats, sea foods and waste effluents. Not only do the products differ but also many products, even those within the same groupings, require different minimum and maximum radiation doses. These variations create many different requirements in the irradiator design. The design of Cobalt-60 radiation processing facilities is well established for a number of commercial applications. Installations in over 40 countries, with some in operation since the early 1960s, are testimony to the fact that irradiator design, manufacture, installation and operation is a well established technology. However, in order to design gamma irradiators for the preservation of foods one must recognize those parameters typical to the food irradiation process as well as those systems and methods already well established in the food industry. This paper discusses the basic design concepts for gamma food irradiators. They are most efficient when designed to handle a limited product density range at an established dose. Safety of Cobalt-60 transport, safe facility operation principles and the effect of various processing parameters on economics, will also be discussed. (Author)

  10. Nutritional aspects of food irradiation

    Murray, T.K.

    1981-08-01

    From the nutritional point of view the irradiation of fruits and vegetables presents few problems. It should be noted that irradiation-induced changes in the ..beta..-carotene content of papaya (not available to the Joint Expert Committee in 1976) have been demonstrated to be unimportant. The Joint Expert Committee also noted the need for more data on thiamine loss. These have been forthcoming and indicate that control of insects in rice is possible without serious loss of the vitamin. Experiments with other cereal crops were also positive in this regard. The most important evidence on the nutritional quality of irradiated beef and poultry was the demonstration that they contained no anti-thiamine properties. A point not to be overlooked is the rather serious loss of thiamine when mackerel is irradiated at doses exceeding 3 kGy. Recent evidence indicates that thiamine loss could be reduced by using a high dose rate application process. Though spices contribute little directly to the nutritional quality of the food supply they play an important indirect role. It is thus encouraging that they can be sterilized by irradiation without loss of aroma and taste and without significant loss of ..beta..-carotenes. Of future importance are the observations on single cell protein and protein-fat-carbohydrate mixtures. The reduction of net protein utilization in protein-fat mixtures may be the result of physical interaction of the components.

  11. Thyroid tumors after irradiation; Tumeurs de la thyroide apres irradiation

    Schlumberger, M. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    1995-12-31

    Epidemiological studies have shown an increased incidence of thyroid tumors after external irradiation during childhood. These studies have shown a long latency and have pointed out risk factors, related either to the subject (young age, female sex) or to the radiation (dose, fractionation, protection). Irradiation by Iodine 131 in adulthood does not seen to increase the risk of thyroid tumor but in childhood data are too scarce to allow any conclusion. Similarly, the risks following low radiation doses and/or protected radiation exposure are still matter of debate. (author). 41 refs., 5 tabs., 1 fig.

  12. Currently developing opportunities in food irradiation and modern irradiation facilities

    Wanke, R. [Director Business Development. SteriGenics International Inc. 17901 East Warren Avenue No. 4, Detroit, Michigan 48224-1333 (United States)

    1997-12-31

    I. Factor currently influencing advancing opportunities for food irradiation include: heightened incidence and awareness of food borne illnesses and causes. Concerns about ensuring food safety in international as well as domestic trade. Regulatory actions regarding commonly used fumigants/pesticides e.g. Me Br. II. Modern irradiator design: the SteriGenics {sup M}ini Cell{sup .} A new design for new opportunities. Faster installation of facility. Operationally and space efficient. Provides local {sup o}nsite control{sup .} Red meat: a currently developing opportunity. (Author)

  13. Materials irradiation research in neutron science

    Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    Materials irradiation researches are planned in Neutron Science Research Program. A materials irradiation facility has been conceived as one of facilities in the concept of Neutron Science Research Center at JAERI. The neutron irradiation field of the facility is characterized by high flux of spallation neutrons with very wide energy range up to several hundred MeV, good accessibility to the irradiation field, good controllability of irradiation conditions, etc. Extensive use of such a materials irradiation facility is expected for fundamental materials irradiation researches and R and D of nuclear energy systems such as accelerator-driven incineration plant for long-lifetime nuclear waste. In this paper, outline concept of the materials irradiation facility, characteristics of the irradiation field, preliminary technical evaluation of target to generate spallation neutrons, and materials researches expected for Neutron Science Research program are described. (author)

  14. Irradiation for conjunctival granulocytic sarcoma

    Fleckenstein, K.; Geinitz, H.; Grosu, A.; Molls, M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Goetze, K. [Dept. of Hematology and Oncology, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Werner, M. [Dept. of Pathology, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany)

    2003-03-01

    Case History and Findings: A 73-year-old woman with a history of myeloproliferative syndrome (MPS) presented with bilateral chemosis, redness and burning of the eyes. The ocular motility was severely impaired. Ophthalmological examination revealed markedly distended conjunctivas on both sides. Biopsy disclosed conjunctival granulocytic sarcoma as an initial symptom of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Diagnosis was confirmed by peripheral blood smear and bone marrow aspiration. Treatment and Outcome: The orbital tumor disappeared completely after local external beam irradiation with a total dose of 30 Gy and no further orbital recurrence occurred. With chemotherapy following irradiation transient hematological remission was achieved. 5 months after diagnosis the patient died of respiratory failure following atypical pneumonia as a consequence of her underlying disorder. Conclusion: Detection of orbital granulocytic sarcoma, even in the absence of typical leukemic symptoms is of practical importance, because treatment with irradiation can lead to stabilization or improvement in the patient's vision. (orig.)

  15. Irradiation for conjunctival granulocytic sarcoma

    Case History and Findings: A 73-year-old woman with a history of myeloproliferative syndrome (MPS) presented with bilateral chemosis, redness and burning of the eyes. The ocular motility was severely impaired. Ophthalmological examination revealed markedly distended conjunctivas on both sides. Biopsy disclosed conjunctival granulocytic sarcoma as an initial symptom of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Diagnosis was confirmed by peripheral blood smear and bone marrow aspiration. Treatment and Outcome: The orbital tumor disappeared completely after local external beam irradiation with a total dose of 30 Gy and no further orbital recurrence occurred. With chemotherapy following irradiation transient hematological remission was achieved. 5 months after diagnosis the patient died of respiratory failure following atypical pneumonia as a consequence of her underlying disorder. Conclusion: Detection of orbital granulocytic sarcoma, even in the absence of typical leukemic symptoms is of practical importance, because treatment with irradiation can lead to stabilization or improvement in the patient's vision. (orig.)

  16. Detection of irradiated frozen foods

    We tried to detect whether foods were irradiated or not by the o-tyrosine method and the mtDNA method. The o-tyrosine method was applied to four kinds of meat (beef, pork, chicken and tuna). The results showed the linear relation between amount of o-tyrosine and dose (0-10 kGy). However, small amount of o-tyrosine were produced in some cases which application of the method summed to be very difficult because small difference between irradiated foods and untreated foods. Possibility of mtDNA method was investigated. Work and time for separation of mitochondria and extraction of DNA were reduced by a protease-solid phase extraction method. By PCR method, accurate mtDNA could be detected from very small amount of DNA. The irradiation effect is able to detect from 50 Gy. (S.Y.)

  17. The identification of irradiated onions

    The aim of this study was to work out a suitable chemical technique for the irradiated onions identification and for the determination of the gamma radiation dose applied. As the average annual 0.30 x 10-4%, it is therefore possible to identify irradiated onions from their higher deoxysaccharide content (0.66 x 10-4%). The deoxysaccharide content (c) in the irradiated onions depends linearly on the applied dose (D) in the range of 0 to 250 Gy according to the equation: D[Gy] = 1.7 x 106 xc[%] - 50. The accuracy of this equation is ± 10%. The detected amount of deoxysaccharides was found to be proportional to the sum of the contents of glucose, saccharose and raffinose. (author)

  18. Mobile gamma-irradiation robot

    A source container with 98 TBq of 137Cs and shielding made from depleted uranium has the total weight of 264 kg, height of 0.370 and diameter 0.272 m is described. The container is joined to accessories allowing movement of the radiation beam. The dose rate at a distance of 0.4 m in the beam axis is 50 Gy/h. Various technical means are available for manipulation and transport. The irradiation process proceeds according to a precalculated program. Safety measures have been taken to secure the possible application of the irradiation plant for the radiopreservation of cultural objects. The licence from health physics authorities has been obtained. The first irradiation process performed is described. (author)

  19. The multifunction neutron irradiator (MNI)

    Yongmao Zhou; Shenzhi Li

    1994-12-31

    The Multifunction Neutron Irradiator (MNI) under design is a small-type neutron source reactor, for studying the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for human brain glioblastoma and other uses in neutron technology such as Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA), short-lived radioistope production, and some fundamental researches. The reactor core is designed to have passive safety and the process control of the reactor operations is fully computerized. There are two operational modes: The routine operation mode with reactor power 20{approximately}30 kW and flux 1 X 10{sup 12} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} {center_dot} {sup -1} and the enhanced power operation mode for medical irradiation. The irradiator can be located in a medical center, research institute or university.

  20. Nuclear fuel irradiation in ACPR

    Ciocanescu, M.; Negut, G.; Costescu, C.; Georgescu, D.; Pop, I. (Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors, Pitesti (Romania))

    1984-07-01

    For our fuel program, experiments were proposed on CANDU fuel in ACPR in pulsing regimes. These experiments were intended to determine the fuel behavior during large deposition of heat, fuel-clad interaction mechanisms, and failure thresholds. The fuel is 159 mm long, 6.5% enriched UO{sub 2}. The capsule used for irradiation is an atmospheric capsule assembled in the central dry tube. The capsule is 1 m long, 12 cm i.d., and is locked on the lead ballast through a locking device. The fuel is instrumented with three thermocouples (for clad temperature) and a fission gas transducer. The coolant pressure and temperature are also measured. During irradiation, the data are recorded by a high-speed magnetic tape recorder. For the first campaign, three fuel elements will be irradiated. (orig.)

  1. Endodontics and the irradiated patient

    With increasingly larger numbers of irradiated patients in our population, it seems likely that all dentists will eventually be called upon to manage the difficult problems that these patients present. Of utmost concern should be the patient's home care program and the avoidance of osteroradionecrosis. Endodontics and periodontics are the primary areas for preventing or eliminating the infection that threatens osteoradionecrosis. Endodontic treatment must be accomplished with the utmost care and maximum regard for the fragility of the periapical tissues. Pulpally involved teeth should never be left open in an irradiated patient, and extreme care must be taken with the between-visits seal. If one is called upon for preradiation evaluation, routine removal of all molar as well as other compromised teeth should be considered. Attention should be directed to the literature for further advances in the management of irradiated patients

  2. Ionic conductivity in irradiated KCL

    The ionic conductivity of X and gamma irradiated KCL single crystals has been studied between room temperature and 600 degree centigree. the radiation induced damage resulting in a decrease of the conductivity heals by thermal annealing in two steps which are at about 350 and 550 degree centigree respectively. It has been found that the radiation induced colour centres are not involved in the observed decrease of the ionic conductivity. However. It has been observed that the effects of quenching and plastic deformation on the conductivity of the samples are very similar to the effect induced by irradiation. It is suggested that, samples radiation induced dislocation loops might cause the ionic conductivity decrease observed in irradiated samples. (Author)

  3. Endodontics and the irradiated patient

    Cox, F.L.

    1976-11-01

    With increasingly larger numbers of irradiated patients in our population, it seems likely that all dentists will eventually be called upon to manage the difficult problems that these patients present. Of utmost concern should be the patient's home care program and the avoidance of osteroradionecrosis. Endodontics and periodontics are the primary areas for preventing or eliminating the infection that threatens osteoradionecrosis. Endodontic treatment must be accomplished with the utmost care and maximum regard for the fragility of the periapical tissues. Pulpally involved teeth should never be left open in an irradiated patient, and extreme care must be taken with the between-visits seal. If one is called upon for preradiation evaluation, routine removal of all molar as well as other compromised teeth should be considered. Attention should be directed to the literature for further advances in the management of irradiated patients.

  4. Neutron irradiation of beryllium pebbles

    Gelles, D.S.; Ermi, R.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Tsai, H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Seven subcapsules from the FFTF/MOTA 2B irradiation experiment containing 97 or 100% dense sintered beryllium cylindrical specimens in depleted lithium have been opened and the specimens retrieved for postirradiation examination. Irradiation conditions included 370 C to 1.6 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, 425 C to 4.8 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, and 550 C to 5.0 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}. TEM specimens contained in these capsules were also retrieved, but many were broken. Density measurements of the cylindrical specimens showed as much as 1.59% swelling following irradiation at 500 C in 100% dense beryllium. Beryllium at 97% density generally gave slightly lower swelling values.

  5. Food irradiation development in Africa

    The paper assesses prospects for using irradiation technology in the preservation of staple foods and in the treatment of agricultural commodities in the African region. This assessment is made in the light of the magnitude of the losses that occur, and the priority attributed by African States to ensuring that foods currently produced are better conserved to reach their consumers in edible condition with minimum loss. Estimates are presented of the cost of food losses and for the consequent food imports necessary to satisfy regional requirements. The principal causes of food loss include bacteria and insect attack, sprouting, maturation and senescence decay. A review of the literature is made which indicates that there is already some limited experience in food irradiation processing in the region. This review and other relevant studies suggest that the major causes of loss in staple foods and deterioration in other agricultural commodities can be controlled or delayed by the application of irradiation doses below the maximum levels permitted by the Codex Alimentarius. In the light of these observations and considering the high estimated cost of food losses and food imports in the region, the paper notes that a systematic assessment of the cost-benefit potential of irradiation processing in the region would be highly desirable. It is advocated that this assessment should determine the feasibility of including irradiation processing as part of the overall technological package required for the preservation of a wide range of foods and cash crops produced in the region. Attention is also drawn to a number of issues to be resolved before commercial-scale operations can be contemplated. These relate to lack of manpower and experience, financial resources and appropriate infrastructure, which may impede a rapid introduction of the technology. In conclusion, details are presented of a co-operative project which is designed to improve national capacities in food

  6. Demonstration of irradiation in onions

    Two onion varietics (Vsetana and Hiberna) were used for the experiments. Radiation treatment was carried out not later than 25 days after harvesting with a 80 Gy dose of gamma radiation. Following treatment the onions were stored at temperatures between 9 and 21.5 degC and a relative humidity of 30 to 76%. Samples were taken at about one month intervals of irradiated and non-irradiated onions of both varieties and the content of deoxysaccharides determined. The concentration in non-irradiated onions was 0.27x10-4% in the Vsetana variety and 0.33x10-4% in the Hiberna variety. In the radiation treated samples the concentrations were higher: 0.65x10-4% in the Vsetana variety and 0.68x10-4% in the Hiberna variety. Samples of the Vsetana variety were further irradiated with doses of 0, 80, 150, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 Gy of gamma radiation and the content of deoxysaccharides determined. It was found that the concentration of deoxysaccharides is in linear dependence on the applied dose, this within the range of 0 to 250 Gy. In this dose range it is possible to determine the absorbed dose from the content of deoxysaccharides. Model solutions were prepared according to the chemical composition of the onions (tabulated). The solutions were irradiated with a dose of 1000 Gy under the same conditions as the onions. The deoxysaccharide concentration in irradiated model solutions was proportional to the concentration of those saccharides which in the solutions were contained in the highest concentration (glucose, saccharose, raffinose). All obtained results are summed up in tables and discussed in great detail. (E.S.) 4 tabs., 1 fig., 29 refs

  7. Regulatory aspects of food irradiation

    The role of the Nuclear Energy Board in relation to radiation safety in Ireland is described. The Board has the duty to control by licence all activities involving ionizing radiation, as well as providing advice and information to the Government on all aspects of radiation safety. The licensing procedures used by the Board, including site approval, construction, commissioning, source loading and commercial operation, in the licensing of large irradiation facilities were described, and an outline of the proposed new legislation which may become necessary if and when the irradiation of food for commercial purposes begins in Ireland is given

  8. Irradiation device for electronic circuits

    The device includes a radiation-tight vessel, a mobile carriage for a radioactive source, a vertically mobile plate carrying a circuit to be tested and an irradiation detector. It includes also a cover related to the vacuum vessel which prevents the source from emitting for a certain source position. It includes also means which prevents irradiation when the vessel is not assembled and which prevents the dismantling when the source is radiating. It includes also a device allowing to disconnect the translation displacement controls of the circuit and of the radiation detector when the source is radiating

  9. Trade promotion of irradiated food

    The meeting carried out by the Group was attended by invited specialists on legislation, marketing, consumer attitudes and industry interested in the application of food irradiation. The major objectives of the meeting were to identify barriers and constraints to trade in irradiated food and to recommend actions to be carried out by the Group to promote trade in such foods. The report of the meeting and selected 9 background papers used at the meeting are presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  10. Irradiated fuel transport emergency arrangements

    For over 30 years spent nuclear fuel has been transported by road and rail. In that time, there has never been an accident involving the release of radioactivity. Notwithstanding this excellent record it is both necessary and desirable to have contingency plans for any emergency situation. The Irradiated Fuel Transport Flask Emergency Plan for England and Wales (IFTFEP) has been developed and administered by Nuclear Electric plc to set out the detailed response by the nuclear industry to a mishap involving an irradiated fuel flask in transit. (author)

  11. Irradiation and annealing sensitivity studies

    This report describes an evaluation of foreign steel production made to US guidelines for improved radiation resistance (new vessel forms) and investigations on radiation sensitivity and post-irradiation annealing for embrittlement relief (vessels produced 1971 or earlier). In the study of foreign steels, investigations coordinated by the IAEA and involving steels produced by West Germany, France, and Japan have confirmed the adequacy of the US-developed specifications. Progress of the Irradiation-Anneal-Reirradiation investigations are described, noting the synergism between copper impurities and nickel alloying in radiation sensitivity and annealing response. The PVI Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program, which as primary application to the more radiation sensitive vessels, is also discussed

  12. Irradiated icecreams for immunosuppressed patients

    Vanilla, raspberry, peach and milk jam icecreams were gamma irradiated with 3, 6 and 9 kGy doses in order to achieve microbial decontamination. Microbiological, sensory and some chemical analysis (acidity, peroxides, ultraviolet and visible absorption, thin-layer chromatography and sugar determination) were performed. Water-based icecreams (raspberry and peach) were more resistant to gamma radiation than cream-based ones (vanilla and milk jam). Gamma irradiation with 3 kGy reduced remarkably the microbial load of these icecreams without impairing the quality of the icecreams

  13. Significance of irradiation of blood

    Many reports of fatal GVHD occurring in non-immunocompromised patients after blood transfusion have been published in Japan. One explantation is that transfused lymphocytes were simulated and attack the recipient organs recognized as HLA incompatible. That is so called 'one-way matching'. To reduce the risk of post-transfusion GVHD, one of the most convenient methods is to irradiate the donated blood at an appropriate dose for inactivation of lymphocytes. Because no one knows about the late effect of irradiated blood, it is necessary to make the prospective safety control. (author)

  14. Light ion irradiation creep apparatus

    An experimental technique developed to measure the irradiation creep of metallic specimens subjected to light ion bombardment is described. The experimental apparatus has the capability to remotely set and control ion flux, stress and temperature. Specimen strain is measured continuously with a noncontracting laser extensometer developed for this application. A typical result obtained for the 17 MeV deuteron irradiation of a 0.15 mm (0.006 in.) thick nickel specimen is presented with an analysis of the source and magnitude of both systematic and random errors. (Auth.)

  15. Recent developments in food irradiation

    Nowadays there is growing interest by the food industry, government and consumers in the use of food irradiatin to kill harmful insects, prevent diseases and keep food fresher longer. This interest has been stimulated by growing public concern over chemicals used in foods. While food irradiation technologies have been around for more than 50 years, only recently have they become cost effective and gained prominent attention as potentially safer ways of protecting food products and public health. This paper looks at recent developments in food irradiation processing and discusses the issues that lie ahead. (author)

  16. Irradiation of onions with the commercial potato irradiator

    Three varieties of onion harvested in Hokkaido were irradiated with the Shohoro Potato Irradiator on 29th September, 1981. One ton of each of the varieties, Kitamiki (KI), Ohohtsuku (OH) and Furanui (FU), was used in this investigation. Onions had longer dormancy period in the order of FU>OH>KI. Higher sprouting percentage was obtained in the unirradiated onions, while they were stored at a higher temperature or stored for a longer period. Generally, unirradiated onions sprouted before they were deteriorated. Thus the number of deteriorated bulbs in the unirradiated onions was superficially less than that in the irradiated ones. When the onions which were taken from warehouses on 26th March, 1982 were stored at room temperature, the percentage of wholesome bulbs was higher in KI and OH than FU. Small buds in some of the irradiated onions turned dark after a long storage time. Quantitative estimation of this phenomena is left to be resolved. There was little relationship between the weight loss and the number of wholesome onions. (author)

  17. Agricultural yields of irradiated sewage sludge

    Lettuce, radish and ryegrass have been used to study the nitrogen fertilization of soil by sewage sludge. The results show that the irradiated sludge improve by 15 - 30 % the production yield, compared to the non-irradiated sludge. (author)

  18. Detection methods for irradiated mites and insects

    Results of the study on the following tests for separation of irradiated pests from untreated ones are reported: (a) test for identification of irradiated mites (Acaridae) based on lack of fecundity of treated females; (b) test for identification of irradiated beetles based on their locomotor activity; (c) test for identification of irradiated pests based on electron spin resonance (ESR) signal derived from treated insects; (d) test for identification of irradiated pests based on changes in the midgut induced by gamma radiation; and (e) test for identification of irradiated pests based on the alterations in total proteins of treated adults. Of these detection methods, only the test based on the pathological changes induced by irradiation in the insect midgut may identify consistently either irradiated larvae or adults. This test is simple and convenient when a rapid processing technique for dehydrating and embedding the midgut is used. (author)

  19. Are low doses of irradiation so dangerous

    Effect of low irradiation doses on the vegetable and animal kingdoms of the Earth inluding mammals and peoples is considered. Comprehensive factual data testifying that low irradiation doses can be useful under certain conditions are given in the generalized form

  20. Safety and quality of irradiated foods

    Irradiated foods can be considered safe concerning pathogenic bacteria decontamination, insect and parasite inactivation, absence of adverse effects to human health. Qualitatively, irradiated foods do not show significant modifications of composition, macro- and micronutrients and of sensory characteristics

  1. Status of irradiation technology development in JMTR

    Irradiation Engineering Section of the Neutron Irradiation and Testing Reactor Center was organized to development the new irradiation technology for the application at JMTR re-operation. The new irradiation engineering building was remodeled from the old RI development building, and was started to use from the end of September, 2008. Advanced in-situ instrumentation technology (high temperature multi-paired thermocouple, ceramic sensor, application of optical measurement), 99Mo production technology by new Mo solution irradiation method, recycling technology on used beryllium reflector, and so on are planned as the development of new irradiation technologies. The development will be also important for the education and training programs through the development of young generation in not only Japan but also Asian counties. In this report, as the status of the development the new irradiation technology, new irradiation engineering building, high temperature multi-paired thermocouple, experiences of optical measurement, recycling technology on used beryllium reflector are introduced. (author)

  2. Food Irradiation Newsletter. V. 14, no. 2

    This issue reports specific training activities on Food Irradiation Process Control School, both for technical supervisors of irradiation facilities and food control officials/inspectors, and summary reports of Workshops on dosimetry techniques for food irradiation and on techno-economic feasibility of food irradiation for Latin American countries are included. After 12 years of operation, the International Facility for Food Irradiation Technology (IFFIT) will cease to function after 31 December 1990. This issue reports the last inter-regional training course organized by IFFIT, and also features reports on food irradiation in Asia. Active developments in the field in several Asian countries may be found in the reports of the Workshop on the Commercialization of Food Irradiation, Shanghai, and the Research Co-ordination Meeting on the Asian Regional Co-operative Project on Food Irradiation (with emphasis on acceptance and process control), Bombay. Status reports of programmes in these countries are also included. Refs and tabs

  3. ICRP N 84: Pregnancy and medical irradiation

    This book is the translation into Spanish of the ICRP n 84: pregnancy and medical irradiation. The diagnosis of pregnancy, irradiation effect in uterus, radiodiagnosis, radiation exposure and recommendations are exposure

  4. Food irradiation with ionizing radiation

    Application possibilities are discussed of ionizing radiation in inhibiting plant germination, in radiopasteurization and radiosterilization of food. Also methods of combining radiation with thermal food sterilization are discussed. The problems of radiation doses and of hygienic purity of irradiated foodstuffs are dealt with. (B.S.)

