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Sample records for 1-mm beryllium pebbles

  1. Stepped-anneal helium release in 1-mm beryllium pebbles from COBRA-1A2

    Oliver, B.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Stepped-anneal helium release measurements on two sets of fifteen beryllium pebbles irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-w), are reported. The purpose of the measurements was to determine the helium release characteristics of the beryllium using larger sample sizes and longer anneal times relative to earlier measurements. Sequential helium analyses were conducted over a narrower temperature range from approximately 800 C to 1100 C in 100 C increments, but with longer anneal time periods. To allow for overnight and unattended operation, a temperature controller and associated circuitry were added to the experimental setup. Observed helium release was nonlinear with time at each temperature interval, with each step being generally characterized by an initial release rate followed by a slowing of the rate over time. Sample Be-C03 showed a leveling off in the helium release after approximately 3 hours at a temperature of 890 C. Sample Be-D03, on the other hand, showed a leveling off only after {approximately}12 to 24 hours at a temperature of 1100 C. This trend is consistent with that observed in earlier measurements on single microspheres from the same two beryllium lots. None of the lower temperature steps showed any leveling off of the helium release. Relative to the total helium concentrations measured earlier, the total helium releases observed here represent approximately 80% and 92% of the estimated total helium in the C03 and D03 samples, respectively.

  2. Behavior of beryllium pebbles under irradiation

    Dalle-Donne, M.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik; Baldwin, D.L.; Gelles, D.S.; Greenwood, L.R.; Kawamura, H.; Oliver, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium pebbles are being considered in fusion reactor blanket designs as neutron multiplier. An example is the European `Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Blanket.` Several forms of beryllium pebbles are commercially available but little is known about these forms in response to fast neutron irradiation. Commercially available beryllium pebbles have been irradiated to approximately 1.3 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E>1 MeV) at 390degC. Pebbles 1-mm in diameter manufactured by Brush Wellman, USA and by Nippon Gaishi Company, Japan, and 3-mm pebbles manufactured by Brush Wellman were included. All were irradiated in the below-core area of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II in Idaho Falls, USA, in molybdenum alloy capsules containing helium. Post-irradiation results are presented on density change measurements, tritium release by assay, stepped-temperature anneal, and thermal ramp desorption tests, and helium release by assay and stepped-temperature anneal measurements, for Be pebbles from two manufacturing methods, and with two specimen diameters. The experimental results on density change and tritium and helium release are compared with the predictions of the code ANFIBE. (author)

  3. Tritium analyses of COBRA-1A2 beryllium pebbles

    Baldwin, D.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Selected tritium measurements have been completed for the COBRA-1A2 experiment C03 and D03 beryllium pebbles. The completed results, shown in Tables 1, 2, and 3, include the tritium assay results for the 1-mm and 3-mm C03 pebbles, and the 1-mm D03 pebbles, stepped anneal test results for both types of 1-mm pebbles, and the residual analyses for the stepped-anneal specimens. All results have been reported with date-of-count and are not corrected for decay. Stepped-anneal tritium release response is provided in addenda.

  4. Postirradiation examination of beryllium pebbles

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Postirradiation examinations of COBRA-1A beryllium pebbles irradiated in the EBR-II fast reactor at neutron fluences which generated 2700--3700 appm helium have been performed. Measurements included density change, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The major change in microstructure is development of unusually shaped helium bubbles forming as highly non-equiaxed thin platelet-like cavities on the basal plane. Measurement of the swelling due to cavity formation was in good agreement with density change measurements.

  5. Characteristics of microstructure and tritium release properties of different kinds of beryllium pebbles for application in tritium breeding modules

    Kurinskiy, P.; Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Applied Materials - Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP); Rolli, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Applied Materials - Materials Biomechanics (IAM-WBM); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    Beryllium pebbles with diameters of 1 mm are considered to be perspective material for the use as neutron multiplier in tritium breeding modules of fusion reactors. Up to now, the main concept of helium-cooled breeding blanket in ITER project foresees the use of 1 mm beryllium pebbles fabricated by company NGK, Japan. It is notable that beryllium pebbles of other types are commercially available at the market. Presented work is dedicated to a study of characteristics of microstructure, packaging density and parameters of tritium release of beryllium pebbles produced by Bochvar Institute, Russian Federation, and Company Materion, USA. (orig.).

  6. Tritium release from highly neutron irradiated constrained and unconstrained beryllium pebbles

    Chakin, V., E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu; Rolli, R.; Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • For the irradiated constrained beryllium pebbles, the tritium release occurs easier than for the unconstrained ones. • Tritium retention in the irradiated constrained and unconstrained beryllium pebbles decreases with increasing irradiation temperature. • Formation of sub-grains in the constrained beryllium pebbles facilitate the open porosity network formation. - Abstract: Beryllium is the reference neutron multiplier material in the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) breeding blanket of fusion power plants. Significant tritium inventory accumulated in beryllium as a result of neutron-induced transmutations could become a safety issue for the operation of such blankets as well as for the nuclear waste utilization. To provide a related materials database, a neutron irradiation campaign of beryllium pebbles with diameters of 0.5 and 1 mm at 686–1006 K, the HIDOBE-01 experiment, has been performed in the HFR in Petten, the Netherlands, producing up to 3020 appm helium and 298 appm tritium. Thermal desorption tests of irradiated unconstrained and constrained beryllium pebbles were performed in a purge gas flow using a quadrupole mass-spectrometer (QMS) and an ionization chamber. Compared to unconstrained pebbles, constrained beryllium pebbles have an enhanced tritium release at all temperatures investigated. Small elongated sub-grains formed under irradiation in the constrained pebbles promote formation of numerous channels for facilitated tritium release.

  7. Tritium release from highly neutron irradiated constrained and unconstrained beryllium pebbles

    Highlights: • For the irradiated constrained beryllium pebbles, the tritium release occurs easier than for the unconstrained ones. • Tritium retention in the irradiated constrained and unconstrained beryllium pebbles decreases with increasing irradiation temperature. • Formation of sub-grains in the constrained beryllium pebbles facilitate the open porosity network formation. - Abstract: Beryllium is the reference neutron multiplier material in the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) breeding blanket of fusion power plants. Significant tritium inventory accumulated in beryllium as a result of neutron-induced transmutations could become a safety issue for the operation of such blankets as well as for the nuclear waste utilization. To provide a related materials database, a neutron irradiation campaign of beryllium pebbles with diameters of 0.5 and 1 mm at 686–1006 K, the HIDOBE-01 experiment, has been performed in the HFR in Petten, the Netherlands, producing up to 3020 appm helium and 298 appm tritium. Thermal desorption tests of irradiated unconstrained and constrained beryllium pebbles were performed in a purge gas flow using a quadrupole mass-spectrometer (QMS) and an ionization chamber. Compared to unconstrained pebbles, constrained beryllium pebbles have an enhanced tritium release at all temperatures investigated. Small elongated sub-grains formed under irradiation in the constrained pebbles promote formation of numerous channels for facilitated tritium release

  8. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    Klimenkov, M., E-mail: michael.klimenkov@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A. [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R. [Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  9. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    Klimenkov, M.; Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A.; Rolli, R.

    2014-12-01

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  10. Mechanical performance of irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Dalle-Donne, M.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-01-01

    For the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Blanket, which is one of the two reference concepts studied within the European Fusion Technology Programme, the neutron multiplier consists of a mixed bed of about 2 and 0.1-0.2 mm diameter beryllium pebbles. Beryllium has no structural function in the blanket, however microstructural and mechanical properties are important, as they might influence the material behavior under neutron irradiation. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating it. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from these irradiation experiments, emphasizing the effects of irradiation of essential material properties and trying to elucidate the processes controlling the property changes. The microstructure, the porosity distribution, the impurity content, the behavior under compression loads and the compatibility of the beryllium pebbles with lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) during the in-pile irradiation are presented and critically discussed. Qualitative information on ductility and creep obtained by hardness-type measurements are also supplied. (author)

  11. Neutron irradiation of beryllium pebbles

    Gelles, D.S.; Ermi, R.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Tsai, H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Seven subcapsules from the FFTF/MOTA 2B irradiation experiment containing 97 or 100% dense sintered beryllium cylindrical specimens in depleted lithium have been opened and the specimens retrieved for postirradiation examination. Irradiation conditions included 370 C to 1.6 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, 425 C to 4.8 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, and 550 C to 5.0 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}. TEM specimens contained in these capsules were also retrieved, but many were broken. Density measurements of the cylindrical specimens showed as much as 1.59% swelling following irradiation at 500 C in 100% dense beryllium. Beryllium at 97% density generally gave slightly lower swelling values.

  12. Characterization of constrained beryllium pebble beds after neutron irradiation at HFR at high temperatures up to helium production of 3000 appm

    Chakin, V., E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Plarz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R. [Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Plarz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Moeslang, A.; Vladimirov, P.; Kurinskiy, P. [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Plarz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Til, S. van; Magielsen, A.J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/ Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Defragmentation of beryllium pebbles at irradiation temperatures of 873 and 948 K was detected. • Formation of brittle beryllium oxide layers on neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles was detected. • Strong interaction between beryllium pebbles and platinum foil under neutron irradiation was detected. • Strong interaction between beryllium pebbles and austenitic stainless steel under neutron irradiation was detected. -- Abstract: Small constrained beryllium pebble beds as well as unconstrained beryllium pebbles have been irradiated within HIDOBE-01 experiment at HFR, Petten, the Netherlands. Beryllium pebbles with 1 mm diameter produced by Rotating Electrode Method (REM) were investigated after irradiation at 630, 740, 873, and 948 K up to helium production of 3000 appm. Intensive pore and bubble formation occurs in beryllium after 873 K irradiation. In the contact zones of the pebbles enhanced pore formation takes place. Oxidation of beryllium pebble external surfaces is accompanied by partial destruction of oxide layers owing to their high brittleness. Strong interactions between beryllium pebbles and platinum foil, as well as between beryllium and stainless steel at contact zones occur at 873 and 948 K.

  13. Characteristics of microstructure and tritium release properties of different kinds of beryllium pebbles for application in tritium breeding modules

    Kurinskiy, P., E-mail: petr.kurinskiy@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Rolli, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics (IAM-WBM), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, Barcelona 08019 (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Tritium release properties and characteristics of microstructure of beryllium pebbles having different sizes of grains were studied. • Fine-grained beryllium pebbles showed the best ability to release tritium compared to pebbles from another charges. • Be pebbles with the grain sizes exceeding 100 μm contain a great number of small pores and inclusions presumably referring to the history of material fabrication. • The sizes of grains are one of a key characteristic of microstructure which influences the parameters of tritium release. - Abstract: Beryllium pebbles with diameters of 1 mm are considered to be perspective material for the use as neutron multiplier in tritium breeding modules of fusion reactors. Up to now, the design of helium-cooled breeding blanket in ITER project foresees the use of 1 mm beryllium pebbles fabricated by NGK Insulators Ltd., Japan. It is notable that beryllium pebbles from Russian Federation and USA are also available and the possibility of their large-scale fabrication is under study. Presented work is dedicated to a study of characteristics of microstructure and parameters of tritium release of beryllium pebbles produced by Bochvar Institute, Russian Federation, and Materion Corporation, USA.

  14. Characteristics of microstructure and tritium release properties of different kinds of beryllium pebbles for application in tritium breeding modules

    Highlights: • Tritium release properties and characteristics of microstructure of beryllium pebbles having different sizes of grains were studied. • Fine-grained beryllium pebbles showed the best ability to release tritium compared to pebbles from another charges. • Be pebbles with the grain sizes exceeding 100 μm contain a great number of small pores and inclusions presumably referring to the history of material fabrication. • The sizes of grains are one of a key characteristic of microstructure which influences the parameters of tritium release. - Abstract: Beryllium pebbles with diameters of 1 mm are considered to be perspective material for the use as neutron multiplier in tritium breeding modules of fusion reactors. Up to now, the design of helium-cooled breeding blanket in ITER project foresees the use of 1 mm beryllium pebbles fabricated by NGK Insulators Ltd., Japan. It is notable that beryllium pebbles from Russian Federation and USA are also available and the possibility of their large-scale fabrication is under study. Presented work is dedicated to a study of characteristics of microstructure and parameters of tritium release of beryllium pebbles produced by Bochvar Institute, Russian Federation, and Materion Corporation, USA

  15. Thermal ramp tritium release in COBRA-1A2 C03 beryllium pebbles

    Baldwin, D.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Tritium release kinetics, using the method of thermal ramp heating at three linear ramp rates, were measured on the COBRA-1A2 C03 1-mm beryllium pebbles. This report includes a brief discussion of the test, and the test data in graph format.

  16. TEM study of beryllium pebbles after neutron irradiation up to 3000 appm helium production

    Klimenkov, M., E-mail: michael.klimenkov@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A. [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R. [Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) European concept of a breeding blanket of DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron irradiated at temperatures typical for fusion blanket. Beryllium pebbles with a diameter of 1 mm produced by the Rotating Electrode Method were subjected to a TEM study after irradiation at the HFR, Petten, at temperatures of 686, 753, 861, and 968 K. The helium production in the pebbles was calculated in the range from 2090 to 3090 appm. Gas bubbles as disks of hexagonal shape were observed for all four irradiation temperatures. The disks were oriented in the (0 0 0 1) basal plane with a height directed along the [0 0 0 1] “c” axis. The average diameters of the bubbles increase from 7.5 to 80 nm with increasing irradiation temperature, the bulk densities accordingly decrease from 4.4 × 10{sup 22} to 3.8 × 10{sup 20} m{sup −3}. With increasing irradiation temperature, the swelling of the pebbles increases from 0.6% at 686 K up to 6.5% at 968 K.

  17. Tritium release from neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik

    1998-01-01

    One of the most important open issues related to beryllium for fusion applications refers to the kinetics of the tritium release as a function of neutron fluence and temperature. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating the beryllium response under neutron irradiation. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from the above mentioned irradiation experiments, trying to elucidate the tritium release controlling processes. In agreement with previous studies it has been found that release starts at about 500-550degC and achieves a maximum at about 700-750degC. The observed release at about 500-550degC is probably due to tritium escaping from chemical traps, while the maximum release at about 700-750degC is due to tritium escaping from physical traps. The consequences of a direct contact between beryllium and ceramics during irradiation, causing tritium implanting in a surface layer of beryllium up to a depth of about 40 mm and leading to an additional inventory which is usually several times larger than the neutron-produced one, are also presented and the effects on the tritium release are discussed. (author)

  18. Thermal cycling tests on Li4SiO4 and beryllium pebbles

    The European B.O.T. Demo-relevant solid breeder blanket is based on the use of beds of beryllium and Li4SiO4 pebbles. Particularly dangerous for the pebble integrity are the rapid temperature changes which could occur, for instance, by a sudden blanket power shut-down. A series of thermal cycle tests have been performed for various beds of beryllium and Li4SiO4 pebbles. No breaking was observed in the beryllium pebbles, however the Li4SiO4 pebbles broke by temperature rates of change of about -50 C/sec independently on pebbles size and lithium enrichment. This value is considerably higher than the peak temperature rates of change expected in the blanket. (orig.)

  19. Mechanical compression tests of beryllium pebbles after neutron irradiation up to 3000 appm helium production

    Chakin, V., E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institite for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R.; Moeslang, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institite for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Compression tests of highly neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles have been performed. • Irradiation hardening of beryllium pebbles decreases the steady-state strain-rates. • The steady-state strain-rates of irradiated beryllium pebbles exceed their swelling rates. - Abstract: Results: of mechanical compression tests of irradiated and non-irradiated beryllium pebbles with diameters of 1 and 2 mm are presented. The neutron irradiation was performed in the HFR in Petten, The Netherlands at 686–968 K up to 1890–2950 appm helium production. The irradiation at 686 and 753 K cause irradiation hardening due to the gas bubble formation in beryllium. The irradiation-induced hardening leads to decrease of steady-state strain-rates of irradiated beryllium pebbles compared to non-irradiated ones. In contrary, after irradiation at higher temperatures of 861 and 968 K, the steady-state strain-rates of the pebbles increase because annealing of irradiation defects and softening of the material take place. It was shown that the steady-state strain-rates of irradiated beryllium pebbles always exceed their swelling rates.

  20. Helium analyses of 1-mm beryllium microspheres from COBRA-1A2

    Multiple helium analyses on four beryllium microspheres irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W), are reported. The purpose of the analyses was to determine the total helium content of the beryllium, and to determine the helium release characteristics of the beryllium as a function of time and temperature. For the helium release measurements, sequential helium analyses were conducted on two of the samples over a temperature range from 500 C to 1100 C in 100 C increments. Total helium measurements were conducted separately using the normal analysis method of vaporizing the material in a single analysis run. Observed helium release in the two beryllium samples was nonlinear with time at each temperature interval, with each step being characterized by a rather rapid initial release rate, followed by a gradual slowing of the rate over time. Sample Be-C03-1 released virtually all of its helium after approximately 30 minutes at 1000 C, reaching a final value of 2722 appm. Sample Be-D03-1, on the other hand, released only about 62% of its helium after about 1 hour at 1100 c, reaching a final value of 1519 appm. Combining these results with subsequent vaporization runs on the two samples, yielded total helium concentrations of 2724 and 2459 appm. Corresponding helium concentrations measured in the two other C03 and D03 samples, by vaporization alone, were 2941 and 2574 appm. Both sets of concentrations are in reasonable agreement with predicted values of 2723 and 2662 appm. Helium-3 levels measured during the latter two vaporization runs were 2.80 appm for Be-C03-2, and 2.62 appm for Be-D03-2. Calculated 3He values are slightly lower at 2.55 and 2.50 appm, respectively, suggesting somewhat higher tritium levels in the beryllium than predicted

  1. Helium analyses of 1-mm beryllium microspheres from COBRA-1A2

    Oliver, B.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Multiple helium analyses on four beryllium microspheres irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W), are reported. The purpose of the analyses was to determine the total helium content of the beryllium, and to determine the helium release characteristics of the beryllium as a function of time and temperature. For the helium release measurements, sequential helium analyses were conducted on two of the samples over a temperature range from 500 C to 1100 C in 100 C increments. Total helium measurements were conducted separately using the normal analysis method of vaporizing the material in a single analysis run. Observed helium release in the two beryllium samples was nonlinear with time at each temperature interval, with each step being characterized by a rather rapid initial release rate, followed by a gradual slowing of the rate over time. Sample Be-C03-1 released virtually all of its helium after approximately 30 minutes at 1000 C, reaching a final value of 2722 appm. Sample Be-D03-1, on the other hand, released only about 62% of its helium after about 1 hour at 1100 c, reaching a final value of 1519 appm. Combining these results with subsequent vaporization runs on the two samples, yielded total helium concentrations of 2724 and 2459 appm. Corresponding helium concentrations measured in the two other C03 and D03 samples, by vaporization alone, were 2941 and 2574 appm. Both sets of concentrations are in reasonable agreement with predicted values of 2723 and 2662 appm. Helium-3 levels measured during the latter two vaporization runs were 2.80 appm for Be-C03-2, and 2.62 appm for Be-D03-2. Calculated {sup 3}He values are slightly lower at 2.55 and 2.50 appm, respectively, suggesting somewhat higher tritium levels in the beryllium than predicted.

  2. Production of various sizes and some properties of beryllium pebbles by the rotating electrode method

    Iwadachi, T.; Sakamoto, N.; Nishida, K. [NGK Insulators Ltd., Nagoya (Japan); Kawamura, H.

    1998-01-01

    The particle size distribution of beryllium pebbles produced by the rotating electrode method was investigated. Particle size depends on some physical properties and process parameters, which can practicaly be controlled by varying electrode angular velocities. The average particle sizes produced were expressed by the hyperbolic function with electrode angular velocity. Particles within the range of 0.3 and 2.0 mm in diameter are readily produced by the rotating electrode method while those of 0.2 mm in diameter are also fabricable. Sphericity and surface roughness were good in each size of pebble. Grain sizes of the pebbles are 17 {mu} m in 0.25 mm diameter pebbles and 260 {mu} m in 1.8 mm diameter pebbles. (author)

  3. Measurement of the thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient of a binary bed of beryllium pebbles

    Donne, M.D.; Piazza, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik; Goraieb, A.; Sordon, G.

    1998-01-01

    The four ITER partners propose to use binary beryllium pebble bed as neutron multiplier. Recently this solution has been adopted for the ITER blanket as well. In order to study the heat transfer in the blanket the effective thermal conductivity and the wall heat transfer coefficient of the bed have to be known. Therefore at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe heat transfer experiments have been performed with a binary bed of beryllium pebbles and the results have been correlated expressing thermal conductivity and wall heat transfer coefficients as a function of temperature in the bed and of the difference between the thermal expansion of the bed and of that of the confinement walls. The comparison of the obtained correlations with the data available from the literature show a quite good agreement. (author)

  4. Gas bubble network formation in irradiated beryllium pebbles monitored by X-Ray micro-tomography

    Full text of publication follows: The efficient and safe operation of helium cooled ceramic breeder blankets requires among others an efficient tritium release during operation at blanket relevant temperatures. In the past out-of-pile thermal desorption studies on low temperature neutron irradiated beryllium have shown that tritium and helium release peaks occur together. This phenomenon can be interpreted in terms of growth and coalescence of helium bubbles and tritium that either is trapped inside the helium bubbles in form of T2 molecules or in their strain field. With increasing temperature the bubble density and size at grain interfaces increase together with the probability of interconnected porosities and channel formation to the outer surface, leading to simultaneous helium and tritium release peaks in TDS. For a reliable prediction of gas release up to end-of-life conditions at blanket relevant temperatures, knowledge of the dynamics of bubble growth and coalescence as well as the 3D distribution of bubble network formation is indispensable. Such data could also be used to experimentally validate any future model predictions of tritium and helium release rates. A high resolution computer aided micro-tomography (CMT) setup has been developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility which allowed reconstructing 3-D images of beryllium pebbles without damaging them. By postprocessing the data a 3D rendering of inner surfaces and of interconnected channel networks can be obtained, thus allowing the identification of open porosities in neutron irradiated and tempered beryllium pebbles. In our case Beryllium pebbles of 2 mm diameter had been neutron irradiated in the 'Beryllium' experiment at 770 K with 1.24 x 1025 nxm-2 resulting in 480 appm He and 12 appm Tritium. After annealing at 1500 K CMT was performed on the pebbles with 4.9 and 1.4 μm voxel resolution, respectively, followed by morphological and topological post-processing of the reconstructed

  5. Effects of helium production and radiation damage on tritium release behavior of neutron-irradiated beryllium pebbles

    The tritium release from neutron-irradiated beryllium pebbles, irradiated under different helium production (0.5-1.0 x 103 appm He) and dpa (4.2-8.6) conditions, was studied. From these results, it was clear that the apparent diffusion coefficient at 600 deg. C was significantly affected by irradiation conditions, but returned to normal values at 900 deg. C, apparently due to thermal annealing. Multiple peaks in the tritium release curve at 900 deg. C were observed

  6. Tritium release from EXOTIC-7 orthosilicate pebbles. Effect of burnup and contact with beryllium during irradiation

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-03-01

    EXOTIC-7 was the first in-pile test with {sup 6}Li-enriched (50%) lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) pebbles and with DEMO representative Li-burnup. Post irradiation examinations of the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} have been performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), mainly to investigate the tritium release kinetics as well as the effect of Li-burnup and/or contact with beryllium during irradiation. The release rate of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from pure Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} bed of capsule 28.1-1 is characterized by a broad main peak at about 400degC and by a smaller peak at about 800degC, and that from the mixed beds of capsule 28.2 and 26.2-1 shows again these two peaks, but most of the tritium is now released from the 800degC peak. This shift of release from low to high temperature may be due to the higher Li-burnup and/or due to contact with Be during irradiation. Due to the very difficult interpretation of the in-situ tritium release data, residence times have been estimated on the basis of the out-of-pile tests. The residence time for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from caps. 28.1-1 irradiated at 10% Li-burnup agrees quite well with that of the same material irradiated at Li-burnup lower than 3% in the EXOTIC-6 experiment. In spite of the observed shift in the release peaks from low to high temperature, also the residence time for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from caps. 26.2-1 irradiated at 13% Li-burnup agrees quite well with the data from EXOTIC-6 experiment. On the other hand, the residence time for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from caps. 28.2 (Li-burnup 18%) is about a factor 1.7-3.8 higher than that for caps. 26.2-1. Based on these data on can conclude that up to 13% Li-burnup neither the contact with beryllium nor the Li-burnup have a detrimental effect on the tritium release of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles, but at 18% Li-burnup the residence time is increased by about a factor three. (J.P.N.)

  7. High resolution studies by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of the spatial distribution of tritium in neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles

    A key issue of beryllium as a neutron multiplier in the blanket of future fusion reactors is tritium retention. Models are under development in order to predict tritium release kinetics in the typical operating conditions of the material in the blanket: the absence of experimental data in this range imposes an extrapolation of the models, therefore a detailed characterization and understanding of microscopic diffusion phenomena related to macroscopic tritium release is necessary. It has been recently shown, that the availability of evidence on such phenomena at a scale of 1 micron down to tens of nanometers enables a relevant progress in the effectiveness of model validation: therefore the need for applying and developing advanced analytical techniques based on mass spectrometry at this scale. A study of tritium spatial distribution in neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles (2 mm diameter, 480 appm 4He, 7 appm 3H) by means of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is presented. Samples in different conditions (non-irradiated, at end of irradiation and at different temperatures during thermal ramp annealing) are examined by an oxygen ion primary beam with a spatial resolution of 1 micron along a diameter. The sample preparation is optimized in order to enable a quantitative comparison among the different conditions. Under an oxygen ion beam tritium is detected in the irradiated samples in a molecular form (3H2), with a continuous distribution inside the grains, which suggests the presence of small clusters in agreement with TEM analyses, and in the form of peaks at grain boundaries, corresponding to large grain boundary bubbles. The evolving of molecular tritium distribution measured by SIMS during a typical thermal ramp release experiment shows precisely tritium diffusion from the centre of the grain to grain boundaries as the temperature increases: at the same time the remaining intragranular tritium inventory, given by the integral of the distribution, decreases

  8. 3D tomography analysis of the inner structure of pebbles and pebble beds

    An analytical tool to monitor the arrangement of pebbles in a pebble bed as well as the morphology of gas bubbles in as fabricated and neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles is presented. The context of this study is the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HPCB) blanket design for the forthcoming generation of fusion reactors. The thermal-mechanical behavior of pebble beds is a basic issue for the HPCB. It depends strongly on the configuration of the pebbles in the bed, and in particular on the number of contacts between pebbles, and between pebbles and the blanket walls. The related contact surfaces play also a major role. The knowledge on the inner structure of the pebbles is required since during the life cycle of a power reactor helium and tritium bubbles are produced inside the beryllium pebbles and the tritium build-up can be in excess of several kilograms, being thereby a key safety issue. All the non-destructive analyses are based on 3D computer aided microtomography using a very powerful synchrotron radiation x-ray source with high spatial resolution. The data analysis relies on a topological operator called filtered medial line applied to the entire data volumes and the related graph representation. By this technique the number of contacts between the pebbles in pebble packs and their angular distribution are obtained, as well as the corresponding contact surfaces. The evaluation of bubble sizes and densities in single pebbles, the assessment of the pore channel network topology, the 3D reconstruction of the fraction of interconnected bubble porosity, and the open-to-closed-porosity ratio are among the most interesting findings. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Pebble bed pebble motion: Simulation and Applications

    Cogliati, Joshua J

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation presents a method for simulation of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. A new mechanical motion simulator, PEBBLES, efficiently simulates the key elements of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. This model simulates gravitational force and contact forces including kinetic and true static friction. It's used for a variety of tasks including simulation of the effect of earthquakes on a PBR, calculation of packing fractions, Dancoff factors, pebble wear and the pebble force on the walls. The simulator includes a new differential static friction model for the varied geometries of PBRs. A new static friction benchmark was devised via analytically solving the mechanics equations to determine the minimum pebble-to-pebble friction and pebble-to-surface friction for a five pebble pyramid. This pyramid check as well as a comparison to the Janssen formula was used to test the new static friction equations. Because larger pebble bed simulations involve hundreds of thousands of pebbles and long periods of time, P...

  10. Pebble bed packing in prismatic containers

    Highlights: • The essential part of ceramic breeder blankets is pebble beds. • The packing factor for blanket relevant cavities must be known. • Tomography experiments revealed details of packing arrangements. • Packing experiments confirm that reference packing factors will be achieved. -- Abstract: New analyses of previous tomography investigations show in detail void fraction fluctuations close to walls generated by regular pebble arrangements. Local packing factors within the pebble bed were determined for characteristic zones. These results are very helpful for the interpretation of the packing experiments performed with spherical pebbles in different kinds of Plexiglas containers dominated by flat walls. The packing factors for single-size pebbles in the containers with a piston on top are fairly independent of bed height unless the height to diameter ratio becomes less than 10. For the closed rectangular containers, the development of structured packings is rendered more difficult. However, for blanket relevant bed heights, both for orthosilicate and beryllium pebbles, the packing factors obtained which agree well with previously obtained reference values

  11. Conceptual design of pebble drop divertor

    A pebble drop divertor concept is proposed for future fusion reactor. The marked feature of this system is the use of multi-layer pebbles that consists of a central kernel and some coating layers, as a divertor surface component. By using multi-layer pebbles, pebble drop divertor have the advantages such as steady state wall pumping with low bulk tritium retention. The performance of whole divertor system depends on the characteristics of the multi-layer pebble. Particularly the maximum heat load of the system is determined by the dimensions, the layer structure and the material of a kernel. A kernel also has an important role to determine surface temperature, which affects the wall pumping efficiency. This paper presents the numerical results of the maximum allowable heat load and the surface temperature of the divertor pebble. From the numerical estimation of thermal stress and surface temperature, it is found that the radius of divertor pebble with ceramic kernel should be 0.5 - 1 mm. (author)

  12. Conceptual design of pebble drop divertor

    A pebble drop divertor concept is proposed for future fusion reactor. The marked feature of this system is the use of multi-layer pebbles that consists of a central kernel and some coating layers, as a divertor surface component. By using multi-layer pebbles, pebble drop divertor have the advantages such as steady state wall pumping with low bulk tritium retention. The performance of whole divertor system depends on the characteristics of the multi-layer pebble. Particularly the maximum heat load of the system is determined by the dimensions, the layer structure and the material of a kernel. A kernel also has an important role to determine surface temperature, which affects the wall pumping efficiency. This paper presents the numerical results of the maximum allowable heat load and the surface temperature of the divertor pebble. From the numerical estimation of thermal stress and surface temperature, it is found that the radius of divertor pebble with ceramic kernel should be 0.5-1 mm. (author)

  13. Assessment of the feasibility and advantages of beryllium recycling

    This paper proposes a generic route for the recycling of beryllium from fusion reactors, based on critical issues associated with beryllium pebbles after their service life in the HCPB breeding blanket. These critical issues are the high tritium inventory, the presence of long-lived radionuclides (among which transuranics due to traces of uranium in the base metal), and the chemical toxicity of beryllium. On the basis of the chemical and radiochemical characteristics of the neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles, we describe a possible recycling route. The first step is the detritiation of the material. This can be achieved by heating the pebbles to 800 oC under an argon flow. The argon gas avoids oxidation of the beryllium, and at the proposed temperature the tritium inventory is readily released from the pebbles. In a second step, the released tritium can be oxidised on a copper oxide bed to produce tritiated water, which is consistent with the current international strategy to convert all kinds of tritiated waste into tritiated water, which can subsequently be treated in a water detritiation plant. Removal of radionuclides from the beryllium pebbles may be achieved by several types of chloride processes. The first step is to pass chlorine gas (in an argon flow) over the pebbles, thus yielding volatile BeCl2. This beryllium chloride can then be purified by fractional distillation. As a small fraction of the beryllium chloride contains the long-lived 10Be isotope, 10BeCl2 has to be separated from 9BeCl2, which could be achieved by centrifugal techniques. The product can then be reduced to obtain high-purity metallic beryllium. Two candidate reduction methods were identified: fused salt electrolysis and thermal decomposition. Both these methods require laboratory parametric studies to maximise the yield and achieve a high purity metal, before either process can be upgraded to a larger scale. The eventual product of the chloride reduction process must be a high purity

  14. Beryllium for fusion application - recent results

    Khomutov, A.; Barabash, V.; Chakin, V.; Chernov, V.; Davydov, D.; Gorokhov, V.; Kawamura, H.; Kolbasov, B.; Kupriyanov, I.; Longhurst, G.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Shestakov, V.

    2002-12-01

    The main issues for the application of beryllium in fusion reactors are analyzed taking into account the latest results since the ICFRM-9 (Colorado, USA, October 1999) and presented at 5th IEA Be Workshop (10-12 October 2001, Moscow Russia). Considerable progress has been made recently in understanding the problems connected with the selection of the beryllium grades for different applications, characterization of the beryllium at relevant operational conditions (irradiation effects, thermal fatigue, etc.), and development of required manufacturing technologies. The key remaining problems related to the application of beryllium as an armour in near-term fusion reactors (e.g. ITER) are discussed. The features of the application of beryllium and beryllides as a neutron multiplier in the breeder blanket for power reactors (e.g. DEMO) in pebble-bed form are described.

  15. PEBBLES Mechanics Simulation Speedup

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-05-01

    Pebble bed reactors contain large numbers of spherical fuel elements arranged randomly. Determining the motion and location of these fuel elements is required for calculating certain parameters of pebble bed reactor operation. These simulations involve hundreds of thousands of pebbles and involve determining the entire core motion as pebbles are recirculated. Single processor algorithms for this are insufficient since they would take decades to centuries of wall-clock time. This paper describes the process of parallelizing and speeding up the PEBBLES pebble mechanics simulation code. Both shared memory programming with the Open Multi-Processing API and distributed memory programming with the Message Passing Interface API are used in simultaneously in this process. A new shared memory lock-less linear time collision detection algorithm is described. This method allows faster detection of pebbles in contact than generic methods. These combine to make full recirculations on AVR sized reactors possible in months of wall clock time.

  16. Beryllium allergy

    Beryllium is not only a high potent allergen, but also a fotoallergen and can provoke contact allergic reactions, fotoallergic reactions, granulomatous skin reactions, pulmonary granulomatous diseases and sometimes even systemic diseases. The authors present 9 own cases of a patch test positive beryllium allergy, 7 patients with relevant allergy and 5 patients with an allergic contact stomatitis. (author)

  17. Analysis of the in-pile operation and preliminary results of the post irradiation dismantling of the pebble bed assemblies

    Magielsen, A.J.; Peeters, M.M.W.; Hegeman, J.B.J.; Stijkel, M.P.; Laan, J.G. van der [NRG-Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (Netherlands)

    2007-07-01

    The Pebble Bed Assemblies (PBA) are four tritium breeding sub scale modules, representing a segment of the European Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Test Blanket. The objective of these experiments is the study the thermomechanical behaviour of the pebble bed assemblies during irradiation. This objective will be full- filled by the analysis of changes in the in-pile temperature profiles during irradiation and the post irradiation examination of the pebble beds in the Hot Cells. The PBA has been irradiated in the HFR in Petten for 294 Full Power Days (FPD), to a dose of 2-3 dpa in Eurofer, and estimated lithium burnup of 2-3 %. Changes in the temperature profile during in-pile operation are indication for pebble bed creep compaction during first start up and the possible formation gas gaps between the pebble beds and the structure. During progressive irradiation the radial and axial differential temperatures within the breeder and beryllium pebble beds are evaluated. During start up of the sub sequent irradiation cycles (each 26 FPD) the temperature differences within the beryllium pebble beds show a slight increase suggesting changes in the structure of the pebble beds. The PBA are transported from the HFR to the Hot Cell Laboratory in upright position to maintain the gas gaps between the pebble beds and Eurofer. Various microscopy preparation techniques are used to study the deformation state of the pebble beds (signs of creep compaction and sintering), formation of gas gaps between the pebble beds and structural materials and the interaction layers between eurofer-ceramic and eurofer-beryllium. In this paper first results on the Post Irradiation examination are given. (orig.)

  18. Study on neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium as neutron multiplier

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    More than 300 tons beryllium is expected to be used as a neutron multiplier in ITER, and study on the neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium as the neutron multiplier with Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) were performed to get the engineering data for fusion blanket design. This study started as the study on the tritium behavior in beryllium neutron reflector in order to make clear the generation mechanism on tritium of JMTR primary coolant since 1985. These experiences were handed over to beryllium studies for fusion study, and overall studies such as production technology of beryllium pebbles, irradiation behavior evaluation and reprocessing technology have been started since 1990. In this presentation, study on the neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium as the neutron multiplier with JMTR was reviewed from the point of tritium release, thermal properties, mechanical properties and reprocessing technology. (author)

  19. Beryllium Toxicity

    ... Favorites Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Yahoo MyWeb Beryllium Toxicity Patient Education Care Instruction Sheet ... Favorites Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Yahoo MyWeb Page last reviewed: May 23, 2008 Page ...

  20. The HFR Petten high dose irradiation programme of beryllium for blanket application

    This paper reports the objectives of a high dose irradiation of beryllium in the High Flux Reactor in Petten. In addition, the nuclear parameters, irradiation parameters and the provisional test-matrix, i.e. Beryllium grades and pebbles is presented. The irradiation will be performed in the frame of the European Programme for the development of the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) to study the irradiation behaviour of Beryllium. Part of the materials will be provided by Japanese and Russian partners, for which cooperation through IEA agreements is being put into place. (author)

  1. Pebble-bed pebble motion: Simulation and Applications

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-11-01

    Pebble bed reactors (PBR) have moving graphite fuel pebbles. This unique feature provides advantages, but also means that simulation of the reactor requires understanding the typical motion and location of the granular flow of pebbles. This report presents a method for simulation of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. A new mechanical motion simulator, PEBBLES, efficiently simulates the key elements of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. This model simulates gravitational force and contact forces including kinetic and true static friction. It's used for a variety of tasks including simulation of the effect of earthquakes on a PBR, calculation of packing fractions, Dancoff factors, pebble wear and the pebble force on the walls. The simulator includes a new differential static friction model for the varied geometries of PBRs. A new static friction benchmark was devised via analytically solving the mechanics equations to determine the minimum pebble-to-pebble friction and pebble-to-surface friction for a five pebble pyramid. This pyramid check as well as a comparison to the Janssen formula was used to test the new static friction equations. Because larger pebble bed simulations involve hundreds of thousands of pebbles and long periods of time, the PEBBLES code has been parallelized. PEBBLES runs on shared memory architectures and distributed memory architectures. For the shared memory architecture, the code uses a new O(n) lock-less parallel collision detection algorithm to determine which pebbles are likely to be in contact. The new collision detection algorithm improves on the traditional non-parallel O(n log(n)) collision detection algorithm. These features combine to form a fast parallel pebble motion simulation. The PEBBLES code provides new capabilities for understanding and optimizing PBRs. The PEBBLES code has provided the pebble motion data required to calculate the motion of pebbles during a simulated earthquake. The PEBBLES code provides the ability to

  2. Modelling of thermal and mechanical behaviour of pebble beds

    FZK (Forshungzentrum Karlsruhe) is developing a Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Blanket Concept for fusion power reactors based on the use of ceramic breeder materials and beryllium multiplier in the form of pebble beds. The design of such a blanket requires models and computer codes describing the thermal-mechanical behavior of pebble beds to evaluate the temperatures, stresses, deformations and mechanical interactions between pebble beds and the structure with required accuracy and reliability. The objective to describe the beginning of life condition for the HCPB blanket seems near to be reached. Mechanical models that describe the thermo-mechanical behavior of granular materials used in form of pebble beds are implemented in a commercial structure code. These models have been calibrated using the results of a large series of dedicated experiments. The modeling work is practically concluded for ceramic breeder; it will be carried on in the next year for beryllium to obtain the required correlations for creep and the thermal conductivity. The difficulties for application in large components (such as the HCPB blanket) are the limitations of the present commercial codes to manage such a set of constitutive equations under complex load conditions and large mesh number. The further objective is to model the thermal cycles during operation; the present correlations have to be adapted for the release phase. A complete description of the blanket behavior during irradiation is at the present out of our capability; this objective requires an extensive R and D program that at the present is only at the beginning. (Y.Tanaka)

  3. Pebble Puzzle Solved

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 In the quest to determine if a pebble was jamming the rock abrasion tool on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, scientists and engineers examined this up-close, approximate true-color image of the tool. The picture was taken by the rover's panoramic camera, using filters centered at 601, 535, and 482 nanometers, at 12:47 local solar time on sol 200 (August 16, 2004). Colored spots have been drawn on this image corresponding to regions where panoramic camera reflectance spectra were acquired (see chart in Figure 1). Those regions are: the grinding wheel heads (yellow); the rock abrasion tool magnets (green); the supposed pebble (red); a sunlit portion of the aluminum rock abrasion tool housing (purple); and a shadowed portion of the rock abrasion tool housing (brown). These spectra demonstrated that the composition of the supposed pebble was clearly different from that of the sunlit and shadowed portions of the rock abrasion tool, while similar to that of the dust-coated rock abrasion tool magnets and grinding heads. This led the team to conclude that the object disabling the rock abrasion tool was indeed a martian pebble.

  4. Method for welding beryllium

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. Beryllium parts made using this method can be used as structural components in aircraft, satellites and space applications.