  5. ESR detection of irradiated seashells

    Raffi, J. [Laboratoire de Recherche sur la Qualite des Aliments, Faculte de Saint-Jerome, Marseille (France); Hasbany, C. [Laboratoire de Recherche sur la Qualite des Aliments, Faculte de Saint-Jerome, Marseille (France)]|[Laboratoire de Chimie des Produits Naturels, Faculte de Saint-Jerome, Marseille (France); Lesgards, G. [Laboratoire de Chimie des Produits Naturels, Faculte de Saint-Jerome, Marseille (France); Ochin, D. [Institut Agricol et Alimentaire de Lille (France). Lab. de Microbiologie et d`Hygiene Alimentaire

    1996-11-01

    Among the protocols for identification of irradiated foodstuffs submitted to the European Committee of Standardization, two using ESR (food containing bone or cellulose) were finally accepted as official `draft European standards` in Berlin on 9-10 June 1994. We present here some new results for oyster and mussel shells, and an ESR draft protocol is proposed. (author).

  6. Operation of the irradiation facilities

    In 1982, 48 companies utilized the 100kCi Co-60 irradiation facility for sterization of their medical products and food products such as gauze sponges, absorbent cotton, ginseng powder and etc. A total of 12,411 cartons of 44 different items of medical products and foods were irradiated for radiosterilization and total operation time was 5,582.3 hours. Source activity of radiosterilization facility was strengthened by supplementing 52,766 Ci Co-60 source. Radiation dosimetry for stationary and dynamic condition in the irradiation cell was done and dose distribution in irradited box was measured after supplement of Co-60 source. Ceric sulfate dosimeter system was used for routine dosimetry in order to guarentee the radiation dose and radiation dosimetry was performed 568 times. In order to develop suitable plastic material for radiosterilization, experiments on the protective effect of hydrocarbon oil on the oxidative degradation of polypropylene were performed. The pre-sterilization counting of contaminated microorganism was carried out on the 6 medical product and the sterility of the irradiated medical product was confirmed accoring to the K.P. IV and U.S.P. XX. (Author)

  7. Manual of food irradiation dosimetry

    Following items are discussed: Fundamentals of dosimetry; description of irradiators; dose distribution in the product and commissioning the process; plant operation and process control; detailed instructions on using various dose-meter systems; references; glossary of some basic terms and concepts

  8. Solar Spectral Irradiance and Climate

    Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.; Cahalan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrally resolved solar irradiance is recognized as being increasingly important to improving our understanding of the manner in which the Sun influences climate. There is strong empirical evidence linking total solar irradiance to surface temperature trends - even though the Sun has likely made only a small contribution to the last half-century's global temperature anomaly - but the amplitudes cannot be explained by direct solar heating alone. The wavelength and height dependence of solar radiation deposition, for example, ozone absorption in the stratosphere, absorption in the ocean mixed layer, and water vapor absorption in the lower troposphere, contribute to the "top-down" and "bottom-up" mechanisms that have been proposed as possible amplifiers of the solar signal. New observations and models of solar spectral irradiance are needed to study these processes and to quantify their impacts on climate. Some of the most recent observations of solar spectral variability from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared have revealed some unexpected behavior that was not anticipated prior to their measurement, based on an understanding from model reconstructions. The atmospheric response to the observed spectral variability, as quantified in climate model simulations, have revealed similarly surprising and in some cases, conflicting results. This talk will provide an overview on the state of our understanding of the spectrally resolved solar irradiance, its variability over many time scales, potential climate impacts, and finally, a discussion on what is required for improving our understanding of Sun-climate connections, including a look forward to future observations.

  9. Food irradiation: a global scenario

    Many of the foods that will be consumed in the 21st century have not yet been invented. New methods of production need new methods of conservation. Food irradiation by gamma radiation or electron beam is a new technology. The intensive production methods of today lead to several potential dangers. For example - if just one chicken is diseased this bird can contaminate all of one days' production at the slaughter house - on average 300,000 birds per day. One has to have conservation methods that can decontaminate the poultry meat. Irradiation is a method that achieves this. The consumer is becoming more and more sophisticated and demanding with regard to the quality of food products, rejecting chemical additives for example, irradiation is a physical method of conservation, this means that there is no residue left in the product, and that there are no changes in the physical characteristics of the food. This paper examines the use of irradiation technology as a food conservation method in today's industry. (author). 4 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Proton irradiation of bone metastases

    A proton beam with the energy of 100-130 MeV, the range up 6-20 Gy/min and diameter up to 6 cm was used for radio- therapy of mammary gland cancer metastases to the bones adjoining the vital organs or normal tissues with low tolerance (the skull, sternum, ribs, jaw, etc.). Medium fractionation regimens were used for the single doses of 4-10 Gy. The number of fractions was from 1 to 7, the integral dose 17-28 Gy that corresponded to 35-46 Gy of classic fractionation designed by the TDF factor. The first experience of the irradiation of bone metastases has shown that general and local reactions to proton irradiation correspond to a dose delivered and irradiation regimen and do not differ from those in conventional radiation. A marked therapeutic effect was obtained in all the patients. The formation of bigger diameter proton beams and of a deeper range is required for the irradiation of large zones of bone metastases

  11. Ovarian irradiation in recurrent endometriosis

    We describe a case of a young woman with a history of an aplastic anaemia in which pelvic radiotherapy was used successfully in the management of a recurrent and inoperable endometriosis. The use of therapeutic pelvic or ovarian irradiation in endometriosis may be considered, when surgical and medical treatments have been exhausted and have failed. (authors)

  12. Cobalt 60 commercial irradiation facilities

    The advantage of using cobalt 60 for ionizing treatment is that it has excellent penetration. Gamma plants are also very efficient, in as much as there is very little mechanical or electrical equipment in a gamma irradiation facility. The average efficiency of a gamma plant is usually around 95% of all available processing time

  13. Irradiation enhancement of biomass conversion

    The vast supply of cellulosic agricultural residues and industrial by-products that is produced each year is a prospective resource of biomass suitable for conversion to useful products such as feedstock for the chemicals industry and feedstuffs for the livestock industry. Conversions of such biomass is poor at present, and utilization is inefficient, because of physio-chemical barriers to biological degradation and/or anti-quality components such as toxicants that restrict biological usages. Improvements in biodegradability of ligno-cellulosic materials have been accomplished by gamma-ray and electron-beam irradiation at intermediate dosage (approx. 50 Mrad; 0.5 MGy); but applications of the technology have been hampered by questionable interpretations of results. Recent research with organic wastes such as sewage sludge and straw suggests opportunity for important applications of irradiation technology in enhancement of biomass conversion. Data from experiments using irradiated straw as feed for ruminants are presented and discussed in relation to research on prospective usage of sewage products as feed for ruminants. Findings are discussed in regard to prospective applications in industrial fermentation processes. Possible usage of irradiation technology for destruction of toxicants in exotic plants is considered in regard to prospective new feedstuffs. (author)

  14. Secondary limb edemas following irradiation

    Tsyb, A.F.; Bardychev, M.S.; Guseva, L.I.

    1981-09-01

    The results of clinical examination and treatment of 96 patients with secondary limb edemas, developed at late periods after radiation therapy of malignant tumors are discussed. The genesis of edema is accounted both for direct radiation injury of lymphatics and blood vessels (veins) and fibrous changes of tissue in irradiated areas.

  15. Secondary limb edemas following irradiation

    The results of clinical examination and treatment of 96 patients with secondary limb edemas, developed at late periods after radiation therapy of malignant tumors are discussed. The genesis of edema is accounted both for direct radiation injury of lymphatics and blood vessels (veins) and fibrous changes of tissue in irradiated areas. (orig.)

  16. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15-19, 2015.

  17. Irradiation mucositis and oral flora

    This study, which is motivated by the substantial morbidity of local signs of mucositis and generalized symptoms that result from mucositis induced by therapeutic irradiation, has the following objectives: To investigate if it is possible to prevent irradiation mucositis via oral flora elimination, and, if it is true that flora plays a role in irradiation mucositis, what fraction of the oral flora may be involved; to evaluate oral Gram-negative bacillary carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate Gram-negative bacilli from the oral cavity; to evaluate oral yeast carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate yeasts stomatitis and the 'selectivity' of elimination of flora. Two methods are described for monitoring alterations of mucositis of the oral cavity and changes in oral flora. Chlorhexidine has been tested as the commonly used prophylaxis. The effect of chlorhexidine 0.1% rinses on oral flora and mucositis has been studied in a prospective placebo controlled double blind randomized programme. The results of the influence of saliva on the antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine and the results of selective elimination of oral flora in irradiated patients who have head and neck cancer are reported. Salivary inactivation of the topical antimicrobials used for selective elimination of oral flora has been studied and the results are reported. Finally, the objectives that have been achieved (or not) are delineated. The significance of the results of the study are discussed in terms of published information and further lines of research are suggested. (author). 559 refs.; 29 figs.; 20 tabs

  18. Progress in food irradiation: Italy

    The effect of irradiation on the nutritional properties of a number of foodstuffs including potatoes, onions, tomatoes, grapes, dried fruits, carrots, and animal feed is under investigation. The main components investigated are: reducing sugars, total sugars, saccharose, vitamins C and A, niacin, carotenes, free amino acids, total and soluble nitrogen. This research has been the subject of a collaborative work programm. (orig./AJ)

  19. Nutritional aspects of irradiated mangoes

    Mangoes, like most other fruits, constitute a small but very important part of human diet in tropical countries. Their carbohydrate content is a source of energy; however, their main importance is as a rich source of vitamins, particularly vitamins A and C. Increasing the shelf life of mangoes is desirable, since on ripening they become highly perishable and have a very short shelf life. Low-dose irradiation is considered to be a good method for extending their shelf life. This literature review examines the effect of radiation processing on the nutrients in mangoes. In general, irradiation has little effect on the main nutrients, vitamin C, carotenoids and carbohydrates. There is a significant loss of vitamin C only in a few varieties of mangoes, while in the others the vitamin C level is unaffected. The extension of shelf life also depends on the storage conditions, particularly temperature. While low-temperature storage followed by ripening at room temperature leads to high vitamin C levels, it reduces the carotenoid levels in some varieties. Thus, the storage and the ripening temperatures should be optimized for each variety to obtain the maximum benefit of irradiation. Long-term, multi-generation rat feeding studies to assess the wholesomeness of irradiated mangoes have shown no adverse effects

  20. Functional properties of irradiated starch

    Irradiation is an effective method capable of modifying the functional properties of starches. Its effect depends on the specific structural and molecular organization of starch granules from different botanical sources. In this study, we have studied the effect of gamma irradiation (3, 5, 10, 20, 35, 50 kGy) on the rheological properties of some varieties of starch (potato, cassava and wheat). First, we were interested in determining dry matter content; the results showed that the variation in dry matter compared to the control (native starch) is almost zero. So it does not depend on the dose of irradiation. Contrariwise, it differs from a botanical species to another. The viscometer has shown that these starches develop different behaviors during shearing. The native potato starch gave the highest viscosity followed by wheat and cassava which have almost similar viscosities. For all varieties, the viscosity of starch decreases dramatically with an increasing dose of irradiation. At high doses (35 and 50 kGy) the behavior of different starch is similar to that of a viscous pure liquid. The textural analysis via the back-extrusion test showed that increasing the dose of radiation causes a decrease in extrusion force and the energy spent of the different starch throughout the test. Indeed, the extrusion resistance decreases with increasing dose.

  1. Inhomogeneous microstructural growth by irradiation

    Krishan, K.; Singh, Bachu Narain; Leffers, Torben

    In the present paper we discuss the development of heterogeneous microstructure for uniform irradiation conditions. It is shown that microstructural inhomogeneities on a scale of 0.1 μm can develop purely from kinematic considerations because of the basic structure of the rate equations used to d...

  2. Food irradiation: a technology for the eighties

    After a brief review of the physical principles of the process of food irradiation and the biological and chemical effects of radiations, data concerning studies about the wholesomeness of irradiated food are presented. The most important fields of potential industrial applications are described. The technology of food irradiators, the economy, present status and future trends of food irradiation are analyzed, with emphasis on the French example

  3. Irradiation embrittlement and optimisation of annealing

    This conference is composed of 30 papers grouped in 6 sessions related to the following themes: neutron irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and weldments used in PWR, WWER and BWR nuclear plants; results from surveillance programmes (irradiation induced damage and annealing processes); studies on the influence of variations in irradiation conditions and mechanisms, and modelling; mitigation of irradiation effects, especially through thermal annealing; mechanical test procedures and specimen size effects

  4. Irradiation of poultry meat and its products

    Modern poultry production methods provide many opportunities for microbial contamination, and poultry meat is considered to have a high bacterial load. This document describes means by which poultry meat can be decontaminated, placing especial emphasis on the use of ionizing radiation. Separate chapters describe the irradiation process, methods for detecting whether the food has been irradiated, the wholesomeness of the irradiated products and the regulatory aspects of poultry irradiation. 441 refs, 35 figs, 16 tabs

  5. Irradiance Variations During This Solar Cycle Minimum

    Woods, Thomas N.

    2010-01-01

    The current cycle minimum appears to be deeper and broader than recent cycle minima, and this minimum appears similar to the minima in the early 1900s. With the best-ever solar irradiance measurements from several different satellite instruments, this minimum offers a unique opportunity to advance our understanding of secular (long-term) changes in the solar irradiance. Comparisons of the 2007-2009 irradiance results to the irradiance levels during the previous minimum in 1996 suggest that th...

  6. Irradiation study of industrial glucoamylase preparation

    The changes of properties for industrial glucoamylase preparation (IGP) irradiated by gamma-rays were studied. The experimental results showed that the preservation period because longer and the hygienic quality was improved when the IGP was irradiated by gamma-rays with dose under 2 kGy. The irradiation does not have obvious poor effects on properties of IGP. Therefore the irradiated IGP could be used normally

  7. Effect of irradiation on sweet corn preservation

    60Co γ-ray was used to irradiate newly-harvested sweet corn and the results showed that the effects of irradiation on soluble solids, sucrose, starch and total sugar were not significant. The viscosity of starch decreased with the increasing of irradiation dose. The preservation duration of irradiated sweet corn was 7 days longer than that of CK, and the sweet, smell, taste of sweet corn had no abnormal change

  8. Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation Test Results

    Daw, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Palmer, Joe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Keller, Paul [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Montgomery, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chien, Hual-Te [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kohse, Gordon [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Tittmann, Bernhard [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Reinhardt, Brian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rempe, Joy [Rempe and Associates, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high-accuracy and -resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other ongoing efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an ATR NSUF project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2. The goal of this research is to characterize and demonstrate magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer operation during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation-tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data is collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. To date, one piezoelectric

  9. Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation Test Results

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high-accuracy and -resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other ongoing efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an ATR NSUF project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2. The goal of this research is to characterize and demonstrate magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer operation during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation-tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data is collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. To date, one piezoelectric transducer and two

  10. Alopecia after prophylactic cranial irradiation

    Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is currently widely used in treatment of patients with lung cancer despite that the data on alopecia after PCI are limited. The aim of the study was to identify factors influencing the duration of alopecia after prophylactic cranial irradiation. Two groups of patients were analyzed: group I - 34 patients radically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and group II - 18 patients undergoing concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). In group I 12 patients were treated with radiotherapy only, the remaining patients were treated with neo- or adjuvant chemotherapy (cisplatin + vinorelbine: PN or cisplatin + gemcitabin: PG) in 2 to 6 cycles. PCI was administered during the last tree weeks of thoracic irradiation or . 2 weeks after the last cycle of chemotherapy and consisted of 15 fractions of 2 Gy per day (30 Gy), 5 days per week. Patients from group II received 25 Gy in 10 fractions starting from the second week of thoracic irradiation; chemotherapy (cisplatin + vepesid: PE every 21 days) started concurrently with thoracic irradiation. Alopecia occurred in all patients treated with PCI; hair loss began 2-3 weeks after the initiation of therapy. In group I full re-growth of hair occurred in 33 patients, one patient died during treatment, before hair re-growth had chance to appear. Time to re-growths (TRG) was 1.5-6 months, median 2.5 months. In this group a trend towards longer re-growths in patients who had received more than 3 cycles of chemotherapy (p=0.07). In group II hair re-growths occurred between 5 and 12 months after the completion of treatment, with median time of 10 months, and was significantly longer than in group I. The results suggest that the most important factor for TRG is the type and the number of chemotherapy cycles. (author)

  11. Evaluation of irradiation hardening of proton irradiated stainless steels by nanoindentation

    Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Kuribayashi, Yutaka; Nogami, Shuhei; Kasada, Ryuta; Hasegawa, Akira

    2014-03-01

    Ion irradiation experiments are useful for investigating irradiation damage. However, estimating the irradiation hardening of ion-irradiated materials is challenging because of the shallow damage induced region. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to prove usefulness of nanoindentation technique for estimation of irradiation hardening for ion-irradiated materials. SUS316L austenitic stainless steel was used and it was irradiated by 1 MeV H+ ions to a nominal displacement damage of 0.1, 0.3, 1, and 8 dpa at 573 K. The irradiation hardness of the irradiated specimens were measured and analyzed by Nix-Gao model. The indentation size effect was observed in both unirradiated and irradiated specimens. The hardness of the irradiated specimens changed significantly at certain indentation depths. The depth at which the hardness varied indicated that the region deformed by the indenter had reached the boundary between the irradiated and unirradiated regions. The hardness of the irradiated region was proportional to the inverse of the indentation depth in the Nix-Gao plot. The bulk hardness of the irradiated region, H0, estimated by the Nix-Gao plot and Vickers hardness were found to be related to each other, and the relationship could be described by the equation, HV = 0.76H0. Thus, the nanoindentation technique demonstrated in this study is valuable for measuring irradiation hardening in ion-irradiated materials.

  12. Evaluation of irradiation hardening of proton irradiated stainless steels by nanoindentation

    Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro, E-mail: kiyohiro.yabuuchi@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aobaku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Kuribayashi, Yutaka [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aobaku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Nogami, Shuhei, E-mail: shuhei.nogami@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aobaku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta, E-mail: r-kasada@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hasegawa, Akira, E-mail: akira.hasegawa@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aobaku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Ion irradiation experiments are useful for investigating irradiation damage. However, estimating the irradiation hardening of ion-irradiated materials is challenging because of the shallow damage induced region. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to prove usefulness of nanoindentation technique for estimation of irradiation hardening for ion-irradiated materials. SUS316L austenitic stainless steel was used and it was irradiated by 1 MeV H{sup +} ions to a nominal displacement damage of 0.1, 0.3, 1, and 8 dpa at 573 K. The irradiation hardness of the irradiated specimens were measured and analyzed by Nix–Gao model. The indentation size effect was observed in both unirradiated and irradiated specimens. The hardness of the irradiated specimens changed significantly at certain indentation depths. The depth at which the hardness varied indicated that the region deformed by the indenter had reached the boundary between the irradiated and unirradiated regions. The hardness of the irradiated region was proportional to the inverse of the indentation depth in the Nix–Gao plot. The bulk hardness of the irradiated region, H{sub 0}, estimated by the Nix–Gao plot and Vickers hardness were found to be related to each other, and the relationship could be described by the equation, HV = 0.76H{sub 0}. Thus, the nanoindentation technique demonstrated in this study is valuable for measuring irradiation hardening in ion-irradiated materials.

  13. Evaluation of irradiation hardening of proton irradiated stainless steels by nanoindentation

    Ion irradiation experiments are useful for investigating irradiation damage. However, estimating the irradiation hardening of ion-irradiated materials is challenging because of the shallow damage induced region. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to prove usefulness of nanoindentation technique for estimation of irradiation hardening for ion-irradiated materials. SUS316L austenitic stainless steel was used and it was irradiated by 1 MeV H+ ions to a nominal displacement damage of 0.1, 0.3, 1, and 8 dpa at 573 K. The irradiation hardness of the irradiated specimens were measured and analyzed by Nix–Gao model. The indentation size effect was observed in both unirradiated and irradiated specimens. The hardness of the irradiated specimens changed significantly at certain indentation depths. The depth at which the hardness varied indicated that the region deformed by the indenter had reached the boundary between the irradiated and unirradiated regions. The hardness of the irradiated region was proportional to the inverse of the indentation depth in the Nix–Gao plot. The bulk hardness of the irradiated region, H0, estimated by the Nix–Gao plot and Vickers hardness were found to be related to each other, and the relationship could be described by the equation, HV = 0.76H0. Thus, the nanoindentation technique demonstrated in this study is valuable for measuring irradiation hardening in ion-irradiated materials

  14. National food irradiation programme of Japan

    The present state of studies on feasibility and wholesomeness of irradiated food is presented. Irradiation projects were realized of potatoes, onions, wheat, Vienna sausages, fish-paste products, and mandarine oranges. Mutagenecity tests with Salmonella or E. coli, chromosome aberration tests, dominant lethal tests, fibroblasts and micronucleus tests, and toxicity tests performed in amimals fed with irradiated food showed no positive results

  15. The Financial Analysis of Gamma Irradiation Technology

    The present study discusses the guideline from the economics point of view of the commercial operation optimized for the Egyptian second irradiation facility. This study included four sections about the financial analysis, the analysis of future demand, future supply of commercial application of irradiation and the irradiation price system

  16. Identification of irradiated potatoes by impedance measurements

    A variety of parameters drawn from impedance measurements are tested to distinguish between irradiated and non-irradiated potatoes. Some of these parameters are able to identify the irradiated potatoes. The identification is still possible after a storage time of 3 months. (author)

  17. Biological effects of ultraviolet irradiation on bees

    The influence of natural solar and artificial ultraviolet irradiation on developing bees was studied. Lethal exposures to irradiation at different stages of development were determined. The influence of irradiation on the variability of the morphometric features of bees was revealed. 5 refs., 1 fig

  18. Applications of irradiation to the rubber industry

    Free radicals are created in polymers by irradiation: macroscopic properties of these polymers are then modified by chemical reactions initiated by these radicals. Technological and economical characteristic of irradiation means are recalled, processes used for rubber are described. Specific advantages of irradiation are pointed out and future trends of the technique are forecasted

  19. Evaluating the safety of irradiated foods

    Health agencies throughout the world have evaluated the safety of irradiated foods by considering the likelihood that irradiation would induce radioactivity, produce toxic radiolytic products, destroy nutrients, or change the microbiological profile of organisms in the food. After years of study, researchers have concluded that foods irradiated under the proper conditions will not produce adverse health effects when consumed

  20. Review of current summary of irradiated foods

    The reasons about widely application of food irradiation as a technology for increasing food safety were presenting in this summary. Topics which are discussing are about: purpose of the irradiation, radiological safety, toxicology, microbiological conclusion, alimentary adequacy, packing, labeling, public acceptance, inspection of food irradiated plants

  1. Facts about food irradiation: Controlling the process

    This fact sheet briefly reviews the procedures that exist to control the process of food irradiation. It also summarizes the difficulties in identifying irradiated food, which stem from the fact that irradiation does not physically change the food or cause significant chemical changes in foods. 4 refs

  2. Educative campaign about information on irradiated foods

    The irradiation of foods is accepted by international agencies (FAO, OMS) like a healthy and effective technology at the moment the irradiated foods are marketed easily in many countries, however in other countries exist several factors that affect the practical application of this process. In this work is planned about an educational campaign about the irradiation process directed to the consumers. (Author)

  3. Effect of gamma irradiation on some characteristics of shell eggs and mayonnaise prepared from irradiated eggs

    Shell eggs were irradiated at doses of 0.0, 0,5, 1.0 and 1.5 kGy of gamma irradiation. Immediately after irradiation, microbiological, physical and chemical analyses of eggs and sensory evaluation of mayonnaise prepared from irradiated eggs were done. The results indicated that all doses of gamma irradiation reduced the total counts of mesophilic bacteria and total coli form of yolk eggs. Irradiated eggs with 1.5 kGy maybe suitable microbiologically to prepare safe mayonnaise. There are no significant differences on saturated fatty acids and TBA values between yolk fat extracted from irradiated and that of non-irradiated eggs. Sensory evaluation showed no significant differences between mayonnaise prepared from irradiated and non-irradiated eggs. (Author)

  4. Ultra-micro-electrochemistry under irradiation; Ultramicroelectrochimie sous irradiation

    Perdicakis, M. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement, UMR 7564 CNRS - Nancy-Univ., 54 - Villers-les-Nancy (France); Corbel, C.; Leoni, E. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. CEA d' Etudes des Solides Irradies; Simon, P. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Centre de Recherches sur les Materiaux a Hautes Temperatures, 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France)

    2007-07-01

    In this work, are exposed volt-amperometric results recorded in situ during irradiation by electrons, protons or helium ions of homogeneous solutions and solid/deionized water interfaces where the solid can be: quartz, steel or uranium oxide. In a second part, the electrochemical answer is obtained in approaching the ultra-micro-electrode in close vicinity to the solid, at a distance inferior to those corresponding to the diffusion layer of this last ones. The last part deals with the results of an experiment which is until now unique: the in situ coupling of ultra-micro-electrochemistry with Raman micro-spectrometry in order to follow the UO{sub 2} corrosion during its irradiation by He{sup 2+} particles. (O.M.)

  5. Pre-pulse irradiation examination, NSRR pulse irradiation and post-pulse irradiation examination of MH-1 fuel rod

    The Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) program for studying failure threshold of pre-irradiated LWR fuel under simulated reactivity initiated accident conditions is in progress. In this program a 14 x 14 PWR type fuel K4-1 was segmented from K4/G08 long size PWR rod pre-irradiated in MIHAMA Unit-2 and was pulse irradiated on November 28, 1989 at NSRR. Energy deposition given to the test rod was 60 cal/g·fuel. No failure indication was observed by in-core monitoring and by post-pulse irradiation examination. As one of the NSRR data base on fuel behavior during transient/RIA, data obtained from pre-pulse irradiation examination, during NSRR pulse irradiation, and from post-pulse irradiation examination are summarized. (author)

  6. Pre-pulse irradiation examination, NSRR pulse irradiation and post-pulse irradiation examination of MH-2 fuel rod

    The Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) program for studying failure threshold of pre-irradiated LWR fuel under simulated reactivity initiated accident conditions is in progress. In this program, a 14 x 14 PWR type fuel K4-2 was segmented from a K4/G08 long size PWR rod pre-irradiated in MIHAMA Unit-2 and was pulse irradiated on March 8, 1990 at NSRR. Energy deposition given to the test rod was 68 cal/g·fuel. No failure indication was observed by in-core monitoring and by post-pulse irradiation examination. As one of the NSRR data base on fuel behavior during transient/RIA, data obtained from pre-pulse irradiation examination, during NSRR pulse irradiation, and from post-pulse irradiation examination are summarized. (author)

  7. Can food irradiation boost nutrition in China?

    In January 1986, the first of five regional irradiation facilities planned for China opened officially in Shanghai, mainly to process food. Irradiated potatoes, mushrooms, rice, onions, garlic, peanuts, pork sausage, and probably apples, will be introduced in mass marketing trials. Four other demonstration plants for irradiating food are being built near provincial capitals. Food irradiation offers large economic incentives, but transportation is an impediment except near large urban centres. All irradiators, whether mainly for food or not, will be made in China, with the exception of AECL and Swiss participation in two facilities

  8. Carbon nanostructures produced through ion irradiation

    2003-01-01

    Several nanostructures we produced by ion irradiation have been reviewed in this paper. By using ions to irradiate two ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene targets respectively, it was found that small fullerenes C20 and C26 were grown, adding two members to the fullerene family. Meanwhile, crystalline diamonds also have been produced by Ar+ ions irradiation of graphite. In the experiment of double ions Ni+ and Ar+ irradiation, nanoscale argon bubbles formed. On the other side, when multi-wall carbon nanotubes were irradiated by C+, many MWCNTs evolved to amorphous carbon nanowires and amorphous carbon nanotubes. And there are possible welding in the crossed nanotubes.

  9. Control of food irradiation in Denmark

    In Denmark food irradiation is not allowed. However, with the consideration within EEC about directives regulating food irradiation and the development of methods for detection, it has been found necessary to ascertain that illegally irradiated foods are not found on the Danish market. Irradiation of spices is allowed in many countries even without being declared in the foods. It thus seemed logical to begin the control of food irradiation by screening a number of spices. This resulted in 1992 in the assessment of 105 samples and in 1993 of 48 samples. (author)

  10. The technological evaluation of irradiated wheat flour

    The effect of gamma-irradiation treatments (2.5, 5 and 10 kGy) on some chemical composition, rheological properties and bread quality of the egyptian wheat flour was investigated. At zero time, application of irradiation up to a dose level of 10 kGy did not show any detectable effect on neither protein nor starch percentages, while irradiation led to gradual increase in both water soluble protein and total sugars of treated samples by increasing irradiation dose. During storage at room temperature (25 5 degree C) for 6 months, starch content markedly decreased while water water soluble protein and total sugars increased for both unirradiated and irradiated samples. The farinograph and extensograph readings reflected a better theological properties of the dough made from irradiated flours. There were no differences between the bread characteristics of the irradiated and non-irradiated flour samples. The color of the crust and crumb turned slightly darker and increased with increasing gamma-irradiation doses. There was no effect on odor, taste and freshness due to gamma-irradiation doses whereas, a remarkable improvement in loaf weight and volume had been obtained especially at the highest dose of gamma-irradiation. 4 tabs

  11. Development of data base on food irradiation

    Ito, Hitoshi; Kume, Tamikazu; Hashimoto, Shoji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Izumi, Fumio

    1995-12-01

    For the exact understanding on food irradiation in Japan, it is important to provide information of food irradiation to consumers, industries and government offices. However, many of information on food irradiation are only restricted in a few experts or institutes relating to this field. For this reason, data base of food irradiation has been completed together with the systems necessary for input the data using computer. In this data base, about 630 data with full reports were inputted in computer in the field of wholesomeness studies, irradiation effects on food, radiation engineering, detection methods of irradiated food and Q and A of food irradiation for easy understanding. Many of these data are inputted by Japanese language. Some English reports on wholesomeness studies are also included which were mainly obtained from international projects of food irradiation. Many of data on food irradiation are responsible in the fields of food science, dietetics, microbiology, radiation biology, molecular biology, medical science, agricultural science, radiation chemistry, radiation engineering and so on. Data base of food irradiation contains many useful data which can apply to many other fields of radiation processing not only on food irradiation but also on sterilization of medical equipments, upgrading of agricultural wastes and others. (author).

  12. Development of data base on food irradiation

    For the exact understanding on food irradiation in Japan, it is important to provide information of food irradiation to consumers, industries and government offices. However, many of information on food irradiation are only restricted in a few experts or institutes relating to this field. For this reason, data base of food irradiation has been completed together with the systems necessary for input the data using computer. In this data base, about 630 data with full reports were inputted in computer in the field of wholesomeness studies, irradiation effects on food, radiation engineering, detection methods of irradiated food and Q and A of food irradiation for easy understanding. Many of these data are inputted by Japanese language. Some English reports on wholesomeness studies are also included which were mainly obtained from international projects of food irradiation. Many of data on food irradiation are responsible in the fields of food science, dietetics, microbiology, radiation biology, molecular biology, medical science, agricultural science, radiation chemistry, radiation engineering and so on. Data base of food irradiation contains many useful data which can apply to many other fields of radiation processing not only on food irradiation but also on sterilization of medical equipments, upgrading of agricultural wastes and others. (author)

  13. Irradiation effects on hydrases for biomedical applications

    Furuta, Masakazu E-mail: mfuruta@riast.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Ohashi, Isao; Oka, Masahito; Hayashi, Toshio

    2000-03-01

    To apply an irradiation technique to sterilize 'Hybrid' biomedical materials including enzymes, we selected papain, a well-characterized plant endopeptidase as a model to examine durability of enzyme activity under the practical irradiation condition in which limited data were available for irradiation inactivation of enzymes. Dry powder and frozen aqueous solution of papain showed significant durability against {sup 60}Co-gamma irradiation suggesting that, the commercial irradiation sterilizing method is applicable without modification. Although irradiation of unfrozen aqueous papain solution showed an unusual change of the enzymatic activity with the increasing doses, and was totally inactivated at 15 kGy, we managed to keep the residual activity more than 50% of initial activity after 30-kGy irradiation, taking such optimum conditions as increasing enzyme concentration from 10 to 100 mg/ml and purging with N{sub 2} gas to suppress the formation of free radicals. (author)

  14. Comparison of Recent Total Irradiance Measurements

    Helizon, R.; Pap, J.

    2002-12-01

    Total solar irradiance has been measured since 1978 from various satellites. Since the absolute accuracy of the current irradiance measurements is about 0.2%, one needs to compile composite irradiance time series to study long-term changes and to establish whether there are any secular variations over the last two and half decades. In this paper we compare the UARS/ACRIM II and SOHO/VIRGO total irradiance data as well as the SOHO/VIRGO and ACRIM III total irradiance. Our main goal is to validate the newly processed ACRIM II total irradiance. Comparison of the SOHO/VIRGO and ACRIM III data will also help to establish whether the high total irradiance values for the maximum of solar cycle 23 represent real solar, rather than, instrumental events.

  15. Rheological and microstructural properties of Irradiated starch

    Gamma irradiation ia s fast and efficient method to improve the functional properties of straches. Wheat and potato starches were submitted, in the present study, at 3,5,10 and 20 kGy radiation dose. The changes induced by irradiation on the rheological properties of these starches showed a decrease in the viscosity with increasing radiation dose. Chemicals bond's hydrolysis has been induced by free radicals that have been identified by EPR. Wheat starch presents five EPR signals after irradiation, whiles potato starch has a weak EPR signal. On the other hand, irradiation caused decrease in amylose content. This decrease is more pronounced in potato starch. Dry irradiated starch's MEB revealed no change in the shape, size and distribution of the granules. While, the observation of wheat starch allowed the complete disappearance of the granular structure and the dissolution of its macromolecules after irradiation which justifies the significant decrease in wheat starch's viscosity irradiated at 20 kGy.

  16. Quality of electron beam irradiated strawberries

    Fresh 'Tristar' strawberries were treated by electron beam irradiation to determine the effects on postharvest quality attributes and shelf life. The intensity of red color rated by sensory panelists decreased as irradiation dosage increased from 0- to 2 kGy. Hunter 'L' values were higher for fruit treated with 2 kGy than for 0 and 0.5 kGy. Instron firmness values were lower for all irradiated fruit than for control fruit. Panelists rated irradiated fruit less firm than nonirradiated fruit stored 1, 2 and 4 days. An increase in off-flavor was noted among all treatments stored 6 and 8 days. Irradiation suppressed fungi on stored berries. Irradiation doses of 1 and 2 kGy extended shelf life 2 and 4 days, respectively. Electron beam irradiation technology has excellent potential for extension of shelf life of fresh strawberry fruits

  17. Food Irradiation Newsletter. V. 11, no. 2

    This issue includes a report of the ICGFI's Workshop on Food Irradiation for Food Control Officials, convened in Budapest, Hungary, May 1987. To provide further assurance on the safety and wholesomeness of irradiated food in general and details about polyploidy (increase in number of chromosomes) resulting from consumption of freshly irradiated wheat in particular, ICGFI Secretariat issued a fact sheet on ''Safety and Wholesomeness of Irradiated Foods: International Status - Facts and Figures'' to its member countries in July 1987. The Newsletter also contains summary reports of two important market testings of irradiated food, i.e. papaya in California in March and strawberries in France in June, which proved that consumers will buy irradiated foods, and status reports on food irradiation in France and Mexico. Ref, 1 tab

  18. Irradiation effects on hydrases for biomedical applications

    Furuta, Masakazu; Ohashi, Isao; Oka, Masahito; Hayashi, Toshio

    2000-03-01

    To apply an irradiation technique to sterilize "Hybrid" biomedical materials including enzymes, we selected papain, a well-characterized plant endopeptidase as a model to examine durability of enzyme activity under the practical irradiation condition in which limited data were available for irradiation inactivation of enzymes. Dry powder and frozen aqueous solution of papain showed significant durability against 60Co-gamma irradiation suggesting that, the commercial irradiation sterilizing method is applicable without modification. Although irradiation of unfrozen aqueous papain solution showed an unusual change of the enzymatic activity with the increasing doses, and was totally inactivated at 15 kGy, we managed to keep the residual activity more than 50% of initial activity after 30-kGy irradiation, taking such optimum conditions as increasing enzyme concentration from 10 to 100 mg/ml and purging with N 2 gas to suppress the formation of free radicals.

  19. Irradiation effects on hydrases for biomedical applications

    To apply an irradiation technique to sterilize 'Hybrid' biomedical materials including enzymes, we selected papain, a well-characterized plant endopeptidase as a model to examine durability of enzyme activity under the practical irradiation condition in which limited data were available for irradiation inactivation of enzymes. Dry powder and frozen aqueous solution of papain showed significant durability against 60Co-gamma irradiation suggesting that, the commercial irradiation sterilizing method is applicable without modification. Although irradiation of unfrozen aqueous papain solution showed an unusual change of the enzymatic activity with the increasing doses, and was totally inactivated at 15 kGy, we managed to keep the residual activity more than 50% of initial activity after 30-kGy irradiation, taking such optimum conditions as increasing enzyme concentration from 10 to 100 mg/ml and purging with N2 gas to suppress the formation of free radicals. (author)

  20. Optical Properties of Irradiated Yttrium Aluminum Garnet

    The results of investigation of the photoluminescence (PL) and optical absorption of crystals Y3Al5O12(YAG) doped with different concentrations of manganese ions exposed to fast neutron irradiation and electron irradiation are presented. Photoluminescence spectra of YAG before neutron irradiation at T=80 K contain fine lines in orange region of spectrum, ascribed to Mn2+ ions in octahedral position. After irradiation band broadening is observed in the luminescence spectra of garnet crystals. Electron irradiation produced broad band with a complex structure related to Mn4+ ions. Exchange interaction between radiation defect and impurity ions during neutron irradiation and electron irradiation leads to appearance of additional lines and luminescence bands broadening in investigated crystals.

  1. Food irradiation development in Pakistan

    Khan, I.

    The large scale trials were held to extend the storage life of potatoes, onions and dry fruits by gamma radiation. It was concluded that radiation preservation of potatoes and onions was much cheaper as compared to conventional methods. A dose of 1 kGy can control the insects in dry fruits and nuts. The consumers' acceptability and market testing performed during the last four years are also conducive to the commercialization of the technology in this country. The Government of Pakistan has accorded clearance for the irradiation of some food items like potatoes, onions, garlic and spices for human consumption. The Pakistan Radiation Services (PARAS), the commercial irradiator (200 Kci) at Lahore, has already started functioning in April, 1987. It is planned to start large scale sterilization of spices by gamma radiation in PARAS shortly.

  2. Human subjects and experimental irradiation

    In recent years the public has expressed concern about the use of human subjects in scientific research. Some professional institutions have adopted codes of practice to guide them in this matter. At the University of New South Wales, where human subjects are used in teaching and research programmes, a committee ensures that high ethical standards are maintained. As the volunteer subjects do not gain any benefit themselves from the procedures, their level of risk is kept low. One type of procedure in which risk is becoming quantifiable, is the irradiation of human subjects. To assist peer review groups, the ICRP, WHO and the National Health and Medical Research Council have enunciated principles which should be followed in the irradiation of human volunteer subjects. In general the role of the Committee is advisory to protect the rights of the investigator, the subject, and the institution. Some of the inherent problems are discussed

  3. Neutron dosimetry for rat irradiations

    Monoenergetic neutron irradiations of rats described in last year's Annual Report (COO-4733-1) were continued in collaboration with the Department of Radiology of Thomas Jefferson University. Three groups of 24 rats received absorbed doses of 0.43 MeV neutrons corresponding to 300, 400, or 560 mGy (30, 40, or 56 rad), respectively, of total tissue kerma in free air at the center of the animal positions. In all cases the absorbed dose contributed by gamma rays was about 3 percent of the total absorbed dose. In order to alleviate some of the traumatic effects of the experimental procedure upon the pregnant rats, extra air holes were drilled in the aluminum end caps of the rat holders, thus providing increased ventilation for respiration and cooling. It was also found to be desirable to postpone transporting them for one day after irradiation

  4. Evaluation of irradiated sewage sludges

    The residual muds are produced by a separation process in the black waters treatment constituted by a solid phase whose origin is the accumulation of pollutant matter that has been extended to the water for anthropogenic and/or natural activities. The present work has the purpose to carry out a technical evaluation for the irradiation process of residual muds for their possible application like alternative of treatment and final disposal. The results obtained for the Evaluation of the irradiation of residual muds are bounded with the federative entities in the study, on the number of treatment plants of residual waters by diverse methods, discharge types, system location, residual muds production and muds treatment, uses and final disposal. The results show in the several entities,a great variety and versatility of industrial branches with diverse systems for treatment of waters and scarceness in the systems for residual muds treatment. (Author)

  5. Genotoxicity test of irradiated foods

    Safety tests of radiation irradiated foods started as early as from 1967 in Japan and genotoxicity tests in the Hatano Res. Inst., from 1977. The latter is unique in the world and is reviewed in this paper. Tests included those for the initial injury of DNA, mutagenicity, chromosomal aberration and transformation with use of bacteria, cultured mammalian cells and animals (for chromosomal aberration, micronucleus formation and dominant lethality). Foods tested hitherto were onion, rice, wheat and flour, Vienna sausage, fish sausage (kamaboko), mandarian orange, potato, black pepper and red capsicum, of which extract or powder was subjected to the test. Irradiation doses and its purposes were 0.15-6 kGy γ-ray (60Co) or electron beam by the accelerator (only for the orange), and suppression of germination, pesticide action or sterilization, respectively. Genotoxicity of all foods under tested conditions is shown negative. (N.I.)

  6. Bone marrow transplantation after irradiation

    Bone marrow transplantation after irradiation is successful in only a part of the affected patients. The Chernobyl accident added to our knowledge: BMT can save life after whole-body irradiation with a dose exceeding 7-8 Gy. A timely decision on transplantation after a nuclear accident is difficult to make (rapid determination of homogeneity and type of radiation and the total dose. HL-A typing in lymphopenia, precise identification of radiation damage to other target organs, etc.). Further attention is to be paid to the treatment. Transplantations in case of malignities (especially hematologic ones) and other diseases will add to our knowledge and will lead to more simple procedures. (author). 3 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs

  7. Kinetics of irradiated liquid hydrogen

    We present a model for the kinetics of irradiated liquid hydrogen, as appropriate to a spallation neutron source environment. This model indicates that the ortho-para distribution in an irradiated volume of liquid hydrogen may be significantly different from the thermodynamically equilibrated distribution, resulting in significantly changed neutronic and operational performance for practical liquid hydrogen moderators. Numerical experimentation with the model indicates that neither the pulsed nature of a pulsed source nor the cyclic nature of a flowing liquid hydrogen loop significantly impacts the ortho-para distribution. In developing this model, we have learned that many proposed methods for measuring the ortho-para distribution in an operating moderator system may have potential difficulties, complicating bench-marking efforts. (orig.)