  5. Behaviour of neutron irradiated beryllium during temperature excursions up to and beyond its melting temperature

    Pajuste, Elina; Kizane, Gunta; Avotiņa, Līga; Zariņš, Artūrs

    2015-10-01

    Beryllium pebble behaviour has been studied regarding the accidental operation conditions of tritium breeding blanket of fusion reactors. Structure evolution, oxidation and thermal properties have been compared for nonirradiated and neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles during thermal treatment in a temperature range from ambient temperature to 1600 K. For neutron irradiated pebbles tritium release process was studied. Methods of temperature programmed tritium desorption (TPD) in combination with thermogravimetry (TG) and temperature differential analysis (TDA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in combination with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) have been used. It was found that there are strong relation between tritium desorption spectra and structural evolution of neutron irradiated beryllium. The oxidation rate is also accelerated by the structure damages caused by neutrons.

  6. Method for welding beryllium

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  7. Fabrication of beryllide pebble as advanced neutron multiplier

    Highlights: • A new beryllide granulation process that combined process with a plasma sintering method for electrode fabrication and a rotating electrode method (REM) for granulation was suggested. • The beryllide electrode fabrication process was investigated for mass production. • As optimized beryllide electrode indicated higher ductility and was sintered at a lower temperature for a shorter time. • It appears to be more able to not only withstand the thermal shock from arc-discharge during granulation but also produce beryllide pebbles on a large scale. • These optimization results can reduce the time for electrode fabrication by 40%, they suggest the possibility of great reductions in time and cost for mass production of beryllide pebbles. - Abstract: Fusion reactors require advanced neutron multipliers with great stability at high temperatures. Beryllium intermetallic compounds, called beryllides such as Be12Ti, are the most promising materials for use as advanced neutron multipliers. However, few studies have been conducted on the development of mass production methods for beryllide pebbles. A granulation process for beryllide needs to have both low cost and high efficiency. To fabricate beryllide pebbles, a new granulation process is established in this research by combining a plasma sintering method for beryllide synthesis and a rotating electrode method using a plasma-sintered electrode for granulation. The fabrication process of the beryllide electrode is investigated and optimized for mass production. The optimized beryllide electrode exhibits higher ductility and can be sintered at a lower temperature for a shorter time, indicating that it is more suitable not only for withstanding the thermal shock from arc-discharge during granulation but also for producing the beryllide pebbles on a large scale. Accordingly, because these optimization results can reduce the time required for electrode fabrication by 40%, they suggest the possibility of

  8. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    ... an immune response or “allergy” to beryllium metal, ceramic or alloy, termed beryllium sensitization (BeS). Beryllium sensitization occurs after ... Mroz MM, Newman LS. Beryllium disease screening in ceramics industry: Blood test ... at a metal, alloy and oxide production plant. Occup Environ Med 1997; ...

  9. Proceedings of the third IEA international workshop on beryllium technology for fusion

    This report is the Proceedings of the Third International Energy Agency International Workshop on Beryllium Technology for Fusion. The workshop was held on October 22-24, 1997, at the Sangyou Kaikan in Mito City with 68 participants who attended from the Europe, the Russian Federation, the Kazakstan, the United States and Japan. The topics for papers were arranged into 9 sessions; beryllium applications for ITER, production and characterization, chemical compatibility and corrosion, forming and joining, plasma/tritium interactions, beryllium coating, first wall applications, neutron irradiation effects, health and safety. To utilize beryllium in the pebble type blanket, a series of discussions were intensified in multiple view points such as the swelling, He/T release from beryllium pebble irradiated up to high He content, effective thermal conductivity, tritium permeation and coating, and fabrication cost, and so on. As the plasma facing material, life time of beryllium and coated beryllium, dust and particle production, joining, waste treatment, mechanical properties and deformation by swelling were discussed as important issues. Especially, it was recognized throughout the discussions that the comparative study by the different researchers should be carried out to establish the reliability of the data reported in the workshop and in others. To enhance the comparative study, the world wide collaboration for the relative evaluation of the beryllium was proposed by the International Organization Committee and the proposal was approved by all of the participants. The 45 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  10. Proceedings of the third IEA international workshop on beryllium technology for fusion

    Kawamura, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Makoto [eds.

    1998-01-01

    This report is the Proceedings of the Third International Energy Agency International Workshop on Beryllium Technology for Fusion. The workshop was held on October 22-24, 1997, at the Sangyou Kaikan in Mito City with 68 participants who attended from the Europe, the Russian Federation, the Kazakstan, the United States and Japan. The topics for papers were arranged into 9 sessions; beryllium applications for ITER, production and characterization, chemical compatibility and corrosion, forming and joining, plasma/tritium interactions, beryllium coating, first wall applications, neutron irradiation effects, health and safety. To utilize beryllium in the pebble type blanket, a series of discussions were intensified in multiple view points such as the swelling, He/T release from beryllium pebble irradiated up to high He content, effective thermal conductivity, tritium permeation and coating, and fabrication cost, and so on. As the plasma facing material, life time of beryllium and coated beryllium, dust and particle production, joining, waste treatment, mechanical properties and deformation by swelling were discussed as important issues. Especially, it was recognized throughout the discussions that the comparative study by the different researchers should be carried out to establish the reliability of the data reported in the workshop and in others. To enhance the comparative study, the world wide collaboration for the relative evaluation of the beryllium was proposed by the International Organization Committee and the proposal was approved by all of the participants. The 45 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  11. Absolute brightness temperature measurements at 2.1-mm wavelength

    Ulich, B. L.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute measurements of the brightness temperatures of the Sun, new Moon, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, and of the flux density of DR21 at 2.1-mm wavelength are reported. Relative measurements at 3.5-mm wavelength are also preented which resolve the absolute calibration discrepancy between The University of Texas 16-ft radio telescope and the Aerospace Corporation 15-ft antenna. The use of the bright planets and DR21 as absolute calibration sources at millimeter wavelengths is discussed in the light of recent observations.

  12. Experimental study and analysis of the purge gas pressure drop across the pebble beds for the fusion HCPB blanket

    Highlights: ► The pressure drop significantly increases with decreasing the pebbles diameter. ► The pressure drop slightly increases with increasing the packing factor. ► The pressure drop is directly proportional to pebble bed length and inlet pressure. ► Predictions of Ergun equation agree well with the measured values of pressure drop. ► The filters resistance has a small contribution to the total pressure drop. -- Abstract: The lithium ceramic and beryllium pebble beds of the breeder units (BU), in the fusion breeding blanket, are purged by helium to extract the bred tritium. Therefore, the objective of this study is to support the design of the BU purge gas system by studying the effect of pebbles diameter, packing factor, pebble bed length, and flow inlet pressure on the purge gas pressure drop. The pebble bed was formed by packing glass pebbles in a rectangular container (56 mm × 206 mm × 396 mm) and was integrated into a gas loop to be purged by helium at BU-relevant pressures (1.1–3.8 bar). To determine the pressure drop across the pebble bed, the static pressure was measured at four locations along the pebble bed as well as at the inlet and outlet locations. The results show: (i) the pressure drop significantly increases with decreasing the pebbles diameter and slightly increases with increasing the packing factor, (ii) for a constant inlet flow velocity, the pressure drop is directly proportional to the pebble bed length and inlet pressure, and (iii) predictions of Ergun's equation agree well with the experimental values of the pressure drop

  13. Beryllium facilities in India

    Due to its unique combination of physical, mechanical, thermal and nuclear properties, beryllium is indispensable for many applications in the fields of nuclear and space sciences. Beryllia and copper beryllium alloys have also found extensive applications in the electrical and electronic industries. Beryllium facilities at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) have been set up to meet indigenous requirements for these materials. Besides developing beryllium technology, the project team has also designed and developed a number of special purpose equipment. (Author)

  14. KEY TECHNOLOGY FOR PRACTICAL 1-mm-DIAMETER ELECTROMAGNETIC MICROMOTOR

    2000-01-01

    A l-mm-diameter electromagnetic micromotor was developed as a crux component for MEMS application. The motor has a novel layer structure with a 1-mm-diameter rotor in the middle of two stators with the same size. The stator uses multiple layers, slotless and concentrated planar winding. The rotor adopts multipolar permanent magnet with high performance. Ruby bearing is used to prolong operating lifetime of the micromotor. The stator winding, consisting of 6-layer coils, 42 turns, and 9 pairs, is fabricated with microprocessing techniques. The micromotor has long operation lifetime, its running speed is stable and controllable, and rotational direction can be easily reversed. Maximum achieved rotational speed of 18000 r/min with maximum output torque of 1. 5 μ N . m has been obtained. This paper presented the key technology for developing this kind of micromotor including the design of structure, magnetic circuit, heat problem, friction improvement, microprocessing techniques, and so on.

  15. Estimation of the tritium production and inventory in beryllium

    Beryllium has been proposed as a candidate material for the neutron multiplier in fusion blanket designs. Tritium will be produced and will accumulate in beryllium under neutron irradiation. The tritium production and inventories under 1.5 and 3.0GW fusion power operation were calculated for a layered pebble bed blanket with lithium oxide (Li2O) breeder and beryllium (Be) multiplier. Neutronics calculations were carried out using the one-dimensional transport code ANISN, and the tritium production due to direct reaction of 9Be(n,T)7Li and the two-step reactions 9Be(n,α)6Li(n,α)Twas taken into account. The tritium production due to the two-step reaction was calculated to be 50% of the total tritium production after 1 year full power operation (FPY). The tritium inventory was estimated by considering three kinetic parameters, the permeability from the breeder region, diffusivity in a beryllium matrix, and solubility. Tritium permeation from the breeder region to the beryllium region through a 316SS wall was as much as 3gh-1, which is 30% of the tritium production (9.6gh-1) in the breeder region. Using the diffusion coefficient of beryllium with no oxide layer on its surface, the total tritium inventory was calculated to be 7gFPY-1, mainly owing to solubility. The content of beryllium oxide significantly affects the effective diffusion coefficient. Using a diffusion coefficient for beryllium with beryllium oxide layer on its surface, the tritium inventory was found to be equal to the amount produced. (orig.)

  16. Status of beryllium development for fusion applications

    Beryllium is a leading candidate material for the neutron multiplier of tritium breeding blankets and the plasma-facing component of first-wall and divertor systems. Depending on the application, the fabrication methods proposed include hot-pressing, hot-isostatic-pressing, cold-isostatic-pressing/sintering, rotary electrode processing and plasma spraying. Product forms include blocks, tubes, pebbles, tiles and coatings. While, in general, beryllium is not a leading structural material candidate, its mechanical performance, as well as its performance with regard to sputtering, heat transport, tritium retention/release, helium-induced swelling and chemical compatibility, is an important consideration in first-wall/blanket design. Differential expansion within the beryllium causes internal stresses which may result in cracking, thereby affecting the heat transport and barrier performance of the material. Overall deformation can result in loading of neighboring structural material. Thus, in assessing the performance of beryllium for fusion applications, it is important to have a good database in all of these performance areas, as well as a set of properties correlations and models for the purpose of interpolation/extrapolation.In this current work, the range of anticipated fusion operating conditions is reviewed. The thermal, mechanical, chemical compatibility, tritium retention/release, and helium retention/swelling databases are then reviewed for fabrication methods and fusion operating conditions of interest. Properties correlations and uncertainty ranges are also discussed. In the case of the more complex phenomena of tritium retention/release and helium-induced swelling, fundamental mechanisms and models are reviewed in more detail. Areas in which additional data are needed are highlighted, along with some trends which suggest ways of optimizing the performance of beryllium for fusion applications. (orig.)

  17. Beryllium chemistry and processing

    Walsh, Kenneth A

    2009-01-01

    This book introduces beryllium; its history, its chemical, mechanical, and physical properties including nuclear properties. The 29 chapters include the mineralogy of beryllium and the preferred global sources of ore bodies. The identification and specifics of the industrial metallurgical processes used to form oxide from the ore and then metal from the oxide are thoroughly described. The special features of beryllium chemistry are introduced, including analytical chemical practices. Beryllium compounds of industrial interest are identified and discussed. Alloying, casting, powder processing, forming, metal removal, joining and other manufacturing processes are covered. The effect of composition and process on the mechanical and physical properties of beryllium alloys assists the reader in material selection. The physical metallurgy chapter brings conformity between chemical and physical metallurgical processing of beryllium, metal, alloys, and compounds. The environmental degradation of beryllium and its all...

  18. Beryllium. Evaluation of beryllium hydroxide industrial processes. Pt. 3

    This work continues the 'Beryllium' series. It is a historical review of different industrial processes of beryllium hydroxide obtention from beryllium ores. Flowsheats and operative parameters of five plants are provided. These plants (Degussa, Brush Beryllium Co., Beryllium Corp., Murex Ltd., SAPPI) were selected as representative samples of diverse commercial processes in different countries. (Author)

  19. RAZVOJ APLIKACIJ ZA PAMETNO URO PEBBLE

    Kranjc, Denis

    2015-01-01

    V diplomski nalogi predstavljamo razvoj aplikacij za pametno uro Pebble in razvoj aplikacij za pametni telefon Android, ki komunicira z uro preko Bluetooth povezave. Pri razvoju smo uporabili razvojno okolje CloudPebble, programski razvojni paket Pebble SDK, razvojno okolje Android Studio in javansko knjižnico PebbleKit. Aplikacije za pametno uro smo razvijali v programskem jeziku C, aplikacije Android pa v programskem jeziku Java. Rezultat diplomskega dela je osem razvitih različnih aplikaci...

  20. Evidence for Pebbles in Comets

    Kretke, K A

    2015-01-01

    When the EPOXI spacecraft flew by Comet 103P/Hartley 2, it observed large particles floating around the comet nucleus. These particles are likely low-density, centimeter- to decimeter-sized clumps of ice and dust. While the origin of these objects remains somewhat mysterious, it is possible that they are giving us important information about the earliest stages of our Solar System's formation. Recent advancements in planet formation theory suggest that planetesimals (or cometestimals) may grow directly from the gravitational collapse of aerodynamically concentrated small particles, often referred to as "pebbles." Here we show that the particles observed in the coma of 103P are consistent with the sizes of pebbles expected to efficiently form planetesimals in the region that this comet likely formed, while smaller pebbles are may be expected in the majority of comets, whose chemistry is often indicative of formation in the colder, outer regions of the protoplanetary disk.

  1. Beryllium: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity

    Beryllium (Be) has physical-chemical properties, including low density and high tensile strength, which make it useful in the manufacture of products ranging from space shuttles to golf clubs. Despite its utility, a number of standard setting agencies have determined that beryllium is a carcinogen. Only a limited number of studies, however, have addressed the underlying mechanisms of the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of beryllium. Importantly, mutation and chromosomal aberration assays have yielded somewhat contradictory results for beryllium compounds and whereas bacterial tests were largely negative, mammalian test systems showed evidence of beryllium-induced mutations, chromosomal aberrations, and cell transformation. Although inter-laboratory differences may play a role in the variability observed in genotoxicity assays, it is more likely that the different chemical forms of beryllium have a significant effect on mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because workers are predominantly exposed to airborne particles which are generated during the machining of beryllium metal, ceramics, or alloys, testing of the mechanisms of the mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of beryllium should be performed with relevant chemical forms of beryllium

  2. Test apparatus for ITER blanket pebble packing behavior

    Current Japanese design for ITER Driver Blanket consists of three breeder layers, nine multiplier layers and five cooling panels. The breeder layers and the multiplier layers contain 1 mm diameter spheres of Li2O and Be, respectively. The heat transfer in such 'Pebble Layered Blanket' is largely affected by the packing fraction of the pebbles which can be easily changed by the vibration during the operation. The packing fraction of the pebbles are expected to be as high as possible on the view point of nuclear heat design to maintain the optimum temperature of the breeder layer. Thus, it is necessary to establish the stable packed bed of the breeder and multiplier. The present experimental apparatus was fabricated for the engineering tests with the partial model of Japanese blanket. Test apparatus consists of stainless steel test panels, transparent plastic test panels, vibrators and measurement instruments. The apparatus can examine various parameters of sphere packed beds such as packing fraction, panels deformation, loading weight at the bottom of the panels and so on under various vibrating conditions. (author)

  3. Pebble Bed Reactor Dust Production Model

    The operation of pebble bed reactors, including fuel circulation, can generate graphite dust, which in turn could be a concern for internal components; and to the near field in the remote event of a break in the coolant circuits. The design of the reactor system must, therefore, take the dust into account and the operation must include contingencies for dust removal and for mitigation of potential releases. Such planning requires a proper assessment of the dust inventory. This paper presents a predictive model of dust generation in an operating pebble bed with recirculating fuel. In this preliminary work the production model is based on the use of the assumption of proportionality between the dust production and the normal force and distance traveled. The model developed in this work uses the slip distances and the inter-pebble forces computed by the authors PEBBLES. The code, based on the discrete element method, simulates the relevant static and kinetic friction interactions between the pebbles as well as the recirculation of the pebbles through the reactor vessel. The interaction between pebbles and walls of the reactor vat is treated using the same approach. The amount of dust produced is proportional to the wear coefficient for adhesive wear (taken from literature) and to the slip volume, the product of the contact area and the slip distance. The paper will compare the predicted volume with the measured production rates. The simulation tallies the dust production based on the location of creation. Two peak production zones from intra pebble forces are predicted within the bed. The first zone is located near the pebble inlet chute due to the speed of the dropping pebbles. The second peak zone occurs lower in the reactor with increased pebble contact force due to the weight of supported pebbles. This paper presents the first use of a Discrete Element Method simulation of pebble bed dust production

  4. Beryllium Manufacturing Processes

    Goldberg, A

    2006-06-30

    This report is one of a number of reports that will be combined into a handbook on beryllium. Each report covers a specific topic. To-date, the following reports have been published: (1) Consolidation and Grades of Beryllium; (2) Mechanical Properties of Beryllium and the Factors Affecting these Properties; (3) Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Beryllium; (4) Joining of Beryllium; (5) Atomic, Crystal, Elastic, Thermal, Nuclear, and other Properties of Beryllium; and (6) Beryllium Coating (Deposition) Processes and the Influence of Processing Parameters on Properties and Microstructure. The conventional method of using ingot-cast material is unsuitable for manufacturing a beryllium product. Beryllium is a highly reactive metal with a high melting point, making it susceptible to react with mold-wall materials forming beryllium compounds (BeO, etc.) that become entrapped in the solidified metal. In addition, the grain size is excessively large, being 50 to 100 {micro}m in diameter, while grain sizes of 15 {micro}m or less are required to meet acceptable strength and ductility requirements. Attempts at refining the as-cast-grain size have been unsuccessful. Because of the large grain size and limited slip systems, the casting will invariably crack during a hot-working step, which is an important step in the microstructural-refining process. The high reactivity of beryllium together with its high viscosity (even with substantial superheat) also makes it an unsuitable candidate for precision casting. In order to overcome these problems, alternative methods have been developed for the manufacturing of beryllium. The vast majority of these methods involve the use of beryllium powders. The powders are consolidated under pressure in vacuum at an elevated temperature to produce vacuum hot-pressed (VHP) blocks and vacuum hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) forms and billets. The blocks (typically cylindrical), which are produced over a wide range of sizes (up to 183 cm dia. by 61

  5. Reactor vessel for pebble beds

    The wall and the bottom of the vessel for the gas-cooled pebble-bed reactor consist of numerous blocks of graphite or carbon rock piled up. They are held together by an exterior cylindrical or polygonal ring and supported by a foundation. The blocks form coherent sectors resp. annular sectors with well-defined separating lines. At high temperatures or load change operation these sectors behave like monolithic blocks expanding heely and contracting again, the center of the vessel remaining fixed. The forces causing the compression result from the own weight of the sectors and the weight of the pebble bed. This motion is supported by the convex arrangement of the opposite surfaces of the sectors and the supporting walls and by roller bearings. The bottom of the vessel may be designed funnel-shaped, in this way facilitating the removal of spheres. (DG)

  6. A smoother pebble mathematical explorations

    Benson, Donald C

    2003-01-01

    Introduction. I. BRIDGING THE GAP. 1. The Ancient Fractions. 2. Greek Gifts. 3. The Music of the Ratios. II. THE SHAPE OF THINGS. 4. Tubeland. 5. The Calculating Eye. III. THE GREAT ART. 6. Algebra Rules. 7. The Root of the Problem. 8. Symmetry Without Fear. 9. The Magic Mirror. IV. A SMOOTHER PEBBLE. 10. On the Shoulders of Giants. 11. Six-Minute Calculus. 12. Roller-Coaster Science. Glossary. References. Index

  7. Drucker-Prager-Cap creep modelling of pebble beds in fusion blankets

    Modelling of thermal and mechanical behaviour of pebble beds for fusion blankets is an important issue to understand the interaction of solid breeder and beryllium pebble beds with the surrounding structural material. Especially the differing coefficients of thermal expansion of these materials cause high stresses and strains during irradiation induced volumetric heating. To describe this process, the coupled thermomechanical behaviour of both pebble bed materials has to be modelled. Additionally, creep has to be considered contributing to bed deformations and stress relaxation. Motivated by experiments, we use a continuum mechanical approach called Drucker-Prager/Cap theory to model the macroscopic pebble bed behaviour. The model accounts for pressure dependent shear failure, inelastic hardening, and volumetric creep. The elastic part is described by a nonlinear elasticity law. The model has been implemented by user-defined routines in the commercial finite-element code ABAQUS. To check the numerics, the implementation is compared to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the Drucker-Prager/Cap tool is applied to a single ceramic breeder bed subject to creep under volumetric heating

  8. Beryllium development programme in India

    India has fairly large deposits of beryl. The requirement of beryllium and copper-beryllium alloys in space and electronic industries has provided the incentive for the setting up of an indigenous base for the development of beryllium process metallurgy. The paper presents the developmental work carried out, in the Metallurgy Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, on the preparation of beryllium metal and its alloys starting from Indian beryl. A laboratory facility incorporating essential precautionary measures has been set up for the safe handling of beryllium and its compounds. Based on the laboratory investigations a flow-sheet suitable to Indian conditions has been developed. The flow-sheet involves preparation of anhydrous beryllium fluoride from beryl through the silico-fluoride route, magnesiothermic reduction of beryllium fluoride for the production of beryllium metal or its master alloy with copper or aluminium, and fabrication of beryllium metal. (author)

  9. Estimation on tritium production and inventory in beryllium

    Beryllium has been proposed as a candidate material for neutron multiplier on fusion blanket design, tritium will be produced and accumulated in beryllium during neutron irradiation. It is very important to estimate the tritium inventory on blanket design. Tritium production and inventory under 3.0 GW fusion power were calculated for the layered pebble bed blanket, with Li2O breeder and beryllium multiplier. Neutronics calculations were carried out by one-dimensional transport code, ANISN and tritium production was calculated by direct reaction of 9Be(n,T)7Li and two-step reactions of 9Be(n,α)6Li(n,α)T. At the position near first wall, the direct reaction occupied the majority of tritium production. However, at the position of the mid-depth, contribution of the two-step reaction was included the production from neutron slow down by beryllium itself. The ratio accounting for 50% of total tritium production of two-step reaction production over whole blanket for one year full power operation (FPY) was resulted

  10. Pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR)

    In 1993, the pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) was identified by ESKOM, the electric utility of South Africa, as a leading option for the installation of new generating capacity to their electric grid. This innovative nuclear power plant incorporates a closed cycle primary coolant system utilizing helium to transport heat energy directly from the modular pebble bed reactor to a recuperative power conversion unit with a single-shaft turbine/compressor/generator. This replacement of the steam cycle that is common in present nuclear power plants (NPP) with a direct gas cycle provides the benefits of simplification and a substantial increase in overall system efficiency with the attendant lowering of capital and operational costs. Although the historical development of this plant is interrelated to other types of high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs), the principle focus herein is on the pebble bed (spherical) fuel element type reactor. The long-term development of this reactor type began in Germany by the KFA Nuclear Research Center (now FZJ). Two pebble bed plants were constructed in Germany, the 46 MW(th)/15 MW(e) Arbeitsgemeinshaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) and the 750 MW(th)/296 MW(e) thorium high temperature reactor (THTR-300). Basically, these steam/electric plants validated the temperature and fission product retention capabilities of the ceramic (TRISO) coated fuel particle and the safety characteristics of the HTGR. Most notable of the operational achievements was with the AVR in sustaining longterm operation at an average core outlet temperature of 950 deg. C, and in demonstration of safety such as extended loss of forced cooling on the core. More details on the AVR and THTR-300 plants are provided The next evolution of the pebble bed plant began in the early 1980s with development of the modular reactor. This small reactor added the unique characteristic of being able to cool the core entirely by passive heat transfer mechanisms following postulated

  11. Formation of pebble-pile planetesimals

    Jansson, Karl Wahlberg

    2014-01-01

    The first stage of planet formation is the accumulation of dust and ice grains into mm-cm-sized pebbles. These pebbles can clump together through the streaming instability and form gravitationally bound pebble 'clouds'. Pebbles inside such a cloud will undergo mutual collisions, dissipating energy into heat. As the cloud loses energy, it gradually contracts towards solid density. We model this process and investigate two important properties of the collapse: (i) the timescale of the collapse and (ii) the temporal evolution of the pebble size distribution. Our numerical model of the pebble cloud is zero-dimensional and treats collisions with a statistical method. We find that planetesimals with radii larger than 100 km collapse on the free-fall timescale of about 25 years. Lower-mass clouds have longer pebble collision timescales and collapse much more slowly, with collapse times of a few hundred years for 10-km-scale planetesimals and a few thousand years for 1-km-scale planetesimals. The mass of the pebble c...

  12. Mechanism analysis of quasi-static dense pebble flow in pebble bed reactor using phenomenological approach

    Highlights: ► We introduced four basic forms of phenomenological method for pebble flow. ► We discussed the physical nature of the quasi-static pebble flow. ► We verified the applicability of the discrete element method. ► We investigated the parameter effects on quasi-static pebble flow. - Abstract: By means of the four basic forms of the phenomenological method, experimental results have intuitionally disclosed the physical mechanism from various views of the quasi-static pebble flow in a pebble bed reactor and successfully verified the availability of the discrete element method, on which the parameter effects have been investigated, including different base cone angle and different friction coefficient. The flow fields under different parameters have been discussed. On the basis of these researches, a framework of the general understanding of pebble flow mechanism has been drawn; many essential problems are discussed, including the interpretation of the quasi-static pebble flow, force analysis inside the pebble packing, propagation and distribution of the voids, internal equilibrium arches, competition mechanism, internal collapse, self-organization, equivalent shear force, equivalent normal force, the physical process of stagnant zone's influence on the overall flow field, and so on. All of these are very helpful to understand the physical mechanism of the quasi-static pebble flow in a pebble bed reactor.

  13. The status of beryllium research for fusion in the United States

    Use of beryllium in fusion reactor has been considered for neutron multiplication in breeding blankets an as an oxygen getter for plasma - facing surface. Previous beryllium research for fusion in the United States included issues of interest to fission (swelling an changes in mechanical and thermal properties) as well as interactions with plasmas and hydrogen isotopes and methods of fabrication. When the United States formally withdrew its participation in the International Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, much of this effort was terminated. The focus in the U.S. has been mainly on toxic effects of beryllium and on industrial hygiene and health-related issues. Work continued at the INEEL (Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory) and elsewhere on beryllium-containing molten salts. This activity is part of the JUPITER II Agreement. Plasma spray of ITER first wall samples at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been performed under the European Fusion Development Agreement. Effects of irradiation on beryllium structure are being studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Numerical and phenomenological models are being developed and applied at the University of California Los Angels to investigate thermo-mechanical characteristics of beryllium pebble beds, similar to research being carried out at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and elsewhere. Additional work, not funded by the fusion program, has dealt with issues of disposal, and recycling. (author)

  14. The Status of Beryllium Research for Fusion in the United States

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2003-12-01

    Use of beryllium in fusion reactors has been considered for neutron multiplication in breeding blankets and as an oxygen getter for plasma-facing surfaces. Previous beryllium research for fusion in the United States included issues of interest to fission (swelling and changes in mechanical and thermal properties) as well as interactions with plasmas and hydrogen isotopes and methods of fabrication. When the United States formally withdrew its participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, much of this effort was terminated. The focus in the U.S. has been mainly on toxic effects of beryllium and on industrial hygiene and health-related issues. Work continued at the INEEL and elsewhere on beryllium-containing molten salts. This activity is part of the JUPITER II Agreement. Plasma spray of ITER first wall samples at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been performed under the European Fusion Development Agreement. Effects of irradiation on beryllium structure are being studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Numerical and phenomenological models are being developed and applied to better understand important processes and to assist with design. Presently, studies are underway at the University of California Los Angeles to investigate thermo-mechanical characteristics of beryllium pebble beds, similar to research being carried out at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and elsewhere. Additional work, not funded by the fusion program, has dealt with issues of disposal, and recycling.

  15. Absorber rod for pebble-bed reactor

    The absorber rod that can be moved into the pebble bed from the top reflector is enclosed by a cladding tube which, if it is completely moved down, ends above the pebble bed and is open at the bottom. Through the cladding tube the absorber rod is cooled with gas. The cladding tube consists of e.g. boron steel. If the absorber rod is drawn it takes along the cladding tube which is moved into the guide tube like a telescope. The rigidity of that part of the absorber rod projecting from the pebble bed is thus guaranteed. (DG)

  16. Radiolysis of Slightly Overstoichiometric Lithium Orthosilicate Pebbles

    Zarins, A.; Supe, A; Kizane, G; Knitter, R.; Reinholds, I; Vitins, A; Tilika, V; Actins, A; Baumane, L

    2010-01-01

    : One of the technological problems of a fusion reactor is the change in composition and structure of ceramic breeder (Li4SiO4 or Li2TiO3 pebbles) during long-term operation. Changes in the composition and structure of the Li4SiO4 ceramic pebbles at fast electron irradiation (E = 5 MeV, dose rate up to 88 MGy•h-1, absorbed dose up to 10.6 GGy) at 543-573 K were investigated in this study. Overstoichiometric (2.5 weight % of additional SiO2) lithium orthosilicate pebbles were fabricated by...

  17. Phase equilibria, compatibility studies and thermal properties of beryllium systems

    The quality control of commercial beryllium, the examinations of the phase equilibria in beryllium systems as well as the broad field of incompatibility and the reaction kinetics of beryllium with other materials necessitate a sophisticated method for the analysis of this element in micrometer areas. A powerful tool is the wavelength dispersive X-ray microanalyser. Therefore, a commercial synthetic Mo-B4C multilayer X-ray diffracting device with 2 d = 22.2 nm periodicity was used to extend X-ray microanalysis to the ultra-light elements Be and B in an existing instrument. The spectrometer covers a wavelength range between 5.2 and 13 nm. The wavelength of the Be Kα emission line from elemental Be is λ = 11.35 nm and the full width at half maximum is ΔE = 7.2 eV. The optimum working voltage Uo is 10 kV for moderate X-ray mass absorption of the targets. The determination of Be in oxides is less favourable owing to the high mass absorption. Uo has to be reduced to 5 kV. The chemical shift of the Be Kα line in BeO is Δλ = + 0.3 nm relative to pure Be. Beryllium pebbles are foreseen as neutron multipliers in future fusion reactor blanket concepts. Industrial intermediate Be products which had been produced by a modified Kroll process and subsequent reduction of BeF2 using Mg were investigated by X-ray microanalysis. The following precipitates in the Be matrix of 2 mm pebbles partially annealed up to 790 C could be detected: (Mg, Zr, U) Be13, MgBe13, Mg2Si, Al2Mg3 and (Fe, Cr) alloys. The maximum solubility of selected metallic impurities in beryllium annealed at 800 C is: 0.06 mass % Fe, 0.03 mass % Al, 0.02 mass % Si, 5Fe2, Be2C and Cr-Fe-Si were observed in specimens annealed between 870 and 690 C. It is interesting that Al5Fe2 precipitates were observed; however, the phase AlFeBe4 that would have been expected according to the phase diagram of the ternary Al-Be-Fe system was not found. Probably the Fe/Al ratio is too low for AlFeBe4 formation. The high annealing

  18. Effect of bed configuration on pebble flow uniformity and stagnation in the pebble bed reactor

    Highlights: • Pebble flow uniformity and stagnation characteristics are very important for HTR-PM. • Arc- and brachistochrone-shaped configuration effects are studied by DEM simulation. • Best bed configurations with uniform flow and no stagnated pebbles are suggested. • Detailed quantified characteristics of bed configuration effects are shown for explanation. - Abstract: Pebble flow uniformity and stagnation characteristics are very important for the design of pebble bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor. Pebble flows inside some specifically designed contraction configurations of pebble bed are studied by discrete element method. The results show the characteristics of stagnation rates, recycling rates, radial distribution of pebble velocity and residence time. It is demonstrated clearly that the bed with a brachistochrone-shaped configuration achieves optimum levels of flow uniformity and recycling rate concentration, and almost no pebbles are stagnated in the bed. Moreover, the optimum choice among the arc-shaped bed configurations is demonstrated too. Detailed information shows the quantified characteristics of bed configuration effects on flow uniformity. In addition, a good design of the pebble bed configuration is suggested

  19. Numerical simulation of nuclear pebble bed configurations

    Shams, A., E-mail: shams@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Roelofs, F., E-mail: roelofs@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Komen, E.M.J., E-mail: komen@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Baglietto, E., E-mail: emiliob@MIT.EDU [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Numerical simulations of a single face cubic centred pebble bed are performed. • Wide range of turbulence modelling techniques are used to perform these calculations. • The methods include 1-DNS, 1-LES, 3-Hybrid (RANS/LES) and 3-RANS models, respectively. • The obtained results are extensively compared to provide guidelines for such flow regimes. • These guidelines are used to perform reference LES for a limited sized random pebble bed. - Abstract: High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) are being considered all over the world. An HTR uses helium gas as a coolant, while the moderator function is taken up by graphite. The fuel is embedded in the graphite moderator. A particular inherent safety advantage of HTR designs is that the graphite can withstand very high temperatures, that the fuel inside will stay inside the graphite pebble and cannot escape to the surroundings even in the event of loss of cooling. Generally, the core can be designed using a graphite pebble bed. Some experimental and demonstration reactors have been operated using a pebble bed design. The test reactors have shown safe and efficient operation, however questions have been raised about possible occurrence of local hot spots in the pebble bed which may affect the pebble integrity. Analysis of the fuel integrity requires detailed evaluation of local heat transport phenomena in a pebble bed, and since such phenomena cannot easily be modelled experimentally, numerical simulations are a useful tool. As a part of a European project, named Thermal Hydraulics of Innovative Nuclear Systems (THINS), a benchmarking quasi-direct numerical simulation (q-DNS) of a well-defined pebble bed configuration has been performed. This q-DNS will serve as a reference database in order to evaluate the prediction capabilities of different turbulence modelling approaches. A wide range of numerical simulations based on different available turbulence modelling approaches are performed and compared with

  20. Numerical simulation of nuclear pebble bed configurations

    Highlights: • Numerical simulations of a single face cubic centred pebble bed are performed. • Wide range of turbulence modelling techniques are used to perform these calculations. • The methods include 1-DNS, 1-LES, 3-Hybrid (RANS/LES) and 3-RANS models, respectively. • The obtained results are extensively compared to provide guidelines for such flow regimes. • These guidelines are used to perform reference LES for a limited sized random pebble bed. - Abstract: High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) are being considered all over the world. An HTR uses helium gas as a coolant, while the moderator function is taken up by graphite. The fuel is embedded in the graphite moderator. A particular inherent safety advantage of HTR designs is that the graphite can withstand very high temperatures, that the fuel inside will stay inside the graphite pebble and cannot escape to the surroundings even in the event of loss of cooling. Generally, the core can be designed using a graphite pebble bed. Some experimental and demonstration reactors have been operated using a pebble bed design. The test reactors have shown safe and efficient operation, however questions have been raised about possible occurrence of local hot spots in the pebble bed which may affect the pebble integrity. Analysis of the fuel integrity requires detailed evaluation of local heat transport phenomena in a pebble bed, and since such phenomena cannot easily be modelled experimentally, numerical simulations are a useful tool. As a part of a European project, named Thermal Hydraulics of Innovative Nuclear Systems (THINS), a benchmarking quasi-direct numerical simulation (q-DNS) of a well-defined pebble bed configuration has been performed. This q-DNS will serve as a reference database in order to evaluate the prediction capabilities of different turbulence modelling approaches. A wide range of numerical simulations based on different available turbulence modelling approaches are performed and compared with

  1. Use of plutonium in pebble bed HTGRs

    This paper provides a summary of the current status of world-wide inventories of weapon-grade plutonium and plutonium from reprocessing of power reactor fuel. It addresses the use of pebble bed HTGRs for consumption of the plutonium in terms of the fuel cycle options. The requirements and neutronics aspects, and results from parameter studies conducted using pebble bed reactor types, are discussed, along with proliferation and waste disposal aspects. (author)

  2. Mechanics of the pebble bed reactor

    In a survey, the quite different type of problems which arise for the reactor designer from the mechanics of the pebble bed are demonstrated by examples. It becomes clear why the apparently simple system of a static heap of pebbles of the same diameter is such a complex problem, so that even after research and development work extending over three decades, it cannot be regarded as completely solved. (orig.)

  3. The natural history of beryllium sensitization and chronic beryllium disease.

    Newman, L. S.; Lloyd, J.; Daniloff, E.

    1996-01-01

    With the advent of in vitro immunologic testing, we can now detect exposed individuals who are sensitized to beryllium and those who have chronic beryllium disease (CBD) with lung pathology and impairment. Earlier detection and more accurate diagnostic tools raise new questions about the natural history of sensitization and granulomatous disease. Preliminary data suggest that early detection identifies people who are sensitized to beryllium and that these individuals are at risk for progressi...

  4. Shielding pebble transfer system for thermonuclear device

    In a system for supplying shielding pebbles to a vacuum vessel filled with the shielding pebbles in a gap of a double-walled structure, a supply port for the shielding pebbles is formed in a diverging shape, and a corny object is disposed at the center of the flow channel, or protrusions are formed in the vicinity of the supply port. Alternatively, a small object is disposed at the center of the flow channel of the supply port, and the small object is supported swingably and tiltably by elastic members. In addition, the upper plate of the vacuum vessel is slanted having the supply port of the shielding pebbles as a top, and a slanting angle relative to a horizontal axis is made greater than the resting angle of the shielding pebble accumulation layer. The shielding pebbles are jetted out from the supply port and spread to the peripheries, abut against the inner surface of the vacuum vessel, jump up and then accumulate. Accordingly, they can be accumulated dispersingly without being localized. An uniform accumulation layer is obtained to form a vacuum vessel having uniform and high shielding performance. (N.H.)

  5. Development Status of the PEBBLES Code for Pebble Mechanics: Improved Physical Models and Speed-up

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2009-12-01

    PEBBLES is a code for simulating the motion of all the pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. Since pebble bed reactors are packed randomly and not precisely placed, the location of the fuel elements in the reactor is not deterministically known. Instead, when determining operating parameters the motion of the pebbles can be simulated and stochastic locations can be found. The PEBBLES code can output information relevant for other simulations of the pebble bed reactors such as the positions of the pebbles in the reactor, packing fraction change in an earthquake, and velocity profiles created by recirculation. The goal for this level three milestone was to speedup the PEBBLES code through implementation on massively parallel computer. Work on this goal has resulted in speeding up both the single processor version and creation of a new parallel version of PEBBLES. Both the single processor version and the parallel running capability of the PEBBLES code have improved since the fiscal year start. The hybrid MPI/OpenMP PEBBLES version was created this year to run on the increasingly common cluster hardware profile that combines nodes with multiple processors that share memory and a cluster of nodes that are networked together. The OpenMP portions use the Open Multi-Processing shared memory parallel processing model to split the task across processors in a single node that shares memory. The Message Passing Interface (MPI) portion uses messages to communicate between different nodes over a network. The following are wall clock speed up for simulating an NGNP-600 sized reactor. The single processor version runs 1.5 times faster compared to the single processor version at the beginning of the fiscal year. This speedup is primarily due to the improved static friction model described in the report. When running on 64 processors, the new MPI/OpenMP hybrid version has a wall clock speed up of 22 times compared to the current single processor version. When using 88 processors, a

  6. Development Status of the PEBBLES Code for Pebble Mechanics: Improved Physical Models and Speed-up

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2009-09-01

    PEBBLES is a code for simulating the motion of all the pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. Since pebble bed reactors are packed randomly and not precisely placed, the location of the fuel elements in the reactor is not deterministically known. Instead, when determining operating parameters the motion of the pebbles can be simulated and stochastic locations can be found. The PEBBLES code can output information relevant for other simulations of the pebble bed reactors such as the positions of the pebbles in the reactor, packing fraction change in an earthquake, and velocity profiles created by recirculation. The goal for this level three milestone was to speedup the PEBBLES code through implementation on massively parallel computer. Work on this goal has resulted in speeding up both the single processor version and creation of a new parallel version of PEBBLES. Both the single processor version and the parallel running capability of the PEBBLES code have improved since the fiscal year start. The hybrid MPI/OpenMP PEBBLES version was created this year to run on the increasingly common cluster hardware profile that combines nodes with multiple processors that share memory and a cluster of nodes that are networked together. The OpenMP portions use the Open Multi-Processing shared memory parallel processing model to split the task across processors in a single node that shares memory. The Message Passing Interface (MPI) portion uses messages to communicate between different nodes over a network. The following are wall clock speed up for simulating an NGNP-600 sized reactor. The single processor version runs 1.5 times faster compared to the single processor version at the beginning of the fiscal year. This speedup is primarily due to the improved static friction model described in the report. When running on 64 processors, the new MPI/OpenMP hybrid version has a wall clock speed up of 22 times compared to the current single processor version. When using 88 processors, a

  7. Development Status of the PEBBLES Code for Pebble Mechanics: Improved Physical Models and Speed-up

    PEBBLES is a code for simulating the motion of all the pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. Since pebble bed reactors are packed randomly and not precisely placed, the location of the fuel elements in the reactor is not deterministically known. Instead, when determining operating parameters the motion of the pebbles can be simulated and stochastic locations can be found. The PEBBLES code can output information relevant for other simulations of the pebble bed reactors such as the positions of the pebbles in the reactor, packing fraction change in an earthquake, and velocity profiles created by recirculation. The goal for this level three milestone was to speedup the PEBBLES code through implementation on massively parallel computer. Work on this goal has resulted in speeding up both the single processor version and creation of a new parallel version of PEBBLES. Both the single processor version and the parallel running capability of the PEBBLES code have improved since the fiscal year start. The hybrid MPI/OpenMP PEBBLES version was created this year to run on the increasingly common cluster hardware profile that combines nodes with multiple processors that share memory and a cluster of nodes that are networked together. The OpenMP portions use the Open Multi-Processing shared memory parallel processing model to split the task across processors in a single node that shares memory. The Message Passing Interface (MPI) portion uses messages to communicate between different nodes over a network. The following are wall clock speed up for simulating an NGNP-600 sized reactor. The single processor version runs 1.5 times faster compared to the single processor version at the beginning of the fiscal year. This speedup is primarily due to the improved static friction model described in the report. When running on 64 processors, the new MPI/OpenMP hybrid version has a wall clock speed up of 22 times compared to the current single processor version. When using 88 processors, a

  8. Reprocessing technology development for irradiated beryllium

    Kawamura, H.; Sakamoto, N. [Oarai Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Tatenuma, K. [KAKEN Co., Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    At present, beryllium is under consideration as a main candidate material for neutron multiplier and plasma facing material in a fusion reactor. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the beryllium reprocessing technology for effective resource use. And, we have proposed reprocessing technology development on irradiated beryllium used in a fusion reactor. The preliminary reprocessing tests were performed using un-irradiated and irradiated beryllium. At first, we performed beryllium separation tests using un-irradiated beryllium specimens. Un-irradiated beryllium with beryllium oxide which is a main impurity and some other impurities were heat-treated under chlorine gas flow diluted with Ar gas. As the results high purity beryllium chloride was obtained in high yield. And it appeared that beryllium oxide and some other impurities were removed as the unreactive matter, and the other chloride impurities were separated by the difference of sublimation temperature on beryllium chloride. Next, we performed some kinds of beryllium purification tests from beryllium chloride. And, metallic beryllium could be recovered from beryllium chloride by the reduction with dry process. In addition, as the results of separation and purification tests using irradiated beryllium specimens, it appeared that separation efficiency of Co-60 from beryllium was above 96%. It is considered that about 4% Co-60 was carried from irradiated beryllium specimen in the form of cobalt chloride. And removal efficiency of tritium from irradiated beryllium was above 95%.