  8. Maternal irradiation and Down Syndrome

    The role of preconception irradiation in the etiology of Down Syndrome was examined using the techniques of record linkage. Although 909 cases of Down Syndrome, born in B.C. between 1952-70, were ascertained through a system of linked vital and health registrations, interest was restricted to the 348 case/control pairs born in the greater Vancouver area. The maternal identifying information routinely recorded on birth and ill-health registrations was used to link 155 Down Syndrome mothers and 116 control mothers to patient files at the Vancouver General Hospital. Only 28 of the case and 25 of the control mothers were subjected to diagnostic irradiation at the Vancouver Ganeral Hospital. The difference was not significant at the 5% level

  9. Overlay welding irradiated stainless steel

    An overlay technique developed for welding irradiated stainless steel may be important for repair or modification of fusion reactor materials. Helium, present due to n,α reactions, is known to cause cracking using conventional welding methods. Stainless steel impregnated with 3 to 220 appm helium by decay of tritium was used to develop a welding process that could be used for repair. The result was a gas metal arc weld overlay technique with low-heat input and low-penetration into the helium-containing material. Extensive metallurgical and mechanical testing of this technique demonstrated substantial reduction of helium embrittlement damage. The overlay technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel containing 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking, although greater than for tritium charged and aged material, was minimal compared to conventional welding methods

  10. Food Irradiation. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Food Irradiation

    For some years research has been done in several countries, with the object of contributing to the world's food supplies, on the application of nuclear methods to food preservation and processing. The importance of food preservation is of particular relevance in certain regions of the world where up to thirty per cent of harvested foodstuffs are being lost because of damage by animal pests and microorganisms. A series of international meetings have been held on this subject; the first, held in 1958 at Harwell, was followed by further meetings in 1960 in Paris and in 1961 in Brussels. The International Symposium on Food Irradiation organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations through their Joint Division of Atomic Energy in Agriculture, and held at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre, Karlsruhe, from 6 to 10 June 1966, at the generous invitation of the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany, is the most recent of this series of meetings. It was held for the purpose of exchanging the most up-to-date results of research, of contributing towards co-operative efforts between Member States, and of stimulating trade in the international exchange of irradiated products between nations. Papers describing research over the past fourteen years were given by outstanding authorities; the results point to a breakthrough having been achieved in the use of ionizing radiation in food preservation, notwithstanding some problems still to be solved, such as overcoming changes in colour, flavour, odour or texture. The Symposium was attended by over 200 scientists from 25 countries and four international organizations. Sixty-nine papers were presented. It was shown that a wide variety of foodstuffs exist for which radiation could be used for three different purposes: to produce indefinitely stable products, to rid food of organisms that constitute health hazards, and to extend the normal shelf or market life

  11. Alterations of ultraviolet irradiated DNA

    Thymine dimers production has been studied in several DNA-3H irradiated at various wave lenght of U.V. Light. The influence of dimers on the hydrodynamic and optic properties, thermal structural stability and transformant capacity of DNA have been studied too. At last the recognition and excision of dimers by the DNA-UV-Endonuclease and DNA-Polimerase-I was also studied. (author)

  12. Wholesomeness data on irradiated food

    There is no item of more primary importance to the welfare of the human race than food. It has long been realized that even small increases in the quality and/or quantity of food mean great benefits to people everywhere, particularly to those who are undernourished or on the threshold of starvation. Therefore, the application of food preservation technology to prevent food losses has become a major factor in solving the world's food problems. Some of the chemical additives used to preserve food have caused harmful effects on the well-being of the consumer, but the newly-developing commercial treatment of a number of food products with low doses of ionizing radiation has been shown to be technologically advantageous and economically viable.The Food Preservation Section of the Joint FA O/lAEA Division decided to set up a data system whereby wholesomeness information on irradiated food can be easily obtained and disseminated by means of publication. The data will be related to toxicological safety, nutritive value and microbial innocuity. To do this the Division has sent a questionnaire to institutes and scientists involved in programmes dealing with wholesomeness of irradiated food, requesting them to provide information on investigations already completed, on those which are currently in progress and on programmes projected for the future. Based on the responses received, a list of wholesomeness investigations recently carried out in Member Countries on different food items, can be found. Summarily it can be stated that the results from these investigations do not indicate any detrimental effects on health. Detailed data will be published periodically by the International Project in the Field of Food Irradiation in 'Food Irradiation Information'. The project has been established under the auspices of FAO, IAEA and OECD (NEA) with 22 countries at present contributing financially to the Project

  13. RERTR-8 Irradiation Summary Report

    D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2011-12-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-8, was designed to test monolithic mini-fuel plates fabricated via hot isostatic pressing (HIP), the effect of molybdenum (Mo) content on the monolithic fuel behavior, and the efficiency of ternary additions to dispersion fuel particles on the interaction layer behavior at higher burnup. The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-8 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis, thermal analysis and hydraulic testing results.

  14. Sewage water treatment by irradiation

    Irradiation of the outlet wastewater from Adra Plant shows that radiation sensitivity for the total count of the microorganism, fungi, and pathogenic microorganism were 0.328, 0.327, 0.305 kGy respectively at 3.4 kGy/h. No Ascaris Lumbricoides eggs were found. These results show that radiation technology in wastewater treatment at Adra Plant for reuse in irrigation safely from microbial point of view can be applied. (author)

  15. Pulsed laser irradiation of silicon

    Pulsed laser irradiation of silicon was investigated with a ruby laser. Development of heat flow theory made it possible to calculate temperature profiles in silicon during pulsed laser irradiation. Silicon self-diffusion measurements, laser annealing of damage in As implanted silicon, and laser induced doping of single crystal silicon was investigated. A computer programme was writen based on the numerical solution, and was used to calculate the temperature profiles in silicon during irradiation. Radioactive 31Si was used to determine the self-diffusion of silicon in silicon during irradiation. Radioactivity profiles in the silicon sample were measured by anodic oxidation, sequential removal of the formed SiO2 by etching in dilute HF and measurement of the radioactivity left in the sample. Spreading of the radioactive silicon marker started to take place at energy densities above 0.8 Jcm-2, giving an average duffusion coefficient of (5.0 ± 2.7) x 10-8 m2s-1, which is of the order of magnitude expected when melting takes place. The doping of silicon with Sb, Bi and In by laser assisted diffusion was investegated from evaporated layers as well as solutions of these dopants. The threshold energies for doping was 0.6, 0.9 and 0.7 Jcm-2, while maximum dopant concentrations of 2 x 1021, 7 x 1020 and 4 x 1020 respectively was found for Sb, Bi and In. These values exceed the equilibrium solid solubility by orders of magnitude, and can be ascribed to trapping of the dopant atoms, due to the high recrystallization velocities involved. Doping was carried out by placing silicon substrates directly into solutions of SbCl3 and triphenyl antimony. The threshold of solution doping was found to be much greater than doping from evaporated layer. This difference could be ascribed to the much larger absorption coefficient of the laser light in the evaporated layers, as compared to single crystal silicon

  16. Pulsed laser irradiation of silicon

    Pulsed laser irradiation of silicon was investigated with a ruby laser, having a pulse width of 30 ns and a variable energy up to 1.5 Joules. Peak powers as high as 50 MW are obtained, which is sufficient to cause melting to depths of a few thousand angstroem. In this study, development of heat flow theory made it possible to calculate temperature profiles in silicon during pulsed laser irradiation. Silicon self-diffusion measurements, laser annealing of damage in As implanted silicon, and laser induced doping of single crystal silicon was also investigated. A computer programme was used to calculate the temperature profiles in silicon during pulsed laser irradiation. Radioactive 31Si (half-life = 2.62 hours) was used to determine for the first time the self-diffusion of silicon in silicon during pulsed laser irradiation. Radioactivity profiles in the silicon sample were measured by anodic oxidation, sequential removal of the formed SiO2 by etching in dilute HF and measurement of the radioactivity left in the sample. The removal of damage caused during ion implantation of Si substrates with As was investigated by using laser annealing. Rutherford backscattering of charged nuclear paricles coupled with the channeling technique, showed that an amorphous layer 1140 A thick formed during implantation. Complete removal of this damage only started to take place at energies high enough to cause melting to depths greater than the amorphous/single crystal interface. During resolidification, the molten silicon regrows epitaxially leading to complete removal of all the damage. Disorder removal started at 0.6 Jcm-2, while complete damage removal was achieved at energies above 1.5 Jcm-2. The doping of silicon with Sb, Bi and In by laser assisted diffusion was investigated from evaporated layers as well as solutions of these dopants

  17. Spectroscopic analysis of irradiated erythrocytes

    Selim, Nabila S. [Biophysics Lab, Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT), AEA, P.O. Box 29, Madinat Nasr, Cairo (Egypt); Desouky, Omar S., E-mail: omardesouky@yahoo.com [Biophysics Lab, Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT), AEA, P.O. Box 29, Madinat Nasr, Cairo (Egypt); Ismail, Nagla M.; Dakrory, Amira Z. [Physics Department, Faculty of Girls for Arts, Sciences and Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-12-15

    The aim of the present work is to study the effect of gamma radiation on the lipid part of the erythrocyte membrane, and to test the efficiency of lipoic acid as a radioprotector. This effect was evaluated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The results showed an increase in the number of spin density by 14%, 22% and 65% after exposure to 25, 50 and 100 Gy respectively; whereas there was a decline in the obtained density after incubation with lipoic acid by a factor of approximately 32%. The FT-IR spectra of the irradiated erythrocytes samples showed a marked decrease in the intensity of all characteristic peaks, which increased as the irradiation dose increased. The second-derivative of these spectra, allow the conformationally sensitive membrane acyl chain methylene stretching modes to be separated from the protein (mostly hemoglobin) vibrations that dominate the spectra of intact cells. The 2850 cm{sup -1} band showed changes in the band shape and position after exposure to 50 and 100 Gy. Therefore it can be concluded that the band at 2850 cm{sup -1} only is useful in monitoring the radiation effect of the lipids cell membrane intact cells. - Highlights: > Effect of {gamma} radiation on erythrocyte membrane was studied using EPR and FT-IR. > Efficiency of {alpha}-lipoic acid as radioprotector was tested. > Lipoic acid diminished the free radicals number after gamma irradiation by 32%. > FT-IR spectra of the irradiated erythrocyte showed a decrease in their intensity. > Lipoic acid enhances the membrane to resist the action of gamma radiation.

  18. Stereotactic Irradiation of Lung Cancer

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the best stereotactic irradiation (STI) technique in treatment of small lung tumors, using dose-volume statistics. Methods: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the study phantom consisting of CT using the software of FOCUS-3D planning system. The beam was a 6MV X-ray from a Varian 2300C. The analysis data of Dose-volume statistics was from the technique used for: (1) 2- 12 arcs; (2) 20° - 45° separation angle of arcs; (3) 80° - 160° of gantry rotation. Then we studied the difference of DVH with various irradiation techniques and the influence of target positions and field size by calculated to the distribution of dose from 20%- 90% of the six targets in the lung with 3×3 cm2, 4′ 4 cm2 and 5′ 5 cm2 field size. Results: The volume irradiated pulmonary tissue was the smallest using a six non-coplanar 120° arcs with 30° separation between arcs in the hypothetical set up, the non-coplanar SRI was superiority than conventional one's. The six targets were chosen in the right lung, the volume was the largest in geometric center and was decreased in hilus, bottom, anterior chest wall, lateral wall and apex of the lung in such an order. The DVH had significant change with an increasing field size. Conclusion: the irradiation damage of normal pulmonary tissue was the lowest using the six non-coplanar 120° arcs with a 30° separation between arcs by <5×5 cm2 field and the position of target was not a restricting factor.

  19. Food Preservation by Irradiation (Rev.)

    Urrows, Grace M.

    1968-01-01

    Up to 30% of food harvests are lost in some parts of the world because of animal pests and microorganisms. Nuclear techniques can help reduce and extend the shelf life of these foods. Around 55 countries now have food irradiation programs. The use of radiation is the most recent step in man's attempts to preserve some of his harvest for the lean part of the year.

  20. Neutron irradiation of bacteriophage λ

    Double strand breaks (DSB) are the most dangerous lesions in DNA caused by irradiation, but many other lesions, usually called mutations, have not been clearly identified. These lesions, like DSB, can be the source of serious chromosomal damages and finally - cell death. Growing interest in heavy particles for radiotherapy and radioprotection encourages the search of the molecular basis of their action. In this respect, we chose bacteriophage λ1390 as the model system for the study of consequences of neutron irradiation. This derivative of λ phage possesses an unique ability to reversibly reorganize their genome in response to various selective pressures. The phages were irradiated with 13 Gy of mixed neutrons (7.5 Gy from fast and 5.6 Gy from thermal neutrons) and phages genomes were tested to DSB and mutations. Additionally, the stability of λ capsid proteins were tested. After all tests, we can conclude that, under our conditions, low flux of neutrons does not induce neither DNA strand break or DNA mutation nor the stability of λ capsid proteins. (author)

  1. The Techniques Of Food Irradiation

    Food irradiation is a technique which is increasingly being recognised as an effective method for reducing post-harvest food losses, ensuring hygienic quality of food and facilitating wider trade of certain food items. Irradiation of food may be used to achieve a variety of desirable objectives including the following which are classified according to the average radiation dose requirement: i. Low dose application (up to about 1 kg), for inhibition of sprouting in yams, potatoes, onions, etc. insect disinfestation and delay of ripening in fruits. ii. Medium dose applications (about 1-10kgy), for reduction of micro-organisms and improvement in technological properties of food. iii. High dose application (about 10-50kgy) which is used for sterilization for commercial purposes and elimination of viruses. From the point of view of food safety the energy level of the radiation applied to food is the most important characteristics that has to be regulated in order to prevent the possible formation of induced radio activity. Fortunately, the most commonly used isotopic sources 60Co and 137Cs; and machine sources such as the electron beam generators, induced radio activity is negligible, short lived and lower than that causing radio activity. This and other scientific and technical aspects of the commercial application irradiation technology with respect Nigeria have been examined in this paper along side with those of its politics and social policy

  2. Triple ion beam irradiation facility

    A unique ion irradiation facility consisting of three accelerators is described. The accelerators can be operated simultaneously to deliver three ion beams on one target sample. The energy ranges of the ions are 50 to 400 keV, 200 keV to 2.5 MeV, and 1.0 to 5.0 MeV. Three different ions in the appropriate mass range can be simultaneously implanted to the same depth in a target specimen as large as 100 mm2 in area. Typical depth ranges are 0.1 to 1.0 μm. The X-Y profiles of all three ion beams are measured by a system of miniature Faraday cups. The low-voltage accelerator can periodically ramp the ion beam energy during the implantation. Three different types of target chambers are in use at this facility. The triple-beam high-vacuum chamber can hold nine transmission electron microscopy specimens at elevated temperature during a irradiation by the three simultaneous beams. A second high-vacuum chamber on the medium-voltage accelerator beamline houses a low- and high-temperature translator and a two-axis goniometer for ion channeling measurements. The third chamber on the high-energy beamline can be gas-filled for special stressed specimen irradiations. Special applications for the surface modification of materials with this facility are described. Appendixes containing operating procedures are also included. 18 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab

  3. The availability of irradiation data

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Solar radiation at ground level is a necessary input for performances modeling and sizing of PV systems. This document reports on the needs for data and discusses the problems faced by users when accessing data. It then presents some technological solutions. Users generally need values of global daily or hourly irradiation with a spatial resolution of approximately 10 km. Relative errors (RMSE) of daily irradiation should be less than 20 %. Spatial coverage (continent) and temporal coverage are of importance. The data must be available conveniently at low cost. Several regional solar atlases have been made by interpolation of ground measurements, taking into account the local variation of climate. Satellite data produce irradiation maps offering a regular sampling in space and a wide geographical coverage. Time-series are also obtained by weather forecast models. Digital atlases have been created as integrated information system. These comprise a database and software to exploit it. The co-operative systems are connected with other servers that provide necessary weather data to compute solar radiation quantities. This survey of solar databases showed that in a general case, there is a discrepancy between users needs and available databases. This conclusion supports the efforts made in integrating information systems and co-operative systems to overcome the technical limits of measurements by using the information and communication technologies. (au)

  4. Design of YCF-1 mobile γ irradiator

    YCF-1 mobile irradiator has been designed by Beijing Institute of Nuclear Engineering of China and has been put into use in Jilin province. It can play an important role in extending irradiation technology in food irradiation, disinfestation, sterilization and quarantine. This paper describes the features and design considerations of a mobile irradiator. The irradiator uses a Cesium-137 source, the design loading capacity of the source is 9.25 PBq (250 kCi). The half-life of Cs-137 is 30.2 years and the source does not need replacing. The dose rate on the surface is 0.0025 mSv/h in accordance with national standards. The shielding of the irradiation room is a steel shell filled with lead. The thickness of lead is 18 cm. The irradiator is installed on a special flat truck. The weight of the irradiator is more than 80 tons. The main components and parts of the irradiator are: source, source racks and hoist, irradiation chamber, storage source chamber, the product's transport system, dose monitoring system, ventilation system and safety interlock system. (author)

  5. Low dose irradiation creep of pure nickel

    A detailed climb-controlled glide model of low dose irradiation creep has been developed to rationalize irradiation creep data of pure nickel irradiated in a light ion irradiation creep apparatus. Experimental irradiation creep data were obtained to study the effects of initial microstructure and stress on low dose irradiation creep in pure nickel. Pure nickel specimens (99.992% Ni), with three different microstructures, were irradiated with 17 or 15 MeV deuterons at 473 K and stresses ranging from 0.35 to 0.9 of the unirradiated yield stress. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the microstructure following irradiation to 0.05 dpa consisted of a high density of small dislocation loops, some small voids and network dislocations. The creep model predicted creep rates proportional to the mobile dislocation density and a comparison of experimental irradiation creep rates as a function of homologous stress revealed a dependence on initial microstructure of the magnitude predicted by the measured dislocation densities. The three microstructures that were irradiated consisted of 85% and 25% cold-worked Ni specimens and well-annealed Ni specimens. A weak stress dependence of irradiation creep was observed in 85% cold-worked Ni in agreement with experimental determinations of the stress dependence of irradiation creep by others. The weak stress dependence was shown to be a consequence of the stress independence of the dislocation climb velocity and the weak stress dependence of the barrier removal process. The irradiation creep rate was observed to be proportional to the applied stress. This linear stress dependence was suggested to be due to the stress dependence of the mobile dislocation density. 101 references, 27 figures, 11 tables

  6. Effect of irradiation on the streptococcus mutans

    To observe direct effect of irradiation on cariogenic Streptococcus mutans. S. mutans GS5 was exposed to irradiation with a single absorbed dose of 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy. Viability and changes in antibiotic sensitivity, morphology, transcription of virulence factors, and protein profile of bacterium after irradiation were examined by pour plate, disc diffusion method, Transmission electron microscopy. RT-PCR, and SDS-PAGE, respectively. After irradiation with 10 and 20 Gy, viability of S. mutans was reduced. Further increase in irradiation dose, however, did not affect the viability of the remaining cells of S. mutans. Irradiated S. mutans was found to have become sensitive to antibiotics. In particular, the bacterium irradiated with 40 Gy increased its susceptibility to cefotaxime, penicillin, and tetracycline. Under the transmission electron microscope, number of morphologically abnormal cells was increased as the irradiation dose was increased. S. mutans irradiated with 10 Gy revealed a change in the cell wall and cell membrane. As irradiation dose was increased. a higher number of cells showed thickened cell wall and cell membrane and lysis, and appearance of ghost cells was noticeable. In RT-PCR, no difference was detected in expression of gtfB and spaP between cells with and without irradiation of 40 Gy. In SDS-PAGE, proteins with higher molecular masses were gradually diminished as irradiation dose was increased. These results suggest that irradiation affects the cell integrity of S. mutans, as observed by SDS-PAGE, and as manifested by the change in cell morphology, antibiotic sensitivity, and eventually viability of the bacterium

  7. Development of detection methods for irradiated foods

    To identify irradiated foods, studies have been carried out with electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy on bone containing foods, such as chicken, pork, and beef. The intensity of the signal induced in bones increased linearly with irradiation doses in the range of 1.0 kGy to 5.0 kGy, and it was possible to distinguish between samples given low and high doses of irradiation. The signal stability for 6 weeks made them ideal for the quick and easy identification of irradiated meats. The analysis of DNA damage made on single cells by agarose gel electrophoresis (DNA 'comet assay') can be used to detect irradiated food. All the samples irradiated with over 0.3 kGy were identified to detect post-irradiation by the tail length of their comets. Irradiated samples showed comets with long tails, and the tail length of the comets increased with the dose, while unirradiated samples showed no or very short tails. As a result of the above experiment, the DNA 'comet assay' might be applied to the detection of irradiated grains as a simple, low-cost and rapid screening test. When fats are irradiated, hydrocarbons contained one or two fewer carbon atoms are formed from the parent fatty acids. The major hydrocarbons in irradiated beef, pork and chicken were 1,7-hexadecadiene and 8-heptadecene originating from leic acid. 1,7 hexadecadiene was the highest amount in irradiated beef, pork and chicken. Eight kinds of hydrocarbons were identified from irradiated chicken, among which 1,7-hexadecadiene and 8-heptadecen were detected as major compounds. The concentration of radiation-induced hydrocarbons was relatively constant during 16 weeks

  8. Effect of irradiation on the streptococcus mutans

    Ahn, Ki Dong; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    To observe direct effect of irradiation on cariogenic Streptococcus mutans. S. mutans GS5 was exposed to irradiation with a single absorbed dose of 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy. Viability and changes in antibiotic sensitivity, morphology, transcription of virulence factors, and protein profile of bacterium after irradiation were examined by pour plate, disc diffusion method, Transmission electron microscopy. RT-PCR, and SDS-PAGE, respectively. After irradiation with 10 and 20 Gy, viability of S. mutans was reduced. Further increase in irradiation dose, however, did not affect the viability of the remaining cells of S. mutans. Irradiated S. mutans was found to have become sensitive to antibiotics. In particular, the bacterium irradiated with 40 Gy increased its susceptibility to cefotaxime, penicillin, and tetracycline. Under the transmission electron microscope, number of morphologically abnormal cells was increased as the irradiation dose was increased. S. mutans irradiated with 10 Gy revealed a change in the cell wall and cell membrane. As irradiation dose was increased. a higher number of cells showed thickened cell wall and cell membrane and lysis, and appearance of ghost cells was noticeable. In RT-PCR, no difference was detected in expression of gtfB and spaP between cells with and without irradiation of 40 Gy. In SDS-PAGE, proteins with higher molecular masses were gradually diminished as irradiation dose was increased. These results suggest that irradiation affects the cell integrity of S. mutans, as observed by SDS-PAGE, and as manifested by the change in cell morphology, antibiotic sensitivity, and eventually viability of the bacterium.