  9. Impact of fusion neutrons on helium production in beryllium and tungsten, and tritium breeding in ITER and DEMO

    Fernández Navarro, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The project studies blanket designs of ITER and DEMO for neutron shielding, helium production and tritium breeding. On the one hand, a comparison has been made between beryllium and tungsten as first wall materials. On the other hand, tritium breeding blanket models have been studied, focus on the European test blanket module (TBM) concepts, the helium-cooled pebble bed (HCPB) and the helium-cooled lithium-lead (HCLL). The choice of plasma facing materials and the tritium breeding technolo...

  10. Beryllium. Its minerals. Pt. 1

    With this work a series of reports begins, under the generic name 'Beryllium', related to several aspects of beryllium technology. The target is to update, with critical sense, current bibliographic material in order to be used in further applications. Some of the most important beryllium ores, the Argentine emplacement of their deposits and world occurrence are described. Argentine and world production, resources and reserves are indicated here as well. (Author)

  11. Microstructure analysis of melt-based lithium orthosilicate/metatitanate pebbles

    Lithium containing ceramics, such as lithium orthosilicate (Li4SiO4) and lithium metatitanate (Li2TiO3), are being developed to be used as tritium sources for future fusion reactors. In the current design of the Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed Blanket, pebbles with a diameter of approximately 1 mm are featured in pebble beds in so called blanket modules surrounding the plasma core. A modified single drop, melt-based process has been developed for the production of the pebbles. This method has many advantages in regard to the yield and the recycling potential of the used material. The current reference material is produced with an excess of 2.5 wt. % SiO2, which results in a 2-phase material composed of roughly 90 mol % Li4SiO4 and 10 mol % Li2SiO3, lithium metasilicate. There are generally two possible methods to increase the mechanical properties of these pebbles: (a) minimize production based defects such as cracks and pores, and (b) by adding stronger phases to the ceramic. Recent work has focused on the modification of the established melt-spraying process to develop a droplet generation technique with more control over the process. Both lithium orthosilicate and metatitanate have the advantage of being low activation materials, which allows the addition of titania, TiO2, to the melt, resulting in the formation of a strengthening secondary phase of lithium metatitanate. This paper looks at the influence of the phase content on the microstructure and the resulting mechanical properties. Phase analysis and porosity measurements were performed, and in particular the microstructure and mechanical crush loads were characterized. (orig.)

  12. Joining of Beryllium

    Goldberg, A

    2006-02-01

    A handbook dealing with the many aspects of beryllium that would be important for the users of this metal is currently being prepared. With an introduction on the applications, advantages and limitations in the use of this metal the following topics will be discussed in this handbook: physical, thermal, and nuclear properties; extraction from the ores; purification and casting of ingots; production and types of beryllium powders; consolidation methods, grades, and properties; mechanical properties with emphasis on the various factors affecting these properties; forming and mechanical working; welding, brazing, bonding, and fastening; machining; powder deposition; corrosion; health aspects; and examples of production of components. This report consists of ''Section X--Joining'' from the handbook. The prefix X is maintained here for the figures, tables and references. In this section the different methods used for joining beryllium and the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of each are presented. The methods discussed are fusion welding, brazing, solid state bonding (diffusion bonding and deformation bonding), soldering, and mechanical fastening. Since beryllium has a high affinity for oxygen and nitrogen with the formation of oxides and nitrides, considerable care must be taken on heating the metal, to protect it from the ambient atmosphere. In addition, mating surfaces must be cleaned and joints must be designed to minimize residual stresses as well as locations for stress concentration (notch effects). In joining any two metals the danger exists of having galvanic corrosion if the part is subjected to moisture or to any type of corroding environment. This becomes a problem if the less noble (anodic) metal has a significantly smaller area than the more noble (cathodic) metal since the ions (positive charges) from the anodic (corroding) metal must correspond to the number of electrons (negative charges) involved at the cathode. Beryllium

  13. The effects of temperatures on the pebble flow in a pebble bed high temperature reactor

    The core of a pebble bed high temperature reactor (PBHTR) moves during operation, a feature which leads to better fuel economy (online refueling with no burnable poisons) and lower fuel stress. The pebbles are loaded at the top and trickle to the bottom of the core after which the burnup of each is measured. The pebbles that are not fully burned are recirculated through the core until the target burnup is achieved. The flow pattern of the pebbles through the core is of importance for core simulations because it couples the burnup distribution to the core temperature and power profiles, especially in cores with two or more radial burnup 'zones '. The pebble velocity profile is a strong function of the core geometry and the friction between the pebbles and the surrounding structures (other pebbles or graphite reflector blocks). The friction coefficient for graphite in a helium environment is inversely related to the temperature. The Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR) operated in Germany between 1983 and 1989. It featured a two-zone core, an inner core (IC) and outer core (OC), with different fuel mixtures loaded in each zone. The rate at which the IC was refueled relative to the OC in THTR was designed to be 0.56. During its operation, however, this ratio was measured to be 0.76, suggesting the pebbles in the inner core traveled faster than expected. It has been postulated that the positive feedback effect between inner core temperature, burnup, and pebble flow was underestimated in THTR. Because of the power shape, the center of the core in a typical cylindrical PBHTR operates at a higher temperature than the region next to the side reflector. The friction between pebbles in the IC is lower than that in the OC, perhaps causing a higher relative flow rate and lower average burnup, which in turn yield a higher local power density. Furthermore, the pebbles in the center region have higher velocities than the pebbles next to the side reflector due to the

  14. Development of mini-tablets with 1mm and 2mm diameter.

    Tissen, Corinna; Woertz, Katharina; Breitkreutz, Joerg; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2011-09-15

    The feasibility of formulating mini-tablets with 1mm diameter on a rotary-die press in comparison to mini-tablets of 2mm was investigated. To gain insight into the production of 1mm mini-tablets, three model drugs of different compression characteristics were chosen, namely quinine hydrochloride, ibuprofen and spray-dried gentian extract. A high drug load in combination with robust and reproducible mechanical properties was requested. Depending on the individual drug substance, mini-tablets were produced by direct compression or after roll-compaction/dry granulation. The tensile strength, mass, and their variation coefficients were determined to assess the mechanical properties of the tablets. The content uniformity and the dissolution behavior of selected batches were analyzed. For the first time 1mm mini-tablets could be successfully produced by direct compression (90% quinine hydrochloride; 90% dried gentian extract) and after roll compaction (70% ibuprofen). Depending on the applied compression pressure, 1mm mini-tablets with quinine hydrochloride exhibited robust mechanical properties (e.g. median tensile strength of 2.02N/mm(2)) with equal or lower variance of distribution compared to the 2mm compacts. With respect to content uniformity of dosage forms, 1mm mini-tablets containing 80% quinine hydrochloride met the requirements of the European Pharmacopeia (AV=6.8). PMID:21726616

  15. Multiscale Analysis of Pebble Bed Reactors

    Hans Gougar; Woo Yoon; Abderrafi Ougouag

    2010-10-01

    – The PEBBED code was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for design and analysis of pebble-bed high temperature reactors. The diffusion-depletion-pebble-mixing algorithm of the original PEBBED code was enhanced through coupling with the THERMIX-KONVEK code for thermal fluid analysis and by the COMBINE code for online cross section generation. The COMBINE code solves the B-1 or B-3 approximations to the transport equation for neutron slowing down and resonance interactions in a homogeneous medium with simple corrections for shadowing and thermal self-shielding. The number densities of materials within specified regions of the core are averaged and transferred to COMBINE from PEBBED for updating during the burnup iteration. The simple treatment of self-shielding in previous versions of COMBINE led to inaccurate results for cross sections and unsatisfactory core performance calculations. A new version of COMBINE has been developed that treats all levels of heterogeneity using the 1D transport code ANISN. In a 3-stage calculation, slowing down is performed in 167 groups for each homogeneous subregion (kernel, particle layers, graphite shell, control rod absorber annulus, etc.) Particles in a local average pebble are homogenized using ANISN then passed to the next (pebble) stage. A 1D transport solution is again performed over the pebble geometry and the homogenized pebble cross sections are passed to a 1-d radial model of a wedge of the pebble bed core. This wedge may also include homogeneous reflector regions and a control rod region composed of annuli of different absorbing regions. Radial leakage effects are therefore captured with discrete ordinates transport while axial and azimuthal effects are captured with a transverse buckling term. In this paper, results of various PBR models will be compared with comparable models from literature. Performance of the code will be assessed.

  16. Experimental and computational investigation of flow of pebbles in a pebble bed nuclear reactor

    Khane, Vaibhav B.

    The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is a 4th generation nuclear reactor which is conceptually similar to moving bed reactors used in the chemical and petrochemical industries. In a PBR core, nuclear fuel in the form of pebbles moves slowly under the influence of gravity. Due to the dynamic nature of the core, a thorough understanding about slow and dense granular flow of pebbles is required from both a reactor safety and performance evaluation point of view. In this dissertation, a new integrated experimental and computational study of granular flow in a PBR has been performed. Continuous pebble re-circulation experimental set-up, mimicking flow of pebbles in a PBR, is designed and developed. Experimental investigation of the flow of pebbles in a mimicked test reactor was carried out for the first time using non-invasive radioactive particle tracking (RPT) and residence time distribution (RTD) techniques to measure the pebble trajectory, velocity, overall/zonal residence times, flow patterns etc. The tracer trajectory length and overall/zonal residence time is found to increase with change in pebble's initial seeding position from the center towards the wall of the test reactor. Overall and zonal average velocities of pebbles are found to decrease from the center towards the wall. Discrete element method (DEM) based simulations of test reactor geometry were also carried out using commercial code EDEM(TM) and simulation results were validated using the obtained benchmark experimental data. In addition, EDEM(TM) based parametric sensitivity study of interaction properties was carried out which suggests that static friction characteristics play an important role from a packed/pebble beds structural characterization point of view. To make the RPT technique viable for practical applications and to enhance its accuracy, a novel and dynamic technique for RPT calibration was designed and developed. Preliminary feasibility results suggest that it can be implemented as a non

  17. Beryllium. Beryllium oxide, obtention and properties. Pt.4

    As a continuation of the 'Beryllium' series this work reviews several methods of high purity beryllia production. Diverse methods of obtention and purification from different beryllium compounds are described. Some chemical, mechanical and electrical properties related with beryllia obtention methods are summarized. (Author)

  18. Plasma spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum-silver alloys

    A preliminary investigation on plasma-spraying of beryllium and a beryllium-aluminum 4% silver alloy was done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Beryllium Atomization and Thermal Spray Facility (BATSF). Spherical Be and Be-Al-4%Ag powders, which were produced by centrifugal atomization, were used as feedstock material for plasma-spraying. The spherical morphology of the powders allowed for better feeding of fine (<38 μm) powders into the plasma-spray torch. The difference in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the two plasma-sprayed powders will be discussed along with the effect of processing parameters on the as-deposited microstructure of the Be-Al-4%Ag. This investigation represents ongoing research to develop and characterize plasma-spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum alloys for magnetic fusion and aerospace applications

  19. Technical Basis for PNNL Beryllium Inventory

    Johnson, Michelle Lynn

    2014-07-09

    The Department of Energy (DOE) issued Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 850, “Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program” (the Beryllium Rule) in 1999 and required full compliance by no later than January 7, 2002. The Beryllium Rule requires the development of a baseline beryllium inventory of the locations of beryllium operations and other locations of potential beryllium contamination at DOE facilities. The baseline beryllium inventory is also required to identify workers exposed or potentially exposed to beryllium at those locations. Prior to DOE issuing 10 CFR 850, Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) had documented the beryllium characterization and worker exposure potential for multiple facilities in compliance with DOE’s 1997 Notice 440.1, “Interim Chronic Beryllium Disease.” After DOE’s issuance of 10 CFR 850, PNNL developed an implementation plan to be compliant by 2002. In 2014, an internal self-assessment (ITS #E-00748) of PNNL’s Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) identified several deficiencies. One deficiency is that the technical basis for establishing the baseline beryllium inventory when the Beryllium Rule was implemented was either not documented or not retrievable. In addition, the beryllium inventory itself had not been adequately documented and maintained since PNNL established its own CBDPP, separate from Hanford Site’s program. This document reconstructs PNNL’s baseline beryllium inventory as it would have existed when it achieved compliance with the Beryllium Rule in 2001 and provides the technical basis for the baseline beryllium inventory.

  20. Beryllium coprecipitation with iron hydroxide

    Coprecipitation and sorption are studied of beryllium with hydroxide of Fe(3) in solutions of NH4NO3, KNO3, NH4HCO3, and H2O2 over a wide range of pH of the medium. The conditions are found for concentrating and separating beryllium from the carrier within definite ranges of pH of the medium

  1. Methods for the mitigation of the chemical reactivity of beryllium in steam

    In the safety assessment of future fusion reactors, the reaction of beryllium with steam remains one of the main concerns. In this case of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), the use of beryllium in combination with pressurized water as coolant can lead to excessive hydrogen production due to the reaction Be + H2O = BeO +H2 +heat. Because of the explosion hazard associated with this phenomenon, the hydrogen generation rate during a LOCA should be reduced as much as possible. Therefore, we started an R and D programme aimed at investigating mitigation methods for the beryllium/steam reaction. Beryllium samples were implanted in a 210 kV ion implanter at ITN (Institute Technologico e Nuclear) Lisbon, with calcium and aluminum ions respectively in a 210 kV ion implanter at ITN Lisbon. The average implantation depth was estimated at 100 nm for both elements. The chemical activity of these samples in steam was then measured at SCK-CEN (The Belgian Nuclear Research Center) in a dedicated experimental facility providing coupled thermogravimetry/mass spectrometry. The observed oxidation kinetics was parabolic. In comparison to reference un-doped material, the reactivity of doped beryllium after 30 minutes of exposure decreased with a factor 2 to 4. The mitigating effect was higher for calcium-doped than for aluminum-doped samples. As a second approach, beryllium pebbles were pre-oxidized in dry air at 400 degree C during ten hours. This did not result in an appreciable decrease in chemical activity. The results indicate that doping may be a viable means of mitigating the chemical activity of beryllium in steam. (author)

  2. Fourier Analysis of the OMC1 Image at 1.1 mm Wavelength

    Youn, Soyoung

    2012-01-01

    We present a 1.1 mm emission map of the OMC1 region observed with AzTEC, a new large-format array composed of 144 silicon-nitride micromesh bolometers that was in use at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). The AzTEC observations of the OMC1 region at 1.1 mm reveal dozens of cloud cores and a tail of filaments in a manner that is almost identical to the submillimeter continuum emission of the entire OMC1 region at 450 and 850 micronm. We perform Fourier analysis of the image with a modified periodogram and the density power spectrum which provides the distribution of length scale of the structures is measured. The expected value of the periodogram converges to the resulting power spectrum in the mean squared sense. From the present analysis of the OMC1 filaments at the 1.1 mm emission, the power spectrum steepens at relatively smaller scales. At largest scales, the power spectrum flattens and the large scale power law becomes shallower. The power spectra of the 1.1 mm emission show clear deviations from ...

  3. AzTEC 1.1 mm Observations of the MBM12 Molecular Cloud

    Kim, M J; Youn, S; Yun, M S; Wilson, G W; Aretxaga, I; Williams, J P; Hughes, D H; Humphrey, A; Austermann, J E; Perera, T A; Mauskopf, P D; Magnani, L; Kang, Y -W

    2011-01-01

    We present 1.1 mm observations of the dust continuum emission from the MBM12 high-latitude molecular cloud observed with the Astronomical Thermal Emission Camera (AzTEC) mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. We surveyed a 6.34 deg$^2$ centered on MBM12, making this the largest area that has ever been surveyed in this region with submillimeter and millimeter telescopes. Eight secure individual sources were detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of over 4.4. These eight AzTEC sources can be considered to be real astronomical objects compared to the other candidates based on calculations of the false detection rate. The distribution of the detected 1.1 mm sources or compact 1.1 mm peaks is spatially anti-correlated with that of the 100 micronm emission and the $^{12}$CO emission. We detected the 1.1 mm dust continuum emitting sources associated with two classical T Tauri stars, LkHalpha262 and LkHalpha264. Observations of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) indicate that LkHalpha262 ...

  4. SXDF-ALMA 2-arcmin2 deep survey: 1.1-mm number counts

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Kohno, Kotaro; Umehata, Hideki; Aretxaga, Itziar; Caputi, Karina I.; Dunlop, James S.; Ikarashi, Soh; Iono, Daisuke; Ivison, Rob J.; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Tadaki, Ken-ich; Tamura, Yoichi; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wilson, Grant W.; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Yun, Min S.

    2016-01-01

    We report 1.1-mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studie

  5. Lithium titanate pebbles reprocessing by wet chemistry

    An original dissolution method for irradiated Li2TiO3 in aqueous H2O2 was developed. One could easily obtain fine Li2TiO3 powders from the solution through drying and calcination. Li2TiO3 pebbles (size ∼0.6 mm, above 90% TD) were obtained from the 'reprocessed' powders. These solutions were also suitable for the formation of a sol emulsion in 2-ethyl-hexanol-1, from which gelled microspheres of lithium titanate could be obtained. Locally prepared Li2TiO3 reprocessed and supplied pebble batches were tested for tritium release by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) methods in He + 0.1%H2 (R-gas) after their short irradiations in a thermal neutron flux. The relative TPD data were compared. A qualitative correlation was developed between peak characteristics and pebble microstructure

  6. Fuel feeding with pebbles, installation and experience

    The AVR reactor is a graphite moderated high temperature reactor cooled with helium (at 10 bar). It was the first reactor which operated with spherical fuel elements. The fuel elements have a diameter of 60 mm. They consists of graphite in which the fuel is embedded as coated particles, and weigh about 200 g. The core is cylindrical, with a diameter of 3 m and 3 m high. About 100,000 pebbles are accommodated in it. The fuelling equipment differs considerably from the fuelling and fuel removal machines of previously operated reactors with rod-shaped or block-shaped fuel elements, because of the spherical fuel elements. The tasks of the fuelling equipment are the addition, turning over and removal of fuel elements and test pebbles. The burnup also has to be measured and all pebbles have to be counted and recorded. One can talk of a completely new development, as there were no tested components for all these tasks. (orig.)

  7. Numerical simulation on friction coefficient effect of pebble flow dynamics in two-dimensional pebble-bed reactor

    In order to investigate the pebble flow dynamics in the high-temperature reactor core and based on the two-dimensional experiments of pebble flow dynamics, discrete element method (DEM) was used to simulate the pebble flow dynamics. The mean flow stream lines, standard deviation and the mean residence time of the pebble flow zone generated by markers were compared and analyzed. The results show that ball friction coefficient has little effect on the pebble flow field. With the pebble friction coefficient increasing, the horizontal diffusion of pebbles decreases and the pebble flow seems to be more uniform. The wall friction coefficient has little effect on the horizontal diffusion. While the wall friction coefficient increases, the flow tends to be more uneven. (authors)

  8. Thermal fatigue of beryllium

    Deksnis, E.; Ciric, D.; Falter, H. [JET Joint undertaking, Abingdon (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Thermal fatigue life of S65c beryllium castellated to a geometry 6 x 6 x (8-10)mm deep has been tested for steady heat fluxes of 3 MW/m{sup 2} to 5 MW/m{sup 2} and under pulsed heat fluxes (10-20 MW/m{sup 2}) for which the time averaged heat flux is 5 MW/m{sup 2}. These tests were carried out in the JET neutral beam test facility A test sequence with peak surface temperatures {le} 600{degrees}C produced no visible fatigue cracks. In the second series of tests, with T{sub max} {le} 750{degrees}C evidence for fatigue appeared after a minimum of 1350 stress cycles. These fatigue data are discussed in view of the observed lack of thermal fatigue in JET plasma operations with beryllium PFC. JET experience with S65b and S65c is reviewed; recent operations with {Phi} = 25 MW/m{sup 2} and sustained melting/resolidification are also presented. The need for a failure criterion for finite element analyses of Be PFC lifetimes is discussed.

  9. AzTEC 1.1 mm OBSERVATIONS OF THE MBM12 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    Kim, M. J.; Kim, S.; Youn, S.; Kang, Y.-W. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Sejong University, KwangJin-gu, KunJa-dong 98, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, M. S.; Wilson, G. W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Aretxaga, I.; Hughes, D. H.; Humphrey, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisca, Optica y Electronica, Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Williams, J. P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Austermann, J. E. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Perera, T. A. [Department of Physics, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, IL 61701 (United States); Mauskopf, P. D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Magnani, L., E-mail: sek@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States)

    2012-02-10

    We present 1.1 mm observations of the dust continuum emission from the MBM12 high-latitude molecular cloud observed with the Astronomical Thermal Emission Camera (AzTEC) mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. We surveyed 6.34 deg{sup 2} centered on MBM12, making this the largest area that has ever been surveyed in this region with submillimeter and millimeter telescopes. Eight secure individual sources were detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of over 4.4. These eight AzTEC sources can be considered to be real astronomical objects compared to the other candidates based on calculations of the false detection rate. The distribution of the detected 1.1 mm sources or compact 1.1 mm peaks is spatially anti-correlated with that of the 100 {mu}m emission and the {sup 12}CO emission. We detected the 1.1 mm dust continuum emitting sources associated with two classical T Tauri stars, LkH{alpha}262 and LkH{alpha}264. Observations of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) indicate that LkH{alpha}262 is likely to be Class II (pre-main-sequence star), but there are also indications that it could be a late Class I (protostar). A flared disk and a bipolar cavity in the models of Class I sources lead to more complicated SEDs. From the present AzTEC observations of the MBM12 region, it appears that other sources detected with AzTEC are likely to be extragalactic and located behind MBM12. Some of these have radio counterparts and their star formation rates are derived from a fit of the SEDs to the photometric evolution of galaxies in which the effects of a dusty interstellar medium have been included.

  10. SXDF-ALMA 2-arcmin2 deep survey: 1.1-mm number counts

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Kohno, Kotaro; Umehata, Hideki; Aretxaga, Itziar; Caputi, Karina I.; Dunlop, James S.; Ikarashi, Soh; Iono, Daisuke; Ivison, Rob J.; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Tadaki, Ken-ich; Tamura, Yoichi; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wilson, Grant W.; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Yun, Min S.

    2016-06-01

    We report 1.1-mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studies are based on the ensemble of serendipitously detected sources in fields originally targeting different sources and could be biased due to the clustering of sources around the targets. We derive number counts in the flux range of 0.2-2 mJy by using 23 (≥4σ) sources detected in a continuous 2.0-arcmin2 area of the SXDF. The number counts are consistent with previous results within errors, suggesting that the counts derived from serendipitously detected sources are not significantly biased, although there could be field-to-field variation due to the small survey area. By using the best-fitting function of the number counts, we find that ˜40% of the extragalactic background light at 1.1 mm is resolved at S1.1mm > 0.2 mJy.

  11. Structure Analysis of OMC1 Filaments at 1.1 mm Emission

    Youn, Soyoung

    2011-01-01

    We present a 1.1 mm emission map of the OMC1 region observed with AzTEC, a new large-format array composed of 144 silicon-nitride micromesh bolometers that was in use at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). The AzTEC observations of the OMC1 region at 1.1 mm reveal dozens of cloud cores and a tail of filaments in a manner that is almost identical to the submillimeter continuum emission of the entire OMC1 region at 450 and 850 micronm. The density power spectrum provides the size distribution of the structures. We find that a single power law might be fitted to the calculated power spectrum of the 1.1 mm emission between 0.3 pc and 0.03 pc. The slope of the best fit power law is \\gamma~-2.6 and is similar to the spectral index of the power spectrum of \\gamma~-2.7 found in numerical simulations. However, there is a distinct spectral break in the power spectrum at a characteristic scale of ~0.3 pc in OMC1. The effects of beam size and noise spectrum on the shape and slope of the power spectrum are also incl...

  12. SXDF-ALMA 2 arcmin$^2$ Deep Survey: 1.1-mm Number Counts

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Umehata, Hideki; Aretxaga, Itziar; Caputi, Karina I; Dunlop, James S; Ikarashi, Soh; Iono, Daisuke; Ivison, Rob J; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Tadaki, Ken-ich; Tamura, Yoichi; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wilson, Grant W; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Yun, Min S

    2016-01-01

    We report 1.1 mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studies are based on the ensemble of serendipitously-detected sources in fields originally targeting different sources and could be biased due to the clustering of sources around the targets. We derive number counts in the flux range of 0.2-2 mJy by using 23 (>=4sigma) sources detected in a continuous 2.0 arcmin$^2$ area of the SXDF. The number counts are consistent with previous results within errors, suggesting that the counts derived from serendipitously-detected sources are not significantly biased, although there could be field-to-field variation due to the small survey area. By using the best-fit function of the number counts, we find that ~40% of the extragalactic background light at 1.1 mm is resolved at S(1.1mm)...

  13. Granular Dynamics in Pebble Bed Reactor Cores

    Laufer, Michael Robert

    This study focused on developing a better understanding of granular dynamics in pebble bed reactor cores through experimental work and computer simulations. The work completed includes analysis of pebble motion data from three scaled experiments based on the annular core of the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt-Cooled High- Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR). The experiments are accompanied by the development of a new discrete element simulation code, GRECO, which is designed to offer a simple user interface and simplified two-dimensional system that can be used for iterative purposes in the preliminary phases of core design. The results of this study are focused on the PB-FHR, but can easily be extended for gas-cooled reactor designs. Experimental results are presented for three Pebble Recirculation Experiments (PREX). PREX 2 and 3.0 are conventional gravity-dominated granular systems based on the annular PB-FHR core design for a 900 MWth commercial prototype plant and a 16 MWth test reactor, respectively. Detailed results are presented for the pebble velocity field, mixing at the radial zone interfaces, and pebble residence times. A new Monte Carlo algorithm was developed to study the residence time distributions of pebbles in different radial zones. These dry experiments demonstrated the basic viability of radial pebble zoning in cores with diverging geometry before pebbles reach the active core. Results are also presented from PREX 3.1, a scaled facility that uses simulant materials to evaluate the impact of coupled fluid drag forces on the granular dynamics in the PB-FHR core. PREX 3.1 was used to collect first of a kind pebble motion data in a multidimensional porous media flow field. Pebble motion data were collected for a range of axial and cross fluid flow configurations where the drag forces range from half the buoyancy force up to ten times greater than the buoyancy force. Detailed analysis is presented for the pebble velocity field, mixing behavior, and residence time

  14. Thorium utilization in a pebble bed reactor

    Thorium reserves in the earth's crust are much more than those of uranium, which today measure about 1.5 million tonnes of reasonably assured resources, plus 3 million tonnes of estimated additional resources. These large amount of thorium reserves, also available in Turkey encourages to focus on the utilization of thorium. The most remarkable applications of the use of thorium have been in high temperature reactors. The high temperature pebble bed reactor, which has been chosen as the basis for this study, is a close approximation of the thorium utilizing German reactor THTR. Pebble bed reactors have some unique features which are suitable to burn thorium. (i) The fuel is loaded in the form of coated particles, which are embedded in the graphite matrix of the fuel pebbles, allowing exceptionally high heavy metal burnups; and (ii) the continuous (on-line) fuel loading allows a high utilization factor. The criticality search of the pebble bed reactor is computed by the use of the SCALE4.4 code, CSASIX and KENOVa modules. And the in-core fuel management is computed via SCALE4.4 code, ORIGEN-S module

  15. Effect of wall structure on pebble stagnation behavior in pebble bed reactor

    Highlights: • DEM study of wall structure role in preventing near wall crystallization is carried out. • Suggestions on pebble’s kinematic parameters and wall structure design are provided. • Triangle is better than arc and sawtooth shapes for wall structure design. • Wall structure size should be close to the scale of pebble diameter. • Suitable intervals can prevent crystallization without significantly increasing the flow resistance. - Abstract: Crystallization of pebbles in pebble bed is a crucial problem in high temperature gas-cooled pebble-bed reactors. This phenomenon usually happens along the internal surface and leads to a large number of stagnated pebbles, which poses a threat to reactor safety. In real reactor engineering, wall structures have been utilized to avoid this problem. This article verifies the crystallization phenomenon through DEM (discrete element method) simulation, and explains how wall structures work in preventing crystallization. Moreover, several kinematic parameters have been adopted to evaluate wall structures with different shapes, sizes and intervals. Detailed information shows the impact of wall structure on flow field in pebble bed. Lastly, the preferred characteristics of an effective wall structure are suggested for reactor engineering

  16. Beryllium usage in fusion blankets and beryllium data needs

    Increasing numbers of designers are choosing beryllium for fusion reactor blankets because it, among all nonfissile materials, produces the highest number (2.5 neutron in an infinite media) of neutrons per 14-MeV incident neutron. In amounts of about 20 cm of equivalent solid density, it can be used to produce fissile material, to breed all the tritium consumed in ITER from outboard blankets only, and in designs to produce Co-60. The problem is that predictions of neutron multiplication in beryllium are off by some 10 to 20% and appear to be on the high side, which means that better multiplication measurements and numerical methods are needed. The n,2n reactions result in two helium atoms, which cause radiation damage in the form of hardening at low temperatures (300/degree/C). The usual way beryllium parts are made is by hot pressing the powder. A lower cost method is to cold press and then sinter. There is no radiation damage data on this form of beryllium. The issues of corrosion, safety relative to the release of the tritium built-up inside beryllium, and recycle of used beryllium are also discussed. 10 figs

  17. Characterization of shocked beryllium

    Explosively driven arrested beryllium experiments were performed with post mortem characterization to evaluate the failure behaviors. The test samples were encapsulated in an aluminum assembly that was large relative to the sample, and the assembly features both axial and radial momentum traps. The sample carrier was inserted from the explosively-loaded end and has features to lock the carrier to the surrounding cylinder using the induced plastic flow. Calculations with Lagrangian codes showed that the tensile stresses experienced by the Be sample were below the spall stress. Metallographic characterization of the arrested Be showed radial cracks present in the samples may have been caused by bending moments. Fractography showed the fractures propagated from the side of the sample closest to the explosives, the side with the highest tensile stress. There was evidence that the fractures may have propagated from the circumferential crack outward and downward radially.

  18. "Smart pebble" design for environmental monitoring applications

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Pavlovskis, Edgars

    2014-05-01

    Sediment transport, due to primarily the action of water, wind and ice, is one of the most significant geomorphic processes responsible for shaping Earth's surface. It involves entrainment of sediment grains in rivers and estuaries due to the violently fluctuating hydrodynamic forces near the bed. Here an instrumented particle, namely a "smart pebble", is developed to investigate the exact flow conditions under which individual grains may be entrained from the surface of a gravel bed. This could lead in developing a better understanding of the processes involved, while focusing on the response of the particle during a variety of flow entrainment events. The "smart pebble" is a particle instrumented with MEMS sensors appropriate for capturing the hydrodynamic forces a coarse particle might experience during its entrainment from the river bed. A 3-axial gyroscope and accelerometer registers data to a memory card via a microcontroller, embedded in a 3D-printed waterproof hollow spherical particle. The instrumented board is appropriately fit and centred into the shell of the pebble, so as to achieve a nearly uniform distribution of the mass which could otherwise bias its motion. The "smart pebble" is powered by an independent power to ensure autonomy and sufficiently long periods of operation appropriate for deployment in the field. Post-processing and analysis of the acquired data is currently performed offline, using scientific programming software. The performance of the instrumented particle is validated, conducting a series of calibration experiments under well-controlled laboratory conditions. "Smart pebble" allows for a wider range of environmental sensors (e.g. for environmental/pollutant monitoring) to be incorporated so as to extend the range of its application, enabling accurate environmental monitoring which is required to ensure infrastructure resilience and preservation of ecological health.

  19. SXDF-ALMA 2 arcmin$^2$ Deep Survey: 1.1-mm Number Counts

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Kohno, Kotaro; Umehata, Hideki; Aretxaga, Itziar; Caputi, Karina I.; Dunlop, James S.; Ikarashi, Soh; Iono, Daisuke; Ivison, Rob J.; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi, Stott, John P; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji

    2016-01-01

    We report 1.1 mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studies are based on the ensemble of serendipitously-detected sources in fields originally targeting different sources and could be biased due to the clustering of sources around the targets. We derive n...

  20. A 1 mm Scintillating Fibre Tracker Readout by a Multi-anode Photomultiplier

    Leverington, B. D.; Anelli, M.; Campana, P.; Rosellini, R

    2011-01-01

    This note describes a prototype particle tracking detector constructed with 1 mm plastic scintillating fibres with a 64 channel Hamamatsu H8500 flat-panel multi-anode photomultiplier readout. Cosmic ray tracks from an array of 11 gas-filled drift tubes were matched to signals in the scintillating fibres in order to measure the resolution and efficiency of tracks reconstructed in the fibre-based tracker. A GEANT4 detector simulation was also developed to compare cosmic ray data with MC results...

  1. Beryllium technology workshop, Clearwater Beach, Florida, November 20, 1991

    This report discusses the following topics: beryllium in the ITER blanket; mechanical testing of irradiated beryllium; tritium release measurements on irradiated beryllium; beryllium needs for plasma-facing components; thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed beryllium; beryllium research at the INEL; Japanese beryllium research activities for in-pile mockup tests on ITER; a study of beryllium bonding of copper alloy; new production technologies; thermophysical properties of a new ingot metallurgy beryllium product line; implications of beryllium:steam interactions in fusion reactors; and a test program for irradiation embrittlement of beryllium at JET

  2. Pebble Accretion and the Diversity of Planetary Systems

    Chambers, J E

    2016-01-01

    I examine the standard model of planet formation, including pebble accretion, using numerical simulations. Planetary embryos large enough to become giant planets do not form beyond the ice line within a typical disk lifetime unless icy pebbles stick at higher speeds than in experiments using rocky pebbles. Systems like the Solar System (small inner planets, giant outer planets) can form if (i) icy pebbles are stickier than rocky pebbles, and (ii) the planetesimal formation efficiency increases with pebble size, which prevents the formation of massive terrestrial planets. Growth beyond the ice line is dominated by pebble accretion. Most growth occurs early, when the surface density of pebbles is high due to inward drift of pebbles from the outer disk. Growth is much slower after the outer disk is depleted. The outcome is sensitive to the disk radius and turbulence level, which control the lifetime and maximum size of pebbles. The outcome is sensitive to the size of the largest planetesimals since there is a th...

  3. The source counts of submillimetre galaxies detected at 1.1 mm

    Scott, K S; Aretxaga, I; Austermann, J E; Chapin, E L; Dunlop, J S; Ezawa, H; Halpern, M; Hatsukade, B; Hughes, D H; Kawabe, R; Kim, S; Kohno, K; Lowenthal, J D; Montana, A; Nakanishi, K; Oshima, T; Sanders, D; Scott, D; Scoville, N; Tamura, Y; Welch, D; Yun, M S; Zeballos, M

    2012-01-01

    The source counts of galaxies discovered at sub-millimetre and millimetre wavelengths provide important information on the evolution of infrared-bright galaxies. We combine the data from six blank-field surveys carried out at 1.1 mm with AzTEC, totalling 1.6 square degrees in area with root-mean-square depths ranging from 0.4 to 1.7 mJy, and derive the strongest constraints to date on the 1.1 mm source counts at flux densities S(1100) = 1-12 mJy. Using additional data from the AzTEC Cluster Environment Survey to extend the counts to S(1100) ~ 20 mJy, we see tentative evidence for an enhancement relative to the exponential drop in the counts at S(1100) ~ 13 mJy and a smooth connection to the bright source counts at >20 mJy measured by the South Pole Telescope; this excess may be due to strong lensing effects. We compare these counts to predictions from several semi-analytical and phenomenological models and find that for most the agreement is quite good at flux densities > 4 mJy; however, we find significant d...

  4. Fabrication of Li4SiO4 pebbles by wet method with modified powders synthesized via sol–gel process

    Li4SiO4 pebbles have been recognized as attractive tritium breeder materials in the fusion reactor blanket of international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). In this work, we present a facile method to prepare Li4SiO4 pebbles of high density and sphericity by using a directive wet method with the Li4SiO4 powders synthesized via sol–gel process. The Li4SiO4 powders were prepared with two-step calcinating method, followed by a ball-milling process. Thermal and phase analysis, morphologies and sintering behaviors observations of the pebbles were carried out systematically. Experimental results show that the pure phase powders with white color that prepared by using two-step calcinating method is different from the powders prepared by the traditional direct calcinating method. The subsequent ball milling process proves to be effective to improve the relative density of the sintered body. When sintered at the temperature as low as 850 °C for 4 h, the favorable Li4SiO4 pebbles with uniform size (∼1 mm), good sphericity (1.02), and high density (above 90% T.D.) were fabricated by using a directive wet method. The as-fabricated pebbles hold good potential as tritium breeding materials for blankets

  5. A study on evaluation of pebble flow velocity with modification of the kinematic model for pebble bed reactor

    Highlights: ► A modified kinematic method is proposed for analysis of pebble flow velocity. ► Experiments are performed to derive the coefficients and to verify the results. ► The method and result can be used for the advanced analysis of pebble bed reactor. - Abstract: A pebble bed reactor is filled by a large number of pebbles, which are randomly piled up in the core region. During the process of fuel loading and extraction, the pebbles flow downward through the core. The basic physics of the dense granular flow such as pebble flow is not fully understood; hence, the dynamic core of the pebble bed reactor has been a subject of concern among designers and regulators. The kinematic model is one of the representative models for the reconstruction of the granular flow velocity, however, it is noted that there are some limitations in the reconstruction ability. In this study, a modified kinematic model was proposed to enhance the reconstruction ability of the pebble velocity profile. Pebble flow experiments were performed to derive the coefficients needed for the modified kinematic model and to verify the reconstruction ability and the applicability of the proposed method in the annular core. The modified kinematic model can contribute to accurate velocity evaluation as well as large applicability for the specific core types such as an annular core. Also, the results can be used for reference data in the design of a pebble bed reactor

  6. Preliminary Neutronics Analysis Of Fuel Pebble With Thorium Fuel Cycle

    A new fuel pebble was designed based on Thorium fuel cycle. 231Pa has been added into fuel pebble for obtaining the minimum reactivity swing. The results show that the new designed pebble fuel with 7.0 % 233U enrichment adding 3.2% 231Pa, the keff is to be controlled up to 65 GWd/t; the other design with 8.0 % 233U enrichment requires 3.9% 231Pa, the keff therefore is remain up to 80 GWd/t. About 95% of loaded 231Pa in fuel pebble is depleted after 120 GWd/t. The results imply that it is optimistic to design the fuel pebble with 233U, 231Pa and 232Th; but some effects such as fuel temperature effect, distribution of TRISO particle in pebble fuel, etc. are required to investigate. (author)

  7. Processing Irradiated Beryllium For Disposal

    T. J. Tranter; R. D. Tillotson; N. R. Mann; G. R. Longhurst

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a process for decontaminating irradiated beryllium that will allow it to be disposed of through normal radwaste channels. Thus, the primary objectives of this ongoing study are to remove the transuranic (TRU) isotopes to less than 100 nCi/g and remove {sup 60}Co, and {sup 137}Cs, to levels that will allow the beryllium to be contact handled. One possible approach that appears to have the most promise is aqueous dissolution and separation of the isotopes by selected solvent extraction followed by precipitation, resulting in a granular form for the beryllium that may be fixed to prevent it from becoming respirable and therefore hazardous. Beryllium metal was dissolved in nitric and fluorboric acids. Isotopes of {sup 241}Am, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 85}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs were then added to make a surrogate beryllium waste solution. A series of batch contacts was performed with the spiked simulant using chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (CCD) and polyethylene glycol diluted with sulfone to extract the isotopes of Cs and Sr. Another series of batch contacts was performed using a combination of octyl (phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) in tributyl phosphate (TBP) diluted with dodecane for extracting the isotopes of Pu and Am. The results indicate that greater than 99.9% removal can be achieved for each isotope with only three contact stages.