  9. Bakery products from irradiated and non-irradiated eggs - analytical problems associated with the detection of irradiation in processed foods

    In spring and early summer 1992, a number of irradiated egg products were illegally imported into Germay. To prove the irradiation of these egg products, mainly combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied. With this present study we wanted to answer the question if we were also able to detect the use of irradiated eggs in processed foods. The processed food we chose to produce and to investigate was a tart layer. For this product, dilution effects are of minor importance as no extra fat was added. Thus, the layers' fat almost exclusively came from the eggs. To study the influence of emulsifiers, we produced batters both with and without adding an emulsifer. The unsaturted hydrocarbons C14:1, C16:3, C16:2, C17:2, and C17:1 served as markers for an irradiation. In the non-irradiated egg samples and in the tart layers produced from them, these compounds could not be detected (or in some cases only in small amounts). They were, however, detectable in all irradiated samples. DCB could be found in all irradiated egg samples and in the tart layers that were baked from irradiated eggs. It was not present in non-irradiated eggs and in tart layers produced from them. (orig./Vhe)

  10. High-dose irradiation of food

    Studies performed on behalf of the International Project on Food Irradiation in the period from 1971 until 1980 resulted in the concluding statement that ''.the irradiation of any food commodity up to an overall average dose of 10 kGy presents no toxicological hazard; hence, toxicological testing of foods so treated is no longer required.'' Since then, licenses for food irradiation have been restricted to this maximum dose in any country applying this technology. Further testing programmes have been carried out investigating the wholesomeness or hazards of high-dose irradiation, but there has been little demand so far by the food industry for licensing of high-dose irradiation, as there is only a small range of products whose irradiation at higher doses offers advantages for given, intended use. These include eg. spices, dried herbs, meat products in flexible pouch packagings for astronauts, or patients with immune deficiencies. (orig./CB)

  11. Maintenance of microflora suppression in irradiated monkeys

    After at least two weeks of decontamination, rhesus monkeys were submitted to a total body irradiation of 8.5 Gy, followed by a bone marrow graft. In the following weeks, a number of colonizations were found. Twenty-seven colonizations were known to be present on the day of irradiation. Sixteen colonizations were due to microorganisms suppressed before irradiation. Thirty-two colonizations were considered as exogenous. Only a few colonizations in the irradiated animals could not be controlled. Irradiation caused severe diarrhoea in decontaminated animals, leading to a life-threatening loss of water and electrolytes. When this loss was corrected, the monkeys survived for prolonged periods following irradiation. The amount of food consumed, which contained antibiotics, had no effect on the faecal concentration. The addition of solid food particles, however, resulted in a much lower faecal concentration. No significant antibiotic serum levels were found. (orig.)

  12. Assessing CANDU requirements for irradiation - Research facilities

    The Canadian nuclear program needs ongoing access to irradiation-research facilities to support the safe operation of existing CANDU reactors and the evolutionary development of CANDU components and design features. The irradiation-research program must facilitate the testing of unique CANDU technology such as the fuel bundle, on-power refueling, the pressure tube, and the heavy-water coolant and moderator. Since 1957, NRU has operated as Canada's principal irradiation facility; however, it has become clear that NRU needs costly refurbishing if its lifetime is to be significantly extended. Accordingly, AECL has reviewed the requirements for CANDU irradiation research and is presently assessing alternatives for providing the necessary future access to irradiation-research facilities. Various options are under consideration, including renting space in existing research reactors, performing irradiations in CANDU power reactors, and building a new indigenous materials testing reactor specifically to meet essential program requirements

  13. Irradiation preservation of seafood: Literature review

    The application of gamma-irradiation for extending the shelf life of seafood has been of interest for many years. This report reviews a number of studies on seafood irradiation conducted over the past several years. Topics covered include seafood irradiation techniques and dosages, species applicability and differences, the effects of packaging on seafood preservation, and changes in organoleptic acceptability as a result of irradiation. Particular attention is given to radiation effects (likely and unlikely) of concern to the public. These include the potential for generation of toxic chemical products, botulinum toxin production, and other health concerns. No scientifically defensible evidence of any kind was found for any harmful effect of irradiation of seafoods at the doses being considered (less than 300 krad), and all indications are that irradiation is an acceptable and needed additional tool for seafood preservation. 49 refs., 14 figs., 14 tabs

  14. BR2 Reactor: Irradiation of Fusion Materials

    In collaboration with the EFDA (European Fusion Development Agreement), SCK-CEN irradiates several materials in the BR2 reactor at different temperatures and up to different doses to study their mechanical and physical properties during and after irradiation. Those materials are candidates for the construction of different parts of the ITER fusion reactor and of the long-term DEMO (DEMOnstration) reactor. The objectives of research performed at SCK-CEN are to irradiate up to 2 dpa RAFM (Reduced Activity Ferritic Martensitic) steels joints and RAFM ODS (Oxide Dispersion Strengthening) at 300 degrees Celsius; to build and test an experimental rig to perform in-situ creep-fatigue tests under neutron irradiation and its out-pile equipment and to design a new irradiation basket to irradiate in BR2 copper/stainless steel joints and RAFM specimens with implanted helium at low dose

  15. Irradiation: Technology whose time has come?

    The characteristics and application of food irradiation are briefly discussed, noting FDA's recent approval of the use of this technology to kill trichnella spirals in pork. Despite public concerns, food irradiation sources (gamma rays from Co-60 and Cs-137) are reported to leave no radioactivity in irradiated foods when used under FDA-approved guidelines. Food irradiation was legally ruled to be a 'food additive' by Congress in 1958 with FDA having regulatory authority; however, while low-level dosing has received FDA approval for sprout inhibition in root crops and as an insect control, concerns about cost-effectiveness, safety, and consumer acceptability have continued to limit high dose food irradiation (i.e., exposure to over 1000krad). The future acceptance of food irradiation still, primarily rests in the hands of food service professionals and their consumers

  16. Regeneration of rat thymus after irradiation

    The regeneration processes were investigated in the rat thymus after heavy dose irradiation (6 and 8 Gy). The weight of thymus was gradually recovered to normal level in 6 Gy irradiated thymus, however it recovered only up to 65% of normal level in 8 Gy irradiated thymus. The ED2 positive macrophages were increased on day 3, and then gradually decreased to normal level in 6 Gy irradiated thymus. Inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IFN-γ and TNF-α) mRNA expressions were gradually recovered from day 7, however IL-6 mRNA was expressed transiently on day 7 after 8 Gy irradiation. These observations suggest that regeneration processes of irradiated thymus may be intimately regulated by cytokine networks. (author)

  17. The IMO-1 mobile irradiation unit

    The IMO-I is made up by a gamma irradiation bucket and a fixed source, mounted on a trailer specially designed. This equipment has been completed with a radiocomunication device. The irradiator unit consist of two fixed and one movable body. The irradiation bucket has a volume of 30 x 40 x 30 cm and is moved through an hydraulic system with allows its vertical movement between the upper or charging position and the bottom or irradiation position. The telecontrol device has been installed in the room contiguous to the irradiator. The conventional industrial sources of Co60, are vertically located in stainless steel source holders at the botton fixed body and they can be changed according with the desired geometry. The trailer has been built over a plain chassis assembled structure with a double axle at the rear. It consists of two rooms, one for the irradiator machine and the other one for the telecontrol device and the radiocomunication facility. (author)

  18. HRB-22 irradiation phase test data report

    Irradiation capsule HRB-22 was a test capsule containing advanced Japanese fuel for the High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR). Its function was to obtain fuel performance data at HTTR operating temperatures in an accelerated irradiation environment. The irradiation was performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The capsule was irradiated for 88.8 effective full power days in position RB-3B of the removable beryllium (RB) facility. The maximum fuel compact temperature was maintained at or below the allowable limit of 1300 degrees C for a majority of the irradiation. This report presents the data collected during the irradiation test. Included are test thermocouple and gas flow data, the calculated maximum and volume average temperatures based on the measured graphite temperatures, measured gaseous fission product activity in the purge gas, and associated release rate-to-birth rate (R/B) results. Also included are quality assurance data obtained during the test

  19. Study of irradiation effect on curcuma polyphenols

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on curcumin (Curcuma Longa rhizome) component, particularly the polyphenolic fraction. Powdered rhizome was irradiated at 0, 5, 10 and 15 KGy (dose rate of 6 KGy / H). Polyphenolics were extracted and total polyphenols conent (TPC) was quantified using the Folin-Ciocalteau method. The irradiation effect was also evaluated by the HPLC technique. The chromatographic analysis showed that the irradiated and non-irradiated curcumin spectrum gave similar data. The antioxidant and antibacterial activities of the phenolic extracts were also assessed. the anti oxidative potential of the sample was evaluated using two radical scavenging methods with DPPH and ABTS. The antimicrobial analysis showed that the phenolic extracts of curcumin inhibited the growth of the studied microorganisms. Our results showed that irradiated samples were not affected in terms of polyphenols content and characteristics. (Author)

  20. Food Irradiation In Vietnam And Japan

    In 2008, Japan Atomic Energy Commission of Cabinet Office performed the study of current status of food irradiation in the world. The results showed that the total quantity of irradiated foods in 2005 was 405,000 tons. Seven main countries for food irradiation were China, USA, Ukraine, Brazil, South Africa, Vietnam and Japan. In Japan, only the potato irradiation for sprout inhibition is continued more than 35 years since 1974 but the quantity is decreasing. On the other hand, the food irradiation of Vietnam has been developed rapidly in a short time to export the frozen seafood and fruit. This paper shows the status of food irradiation in Vietnam and Japan, and the progress in both countries after 2005. (author)

  1. Food Irradiation Newsletter. Vol. 15, no. 1

    This Newsletter contains reports of the Final FAO/IAEA Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) on the Latin American Regional Cooperative Programme on Food Irradiation, the first FAO/IAEA RCM of the Research Coordination Programme on Analytical Detection Methods for Irradiation Treatment of Foods, and the final FAO/IAEA RCM on the Use of Irradiation as a Quarantine Treatment of Food and Agriculture Commodities. Also included are excerpts of the Seventh Annual Meeting of the International Consultative Group on Food Irradiation (ICGFI) and a summary of an ICGFI Task Force Meeting on Irradiation as a Quarantine Treatment of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables. The new regulations on food irradiation in the United Kingdom, effective 1 January 1991, are summarized

  2. Irradiation of foodstuffs: ECC Report (and debate)

    When the report of the European Communities Committee on the Irradiation of foodstuffs was introduced it was explained that this subject had already been debated and the government had been able to explain and justify the legislation to permit food irradiation. The report notes that, far from being an untested procedure, studies had shown it to be a safe way of treating food. The Committee members had studied all the evidence and visited a food irradiation plant in Holland. The main effects of food irradiation are noted and the reasons for allowing its use are given. The debate lasted nearly two hours and is reported verbatim. The debate covered many aspects of food irradiation: the chemical and nutritional changes in food, the damage to vitamins, the need to mark irradiated food clearly, the lack of an organised data base, food safety and the disposal of packaging materials. (UK)

  3. Irradiation preservation of seafood: Literature review

    Molton, P.M.

    1987-10-01

    The application of gamma-irradiation for extending the shelf life of seafood has been of interest for many years. This report reviews a number of studies on seafood irradiation conducted over the past several years. Topics covered include seafood irradiation techniques and dosages, species applicability and differences, the effects of packaging on seafood preservation, and changes in organoleptic acceptability as a result of irradiation. Particular attention is given to radiation effects (likely and unlikely) of concern to the public. These include the potential for generation of toxic chemical products, botulinum toxin production, and other health concerns. No scientifically defensible evidence of any kind was found for any harmful effect of irradiation of seafoods at the doses being considered (less than 300 krad), and all indications are that irradiation is an acceptable and needed additional tool for seafood preservation. 49 refs., 14 figs., 14 tabs.

  4. Irradiation swelling in self-ion irradiated niobium

    Refractory metals and their alloys offer distinct advantages for applications in nuclear systems where high temperatures are required because they exhibit high elevated temperature strength, better corrosion resistance in liquid alkali metal coolants and better thermophysical properties than other structural materials. One of the important aspects of applications of these materials at high temperatures in irradiation environments is the neutron induced swelling. However, swelling data for these materials are limited and the current theoretical treatments of swelling are not directly applicable to refractory metal since they were developed for face centered cubic (fcc) rather than body centered cubic (bcc) materials. This paper presents initial results of an investigation of swelling mechanisms in a model bcc metal; niobium. The objective of this work is to achieve an understanding of the elevated temperature swelling in bcc metals. A theory-experiment coupling is used to achieve this goal. The neutron induced swelling is simulated by irradiation with self-ions with an accumulated dose corresponding to approx.1 x 1023 n/cm2 (50 displacements per atom, dpa) which exceeds the fluences expected in SP-100

  5. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of numerous parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. To address this need, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). This test will be an instrumented lead test; and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. By characterizing magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, test results will enable the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. (authors)

  6. Irradiated food for immunocompromised people

    Immune-compromise is a condition in which the natural defenses against diseases are dimished; several situations can be cited as examples, including mis nourishment, pregnancy, young and old age. This enhances the probability of suffering microbial diseases, caused by food borne pathogens. Traditionally, immune-suppressed patients in hospitals were isolated from the environment, being their food sterilized by different treatments, including irradiation. At present the medical opinion differs from this approach due to the costs and specialized requirements, uncertainties about the clinical benefits, and psychological convenience. So, the tendency nowadays seems to move, when the patient's condition allows it, from 'sterile diets' to 'low microbe diets' (or 'clean diets'). At the National Atomic Energy Commission, Argentina, under Coordinated Research Programmes of the Food and Environmental Preservation Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, in which 14 countries participated, treatments at pasteurizing doses were studied to widen the meals availability for vulnerable persons, to include some products usually considered as 'high risk' , but nutritionally or psychologically adequate. In a first experience, nutritionists working at the corresponding Service in a Buenos Aires hospital elaborated diets suitable for patients with different immune-compromise degrees, and advised on the interesting meal types to be studied. In a second experience, advanced nutrition students of the Entre Rios University performed a sensory evaluation in which 44 immune- compromised patients at the Jose de San Martin Clinical School Hospital, Buenos Aires, tasted a whole irradiated lunch composed of meals usually forbidden due to high microbial risk, though highly desired. The patients evaluated this lunch with high scores and showed enthusiastic towards the irradiation treatment. This preservation treatment could not only be useful to supply hospitals but also supermarkets. (author)

  7. EPR Dosimetry in Irradiated Fingernails

    The Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) is being transformed in a complementary tool of biologically-based methods for evaluation of dose after accidental radiation exposure. Many efforts are being carried out in laboratories to evaluate the performance of different materials for its use in EPR doses measurements and for improving the current methods for spectrum analysis and calibration curves determinations. In our country the EPR techniques have been used in different areas with dosimetric (alanine) and non dosimetric purposes. Now we are performing the first studies to obtain properly dose response curves to be used for accidental dose assessments through irradiated fingernails. It is by now well known that the fingernails present two types of signals, a background one (BKS), originated in elastic and inelastic mechanical deformations and the radio induced one (RIS), object of interest (I). In this work we will present some of the previous studies performed to characterize the fingernail samples and we analyse the additive dose method for data obtained employing the technique of the substraction of the spectrum recorded at two different microwave powers in order to reduce the BKS signal. Fingernail samples collected from different donors were treated by soaking in water during 10 min and 5 min drying on paper towel and the BKS signals were studied previously its irradiation. The statistical analysis (R statistics) show a distribution with a Standard Deviation of 24% respects to its media. During these studies we also conserved in freezer for more than 6 months irradiated fingernails that, were periodically measured and the statistical analysis of the peak to peak amplitude show a normal distribution through the Quantile correlation test with a SD 11% respected to its median. (authors)

  8. Adriamycin--irradiation cutaneous complications

    Four cases of abnormally severe skin reactions including an instance of skin necrosis occurred in patients with breast cancer who were treated with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin and irradiation concurrently following mastectomy. These unusual skin reactions apparently resulted from the interaction of radiation with adriamycin and prompted us to modify both the radiation dose and the timing of administration of chemotherapy. To date, no unusual or severe skin reactions have been observed in 14 patients who have received chemotherapy with adriamycin plus radiation in accord with this modified treatment plan

  9. Transportation of irradiated fuel elements

    The report falls under the headings: introduction (explaining the special interest of the London Borough of Brent, as forming part of the route for transportation of irradiated fuel elements); nuclear power (with special reference to transport of spent fuel and radioactive wastes); the flask aspect (design, safety regulations, criticisms, tests, etc.); the accident aspect (working manual for rail staff, train formation, responsibility, postulated accident situations); the emergency arrangements aspect; the monitoring aspect (health and safety reports); legislation; contingency plans; radiation - relevant background information. (U.K.)

  10. Reconstruction in previously irradiated patients

    Chaudhari Charudatta

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy, which forms the mainstay of the treatment in many head and neck cancers, is viewed by many surgeons with skepticism. But many are not fully conversant with radiobiology and the effect of the radiation in tissues. This article aims at bringing the reader acquainted with the beneficial and harmful effects of radiation on the tissues. The alterations in tissue healing with radiation and the problems associated with surgery in a previously irradiated patient is discussed din detail. The role of free tissue transfer, in this setting is also dealt with.

  11. Thymus irradiation for myasthenia gravis

    Currier, R.D.; Routh, A.; Hickman, B.T.; Douglas, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with progressive myasthenia gravis without thymoma received treatment of 3000 rads (30 Gy) to the anterior mediastinum, and a followup was conducted for five to 18 years. Twenty-four patients had generalized myasthenia, and four had ocular myasthenia gravis. Twenty patients with generalized myasthenia survived the several month post-treatment period and improved, but four died during that period. The improvement lasted a median of 1.5 years, and older patients had longer remissions than younger patients. The four patients who had ocular myasthenia did not change after treatment. Mediastinal irradiation produces a temporary remission in generalized myasthenia.

  12. Thymus irradiation for myasthenia gravis

    Twenty-eight patients with progressive myasthenia gravis without thymoma received treatment of 3000 rads (30 Gy) to the anterior mediastinum, and a followup was conducted for five to 18 years. Twenty-four patients had generalized myasthenia, and four had ocular myasthenia gravis. Twenty patients with generalized myasthenia survived the several month post-treatment period and improved, but four died during that period. The improvement lasted a median of 1.5 years, and older patients had longer remissions than younger patients. The four patients who had ocular myasthenia did not change after treatment. Mediastinal irradiation produces a temporary remission in generalized myasthenia

  13. Food irradiation and airline catering

    Food poisoning from contaminated airline food can produce serious consequences for airline crew and passengers and can hazard flight. While irradiation of certain foodstuffs has been practised in a number of countries for some years, application of the process has not been made to complete meals. This paper considers the advantages, technical considerations, costs and possible application to airline meals. In addition, the need to educate the public in the advantages of the process in the wake of incidents such as Chernobyl is discussed

  14. Arrangement for selectively irradiating webs

    The arrangement for selectively irradiating a web includes a perforated band of a radiation impermeable substance which is guided in an endless path via a pair of guide rollers and has two juxtaposed runs in this path. A take-up roller conveys a web of material past one of the runs at a side thereof remote from the other run, the direction of movement of the web being other than parallel to that of the band and, preferably, normal thereto. An electron accelerator is provided at the far side of the run remote from the web and is effective for directing a radiation beam at the web through the perforations

  15. Resistance of acrylic vessel to gamma irradiation

    This paper describes the preliminary studies made in acrylic material in order to verify the effects of radiolysis in acrylic recipients in which the uranium ore standards are conditioned and check if the material is able to keep the 222Rn inside the vessel. The preliminary results after gamma irradiation of two kinds of recipients indicate no differences between the vessels irradiated and the ones no irradiated, related to color changes and tension resistance. (author)

  16. Irradiation and the food industry in France

    Part of a special section on food irradiation. The historical development in France of some industrial applications of food irradiation resulting from efficient technology transfer to the food industry is discussed. The 4 basic steps in successfully marketing any technology transfer, including irradiated foods, are that research must define conditions of the product's application, legislation must specify conditions of its application, consumers must accept the product, and appropriate processing capacity must exist

  17. Irradiation as Quarantine Treatment of Rambutan

    Eggs and larvae of Bactrocera dorsalis and Bactrocera correcta were investigated for their tolerant dose of irradiation. Artificially in feasted rambutans were irradiated at target doses of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 Gy. The results showed that the lowest dose that could inhibit adult emergence was 102.89 Gy for B. dorsalis and 97.61 Gy for B. correcta (P=0.999968, Probit 9). Larvae of B. dorsalis were irradiated at the dose

  18. Food Irradiation: Microbiological Safety and Disinfestation

    Irradiation can kill microorganisms, insects and parasites and this is a fundamental reason for applying the technology to improve the safety and quality of many foods and food products. This paper will discuss how various organisms can be affected by irradiation treatment. Factors affecting radiation sensitivity will also be discussed and how the use of irradiation in combination with other treatments can be beneficial in improving quality and safety

  19. Models of Solar Irradiance Variations: Current Status

    Natalie A. Krivova; Sami K. Solanki

    2008-03-01

    Regular monitoring of solar irradiance has been carried out since 1978 to show that solar total and spectral irradiance varies at different time scales. Whereas variations on time scales of minutes to hours are due to solar oscillations and granulation, variations on longer time scales are driven by the evolution of the solar surface magnetic field. Here the most recent advances in modelling of solar irradiance variations on time scales longer than a day are briefly reviewed.

  20. Dose rate effect in food irradiation

    It has been suggested that the minor losses of nutrients associated with radiation processing may be further reduced by irradiating foods at the high dose rates generally associated with electron beams from accelerators, rather than at the low dose rates typical of gamma irradiation (e.g. 60Co). This review briefly examines available comparative data on gamma and electron irradiation of foods to evaluate these suggestions. (137 refs., 27 tabs., 11 figs.)