  8. PEBBLE: a two-dimensional steady-state pebble bed reactor thermal hydraulics code

    This report documents the local implementation of the PEBBLE code to treat the two-dimensional steady-state pebble bed reactor thermal hydraulics problem. This code is implemented as a module of a computation system used for reactor core history calculations. Given power density data, the geometric description in (RZ), and basic heat removal conditions and thermal properties, the coolant properties, flow conditions, and temperature distributions in the pebble fuel elements are predicted. The calculation is oriented to the continuous fueling, steady state condition with consideration of the effect of the high energy neutron flux exposure and temperature history on the thermal conductivity. The coolant flow conditions are calculated for the same geometry as used in the neutronics calculation, power density and fluence data being used directly, and temperature results are made available for subsequent use

  9. Thermal-hydraulic analysis techniques for axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor cores. [PEBBLE code

    Stroh, K.R.

    1979-03-01

    The pebble bed reactor's cylindrical core volume contains a random bed of small, spherical fuel-moderator elements. These graphite spheres, containing a central region of dispersed coated-particle fissile and fertile material, are cooled by high pressure helium flowing through the connected interstitial voids. A mathematical model and numerical solution technique have been developed which allow calculation of macroscopic values of thermal-hydraulic variables in an axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor core. The computer program PEBBLE is based on a mathematical model which treats the bed macroscopically as a generating, conducting porous medium. The steady-state model uses a nonlinear Forchheimer-type relation between the coolant pressure gradient and mass flux, with newly derived coefficients for the linear and quadratic resistance terms. The remaining equations in the model make use of mass continuity, and thermal energy balances for the solid and fluid phases.

  10. PEBBLE: a two-dimensional steady-state pebble bed reactor thermal hydraulics code

    Vondy, D.R.

    1981-09-01

    This report documents the local implementation of the PEBBLE code to treat the two-dimensional steady-state pebble bed reactor thermal hydraulics problem. This code is implemented as a module of a computation system used for reactor core history calculations. Given power density data, the geometric description in (RZ), and basic heat removal conditions and thermal properties, the coolant properties, flow conditions, and temperature distributions in the pebble fuel elements are predicted. The calculation is oriented to the continuous fueling, steady state condition with consideration of the effect of the high energy neutron flux exposure and temperature history on the thermal conductivity. The coolant flow conditions are calculated for the same geometry as used in the neutronics calculation, power density and fluence data being used directly, and temperature results are made available for subsequent use.

  11. Planetary brightness temperature measurements at 8.6 mm and 3.1 mm wavelengths.

    Ulich, B. L.; Cogdell, J. R.; Davis, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    New measurements of the sun, moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn at 3.1- and 8.6-mm wavelengths are given. The temperatures reported for the planets at 3.1-mm wavelength are higher than previous measurements in this wavelength range and change the interpretation of some planetary spectra. For Mercury, it is found that the mean brightness temperature is independent of wavelength and that a temperature-dependent thermal conductivity is not required to match the observations. In the case of Mars, the spectrum is shown to rise in the millimeter region, as simple models predict. For Jupiter, the need to recalculate the spectrum with recent models is demonstrated. The flux density scale proposed by Dent (1972) has been revised according to a more accurate determination of the millimeter brightness temperature of Jupiter.

  12. A 1 mm Scintillating Fibre Tracker Readout by a Multi-anode Photomultiplier

    Leverington, B D; Campana, P; Rosellini, R

    2011-01-01

    This note describes a prototype particle tracking detector constructed with 1 mm plastic scintillating fibres with a 64 channel Hamamatsu H8500 flat-panel multi-anode photomultiplier readout. Cosmic ray tracks from an array of 11 gas-filled drift tubes were matched to signals in the scintillating fibres in order to measure the resolution and efficiency of tracks reconstructed in the fibre-based tracker. A GEANT4 detector simulation was also developed to compare cosmic ray data with MC results and is discussed in the note. Using the parameters measured in this experimental setup, modified fibre tracker designs are suggested to improve resolution and efficiency in future prototypes to meet modern detector specifications.

  13. Status of beryllium materials for fusion application

    The possible use of beryllium as a material for fusion reactors is discussed. Based on the results of recent Russian elaborations, which were not covered previously in the scientific literature, an attempt of complex analysis of the techniques of using beryllium is made. The specific requirements on beryllium as a protective material for first wall and divertor are considered. Also the possibility of creating a fusion grade of beryllium is discussed and an optimum strategy is suggested. (orig.)

  14. Pebble Delivery for Inside-Out Planet Formation

    Hu, Xiao; Chatterjee, Sourav

    2014-01-01

    Inside-Out Planet Formation (IOPF; Chatterjee & Tan 2014, hereafter CT14) is a scenario for sequential in situ planet formation at the pressure traps of retreating dead zone inner boundaries (DZIBs) motivated to explain the many systems with tightly packed inner planets (STIPs) discovered by Kepler. The scenario involves build-up of a pebble-dominated protoplanetary ring, supplied by radial drift of pebbles from the outer disk. It may also involve further build-up of planetary masses to gap-opening scales via continued pebble accretion. Here we study radial drift & growth of pebbles delivered to the DZIB in fiducial IOPF disk models.

  15. Phenomenological method investigation of pebble flow dynamics in two-dimensional two-region pebble-bed reactor

    By means of the four basic forms of the phenomenological method, the experimental research was carried out according to the principle of similarity criterion to simulate 2D pebble flow dynamics of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The result indicates that the test with circulating pebble-loading mode obviously presents better the situation in the real pebble bed reactor. The pebble flow dynamics spreads from bottom to top and from middle to sides. The movement of pebbles in central region is faster than that in annulus region and has no laminar characteristics performance. The mixed zone exists between central region and annulus region, and the distinct stagnant zone also exists at pebble bed bottom corner. (authors)

  16. Spectrographic measurement of beryllium in the atmosphere

    We describe here a method for the spectrographic determination of beryllium on filters which is valid for amounts varying between 0,01 and 30 μg of beryllium and which is independent of the nature of the beryllium compound involved. This is a flux method (graphite-lithium carbonate mixture), the excitation being by a direct current arc. (author)

  17. Numerical simulation on pebble dynamics of two-dimensional two-region pebble-bed reactor using phenomenological method

    Discrete element method was used to simulate the pebble dynamics in the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core, based on the two-dimensional pebble dynamics experiments. Phenomenological method was used to analyze the formation of the two-region distribution, the central, mixing and stagnant regions, and the velocity distribution. The simulation results show that a stable central region is formed, mixing zones between the central and annular regions and stagnant regions are observed in current simulation. The closer to the bottom of the pebble bed, the more uneven the vertical pebble velocity and the bigger the horizontal diffusion. (authors)

  18. Defense programs beryllium good practice guide

    Within the DOE, it has recently become apparent that some contractor employees who have worked (or are currently working) with and around beryllium have developed chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an occupational granulomatous lung disorder. Respiratory exposure to aerosolized beryllium, in susceptible individuals, causes an immunological reaction that can result in granulomatous scarring of the lung parenchyma, shortness of breath, cough, fatigue, weight loss, and, ultimately, respiratory failure. Beryllium disease was originally identified in the 1940s, largely in the fluorescent light industry. In 1950, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) introduced strict exposure standards that generally curtailed both the acute and chronic forms of the disease. Beginning in 1984, with the identification of a CBD case in a DOE contractor worker, there was increased scrutiny of both industrial hygiene practices and individuals in this workforce. To date, over 100 additional cases of beryllium-specific sensitization and/or CBD have been identified. Thus, a disease previously thought to be largely eliminated by the adoption of permissible exposure standards 45 years ago is still a health risk in certain workforces. This good practice guide forms the basis of an acceptable program for controlling workplace exposure to beryllium. It provides (1) Guidance for minimizing worker exposure to beryllium in Defense Programs facilities during all phases of beryllium-related work, including the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of facilities. (2) Recommended controls to be applied to the handling of metallic beryllium and beryllium alloys, beryllium oxide, and other beryllium compounds. (3) Recommendations for medical monitoring and surveillance of workers exposed (or potentially exposed) to beryllium, based on the best current understanding of beryllium disease and medical diagnostic tests available. (4) Site-specific safety procedures for all processes of beryllium that is

  19. Cryogenic Properties of Aluminum Beryllium and Beryllium Materials

    Gamwell, Wayne R.; McGill, Preston B.

    2003-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation were obtained for the aluminum-beryllium alloy, AlBeMetl62 (38%Al-62%Be), at cryogenic (-195.5 C (-320 F) and (-252.8 C) (-423 F)) temperatures, and for an optical grade beryllium, O-30H (99%Be), at -252.8 C. AlBeMetl62 material was purchased to the requirements of SAE-AMS7912, "Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy, Extrusions." O-30H material was purchased to the requirements of Brush Wellman Inc. specification O-30H Optical Grade Beryllium. The ultimate tensile and yield strengths for extruded AlBeMetl62 material increased with decreasing temperature, and the percent elongation decreased with decreasing temperature. Design properties for the ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and percent elongation for extruded AlBeMetl62 were generated. It was not possible to distinguish a difference in the room and cryogenic ultimate strength for the hot isostatically pressed (HIP'ed) O-30H material. The O30H elongation decreased with decreasing temperature.

  20. Cryogenic Properties of Aluminum-Beryllium and Beryllium Materials

    Gamwell, Wayne R.; McGill, Preston B.

    2003-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation were obtained for the aluminum- beryllium alloy, AlBeMetl62 (38%Al-62%Be), at cryogenic (-195.5 C (-32O F) and (- 252.8 C) (-423 F)) temperatures, and for an optical grade beryllium, O-30H (99%Be), at -252.8 C. AlBeMet162 material was purchased to the requirements of SAE- AMs7912, "Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy, Extrusions". O-30H material was purchased to the requirements of Brush Wellman Inc. specification O-30H Optical Grade Beryllium. The ultimate tensile and yield strengths for extruded AlBeMet162 material increased with decreasing temperature, and the percent elongation decreased with decreasing temperature. Design properties for the ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and percent elongation for extruded AlBeMetl62 were generated. It was not possible to distinguish a difference in the room and cryogenic ultimate strength for the hot isostatically pressed (HIP'ed) O-30H material. The O-30H elongation decreased with decreasing temperature.

  1. Reactivity test between beryllium and copper

    Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kato, M. [NGK Insulators, Ltd., Aichi-ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium has been expected for using as plasma facing material on ITER. And, copper alloy has been proposed as heat sink material behind plasma facing components. Therefore, both materials must be joined. However, the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper alloy does not clear in detail. For example, other authors reported that beryllium reacted with copper at high temperature, but it was not obvious about the generation of reaction products and increasing of the reaction layer. In the present work, from this point, for clarifying the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper, the out-of-pile compatibility tests were conducted with diffusion couples of beryllium and copper which were inserted in the capsule filled with high purity helium gas (6N). Annealing temperatures were 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700{degrees}C, and annealing periods were 100, 300 and 1000h. Beryllium specimens were hot pressed beryllium, and copper specimens were OFC (Oxygen Free Copper).

  2. A Pebble Bed Reactor cross section methodology

    A method is presented for the evaluation of microscopic cross sections for the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) neutron diffusion computational models during convergence to an equilibrium (asymptotic) fuel cycle. This method considers the isotopics within a core spectral zone and the leakages from such a zone as they arise during reactor operation. The randomness of the spatial distribution of fuel grains within the fuel pebbles and that of the fuel and moderator pebbles within the core, the double heterogeneity of the fuel, and the indeterminate burnup of the spectral zones all pose a unique challenge for the computation of the local microscopic cross sections. As prior knowledge of the equilibrium composition and leakage is not available, it is necessary to repeatedly re-compute the group constants with updated zone information. A method is presented to account for local spectral zone composition and leakage effects without resorting to frequent spectrum code calls. Fine group data are pre-computed for a range of isotopic states. Microscopic cross sections and zone nuclide number densities are used to construct fine group macroscopic cross sections, which, together with fission spectra, flux modulation factors, and zone buckling, are used in the solution of the slowing down balance to generate a new or updated spectrum. The microscopic cross-sections are then re-collapsed with the new spectrum for the local spectral zone. This technique is named the Spectral History Correction (SHC) method. It is found that this method accurately recalculates local broad group microscopic cross sections. Significant improvement in the core eigenvalue, flux, and power peaking factor is observed when the local cross sections are corrected for the effects of the spectral zone composition and leakage in two-dimensional PBR test problems.

  3. Worker Environment Beryllium Characterization Study

    This report summarizes the conclusion of regular monitoring of occupied buildings at the Nevada Test Site and North Las Vegas facility to determine the extent of beryllium (Be) contamination in accordance with Judgment of Needs 6 of the August 14, 2003, 'Minnema Report.'

  4. Worker Environment Beryllium Characterization Study

    NSTec Environment, Safety, Health & Quality

    2009-12-28

    This report summarizes the conclusion of regular monitoring of occupied buildings at the Nevada Test Site and North Las Vegas facility to determine the extent of beryllium (Be) contamination in accordance with Judgment of Needs 6 of the August 14, 2003, “Minnema Report.”

  5. Survey of dust production in pebble bed reactor cores

    Highlights: → We review potential sources of the graphite dust found in the German pebble bed reactors. → Available literature on graphite wear coefficients in pebble bed core-like conditions is reviewed. → Limited conclusions and remaining open questions are discussed. - Abstract: Graphite dust produced via mechanical wear from the pebbles in a pebble bed reactor is an area of concern for licensing. Both the German pebble bed reactors produced graphite dust that contained activated elements. These activation products constitute an additional source term of radiation and must be taken under consideration during the conduct of accident analysis of the design. This paper discusses the available literature on graphite dust production and measurements in pebble bed reactors. Limited data is available on the graphite dust produced from the AVR and THTR-300 pebble bed reactors. Experiments that have been performed on wear of graphite in pebble-bed-like conditions are reviewed. The calculation of contact forces, which are a key driving mechanism for dust in the reactor, are also included. In addition, prior graphite dust predictions are examined, and future areas of research are identified.

  6. Neutronic modeling of pebble bed reactors in APOLLO2

    In this thesis we develop a new iterative homogenization technique for pebble bed reactors, based on a 'macro-stochastic' transport approximation in the collision probability method. A model has been developed to deal with the stochastic distribution of pebbles with different burnup in the core, considering spectral differences in homogenization and depletion calculations. This is generally not done in the codes presently used for pebble bed analyses, where a pebble with average isotopic composition is considered to perform the cell calculation. Also an iterative core calculation scheme has been set up, where the low-order RZ SN full-core calculation computes the entering currents in the spectrum zones subdividing the core. These currents, together with the core keff, are then used as surface source in the fine-group heterogeneous calculation of the multi-pebble geometries. The developed method has been verified using reference Monte Carlo simulations of a simplified PBMR- 400 model. The pebbles in this model are individually positioned and have different randomly assigned burnup values. The APOLLO2 developed method matches the reference core keff within ± 100 pcm, with relative differences on the production shape factors within ± 4%, and maximum discrepancy of 3% at the hotspot. Moreover, the first criticality experiment of the HTR-10 reactor was used to perform a first validation of the developed model. The computed critical number of pebbles to be loaded in the core is very close to the experimental value of 16890, only 77 pebbles less. A method to calculate the equilibrium reactor state was also developed and applied to analyze the simplified PBMR-400 model loaded with different fuel types (UO2, Pu, Pu + MA). The potential of the APOLLO2 method to compute different fluxes for the different pebble types of a multi-pebble geometry was used to evaluate the bias committed by the average composition pebble approximation. Thanks to a 'compensation of error', this

  7. Synthesis of Be–Ti–V ternary beryllium intermetallic compounds

    Kim, Jae-Hwan, E-mail: kim.jaehwan@jaea.go.jp; Nakamichi, Masaru

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Preliminary synthesis of ternary Be–Ti–V beryllides was investigated. • An area fraction of Be phase increased with increase of V amount in the beryllide because of increasing melting temperature. • The increase of Be phase fraction resulted in increase of weight gain as well as H{sub 2} generation. • The beryllides with lower V contents indicated to better phase stability at high temperature. - Abstract: Beryllium intermetallic compounds (beryllides) such as Be{sub 12}Ti and Be{sub 12}V are the most promising advanced neutron multipliers in demonstration power reactors. Advanced neutron multipliers are being developed by Japan and the EU as part of their Broader Approach activities. It has been previously shown, however, that beryllides are too brittle to fabricate into pebble- or rod-like shapes using conventional methods such as arc melting and hot isostatic pressing. To overcome this issue, we developed a new combined plasma sintering and rotating electrode method for the fabrication of beryllide rods and pebbles. Previously, we prepared a beryllide pebble with a Be–7.7 at.% Ti composition as the stoichiometric value of the Be{sub 12}Ti phase; however, Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} and Be phases were present along with the Be{sub 12}Ti phase that formed as the result of a peritectic reaction due to re-melting during granulation using the rotating electrode method. This Be phase was found to be highly reactive with oxygen and water vapor. Accordingly, to investigate the Be phase reduction and applicability for fabrication of electrodes prior to granulation using the rotating electrode method, Be–Ti–V ternary beryllides were synthesized using the plasma sintering method. Surface observation results indicated that increasing plasma sintering time and V addition led to an increase in the intermetallic compound phases compared with plasma-sintered beryllide with a Be–7.7 at.% Ti composition. Additionally, evaluation of the reactivity of

  8. Molecular cloning and analysis of Myc modulator 1 (Mm-1 from Bufo gargarizans (Amphibia: Anura

    Ning Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The protein of Myc modulator 1 (Mm-1 has been reported to repress the transcriptional activity of the proto-oncogene c-Myc in humans. Moreover, it was shown to be the subunit 5 of human prefoldin (PFD. So far, this gene and its homologs have been isolated and sequenced in many organisms, such as mammals and fish, but has not been sequenced for any amphibian or reptile. In order to better understand the function and evolution of Mm-1, we isolated a full-length Mm-1 cDNA (BgMm-1, GenBank accession no. EF211947 from Bufo gargarizans (Cantor, 1842 using RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends methods. Mm-1 in B. gargarizans is 755 bp long, comprising an open reading frame (ORF of 459 bp encoding 152 amino acids. The amino acid sequence had a prefoldin α-like domain, partially including a typical putative leucine zipper motif. BgMm-1 showed high similarity to its homolog of Mus musculus Linnaeus, 1758 (82% and Homo sapiens Linnaeus, 1758 MM-1 isoform a (81% at the amino acid level. The protein secondary structure modeled with the SWISS MODEL server revealed that there were two α-helices and four b-strands in BgMm-1 as its human orthologue, and both proteins belonged to the a class of PFD family. The phylogenetic relationships of Mm-1s from lower archaea to high mammals was consistent with the evolution of species, meanwhile the cluster result was consistent with the multiple alignment and the sequence identity analysis. RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that BgMm-1 expressed widely in ten tissues of adult toad. These results can be helpful for the further investigation on the evolution of Mm-1.

  9. OVERVIEW OF BERYLLIUM SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    Brisson, M

    2009-04-01

    Because of its unique properties as a lightweight metal with high tensile strength, beryllium is widely used in applications including cell phones, golf clubs, aerospace, and nuclear weapons. Beryllium is also encountered in industries such as aluminium manufacturing, and in environmental remediation projects. Workplace exposure to beryllium particulates is a growing concern, as exposure to minute quantities of anthropogenic forms of beryllium may lead to sensitization and to chronic beryllium disease, which can be fatal and for which no cure is currently known. Furthermore, there is no known exposure-response relationship with which to establish a 'safe' maximum level of beryllium exposure. As a result, the current trend is toward ever lower occupational exposure limits, which in turn make exposure assessment, both in terms of sampling and analysis, more challenging. The problems are exacerbated by difficulties in sample preparation for refractory forms of beryllium, such as beryllium oxide, and by indications that some beryllium forms may be more toxic than others. This chapter provides an overview of sources and uses of beryllium, health risks, and occupational exposure limits. It also provides a general overview of sampling, analysis, and data evaluation issues that will be explored in greater depth in the remaining chapters. The goal of this book is to provide a comprehensive resource to aid personnel in a wide variety of disciplines in selecting sampling and analysis methods that will facilitate informed decision-making in workplace and environmental settings.