  1. Resistance of acrylic vessel to gamma irradiation

    Carneiro, Andre Cavalcanti; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C.; Pereira, Marcio Tadeu; Rocha, Nirlando Antonio; Vilela, Jefferson Jose, E-mail: andreccarneiro@gmail.com, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br, E-mail: mtp@cdtn.br, E-mail: nar@cdtn.br, E-mail: jjv@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Braga, Mario Roberto Martins S.S., E-mail: mariomartins@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the preliminary studies made in acrylic material in order to verify the effects of radiolysis in acrylic recipients in which the uranium ore standards are conditioned and check if the material is able to keep the {sup 222}Rn inside the vessel. The preliminary results after gamma irradiation of two kinds of recipients indicate no differences between the vessels irradiated and the ones no irradiated, related to color changes and tension resistance. (author)

  2. Application of irradiated chitosan for fruit preservation

    Preliminary test of mango (Mangifera indica) preservation by irradiated chitosan coating has been investigated. The coating by using irradiated chitosan in 1.5% solution has extended the shelf life of mango from 7 to 15 days. At the 15th day mango coated by irradiated chitosan has been keeping good color, natural ripening, without spoilage, weight loss 10%, whereas the mango without coating was spoiled completely and the coating of fruit with unirradiated chitosan inhibited the ripening. (author)

  3. The influence of gamma irradiation in poultry

    The effect of a single whole - body gamma - irradiation of broiler chickens with a dose of 15.0 Gy on the activities of alaninaminotransferase (ALT) and aspartataminotransferase (AST) in the serum was investigated 1, 3, 5 and 7 days post irradiation. The numbers of erythrocytes and leucocytes and concentrations of haemoglobin in peripheral blood was investigated 1, 2, 4, 7, 9 and 14 days post irradiation. (authors)

  4. Food irradiation - a Northern Ireland dimension

    Irradiation is a technology which has been exploited in a wide variety of industries ranging from sterilization of medical products and polymer modification to applications with respect to food. Whilst food irradiation has recently become a controversial subject, the process has been studied for many years. Many products could be irradiated to advantage and these need to be thoroughly investigated before final recommendations can be made as to the commercial feasibility and suitability of the processing technology in the Northern Ireland context

  5. Electron spin resonance identification of irradiated fruits

    The electron spin resonance spectrum of achenes, pips, stalks and stones from irradiated fruits (stawberry, raspberry, red currant, bilberry, apple, pear, fig, french prune, kiwi, water-melon and cherry) always displays, just after γ-treatment, a weak triplet (aH ∼30 G) due to a cellulose radical; its left line (lower field) can be used as an identification test of irradiation, at least for strawberries, raspberries, red currants or bilberries irradiated in order to improve their storage time. (author)

  6. Effectiveness of irradiation in killing pathogens

    United States Environmental Protection Agency regulations include gamma ray irradiation of sludge as an approved Process to Further Reduce Pathogens (PFRP) prior to land application. Research at Sandia National Laboratories on pathogen inactivation in sludge by gamma irradiation has demonstrated that the 1 Mrad PFRP dose is capable, by itself, of eliminating bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens from sludge. Gamma irradiation of sludge in conjunction with the required Processes to Significantly Reduce Pathogens (PSRP) should also eliminate the viral hazard from wastewater sludges

  7. Food irradiation and its biological effects

    Irradiation of foods drew attention mostly in 1960s for disinfestation of food grains, spices and sprout inhibition in mainly potato and onion. γ-irradiation at 0.25 to 1 kGy dosage levels are usually used for irradiating grains, legumes, spices and sprout-prone vegetables. Irradiation of foods with in permissible dosage levels of 0.25 to 5 kGy is usually considered fairly safe from human consumption point of view not withstanding usual health concerns about its usage in foods. Irradiation of foods, in mostly solid or semi-solid form, at 5 kGy levels of γ-irradiation can achieve radicidation or, radiation equivalent of pasteurization and, if γ-irradiation is used at 10 kGy, it can achieve radappertization or, radiation equivalent of thermal commercial sterilization. However, the food industry uses γ-irradiation at 0.25 to 2 kGy only for mostly disinfestation of food grains/legumes, spices, sprout inhibition in potato and onion and, for surface sanitation of frozen fish, poultry and meat. Exposure to irradiation creates free radicals in foods that are capable of destroying some of the spoilage and pathogenic microflora but the same can also damage vitamins and enzymes besides creating some new harmful new chemical species, called unique radiolytic products (URPs), by combining with certain chemicals that a food may be laced with (like pesticides/fungicides). Exposure to high-energy electron beams are also known to create deleterious biological effects which may even lead to detection of trace amounts of radioactivity in the food. Some possible causes delineated for such harmful biological effects of irradiation include: irradiation induced vitamin deficiencies, the inactivity of enzymes in the foods, DNA damage and toxic radiolytic products in the foods. Irradiation, a non-thermal food preservation technique, has a role in salvaging enormous post harvest losses (25-30%) in developing economies to increase the per capita availability of foods. (author)

  8. Effect neutron irradiation on glassy carbon

    Consideration is being given to change of mass (m), volume (v), specific electric resistance (ρ), coefficient of linear thermal expansion (α), dynamic elasticity modulus (E), bending strength (σ) of glassy carbon materials under neutron irradiation. It is shown that neutron irradiation of glassy carbon leads to its shrinkage, accompanied by material disordering. Shrinkage and disordering of glassy carbon decrease with growth both of temperature of material treatment and irradiation temperature

  9. Application of irradiated chitosan for fruit preservation

    Lan, K.N. [Post-harvest Technology Institute, 4, Ngo Quyen-Ha Noi (Viet Nam); Lam, N.D. [Ha Noi Radiation Center, VAEC, 5T-160, Nghiado, Tuliem, Ha Noi (Viet Nam); Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Preliminary test of mango (Mangifera indica) preservation by irradiated chitosan coating has been investigated. The coating by using irradiated chitosan in 1.5% solution has extended the shelf life of mango from 7 to 15 days. At the 15th day mango coated by irradiated chitosan has been keeping good color, natural ripening, without spoilage, weight loss 10%, whereas the mango without coating was spoiled completely and the coating of fruit with unirradiated chitosan inhibited the ripening. (author)

  10. Nutritional value and acceptability of irradiated legumes

    Disinfestation of prepacked cereal products, legumes and pulses by low dose gamma irradiation is well documented. This study showed that irradiation of prepacked green gram (Mung), Bengal gram (Chick pea or Chole) and horse bean (Val) at 0.25 and 0.75 kGy dose did not alter the contents of macronutrients, functional qualities and sensory attributes of these legumes, compared to non-irradiated legumes. (author)

  11. Palliative irradiation of the bile ducts

    Kutzner, J.; Klose, K.; Keller, E.

    1985-11-01

    Carcinoma of the common hepatic bile duct or common bile duct were treated by interstitial irradiation with gold seeds using the percutaneous transhepatic drainage partly boosted by external irradiation. The interstitial dose of 50 Gy was given in two applications and 40 Gy by linac. Twice histological examination showed wide tumor destruction of local irradiation, but also much more tumor extension than seen before by diagnostic investigation. Mostly the therapy is only palliative because of the infiltration of liver and lymphnodes. (orig.).

  12. Preservation of potatoes by gamma irradiation

    In Algeria, potatoes are a major food item in nutrition habits. Because of lack of cold storage facilities, losses can reach up to 40% of the total output of summer harvest. This paper describes the first experiments on the application of gamma irradiation for the preservation of local varieties of potatoes. Losses are strongly reduced by inhibition sprouting effect of irradiation and reduction of sugars content has no significant influence on the acceptability of irradiated potatoes

  13. Heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy in irradiated C2C12 myoblasts and their bystander cells

    Autophagy is one of the major processes involved in the degradation of intracellular materials. Here, we examined the potential impact of heavy ion irradiation on the induction of autophagy in irradiated C2C12 mouse myoblasts and their non-targeted bystander cells. In irradiated cells, ultrastructural analysis revealed the accumulation of autophagic structures at various stages of autophagy (id est (i.e.) phagophores, autophagosomes and autolysosomes) within 20 min after irradiation. Multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and autolysosomes containing MVBs (amphisomes) were also observed. Heavy ion irradiation increased the staining of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 and LysoTracker Red (LTR). Such enhanced staining was suppressed by an autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. In addition to irradiated cells, bystander cells were also positive with LTR staining. Altogether, these results suggest that heavy ion irradiation induces autophagy not only in irradiated myoblasts but also in their bystander cells. (author)

  14. Grafting of styrene into pre-irradiated fluoropolymer films: Influence of base material and irradiation temperature

    Lappan, Uwe; Geißler, Uwe; Gohs, Uwe; Uhlmann, Steffi

    2010-10-01

    In this study, the influence of irradiation temperature on mechanical properties of three fluoropolymers and on grafting of styrene into the polymers by the pre-irradiation method was investigated. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the irradiated polymers regarding trapped radical species and changes in the chemical structure, respectively. For poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-perfluoropropyl vinyl ether) (PFA) the irradiation temperature was found to be an important factor for tensile strength and elongation at break of the pre-irradiated film. No strong effect of irradiation temperature on the mechanical properties was noticed for poly(tetrafluoroethylene-co-ethylene) (ETFE); however the yield of grafting drops at high irradiation temperatures. Finally, mechanical properties of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) were found to be dramatically altered, even if the film was irradiated at elevated temperature.

  15. Effect of gamma irradiated parenchyma on the growth of irradiated potato tuber buds

    The development of buds greffed on irradiated potato parenchyma was studied. The irradiated parenchyma does not influence the sprouting capacity of buds, but it affects the way they develop. (Author) 9 refs

  16. Gemstone enhancing dedicated gamma irradiator development

    The gemstones gamma irradiation process to enhance the color is widely accepted for the jewelry industry. These gems are processed in conventional industrial gamma irradiation plant which are optimized for other purposes, using underwater irradiation devices with high rejection rate due to it's poor dose uniformity. A new conception design, which states the working principles and manufacturing ways of the device, was developed in this work. The suggested device's design is based on the rotation of cylindrical baskets and their translation in circular paths inside and outside a cylindrical source rack as a planetary system. The device is meant to perform the irradiation in the bottom of the source storage pool, where the sources remain always shielded by the water layer. The irradiator matches the Category III IAEA classification. To verify the physical viability of the basic principle, tests with rotating cylindrical baskets were performed in the Multipurpose Irradiator raised in the CTR, IPEN. Also, simulations using the CADGAMMA software, adapted to simulate underwater irradiations were performed. With the definitive irradiator, the irradiation quality will be enhanced with better dose control and the production costs will be significantly lower than market prices due to the intended treatment device's optimization. (author)

  17. Tolerance of edible flowers to gamma irradiation

    People have been eating flowers and using them in culinary creations for hundreds of years. Edible flowers are increasingly being used in meals as an ingredient in salads or garnish, entrees, drinks and desserts. The irradiation process is an alternative method that can be used in disinfestation of food and flowers, using doses that do not damage the product. The sensitivity of flowers to irradiation varies from species to species. In the present research was irradiated with doses up to 1 kGy some edible flowers to examine their physical tolerance to gamma-rays. Furthermore, high doses gamma irradiation causes petal withering, browning process and injury in edible flowers. (author)

  18. Quality of gamma irradiated California Valencia oranges

    The effects of gamma irradiation at 0.30-1.0 kGy (30-100 krad) on sensory qualities, certain biochemical components, and short-term storage life of Valencia oranges were examined. Irradiation at 0.75 kGy maintained food quality during 7°C storage for 7 weeks, while 0.50 kGy irradiation retained food quality at 21 °C. Irradiation at 0.26-0.30 kGy accomplished fruit fly disinfection while preserving market qualities of the oranges

  19. The efficacy testing of irradiated shrimp paste

    Two lots of shrimp paste from commercial source in Samutsakhon were irradiated at a recommended minimum dose of 6 kGy using a J S 8900 cobalt-60 carrier gamma irradiator of Thai Irradiation Center in Patum Thani. Red Perspex dosimeter were used to measure the absorbed dose throughout the product with emphasis on the region of minimum and maximum absorbed dose. This way, it was aimed to compare the dose effects of gamma irradiation on the microbiological, chemical and sensory quality of shrimp paste. The results indicated that the shrimp paste received minimum and maximum absorbed dose of 6.85 and 12.83 kGy with dose uniformity ratio of 1.87 . Throughput rate is 468 kilogram per hour. The microbiological load of shrimp paste was rather high resulting in not compliance with Thai industrial standard 1080-2535. Irradiation at 6.8 kGy reduced total viable bacterial count by one log cycle. Although the irradiated product was organoleptic ally acceptable and could be kept for 16 months at room temperature, mold and Clostridium perfringens were still present in some samples after irradiation and during prolonged storage in amount that exceeds the limitation of Thai industrial standard. Chemical properties such as p H, moisture and sodium chloride content of irradiated shrimp paste were not significantly changed after irradiation

  20. Insects control in soybean flour by irradiation

    The effect of irradiation with the doses 0.5 and 1.0 kGy on disinfestation of soy meal and on important chemical compounds of this product, and the organoleptic quality of hamburgers made with irradiated soy meal were studied in this paper. The results showed that the effectiveness of applied doses in the control of insect pests of soy meal during its storage and total proteins, fat, and moisture of product did not change by irradiation. The organoleptic quality of hamburgers with irradiated soy meal was the same as the quality of the product made with untreatment meal

  1. Irradiation preservation of onions on commercial scale

    The present studies were initiated to reduced the post-harvest losses and extend the storage life of onions by sproupt inhibiting dose (10 Krad) of gamma irradiation on commercial scale during storage at ambient conditions under the shade. The post-irradiation research studies were conducted in a specially designed onion-shed and under the shade of for the winter and summer crops, respectively. Preservation of onions by irradiation on commercial scale revealed that treatment with 0.1 KGy irradiation dose and subsequent storage under the shade sinificantly reduced these losses. (A.B.)

  2. Development of modified starch by gamma irradiation

    The purpose of this study was to develop the production technology of modified starch. Corn starches were gamma irradiated at 0-110 kGy and the effect of irradiation dose levels on the physicochemical properties of corn starches were investigated. Blue value linearly decreased, while alkali number and solubility markedly increased as irradiation dose levels were increased. The optical transmittance increased as applied irradiation dose levels were increased in the temperature range of 65-95 deg. C. Water binding capacity and swelling power showed maximum value at 30 and 10 kGy, respectively and they tended to decrease thereafter. Gelatinization viscosity of the gamma irradiated starch considerably decreased as compared to that of the non-irradiated starch. Irradiation at 110kGy resulted in a marked reduction of peak viscosity and cooling viscosity at 30 deg. C by 100 and 300 times, respectively. The physicochemical properties of corn starch irradiated at 30 kGy were similar to those of commercial acid-modified starch, while those of corn starch irradiated at 100 kGy were similar to those if oxidized starch

  3. Deformation fracture of materials under irradiation

    This study aims at fundamental research to experimentally and theoretically elucidate extreme plastic deformation behavior dynamically induced under irradiation, fatigue fracture performance under irradiation, and both superposed phenomena. In 1997 fiscal year, a study on fatigue fracture under irradiation scarcely found any report, and on creep fatigue superposed phenomena scarcely obtained any information for its objects on 20% cold working materials of 316 stainless steel. As a result, extreme creep deformation at 60degC under irradiation was confirmed experimentally, which supported its forecasted results using computer simulation. As life much enlarged in comparison with at non-irradiation on simple fatigue under irradiation, it was found that elongation was reduced by adding load-bearing. Furthermore, it was found that on test of specimen giving preirradiation of dosage equal to total one both modes of simple fatigue and creep fatigue showed longer lives than those under non-irradiation, the elongation was smaller than that under non-irradiation and was nearly same as that of creep fatigue under irradiation. (G.K.)

  4. Microstructural characterisation of irradiated CT material

    The characterisation of these materials using electron-optical techniques provides quantitative data concerning the hardening of the grain interiors by dislocation loops and the changes in grain boundary chemistry caused by irradiation. The microstructure and microchemistry has been studied in three irradiated and one archive samples of material used in the Halden IASCC programme. In the archive condition, the 316NG steel exhibits slight thermal non-equilibrium segregation of chromium and molybdenum to the grain boundaries. On irradiation these effects are reduced by irradiation-induced segregation and the enrichments of nickel and silicon are similar to those found in a 304 steel irradiated under the same conditions. The 347 steel was found to have similar grain boundary microchemistry to the 348G steel irradiated in the first phase of the Halden IASCC programme. The high fluence 304 steel showed significant radiation-induced segregation with pronounced depletion of chromium and enrichment of silicon and nickel at the grain boundaries. High densities of small dislocation loops were found in the irradiated steels. The size and the density of the loops depended at least as much on the composition of the steel as on the irradiation level. A significant finding in the 304 steel was the presence of a high density of nano metre-scale cavities which give rise to a calculated swelling of ∼0.1%. This is the most significant swelling data yet published for a BWR-irradiated steel. (Author)

  5. Study of irradiation creep of vanadium alloys

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Thin-wall tubing was produced from the 832665 (500 kg) heat of V-4 wt.% Cr-4 wt.% Ti to study its irradiation creep behavior. The specimens, in the form of pressurized capsules, were irradiated in Advanced Test Reactor and High Flux Isotope Reactor experiments (ATR-A1 and HFIR RB-12J, respectively). The ATR-A1 irradiation has been completed and specimens from it will soon be available for postirradiation examination. The RB-12J irradiation is not yet complete.

  6. Tolerance of edible flowers to gamma irradiation

    Koike, Amanda C.R.; Araujo, Michel M.; Costa, Helbert S.F.; Almeida, Mariana C.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H., E-mail: ackoike@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    People have been eating flowers and using them in culinary creations for hundreds of years. Edible flowers are increasingly being used in meals as an ingredient in salads or garnish, entrees, drinks and desserts. The irradiation process is an alternative method that can be used in disinfestation of food and flowers, using doses that do not damage the product. The sensitivity of flowers to irradiation varies from species to species. In the present research was irradiated with doses up to 1 kGy some edible flowers to examine their physical tolerance to gamma-rays. Furthermore, high doses gamma irradiation causes petal withering, browning process and injury in edible flowers. (author)

  7. Irradiation of sewage sludge and waste water

    The aim of this investigaton was to establish how the chemico-physical nature of sewage sludge varies with irradiation dose and circulaton frequency. For aerobically-stable sludge, irradiation treatment was found to improve settling, whereas dehydration was impaired. Irradiation achieved an approx. 20% improvement in dehydration for anaerobically stable sewage from a non-heated fermentation room. Filtration resistance and the amount of organic flocculant required deteriorated, however. For anaerobic sludge from a heated fermentation room, settling behaviour improved by 10%, specific filtration resistance by 50% and dehyration by as much as 80% upon irradiation. A radiation dose greater than 300 krad (3000 T/kg) was however necessary. The amount of organic flocculant required remained uncharged and at the same time more favourable settling and filtering characteristics of the sludge could be observed. Increase in dry matter of the liquid sludge on irradiation was caused to same 60-95% by suspended matter (> 0.45 μm). Increasing circulation frequency led, in general, to a deterioration in the sludge characteristics of all treated sludges. In order to achieve a dose distribution as homogenous as possible, irradiation should be carried out with a medium circulation frequency of approx. 1.5 rotations/min. Irradiated sewage sludge had more favourable physical properties compared to pasteurisation and had no repugnant odor. Provided sufficient inoculating sludge is added to raw sewage, irradiation treatment does not affect the fermentation gas production. Irradiated sludge exhibited a slightly more favourable settling and filtration behaviour. (orig./MG)

  8. Irradiation effect on animal feeds and feedstuffs

    Aiming to secure the safety of animal feeds and develop the new resources, the effect of γ-irradiation on disinfection and the changes in components were investigated. Salmonellae and coliforms contaminating in animal feeds and feedstuffs were eliminated by 0.5 -- 0.6 Mrad and 0.5 -- 0.8 Mrad, and osmophilic moulds were sterilized by 0.7 -- 0.75 Mrad. From these results, it is concluded that the dose for disinfection of animal feeds is 0.8 Mrad. The main components were hardly changed by irradiation up to 5 Mrad, and the component changes in irradiated samples could be suppressed during storage while the components in unirradiated samples were markedly changed with the growth of osmophilic moulds. Histamine and lysinoalanine, which may cause the feed poisoning, were never accumulated in feedstuffs by irradiation. The nutritional value of chick feeds was not changed by 1.0 Mrad irradiation. From these results, it is considered that no problem for wholesomeness of animal feeds occurs by irradiation. Therefore, the irradiation is effective for disinfection and keeping the nutritional value of animal feeds during storage. Irradiation promotes the recovery of proteins in the wastewater by coagulation of proteins and improves the property of coagulants due to the degradation of polysaccharides. These results indicate that irradiation is effective to develop the new resources for animal feeds. (author)

  9. Food Irradiation Newsletter. V. 12, no. 2

    This Newsletter reports activities of two ICGFI training workshops convened in Santiago, Chile, and Rehovot, Israel, in the past six months. The summary report of the FAO/IAEA Seminar on Food Irradiation for Developing Countries in Africa is also included. A follow-up to this Seminar is the ''Co-ordinated Research Programme on Food Irradiation for African Countries'' which will be implemented as soon as funds become available. Further, this issue contains a report of the Working Group on Food Irradiation of the European Society for Nuclear Agriculture convened in Stara Zagora, Bulgaria in 1987 and status reports of practical applications of food irradiation in different countries. 2 tabs

  10. Spectrophotometry determination of irradiated ascorbic acid

    This work aims at the study of the radiation effects on vitamin C, when irradiated either solid, as a powder, or in an acetic-metaphosforic acid solution, irradiated with Co-60 or electron beam irradiation (EB). Doses of Co-60 γ radiation of 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 5.0, 10, 20 and 50 kGy were used for both solid or liquid samples. EB irradiations, with doses of 0, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200 and 300 kGy were only employed for solid state samples. For samples irradiated in solution, a decrease of the UV absorbance as a linear function of dose was shown for doses of 0.05, 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 kGy remaining constant afterwards. UV spectra of samples irradiated in the solid state and dissolved after irradiation did not change as a function of dose showing no effect of γ or EB irradiation on ascorbic acid in this case. These results point out the importance of the water content on vitamin C stability and suggest several practical considerations that can be drawn on industrial food irradiation. (author). 11 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Utilization of HANARO Irradiation Facilities in 2010

    HANARO is an open-pool type multi-purposed research reactor located at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), in Korea. To support the national research and development programs on nuclear reactors and nuclear fuel cycle technology in Korea, various neutron irradiation facilities such as the rabbit (small non-instrumented capsule) irradiation facilities, the capsule irradiation facilities, and the fuel test loop facilities have been developed and actively utilized for the irradiation tests requested by numerous users. In this paper, the recent utilization of the facilities to support the National R and D Projects relevant to the present and future nuclear systems of Korea is described

  12. Acceptance of irradiated food: an education issue

    The commercial use of irradiated food technology in Brazil has a slow growing due to misinterpretation by most Brazilian consumers, who have been mislead by wrong ideas about the meaning of what is nuclear energy. Researches indicate that consumers have difficult in accepting such a technology due to the confusion between the terms irradiation and radioactivity, which are often related to health risks. When properly informed about the process, its purpose and the benefits offered by food irradiation technology, most consumers react positively. Therefore, this work aims to: first, to evaluate the acceptance of irradiated foods by Brazilian consumers; second, to verify the teaching at school about the food irradiation process; third, to analyze the Brazilian school curriculum from elementary school to high school, regarding nuclear energy applications; then, to compare the content taught in Brazil with the content covered in other surveyed countries, such as France, United States, and China. The methodology of this study consisted of a systematic survey of the specific literature, and a questionnaire to verify the acceptance of irradiated food by Brazilian consumers. According to the researched bibliography, it was clear the recommendation of an early school education about the usage of nuclear energy, more specifically, food irradiation. Such a recommendation is due to the fact that the consulted costumers, in Brazil and other countries mentioned in this work, do not clearly understand the full benefits of irradiated food. Hence, education is fundamental for the acceptance of new technologies by consumers, as it is the case with irradiated food. (author)

  13. The irradiation effects on zirconium alloys

    Negut, Gh. [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Campului Str., 1, Mioveni P.O. Box 78, 0300 Pitesti (Romania)]. E-mail: joenegut@yahoo.com; Ancuta, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Campului Str., 1, Mioveni P.O. Box 78, 0300 Pitesti (Romania); Radu, V. [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Campului Str., 1, Mioveni P.O. Box 78, 0300 Pitesti (Romania); Ionescu, S. [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Campului Str., 1, Mioveni P.O. Box 78, 0300 Pitesti (Romania); Stefan, V. [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Campului Str., 1, Mioveni P.O. Box 78, 0300 Pitesti (Romania); Uta, O. [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Campului Str., 1, Mioveni P.O. Box 78, 0300 Pitesti (Romania); Prisecaru, I. [University Politehnica Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania); Danila, N. [University Politehnica Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-05-31

    Pressure tube samples were irradiated under helium atmosphere in the TRIGA Steady State Research and Material Test Reactor of the Romanian Institute for Nuclear Research (INR). These samples are made of the Zr-2.5%Nb alloy used as structural material for the CANDU Romanian power reactors. After irradiation, mechanical tests were performed in the Post Irradiation Examination Laboratory (PIEL) to study the influence of irradiation on zirconium alloys mechanical behaviour. The tensile test results were used for structural integrity assessment. Results of the tests are presented. The paper presents, also, pressure tube structural integrity assessment.

  14. The irradiation effects on zirconium alloys

    Pressure tube samples were irradiated under helium atmosphere in the TRIGA Steady State Research and Material Test Reactor of the Romanian Institute for Nuclear Research (INR). These samples are made of the Zr-2.5%Nb alloy used as structural material for the CANDU Romanian power reactors. After irradiation, mechanical tests were performed in the Post Irradiation Examination Laboratory (PIEL) to study the influence of irradiation on zirconium alloys mechanical behaviour. The tensile test results were used for structural integrity assessment. Results of the tests are presented. The paper presents, also, pressure tube structural integrity assessment

  15. Radioprotective efficiency of fullerenol in irradiated mice

    Trajkovic, S.; Dobric, S.; Dragojevic-Simic, V.; Milovanovic, Z. [National Poison Control Centre, Military Medical Academy, Belgrade (Czechoslovakia); Djordjevic, A. [Faculty of Science, Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Novi Sad (Czechoslovakia)

    2005-07-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that fullerenol, a polyhydroxylated derivative of fullerene (C{sub 60}(OH){sub n} n = 12-26), has a high antioxidative potential. Since any radiation injury is mainly a consequence of the action of free radical species, the aim of this study was to examine radioprotective efficiency of fullerenol in whole-body irradiated mice. The experiment was performed on male, adult, white mice, whole-body irradiated with X-rays doses of 6 to 8 Gy (X-ray energy of 8 MV). Fullerenol C{sub 60}(OH){sub 24} was given in doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg i.p. 30 minutes before irradiation. The experimental groups consisted of 25-30 animals each. The survival rate and body mass gain of irradiated animals were monitored for 30 days after irradiation. The mean lethal times (LT{sub 50}) of irradiated mice and mean lethal dose of X-rays were calculated and compared. The results showed that fullerenol C{sub 60}(OH){sub 24}, in a dose of 100 mg/kg i.p., prolonged LT{sub 50} of irradiated mice. This effect was especially pronounced in mice irradiated with 7 and 8 Gy of X-rays. It seems that radioprotective efficiency of fullerenol C{sub 60}(OH){sub 24} is more marked in mice irradiated by higher doses of X-rays. (orig.)

  16. Effect of gamma irradiation on drugs

    Several drugs (ceftazidime, vancomycin, glucagon, erythromycin and dobutamine) were studied in order to determine their radiostability. The methods used to measure the degradation of the drug were the potency and the colour change after irradiation. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is currently being used to detect irradiated foodstuffs and may be a promising technique to detect irradiated drugs. Trapped radicals in cefazolin sodium were studied and quantified by ESR for this purpose. It is proposed that the trapped radicals play an important role in the formation of the final radiolytic compounds. The potency of ceftazidime was not significantly modified after an irradiation of 25 kGy, whereas the potency of erythromycin and dobutamine decreased slightly. Glucagon was revealed to be radiosensitive with a significant decrease in its potency after irradiation. The visible spectra of glucagon and dobutamine did not change significantly after irradiation. The absorbance of erythromycin and vancomycin increased after irradiation. According to European Pharmacopoeia standards, the colour change of ceftazidime is unacceptable. The ESR spectra reveal that the trapped radicals in cefazolin sodium are characteristic of an irradiation. The radical concentration is dependent on the irradiation dose and decays over time. Radical concentration in cefazolin sodium was reduced by 99% after 100 days of storage. These radicals are responsible for about 13% of the measured final radiolytic product. Ionic reactions could also lead to final radiolytic products. (author)

  17. Microbiological decontamination of some herbs by irradiation

    The research work on the microbiological decontamination of the medical herbs by electron beam was carried out. The seven samples of the herbs granules were irradiated at the doses 3, 6 and 10 kGy. It has been shown, that D10 values are varied in several samples after irradiation. Additional, research work, by gas chromatographic method, on the composition volatile oils (salvia, orange, peppermint and anise), after irradiation at the dose 4.4 and 8.8 kGy was carried out. It was not significant differences in the compositions between control and irradiated oils. (author). 12 figs, 2 tabs

  18. Wholesomeness and safety of irradiated foods

    Irradiation with gamma-rays, X-rays or fast electrons can be used to change foodstuffs in beneficial ways or to destroy harmful organisms. Gamma rays do not induce radioactivity in foods, but X-rays and fast electrons can induce short lived radioactivity if sufficiently energetic. This imposes limitations on the energies which can be used, and a short wait between irradiation and consumption may be advisable. Irradiation produces chemical changes in foodstuffs, and some foods are unsuitable for irradiation. With appropriate foods, trials with animals and human volunteers generally show that the product is safe. Some loss in nutritional quality can take place, which could be significant for some individuals, but are unlikely to be important for those on a balanced diet. Irradiation does not eliminate all risk from microbial contamination. Foods to be irradiated should be good quality, and need to be kept under proper conditions after irradiation. Irradiated foods should be appropriately labelled. Tests for radiation would help to enforce necessary controls. If the process is properly carried out on appropriate foods, and all due precautions are taken, irradiated foods are wholesome and safe. 52 references

  19. Detection of hydrocarbons in irradiated foods

    Miyahara, Makoto; Maitani, Tamio [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Akiko; Kamimura, Tomomi; Nagasawa, Taeko [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Allied Health Sciences; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Ito, Hitoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Establishment

    2003-06-01

    The hydrocarbon method for the detection of irradiated foods is now recognized as the international technique. This method is based on radiolysis of fatty acids in food to give hydrocarbons. In order to expand this technique's application, ten foods (butter, cheese, chicken, pork, beef, tuna, dry shrimp, avocado, papaya, and mango) were irradiated in the range from 0.5 to 10 kGy and the hydrocarbons in them were detected. Recoveries of the hydrocarbons from most foods were acceptable (38-128%). Some hydrocarbons were found in non-irradiated foods, particularly, in butter, cheese, tuna, and shrimp. Seven irradiated foods, butter, cheese, chicken, beef, pork, tuna, dry shrimp, and avocado were detectable at their practical doses by measuring the appropriate marker hydrocarbons. In most case, marker hydrocarbon will be 1,7-hexadecadiene. However, the marker hydrocarbons produced only in irradiated foods varied from food to food; therefore, it is necessary to check a specific irradiated food for marker hydrocarbons. On the other hand, two irradiated foods (papaya and mango which were irradiated at their practical doses) were difficult to distinguish from non-irradiated foods using this method. (author)

  20. Food Irradiation Newsletter. V.13, no. 1

    The International Conference on the Acceptance, Control of, and Trade in Irradiated Food, jointly sponsored by FAO, IAEA, WHO and ITC-UNCTAD/GATT, Geneva, Switzerland, December 1988, recognized that (1) food irradiation has the potential to reduce the incidence of foodborne diseases; (2) food irradiation can reduce post-harvest food losses and make available a larger quantity and a wider variety of foodstuffs for consumers - It can also be an effective quarantine treatment for certain food and thus contribute to international trade; (3) international trade in irradiated foods would be facilitated by harmonization of national procedures based on internationally recognized standards for the control of food irradiation. The ''International Document on Food Irradiation'' adopted by consensus at the Conference is included in this issue, which also contains excerpts of the 5th Annual Meeting of the International Consultative Group on Food Irradiation (ICGFI), convened in Vienna, September 1988, and reports of two co-ordinated meetings, the second Research Co-ordination Meeting on the Use of Irradiation as a Quarantine Treatment of Food and Agricultural Commodities, and the Second Co-ordination Meeting on Food Irradiation Programme for Developing Countries in Middle East and Europe. 3 tabs

  1. Irradiation of polyacrylate compositions in air

    The invention relates to processes for polymerizing polyacrylate functional compositions and in particular to processes for the curing in air of certain polyacrylate functional materials by irradiation

  2. Detection of hydrocarbons in irradiated foods

    The hydrocarbon method for the detection of irradiated foods is now recognized as the international technique. This method is based on radiolysis of fatty acids in food to give hydrocarbons. In order to expand this technique's application, ten foods (butter, cheese, chicken, pork, beef, tuna, dry shrimp, avocado, papaya, and mango) were irradiated in the range from 0.5 to 10 kGy and the hydrocarbons in them were detected. Recoveries of the hydrocarbons from most foods were acceptable (38-128%). Some hydrocarbons were found in non-irradiated foods, particularly, in butter, cheese, tuna, and shrimp. Seven irradiated foods, butter, cheese, chicken, beef, pork, tuna, dry shrimp, and avocado were detectable at their practical doses by measuring the appropriate marker hydrocarbons. In most case, marker hydrocarbon will be 1,7-hexadecadiene. However, the marker hydrocarbons produced only in irradiated foods varied from food to food; therefore, it is necessary to check a specific irradiated food for marker hydrocarbons. On the other hand, two irradiated foods (papaya and mango which were irradiated at their practical doses) were difficult to distinguish from non-irradiated foods using this method. (author)

  3. Fermentation of irradiated sugarcane must

    Bacillus and Lactobacillus are bacteria that usually contaminate the ethanolic fermentation by yeasts and my influence yeast viability. As microorganisms can be killed by ionizing radiation, the efficacy of gamma radiation in reducing the population of certain contaminating bacteria from sugarcane must was examined and, as a consequence, the beneficial effect of lethal doses of radiation on some parameters of yeast-based ethanolic fermentation was verified. Must from sugarcane juice was inoculated with bacteria of the general Bacillus and Lactobacillus. The contaminated must was irradiated with 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0 and 10.0 kGy of gamma radiation. After ethanolic fermentation by the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) the total and volatile acidity produced during the process were evaluated: yeast viability and ethanol yield were also recorded. Treatments of gamma radiation reduced the population of the contaminating bacteria in the sugarcane must. The acidity produced during the fermentation decreased as the dose rate of radiation increased. Conversely, the yeast viability increased as the dose rate of radiation increased. Gamma irradiation was an efficient treatment to decontaminate the must and improved its parameters related to ethanolic fermentation, including ethanol yield, which increased 1.9%. (author)

  4. Consumer acceptance of irradiated produce

    Food irradiation is a process that uses ionizing radiation to affect physically and interact with the atoms and molecules that make up foods and food contaminants, causing chemical and biological consequences which can be used in beneficial ways (Urbain, 1986). On April 18, 1986, ionizing radiation applications were expanded to include treatment of fresh fruits and vegetables at doses up to 1kGy, or 100 krad (Kader, 1986). At this time, the Food and Drug Administration also required that all irradiated food products sold in retail packages be labeled with a symbol (Figure 1) and the statement, “treated by irradiation” (or “irradiated”). The statement also may describe the type of radiation used, as well as its purpose, e.g. “treated with gamma radiation to extend shelf life.” Additional information, such as “this treatment does not induce radioactivity,” may be included for educational purposes. Current legislation allows for the removal of the wording “treated by irradiation” (or “irradiated”) after April 18, 1988

  5. Irradiation: Consumers' point of view

    The various potential reactions of consumers to irradiated foods are enumerated, with consideration being given to significant factors that will influence acceptance such as accentuation of freshness, just sufficient information (since the consumer wants a few reassuring facts, not too many technical details and a good reason to buy the product), assurance of safety, taste and appearance of the products, assurance of correct treatment under product conditions that will ensure the expected benefit, and indication of the expiry date (to ensure that shelf life used up in new transportation and distribution shcedules is clear to the consumer), assurance that the nutritional value has not been affected, competitive pricing - particularly where the handler has benefited from part of the shelf life extension, and information as to the benefits to the economy (lower food spoilage). Some steps taken in Canada to promote the technology and its acceptance by consumers were: adoption of the Codex Standard and Recommended Code of Practice, assurance of proper industry performance, and a decision to develop an appropriate symbol to designate irradiated food in a clearly recognisable manner, without unduly antagonizing the consumer. The Consumer's Association has acted to allay consumers' fears by supplying information to all media and by providing speakers at Seminars. It is now the task of industry to use ''marketing experts'' to further the education and selling process, and to tell the facts in simple concise terms. (author)

  6. The Cracking of Irradiated Uranium

    Structural features other than fission-product gas bubbles seen in unrestrained, unalloyed uranium irradiated in the alpha range to burn-ups of up to 0.7% of all atoms are described. The main features are: (1) Brittle grain-boundary cracks in which the grains appear to have parted without plastic deformation. These cracks are associated with thermal cycling and high maximum temperatures (~600°C). (2) Transgranular cracks, which are comparatively rare. It is suggested that they may be related to the pseudo-cleavage or ''twin parting'' observed in unirradiated uranium by Cahn. (3) Grain boundary ''creep voids'' believed to arise from the coalescence of vacancies under tensile stress. The voids may form a path for crack propagation or may themselves coalesce to form cracks. Apart from the direct effects of these features in increasing the volume and changing the thermal conductivity and mechanical properties of the uranium, a mechanism is discussed by which cracks may accumulate fission-product gas and cause further volume increases. The possible effects of structural variations in the uranium and of restraint during irradiation on the incidence of cracking and void formation are considered. (author)

  7. Disinfection of water by irradiation

    The disinfection by radiation is a kind of physical treatment method, in which microorganisms are killed by utilizing the action of ionization induced in substances by irradiation. As it does not use chemicals, such secondary pollution as residual chemicals and the formation of harmful organic substances never occurs. Besides, as the technical merits, this method is not affected by water quality, and this method is effective also against the spores and viruses in shells. Since a large apparatus is required for the radiation process as compared with ultraviolet process, it is suitable to the treatment of large scale, for example the disinfection of sewerage secondary treatment water. The history of radiation sterilization is briefly described. The first irradiation for the disinfection of sewerage treatment water was attempted in 1953. However, for the reason of high treatment cost, it was not put in practical use. Recently, due to the advance of electron beam accelerator technology, the cost reduction by the treatment of a large quantity is expected. Gamma ray and electron beam are mainly used. The mechanism of radiation sterilization, the sterilization of sewerage secondary treatment water by radiation and the safety of radiation-treated water are reported. (K.I.)

  8. Disinfestation of mangoes by irradiation

    The mango is a fruit-bearing very important in the mexican economy. Mexico is between the first positions of the world like country producing with an average export volume of 40,000 annual tons in the last years. For this reason it was decided to make this investigation, which was developed according to the investigation protocols proposed by the Agricultural Research Service of the USA (ARS - US DOA). The objective is to account with the technical and scientific necessary bases to propose to the US DOA the regulation of the irradiation process like quarantine treatment for Mexican export mango. The goals are: to determine in the laboratory the minimum dose (Dmin.) to inhibit the emergency of adults of the species of the fruit flies of more importance for Mexico. To confirm the least radiation dose Dmin. for quarantine treatment based on the safety value Probit-9. To evaluate the mango quality irradiated to 2 and 2.5 times the Dmin. proposal for quarantine treatment. According to information provided by the General Direction of Vegetable Sanity, it was determined that the fly species of the fruit of more economic importance for Mexico are of the genus Anastrepha ludens, Anastrepha serpentina, Anastrepha obliqua and Ceratitis capitata. (Author)

  9. Gas retention in irradiated beryllium

    Helium (an inert gas) with low solubility in beryllium is trapped in irradiated beryllium at low temperatures (22 n/cm2 (E > 1 MeV). In these samples the calculated helium generated was ∼ 14,000 appm. They are described in terms of swelling, annealing, microstructure, and helium bubble behavior (size, density and mobility). A second sample was irradiated to ∼5 x 1022 n/cm2 (E > 1 MeV). In that one the calculated helium and tritium generated were ∼24,000 appm He and ∼3720 appm, and tritium content was examined in a dissolution experiment. Most of the tritium was released as gas to the glovebox indicating the generated tritium was retained in the helium bubbles. In a third set of experiments a specimen was examined by annealing at a succession of temperatures to more than 600 degree C for tritium release. In the temperature range of 300--500 degree C little release (0.01--0.4%) occurred, but there was a massive release at just over 600 degree C. Theories of swelling appear to adequately describe bubble behavior with breakaway release occurring at high helium contents and at large bubble diameters. 8 refs., 6 figs

  10. Biological effects of prenatal irradiation

    After large releases of radionuclides, exposure of the embryo or fetus can take place by external irradiation or uptake of radionuclies. The embryo and fetus are radiosensitive throughout prenatal development. The quality and extent of radiation effects depend on the development stage. During the preimplantation period (one to 10 days postconception, p.c.) a radiation exposure of at least 0.2 Gy can cause the death of the embryo. Malformations are only observed in rare cases when genetic predisposition exist. Macroscopic, anatomical malformations are induced only after irradiation during the major organogenesis (two to eight weeks p.c.). A radiation dose of about 0.2 Gy is a doubling dose for the malformation risks as extrapolated from experiments with rodents. The human embryo may be more radioresistant. During early fetogenesis (8-15 weeks p.c.) a high radiosensitivity exists for the developmental of the brain. Radiation doses of 1.0 Gy cause severe mental retardation in about 40% of the exposed fetuses. It must be taken into account that a radiation exposure during the fetal period can also induce cancer. It is generally assumed that the risk exists at about the same level as for children. (Author)

  11. Fermentation of irradiated sugarcane must

    Alcarde, Andre Ricardo; Horii, Jorge [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao]. E-mail: aralcard@esalq.usp.br; Walder, Julio Marcos Melges [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia

    2003-12-01

    Bacillus and Lactobacillus are bacteria that usually contaminate the ethanolic fermentation by yeasts and my influence yeast viability. As microorganisms can be killed by ionizing radiation, the efficacy of gamma radiation in reducing the population of certain contaminating bacteria from sugarcane must was examined and, as a consequence, the beneficial effect of lethal doses of radiation on some parameters of yeast-based ethanolic fermentation was verified. Must from sugarcane juice was inoculated with bacteria of the general Bacillus and Lactobacillus. The contaminated must was irradiated with 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0 and 10.0 kGy of gamma radiation. After ethanolic fermentation by the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) the total and volatile acidity produced during the process were evaluated: yeast viability and ethanol yield were also recorded. Treatments of gamma radiation reduced the population of the contaminating bacteria in the sugarcane must. The acidity produced during the fermentation decreased as the dose rate of radiation increased. Conversely, the yeast viability increased as the dose rate of radiation increased. Gamma irradiation was an efficient treatment to decontaminate the must and improved its parameters related to ethanolic fermentation, including ethanol yield, which increased 1.9%. (author)

  12. Electrocardiographic changes by thoracic irradiation

    A study on radiation induced electrocardiographic changes concomitant and after thoracic irradiation was conducted on 50 histopathologically proved cases of cancer including carcinoma of the breast, carcinoma of the oesophague (middle 1/3) and Hodgkin's disease (above diaphragm). All cases were treated by tele Co60 therapy. No cardiac abnormality was noticed after 2000 rads in 2 weeks. Eighteen percent of the carcinoma of the oesophagus and 20 percent of carcinoma of the breast (left side) depicted ECG changes after 4400 rads in 4.5 weeks. None of the case of carcinoma of the breast (Rt. side) showed any change in electro-cardiogram post-therapy. All these findings persisted in subsequent follow ups of 6 months. All those patients except one showing ECG changes also found to have sinus tachycardia. Thus there is a considerable risk of radiation induced heart disease in cancer patients after incidental thoracic irradiation by radiation doses of the order of 4400 rads in 4 weeks or more. Even though the efficacy of radiation therapy can not be compromised in an attempt to protect the heart, the regular ECG examination after 4000 rads in such cases is recommended. (author). 2 tables, 3 figures, 9 refs

  13. Control of tapeworms by irradiation

    Cysticerci of Taenia solium were exposed to gamma radiation in doses varying from 20-140 krad. Radiation had an adverse effect on the ability of the cysticerci to evaginate in vitro after a time lag of 9 days. This effect was most marked at doses of 100 krad and higher, thus no cysticerci exposed to 140, 120 and 100 krad evaginated after 12, 18 and 21 days, respectively. On Day + 24, when 60% of the control cysticerci evaginated, 55%, 50%, 30% and 40% of the cysticerci exposed to 20, 40, 60, and 80 krad, respectively, evaginated in vitro. Cysticerci exposed to radiation doses of 20-120 krad are as infective to golden hamsters as are unirradiated cysticerci. Cestodes resulting from irradiated cysticerci, however, cannot maintain themselves indefinitely, and are excreted or digested at varying times from Day + 12 onwards. Moreover, cestodes resulting from such irradiated cysticerci do not grow, but are resorbed, and finally consist of only a scolex. By Day + 30 the mean length of the worms resulting from the unirradiated cysticerci is 173,8 mm, while those resulting from cysticerci exposed to 20 and 40 krad consist of scolices only and the hamsters fed material exposed to 60 krad were negative. It appears, therefore, that radiation inhibits the ability of the cells in the neck region to divide and thus form new proglottids. Carcasses infested with cysticercosis can possibly be rendered fit for human consumption by exposure to gamma radiation at doses between 20 and 60 krad

  14. Uranium briquettes for irradiation target

    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari; Martins, Ilson Carlos; Carvalho, Elita Fontenele Urano de; Durazzo, Michelangelo, E-mail: saliba@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Direct irradiation on targets inside nuclear research or multiple purpose reactors is a common route to produce {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc radioisotopes. Nevertheless, since the imposed limits to use LEU uranium to prevent nuclear armament production, the amount of uranium loaded in target meats has physically increased and new processes have been proposed for production. Routes using metallic uranium thin film and UAl{sub x} dispersion have been used for this purpose. Both routes have their own issues, either by bringing difficulties to disassemble the aluminum case inside hot cells or by generating great amount of alkaline radioactive liquid rejects. A potential route might be the dispersion of powders of LEU metallic uranium and nickel, which are pressed as a blend inside a die and followed by pulse electroplating of nickel. The electroplating provides more strength to the briquettes and creates a barrier for gas evolution during neutronic disintegration of {sup 235}U. A target briquette platted with nickel encapsulated in an aluminum case to be irradiated may be an alternative possibility to replace other proposed targets. This work uses pulse Ni-electroplating over iron powder briquette to simulate the covering of uranium by nickel. The following parameters were applied 10 times for each sample: 900Hz, -0.84A/square centimeters with duty cycle of 0.1 in Watts Bath. It also presented the optical microscopy analysis of plated microstructure section. (author)

  15. Effects of ion beam irradiation on semiconductor devices

    Nashiyama, Isamu; Hirao, Toshio; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Energetic heavy-ion irradiation apparatus has been developed for single-event effects (SEE) testing. We have applied three irradiation methods such as a scattered-ion irradiation method, a recoiled-atom irradiation method, and a direct-beam irradiation method to perform SEE testing efficiently. (author)

  16. The Thai multipurpose food irradiation and experience in food irradiation

    Losses of agricultural produce in Thailand are due to the hot climate accelerating the ripening of fruits and sprouting of vegetables, spoilage microorganisms, pathogenic microorganisms, and insect infestation. Losses amount to as much as 30%. Onion, garlic and potato which have a short shelf-life, for instance, cannot be stored long enough for off-season domestic consumption. The annual production and domestic consumption of onion in Thailand is approximately 50,000 and 30,000 tons respectively. However, about 50% of the harvest is discarded during storage because of rotting and sprouting. Fresh onion can be stored for only a few months under tropical conditions. Therefore during the scarce season of 1982, Thailand had to import 4,760 tons of onion at a cost of 56 million baht. Other major problems for fruit are short shelf-life and insect infestation. Food items for export may meet with rejection by importing countries due to insect infestation and microbial contamination. This can mean considerable economic loss. In order to solve these problems, the government of Thailand is interested in setting up a multi-purpose agricultural pilot plant demonstration facility for government-industry-consumer benefit. Since 1963, the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) has been responsible for carrying out research and development in food irradiation in the areas of extending shelf-life, insect disinfestation, radicidation, and inhibition of sprouting in food and agricultural produce. There are many well-trained scientists able to assist in the commercialization of food irradiation. The multi-purpose agricultural pilot plant demonstration facility in this project will be operated by the staff of OAEP. The service will be available for irradiation of eight selected food items, initially for 6,084 operating hours. These are onion, potato, and garlic at 6,000, 2,000, 6,000 tons respectively; salted and dried fish at 1,000 and mungbeans at 3,000 tons; fermented pork, Vietnam

  17. Cost-benefit analysis of irradiation of vegetables and fruits at the Shanghai irradiation centre

    Differences between the developing and the developed countries in development and application of food irradiation are discussed, including the objectives of irradiation, scale, and the operation and control of facilities. These represent the chief problems of development of food irradiation in the developing countries. A proposal concerning the economic benefit of a gamma irradiation facility is discussed. In the light of many years' operating experience at the Shanghai Irradiation Centre, the operation cost per hour and coefficient of economic benefit are presented. These data can be used to estimate the economic benefit of gamma irradiated products at any time, and are useful for directing the daily operation of gamma irradiation facilities. From examples of cost-benefit analysis of irradiated garlic and apples it is shown that to improve the benefit of gamma irradiation facilities the annual hours of operation must be increased, so as to reduce the cost of operation. Food irradiated with a low dose provides more economic benefit than other irradiated products; the coefficients of economic benefit will increase as the irradiated processing throughput increases. Practical examples are given relating to garlic and apples, showing the economic benefit to wholesalers and retailers. (author). 4 refs, 3 figs, 7 tabs

  18. Commercial irradiation of natural rubber latex

    Cost of irradiation is one of the important factor to expand industrial application of radiation vulcanized natural rubber latex (RVNRL). The irradiation cost was studied under the RCA project, RAS/8/061/1109, and reasonable cost was reported by use of single purpose latex irradiation facility of 1500 ton/year. For a market development of RVNRL, irradiation of latex of the order of 100 ton/year may be required. Construction of the single purpose pilot plant of this scale is not commercially feasible. In this stage use of contract irradiation facilities which are familiar world wide gives a solution. Radia Industry Co., Ltd. have two irradiation facilities with 1.4 MCi of Co-60 and irradiate natural rubber latex for Okamoto Industries, Inc. with use of the incremental dose irradiator which is commonly used for sterilization of medical supplies. Natural rubber latex filled in standard 20 liter plastic bags are loaded on the hanger of trolley conveyer, and irradiated without agitation. The dose uniformity was around 2, and properties of the RVNRL was reported satisfactory. The dose uniformity can be improved if special container is applied. In future it is expected to construct a larger single purpose irradiation plant to provide low cost irradiation for multi-client, or import RVNRL from RCA countries provided transportation test is successful. We have interest in electron beam valcanization. Radia Industry Co., Ltd. put an order 5 MeV, 150 kW electron beam machine and it will be operational in 1990. High penetration of 5 MeV electron beam is useful for radiation processing in the condensed media like natural rubber latex. (author)

  19. Effect of dexamethasone on irradiated rabbit pancreas

    The caudal half of the rabbit pancreas was irradiated with 3,000 rad of 60Co in a single dose. Dexamethasone, 1 mg, was given intravenously 30 minutes before irradiation, and then, 0.5 mg of dexamethasone was given intramuscularly for the following 3 days. Pancreatic tissues were observed 20 hours, 44 hours, 3 days, 4 days, 10 days and 25 days after irradiation. Light microscopic findings in the single irradiated group showed swelling and vacuole formation of acinar cells and dilatation of the ductal system at the early stage after irradiation. Twenty-five days after irradiation, lobules were separated by fibrous tissues, atrophy of acini appeared, and the number of acini decreased. In the dexamethasone, treated group atrophic degeneration of acinar cells was accelerated, focal necrosis appeared at the early stage after irradiation, and fibrosis appeared markedly. Electron microscopic findings in the single irradiated group showed whorle-like configurations of rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in acinar cells, an decrease in lysosomes, a decrease in exocrine granules, and large autophagic vacuoles. Changes in nucleus, swelling of basement membranes of acini, and an increase in collagen fibri appeared at the early stage after irradiation. In the dexamethasone treated group, above-mentioned changes were observed more markedly and many necrotic cells were observed at the early stage after irradiation. Twenty-five days after irradiation, a marked increase in collagen fibri and a marked decrease in acini was observed. In acinar cells, a decrease in rough ER, disappearance of exocrine granules, swelling of mitochondria, and appearance of filament-like substances were observed. (Tsunoda, M.)

  20. Development of irradiation capsules in liquid metal environment in Joyo and their application to irradiation creep measurement of vanadium alloys

    In order to perform irradiation experiments in a liquid metal environment in a nuclear reactor, an irradiation technique with sodium bonding irradiation capsules was developed and a series of neutron irradiation experiments with sodium bonding irradiation capsules were performed in Joyo. The design and fabrication of sodium bonding capsules, sodium filling into capsules, capsule loading to Joyo, irradiation experiments, dismantling for irradiated capsules, removing the irradiated specimens from sodium-filled capsules, and sodium cleaning of the irradiated specimens were established through this study. Using the Joyo irradiation with the sodium bonding capsules where irradiation temperature was distributed uniformly, the irradiation creep experiment for highly purified V-4Cr-4Ti alloys, NIFS-Heat, was carried out and the knowledge about the irradiation creep behavior of the alloys was obtained. (author)

  1. Radiation safety at irradiation facilities

    Radiation processing is a regulated industry that has been operating safely for more than 40 years in commercial and business parks. The workers in these facilities wear normal everyday clothing and comply with standard health and worker safety regulations. Yet it is recognized that large quantities of radioactive material located at one place (for any purpose) or high energy electrons or X rays pose a potential hazard to people (workers as well as the general public) and the environment, indicating the need to achieve a high degree of safety and reliability in the use of these sources. In view of this, the IAEA in collaboration with several international organizations - Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), International Labour Organization (ILO), OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), World Health Organization (WHO) and Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) - issued Basic Safety Standards (BSS) for protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources in 1996. The standards comprise basic requirements to be fulfilled in all activities involving radiation exposure. They are aimed to serve as a practical guide for public authorities and services, employers and workers, specialized radiation protection bodies, enterprises, and safety and health committees. These requirements are fulfilled by effective quality control procedures together with careful design, manufacture, transportation, installation, operation and decommissioning of radiation sources. In 2003, the IAEA published a report that provides information and guidance regarding the design and safe operation of facilities to organizations intending to purchase and operate industrial irradiation facilities. This information satisfies the requirements of the BSS in that a code is provided to ensure that radiation exposure of the workers and public is kept as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) during normal operation, maintenance and decommissioning, and in emergency situations

  2. Effect of medium and post-irradiation storage on rooting of irradiated onions

    Rooting test for detection of irradiation in onion bulbs was studied. Onions were exposed to different dose levels of 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 Gy. The effects of irradiation dose, cultivar difference, rooting medium and post-irradiation storage on the rooting were investigated. The number and the length of the roots formed in onions were found to decrease on irradiation. The effect was more at higher doses. The effect of irradiation on rooting was also evident after 120 days of storage. (author)

  3. Irradiation growth of titanium alloy VT1-0 under proton irradiation

    A specially developed procedure was used to study the irradiation growth of the rods of titanium alloy VT1-0 under proton irradiation. There was determined the relation between the dimensional changes induced by irradiation growth and the texture. The effect of various types of heat-treatment on the texture, structure and irradiation growth of the VT1-0 rods was studied. It is demonstrated that destruction of the initial texture of VT1-0 rods by the mechanical and microwave heat-treatment results in almost complete suppression of irradiation growth

  4. Present status of food irradiation in Japan

    Mainly irradiation effect on potatoes and onions and an actual condition of irradiation technique were given an outline, and a general situation of food establishments in Japan was described. Potatoes can be stored for 8 months during a resting stage of about 100 days after a harvest when they are irradiated 7 - 15 Krad of γ-ray. Induced radioactivity is not recognized, and there is no problem in a field of hygienic chemistry. Toxicity is not recognized in animal experiments, and irradiation of potatoes is put to practical use. Germination of onion can be prevented for 8 months by irradiation of 3 - 15 Krad within one month after a harvest. In order to lengthen the period of irradiation and to prevent germination of onion, a good combination of irradiation and storage of potatoes at low temperature of about 30C is desirable. Sterilization and killing of insects in rice, wheat, Vienna sausage, parades of marine products were also described, and food irradiation establishments with γ-ray was introduced. (Kanao, N.)

  5. Industrialization development of food irradiation in China

    This report introduces present status on food irradiation at home and abroad in detail. It also introduces the scientific research and application in reducing diseases caused by food borne pathogens, quarantine control of import and export products, grain store and killing insects in traditional Chinese medicine. The report also analyzes the problems in developing food irradiation in China and gives some suggestions

  6. Research on food irradiation in Indonesia

    Studies on various aspects of food irradiation have been done in Indonesia since 1968, mainly at the Centre for the Application of Isotopes and Radiation, National Atomic Energy Agency of Indonesia. Three irradiation facilities available at the Centre are gamma cell-220, panoramic batch irradiator, and latex irradiator with the present source capacities of about 1.1, 40, and 163.8 kCi Co-60, respectively. In this paper, the present status of research and development on irradiation is presented, covering (1) spices and medicinal plants, (2) rice, wheat flour and coffee bean, (3) fish and fishery products, (4) animal feed, and (5) ongoing projects including fresh fruits, cacao beans, and cashew nut. The Sub-Committee for the Control of Irradiation of Food and Medical Products, set up in August 1984, has prepared the draft of recommendations regarding the regulation for application of food irradiation in Indonedia and the draft of Regulation for the Control of and Trade in Irradiated Food and Traditional Drug to be issued by the government. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Effect of brain prenatal irradiations (review)

    Tendency of intellectual deficiency and emotion disturbance among children which were irradiated in womb was found. Study of the risk of endogenic psychic disorder development and, first of all, schizophrenia in pre-natally irradiated children, as a result of Chernobyl catastrophe, is of special interest. 256 refs., 1 tab

  8. Chemical consequences of irradiating nucleic acids

    On the basis of literature data, a discussion is presented of the DNA damage which would be produced in a cellular environment and an attempt is made to place this damage in perspective as a potential hazard in food irradiation. The topics discussed are radiation damage mechanisms, OH reactions with DNA, base products, sugar products, and evaluation of damage from irradiated nucleic acids

  9. Identification of irradiated apples for phytosanitary purposes

    Horak, Celina I.; Di Giorgio, Marina; Kairiyama, Eulogia

    2009-07-01

    The irradiation treatment of fresh fruits and vegetables for phytosanitary purposes is a satisfactory alternative method to others like fumigation and cold and hot treatments. Its use is increasing in several countries, and at present its approval is under revision by the National Regulatory Authorities. To verify the control process, apart from irradiation and dosimetry certificates, National Authorities require complementary evidence to show the efficacy of this treatment, especially when the documentation is not clear. The irradiation of fresh fruits produces single and double fragmentation in the DNA molecule, which can be measured using the microgel electrophoresis of individual cell (comet assay). The purpose of this work was to evaluate if it is possible to identify the irradiated apples for phytosanitary purposes from the others that were not treated. The possibility to estimate the absorbed dose was also evaluated. The methodology was carried out on the cell suspension obtained from irradiated seed cells with incremental doses (100, 200 and 300 Gy). The irradiation treatment for phytosanitary purposes to avoid emergency of codling moth ( Cydia pomonella) is 200 Gy. The fragmentation produced in the irradiated samples was proportional with the incremental doses applied. These results show that with this methodology it can be determined if the apple was irradiated or not. This comet assay is a simple, economical and interesting method that can be used, in case of necessity, by the National Authorities.

  10. Kraft cooking of gamma irradiated wood, (2)

    Pre-irradiation of wood in alkaline aqueous ethanol increases kraft pulp yield by up to 1.2%, as already reported. In order to clarify the mechanism of the pulp yield gain, the behaviors of lignin and carbohydrates during pre-irradiation and cooking were investigated. The results are summarized as follows: 1) γ-Irradiation of guaiacylethane in alkaline aqueous ethanol produced 5-(1-hydroxyethyl)-guaicylethane, which is formed by radical coupling between α-hydroxyethyl radical from ethanol and guaiacylethane radical having an unpaired electron at C-5. 5,5'-Dehydrodiguaiacylethane, which may be a predominant product produced by γ-irradiation in the absence of ethanol, was also detected. 2) The yield of vanillin obtained by nitrobenzene oxidation of MWL decreased with an increase of γ-ray dosage. The presence of ethanol during γ-irradiation lessened the extent of this decrease and also the degradation of cellobiose. 3) Gel filtration of the products obtained by γ-irradiation of MWL and cellobiose in the presence of 14C-ethanol showed the possible combination between ethanol and MWL or cellobiose. 4) Molecular weight distributions of kraft lignin obtained from pre-irradiated beech chips were compared with those obtained from unirradiated chips. This result shows that γ-irradiation in the presence of ethanol decreases the ability of lignin to condense during kraft cooking. (author)

  11. Schedule and status of irradiation experiments

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Robertson, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The current status of reactor irradiation experiments is presented in tables summarizing the experimental objectives, conditions, and schedule. Currently, the program has one irradiation experiment in reactor and five experiments in the design or construction stages. Postirradiation examination and testing is in progress on ten experiments.

  12. Brazilian Consumer views on food irradiation

    Behrens, J.H.; Barcellos, M.N.; Frewer, L.J.; Nunes, T.P.; Landgraf, M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the consumer attitude to food irradiation in São Paulo, Brazil, through a qualitative research perspective. Three focus groups were conducted with 30 consumers, responsible for food choices and purchases. Both irradiated and nonirradiated food samples were served in the sessi

  13. Economic prospects of food irradiation in Zambia

    Instances of economic benefits which are likely to be considered when introducing food irradiation as an industrial and commercial food processing method in Zambia are discussed from a point of view of increasing both the local and external marketing potential of various local food commodities. The present status of the food irradiation programme is also briefly discussed. (author)

  14. Design of special facility for liquor irradiation

    The design principle, physical scheme, technological process, construction and safety features of a special facility used for irradiating liquors is briefly described. 0.925 x 1015 Bq cobalt source is used and the irradiation capacity for liquors approaches 10 t per day. The facility bears advantages of simple in construction, easy to operate, safe, reliable and efficient in source utilization

  15. Pagure 60Co panoramic irradiation facility

    After a description of the various parts of 'PAGURE', a 10 KCi panoramic irradiation facility, and of the operations data, a critic scrutiny is given. From the experience of five years operations, working of the facility can be thought of very satisfying. From the point of view of standardization of irradiation facilities, PAGURE can be taken, in its range, as a standard design. (authors)

  16. Cherry Irradiation Studies. 1984 annual report

    Fresh cherries, cherry fruit fly larvae, and codling moth larvae were irradiated using the PNL cobalt-60 facility to determine the efficacy of irradiation treatment for insect disinfestation and potential shelf life extension. Irradiation is an effective disinfestation treatment with no significant degradation of fruit at doses well above those required for quarantine treatment. Sufficient codling moth control was achieved at projected doses of less than 25 krad; cherry fruit fly control, at projected doses of less than 15 krad. Dose levels up to 60 krad did not adversely affect cherry quality factors tested. Irradiation above 60 krad reduced the firmness of cherries but had no significant impact on other quality factors tested. Irradiation of cherries below 80 krad did not result in any significant differences in sensory evaluations (appearance, flavor, and firmness) in tests conducted at OSU. Irradiation up to 200 krad at a temperature of about 250C (770F) did not measurably extend shelf life. Irradiation at 500 krad at 250C (770F) increased mold and rotting of cherries tested. There is no apparent advantage of irradiation over low-temperature fumigation

  17. Food irradiation; Global aspects and future prospects

    Matsuyama, Akira (Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture (Japan). Nodai Research Institute)

    1990-07-01

    This paper reviews researches, commentaries, and conference and public records of food irradiation, published mainly during the period 1987-1989, focusing on the current conditions of food irradiation that may pose not only scientific or technologic problems but also political issues or consumerism. Approximately 50 kinds of food, although not enough to fill economic benefit, are now permitted for food irradiation in the world. Consumerism is pointed out as the major factor that precludes the feasibility of food irradiation in the world. In the United States, irradiation is feasible only for spices. Food irradiation has already been feasible in France, Hollands, Belgium, and the Soviet Union; has under consideration in the Great Britain, and has been rejected in the West Germany. Although the feasibility of food irradiation is projected to increase gradually in the future, commercial success or failure depends on the final selection of consumers. In this respect, the role of education and public information are stressed. Meat radicidation and recent progress in the method for detecting irradiated food are referred to. (N.K.) 128 refs.

  18. Identification of irradiated apples for phytosanitary purposes

    The irradiation treatment of fresh fruits and vegetables for phytosanitary purposes is a satisfactory alternative method to others like fumigation and cold and hot treatments. Its use is increasing in several countries, and at present its approval is under revision by the National Regulatory Authorities. To verify the control process, apart from irradiation and dosimetry certificates, National Authorities require complementary evidence to show the efficacy of this treatment, especially when the documentation is not clear. The irradiation of fresh fruits produces single and double fragmentation in the DNA molecule, which can be measured using the microgel electrophoresis of individual cell (comet assay). The purpose of this work was to evaluate if it is possible to identify the irradiated apples for phytosanitary purposes from the others that were not treated. The possibility to estimate the absorbed dose was also evaluated. The methodology was carried out on the cell suspension obtained from irradiated seed cells with incremental doses (100, 200 and 300 Gy). The irradiation treatment for phytosanitary purposes to avoid emergency of codling moth (Cydia pomonella) is 200 Gy. The fragmentation produced in the irradiated samples was proportional with the incremental doses applied. These results show that with this methodology it can be determined if the apple was irradiated or not. This comet assay is a simple, economical and interesting method that can be used, in case of necessity, by the National Authorities.

  19. Rat brain methotrexate levels following cranial irradiation

    Brain disfunction has been reported in leukemia patients receiving both brain irradiation and methotrexate (MTX) therapy. It has been speculated that the neuropathy is a result of radiation-induced vascular permeability in the brain, allowing increased levels of MTX to cross the Blood-Brain-Barrier. If this hypothesis is correct, it may be possible to reduce brain MTX concentrations following irradiation by administering drugs which reduce the radiation-induced vascular permeability. To examine the hypothesis, the authors have irradiated male S-D rats to the brain area only with a single dose of 20 Gy /sup 137/Cs gamma rays. Various times following irradiation we have administered MTX i.v. at either 50 or 100 mg/kg. At 18 hours after MTX administration, brain tissue was taken, and the MTX concentration was measured. Compared to nonirradiated controls, elevated levels of MTX were seen in the brain when the drug was administered 30 hours following irradiation (p < 0.05). Elevated levels were not seen when the drug was administered 7 or 14 days post irradiation. Blood levels of the drug in irradiated animals were elevated compared to nonirradiated controls when MTX was administered 7 days post irradiation. Additional time points must be evaluated before any substantial conclusions can be drawn

  20. Schedule and status of irradiation experiments

    The current status of reactor irradiation experiments is presented in tables summarizing the experimental objectives, conditions, and schedule. Currently, the program has four irradiation experiments in reactor, and five experiments in the design or construction stages. Postirradiation examination and testing is in progress on ten experiments