  10. Beryllium - A Unique Material in Nuclear Applications

    Beryllium, due to its unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section characteristics, has been used successfully as a neutron reflector for three generations of nuclear test reactors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), the largest test reactor in the world, has utilized five successive beryllium neutron reflectors and is scheduled for continued operation with a sixth beryllium reflector. A high radiation environment in a test reactor produces radiation damage and other changes in beryllium. These changes necessitate safety analysis of the beryllium, methods to predict performance, and appropriate surveillances. Other nuclear applications also utilize beryllium. Beryllium, given its unique atomic, physical, and chemical characteristics, is widely used as a ''window'' for x-rays and gamma rays. Beryllium, intimately mixed with high-energy alpha radiation emitters has been successfully used to produce neutron sources. This paper addresses operational experience and methodologies associated with the use of beryllium in nuclear test reactors and in ''windows'' for x-rays and gamma rays. Other nuclear applications utilizing beryllium are also discussed

  11. Tritium release from lithium orthosilicate pebbles deposited with palladium

    Full text of publication follows: Slightly over-stoichiometric lithium orthosilicate pebbles have been selected as one optional breeder material for the European Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket. This material has been developed in collaboration of Research Center Karlsruhe and the Schott Glass, Mainz. The lithium orthosilicate pebbles are fabricated from lithium hydroxide and silica by a melting and spraying method in a semi-industrial scale facility. Lithium hydroxide was selected as the precursor since enriched lithium hydroxide is commercially available. The lithium orthosilicate pebbles produced by the process contains oxide phases besides orthosilicate, but it was also found that the oxide phases can be decomposed by annealing at high temperatures. The lithium orthosilicate pebbles produced in this way possesses satisfactory pebble characteristics. Therefore, the authors performed out-of-pile annealing tests using the lithium orthosilicate pebbles irradiated in a research reactor. Moreover, the effect of the deposition of palladium in the lithium orthosilicate pebbles on the behavior of tritium release was investigated. Palladium was deposited in the lithium orthosilicate pebbles by the incipient wet impregnation method using a solution of a palladium amino complex. The lithium orthosilicate pebbles were submitted to neutron irradiation at the Kyoto university research reactor. In the out-of-pile annealing experiments, the temperature of the breeder material placed in a tubular reactor made of quartz was raised from ambient temperature to 1173 K at a constant rate of 5 K/min under the stream of sweep gases. The tritium concentration in the outlet stream of the reactor was traced with two ionization chambers. The ionization chambers were used with a water bubbler, which enables to measure the concentrations of molecular form of tritium (HT) and tritiated water vapor (HTO) separately. In the experiments, a 0.1 % hydrogen/nitrogen sweep gas was used. The

  12. Defense programs beryllium good practice guide

    Herr, M.

    1997-07-01

    Within the DOE, it has recently become apparent that some contractor employees who have worked (or are currently working) with and around beryllium have developed chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an occupational granulomatous lung disorder. Respiratory exposure to aerosolized beryllium, in susceptible individuals, causes an immunological reaction that can result in granulomatous scarring of the lung parenchyma, shortness of breath, cough, fatigue, weight loss, and, ultimately, respiratory failure. Beryllium disease was originally identified in the 1940s, largely in the fluorescent light industry. In 1950, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) introduced strict exposure standards that generally curtailed both the acute and chronic forms of the disease. Beginning in 1984, with the identification of a CBD case in a DOE contractor worker, there was increased scrutiny of both industrial hygiene practices and individuals in this workforce. To date, over 100 additional cases of beryllium-specific sensitization and/or CBD have been identified. Thus, a disease previously thought to be largely eliminated by the adoption of permissible exposure standards 45 years ago is still a health risk in certain workforces. This good practice guide forms the basis of an acceptable program for controlling workplace exposure to beryllium. It provides (1) Guidance for minimizing worker exposure to beryllium in Defense Programs facilities during all phases of beryllium-related work, including the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities. (2) Recommended controls to be applied to the handling of metallic beryllium and beryllium alloys, beryllium oxide, and other beryllium compounds. (3) Recommendations for medical monitoring and surveillance of workers exposed (or potentially exposed) to beryllium, based on the best current understanding of beryllium disease and medical diagnostic tests available. (4) Site-specific safety procedures for all processes of beryllium that is likely to

  13. Requirements for helium cooled pebble bed blanket and R and D activities

    Carloni, D., E-mail: dario.carloni@kit.edu; Boccaccini, L.V.; Franza, F.; Kecskes, S.

    2014-10-15

    This work aims to give an outline of the design requirements of the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) blanket and its associated R and D activities. In DEMO fusion reactor the plasma facing components have to fulfill several requirements dictated by safety and process sustainability criteria. In particular the blanket of a fusion reactor shall transfer the heat load coming from the plasma to the cooling system and also provide tritium breeding for the fuel cycle of the machine. KIT has been investigating and developed a helium-cooled blanket for more than three decades: the concept is based on the adoption of separated small lithium orthosilicate (tritium breeder) and beryllium (neutron multiplier) pebble beds, i.e. the HCPB blanket. One of the test blanket modules of ITER will be a HCPB type, aiming to demonstrate the soundness of the concept for the exploitation in future fusion power plants. A discussion is reported also on the development of the design criteria for the blanket to meet the requirements, such as tritium environmental release, also with reference to the TBM. The selection of materials and components to be used in a unique environment as the Tokamak of a fusion reactor requires dedicated several R and D activities. For instance, the performance of the coolant and the tritium self-sufficiency are key elements for the realization of the HCPB concept. Experimental campaigns have been conducted to select the materials to be used inside the solid breeder blanket and R and D activities have been carried out to support the design. The paper discusses also the program of future developments for the realization of the HCPB concept, also focusing to the specific campaigns necessary to qualify the TBM for its implementation in the ITER machine.

  14. Requirements for helium cooled pebble bed blanket and R and D activities

    This work aims to give an outline of the design requirements of the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) blanket and its associated R and D activities. In DEMO fusion reactor the plasma facing components have to fulfill several requirements dictated by safety and process sustainability criteria. In particular the blanket of a fusion reactor shall transfer the heat load coming from the plasma to the cooling system and also provide tritium breeding for the fuel cycle of the machine. KIT has been investigating and developed a helium-cooled blanket for more than three decades: the concept is based on the adoption of separated small lithium orthosilicate (tritium breeder) and beryllium (neutron multiplier) pebble beds, i.e. the HCPB blanket. One of the test blanket modules of ITER will be a HCPB type, aiming to demonstrate the soundness of the concept for the exploitation in future fusion power plants. A discussion is reported also on the development of the design criteria for the blanket to meet the requirements, such as tritium environmental release, also with reference to the TBM. The selection of materials and components to be used in a unique environment as the Tokamak of a fusion reactor requires dedicated several R and D activities. For instance, the performance of the coolant and the tritium self-sufficiency are key elements for the realization of the HCPB concept. Experimental campaigns have been conducted to select the materials to be used inside the solid breeder blanket and R and D activities have been carried out to support the design. The paper discusses also the program of future developments for the realization of the HCPB concept, also focusing to the specific campaigns necessary to qualify the TBM for its implementation in the ITER machine

  15. Reprocessing of lithium titanate pebbles by graphite bed method

    Lithium titanate enriched by 6Li isotope is considered as a candidate of tritium breeding materials for fusion reactors due to its excellent performance. The reuse of burned Li2TiO3 pebbles is an important issue because of the high costs of 6Li-enriched materials and waste considerations. For this purpose, reprocessing of Li2TiO3 pebbles by graphite bed method was developed. Simulative Li2TiO3 pebbles with low-lithium content according to the expected lithium burn-up were fabricated. After that, Li2TiO3 pebbles were re-fabricated with lithium carbonate as lithium additives, in order to gain the composition of lithium titanate with a Li/Ti ratio of 2. The process was optimized to obtain reprocessed Li2TiO3 pebbles that were suitable for reuse as ceramic breeder. Density, porosity, grain size and crushing load of the reprocessed pebbles were characterized. This process did not deteriorate the properties of the reprocessed pebbles and was almost no waste generation

  16. Optimization of MOX fuel cycles in pebble bed HTGR

    Compared with light water reactor (LWR), the pebble bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is able to operate in a full mixed oxide (MOX) fuelled core without significant change to core structure design. Based on a reference design of 250 MW pebble bed HTGR, four MOX fuel cycles were designed and evaluated by VSOP program package, including the mixed Pu-U fuel pebbles and mixed loading of separate Pu-pebbles and U-pebbles. Some important physics features were investigated and compared for these four cycles, such as the effective multiplication factor of initial core, the pebble residence time, discharge burnup, and temperature coefficients. Preliminary results show that the overall performance of one case is superior to other equivalent MOX fuel cycles on condition that uranium fuel elements and plutonium fuel elements are separated as the different fuel pebbles and that the uranium fuel elements are irradiated longer in the core than the plutonium fuel elements, and the average discharge burnup of this case is also higher than others. (authors)

  17. Compatibility problems with beryllium in ceramic blankets

    Compatibility of beryllium with structural materials (316L austenitic steel and 1.4914 martensitic steel) and with tritium breeding ceramics (lithium aluminate or silicate) has been studied in contact tests between 550 C and 700 C and for durations reaching 3000 hours. Beryllium-ceramic interaction is negligeable in all the temperature range with aluminate and up to 600 C with silicates. On the other hand, noticeable interaction is observed between beryllium and 316L steel at 580 C and above. Beryllium interaction with 1.4914 steel is visible only at 650 C and above and its amplitude is lower than 316L steel one. In these two cases, the superficial layer is brittle, and adherent to the steel. Comparison between beryllium - 0.4 wt% calcium alloy and beryllium at 700 C shows that interaction with steels or ceramics is qualitatively the same but slightly weaker. (author). 6 refs.; 6 figs.; 3 tabs

  18. Belgian research on fusion beryllium waste

    Future fusion power plants will generate important quantities of neutron irradiated beryllium. Although recycling is the preferred management option for this waste, this may not be technically feasible for all of the beryllium, because of its radiological characteristics. Therefore, at SCK·CEN, we initiated a research programme aimed at studying aspects of the disposal of fusion beryllium, including waste characterisation, waste acceptance criteria, conditioning methods, and performance assessment. One of the main issues to be resolved is the development of fusion-specific waste acceptance criteria for surface or deep geological disposal, in particular with regard to the tritium content. In case disposal is the only solution, critical nuclides can be immobilised by conditioning the waste. As a first approach to immobilising beryllium waste, we investigated the vitrification of beryllium. Corrosion tests were performed on both metallic and vitrified beryllium to provide source data for performance assessment. Finally, a first step in performance assessment was undertaken. (author)

  19. Advances in Identifying Beryllium Sensitization and Disease

    Peter Kowalski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Beryllium is a lightweight metal with unique qualities related to stiffness, corrosion resistance, and conductivity. While there are many useful applications, researchers in the 1930s and l940s linked beryllium exposure to a progressive occupational lung disease. Acute beryllium disease is a pulmonary irritant response to high exposure levels, whereas chronic beryllium disease (CBD typically results from a hypersensitivity response to lower exposure levels. A blood test, the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT, was an important advance in identifying individuals who are sensitized to beryllium (BeS and thus at risk for developing CBD. While there is no true "gold standard" for BeS, basic epidemiologic concepts have been used to advance our understanding of the different screening algorithms.

  20. Regulation of the pebble flow in a pebble-bed reactor

    The cylindrical core tank of the pebble bed reactor has a funnel-shaped outlet at its bottom end with one single discharge tube. The cylindrical part of the pebble bed has a height-to-diameter ratio of 0.5. In order to achieve an approximately constant vertical velocity of the OTTO program in the Juelich AVR and the Uentrop THTR reactors, respectively, there is a small cone mounted on supports in the outlet. Its tip is pointed upward and its largest diameter has a distance to the wall of the funnel sufficient to accommodate the diameter of the spheres. At high powers the outlet and the cone are built up of graphite blocks. They are equipped with numerous vertical channels for coolant passage. The cone may also be a rotationally symmetrical body with a rhombic longitudinal section which rests upon the outlet on radial bars. (orig./PW)

  1. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of filling fraction of pebble bed in pebble bed HTR

    Highlights: • An analysis approach is proposed to conduct SAU analysis of filling fraction of pebble bed core. • The contribution of uncertainty in filling fraction to key parameters of pebble bed core is quantified. • The primary drivers of the uncertainty in the key parameters are identified by sensitivity analysis. • Mechanism of effect of uncertainty in the filling fraction to key parameters is studied in depth. - Abstract: The filling fraction of pebble bed in each small region has some uncertainty, which will contribute to the total uncertainty in the key parameters of pebble bed core, such as power peak, axial offset, keff and so on. In fact, the heavy metal content and graphite content of the corresponding region will change synchronously due to the perturbation of filling fraction but the ratio of atomic number density of moderator to the fuel (carbon–uranium) is still constant. To investigate these effects, the Chinese demonstration plant HTR-PM was selected as the research object and the VSOP code and CUSA package were used to conduct detailed analysis of the influence of the uncertainty in the filling fraction on the HTR-PM output variables of interest, based on the propagation of input uncertainties by using statistical sampling method to calculate uncertainty and sensitivity information from the simulation results. At the same time, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of uranium loading had also been conducted for comparative analysis to study the mechanism of effect of uncertainty in the filling fraction to key parameters, and therefore only the heavy metal content of the corresponding region changes in the presence of perturbation of uranium loading. Finally, the propagated uncertainty in the power peak, axial offset and keff of HTR-PM core was obtained and the primary drivers of the uncertainty in the key parameters were identified by sensitivity analysis

  2. Thermodynamic properties of beryllium hydroxide

    The study of the hydro-thermal decomposition of beryllium hydroxide has made it possible to determine the free energy of formation and the entropy. The results obtained are in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated from the solubility product of this substance. They give furthermore the possibility of acquiring a better understanding of the BeO-H2O-Be (OH)2 system between 20 and 1500 C. (authors)

  3. Current Treatment of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Sood, Akshay

    2009-01-01

    The current mainstay of management of chronic beryllium disease involves cessation of beryllium exposure and use of systemic corticosteroids. However, there are no randomized controlled trials to assess the effect of these interventions on the natural history of this disease. Despite this limitation, it is prudent to remove patients with chronic beryllium disease from further exposure and consider treating progressive disease early with long-term corticosteroids. The effect of treatment shoul...

  4. MEASUREMENTS OF THE PROPERTIES OF BERYLLIUM FOIL

    The electrical conductivity of beryllium at radio frequency (800 MHz) and liquid nitrogen temperature were investigated and measured. This summary addresses a collection of beryllium properties in the literature, an analysis of the anomalous skin effect, the test model, the experimental setup and improvements, MAFIA simulations, the measurement results and data analyses. The final results show that the conductivity of beryllium is not as good as indicated by the handbook, yet very close to copper at liquid nitrogen temperature

  5. New audio applications of beryllium metal

    The major applications of beryllium metal in the field of audio appliances are for the vibrating cones for the two types of speakers 'TWITTER' for high range sound and 'SQUAWKER' for mid range sound, and also for beryllium cantilever tube assembled in stereo cartridge. These new applications are based on the characteristic property of beryllium having high ratio of modulus of elasticity to specific gravity. The production of these audio parts is described, and the audio response is shown. (author)

  6. The beryllium "double standard" standard.

    Egilman, David S; Bagley, Sarah; Biklen, Molly; Golub, Alison Stern; Bohme, Susanna Rankin

    2003-01-01

    Brush Wellman, the world's leading producer and supplier of beryllium products, has systematically hidden cases of beryllium disease that occurred below the threshold limit value (TLV) and lied about the efficacy of the TLV in published papers, lectures, reports to government agencies, and instructional materials prepared for customers and workers. Hypocritically, Brush Wellman instituted a zero exposure standard for corporate executives while workers and customers were told the 2 microgram standard was "safe." Brush intentionally used its workers as "canaries for the plant," and referred to them as such. Internal documents and corporate depositions indicate that these actions were intentional and that the motive was money. Despite knowledge of the inadequacy of the TLV, Brush has successfully used it as a defense against lawsuits brought by injured workers and as a sales device to provide reassurance to customers. Brush's policy has reaped an untold number of victims and resulted in mass distribution of beryllium in consumer products. Such corporate malfeasance is perpetuated by the current market system, which is controlled by an organized oligopoly that creates an incentive for the neglect of worker health and safety in favor of externalizing costs to victimized workers, their families, and society at large. PMID:14758859

  7. Recommended design correlations for S-65 beryllium

    The properties of tritium and helium behavior in irradiated beryllium are reviewed, along with the thermal-mechanical properties needed for ITER design analysis. Correlations are developed to describe the performance of beryllium in a fusion reactor environment. While this paper focuses on the use of beryllium as a plasma-facing component (PFC) material, the correlations presented here can also be used to describe the performance of beryllium as a neutron multiplier for a tritium breeding blanket. The performance properties for beryllium are subdivided into two categories: properties which do not change with irradiation damage to the bulk of the material; and properties which are degraded by neutron irradiation. The approach taken in developing properties correlations is to describe the behavior of dense, pressed S-65 beryllium as a function of temperature. As there are essentially no data on the performance of porous and/or irradiated S-65 beryllium, the degradation of properties with as-fabricated porosity and irradiation are determined form the broad data base on S-200F, as well as other types and grades, and applied to S-65 beryllium by scaling factors. The resulting correlations can be used for Be produced by vacuum hot pressing (VHP) and cold-pressing (CP)/sintering(S)/hot-isostatic-pressing(HIP). The performance of plasma-sprayed beryllium is discussed but not quantified

  8. (Beryllium). Internal Report No. 137, Jan. 15, 1958

    After a brief summary of the physical and chemical properties of beryllium, the various chemical treatments which can be applied to beryllium minerals either directly or after a physical enrichment are discussed. These various treatments give either the hydroxide or beryllium salts, from which either beryllium oxide or metallic beryllium can easily be obtained. The purification, analysis and uses of beryllium are also briefly discussed. (author)

  9. Calibration of a pebble bed configuration for direct numerical simulation

    The appearance of hot spots in the pebble bed cores of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) may affect the integrity of the pebbles. A good prediction of the flow and heat transport in such a pebble bed core is a challenge for available turbulence models. Such models need to be validated in order to gain trust in the simulation of these types of flow configurations. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) can serve as a reference for validation, however, it poses restrictions in terms of flow parameters and numerical tools corresponding to the available computational resources. In the present study, a wide range of numerical simulations has been performed in order to calibrate a pebble bed configuration for DNS which may serve as reference for validation. (author)

  10. Building massive compact planetesimal disks from the accretion of pebbles

    Moriarty, John

    2015-01-01

    We present a model in which planetesimal disks are built from the combination of planetesimal formation and accretion of radially drifting pebbles onto existing planetesimals. In this model, the rate of accretion of pebbles onto planetesimals quickly outpaces the rate of direct planetesimal formation in the inner disk. This allows for the formation of a high mass inner disk without the need for enhanced planetesimal formation or a massive protoplanetary disk. Our proposed mechanism for planetesimal disk growth does not require any special conditions to operate. Consequently, we expect that high mass planetesimal disks form naturally in nearly all systems. The extent of this growth is controlled by the total mass in pebbles that drifts through the inner disk. Anything that reduces the rate or duration of pebble delivery will correspondingly reduce the final mass of the planetesimal disk. Therefore, we expect that low mass stars (with less massive protoplanetary disks), low metallicity stars and stars with gian...

  11. Pebble bed reactor with a feeding device for absorber materials

    Description of a second shutdown device for pebble bed reactors with small absorber pebbles, which, if required, can be let off a storage tank and regularly trickle through a dispersion cone into the pebble bed. In the normal state the storage tank is in a low position with its outlet being obstructed by absorber pebbles filling a cylinder in which slides a piston which is firmly connected with the storage tank. By giving pressure over a line a piston in a pneumatic cylinder can be moved which lifts the storage tank. The cylinder is emptied by lifting the piston and the outlet is released. The level of the storage tank is measured by means of a probe. The whole device is installed in the prestressed concrets ceiling of the reactor. The device is proposed to be set into motion for a short moment from time to time in order to prove its operatability. (orig.)

  12. On the growth of pebble-accreting planetesimals

    Visser, Rico G

    2015-01-01

    Pebble accretion is a new mechanism to quickly grow the cores of planets. In pebble accretion, gravity and gas drag conspire to yield large collisional cross sections for small particles in protoplanetary disks. However, before pebble accretion commences, aerodynamical deflection may act to prevent planetesimals from becoming large, because particles tend to follow gas streamlines. We derive the planetesimal radius where pebble accretion is initiated and determine the growth timescales of planetesimals by sweepup of small particles. We obtain the collision efficiency factor as the ratio of the numerically-obtained collisional cross section to the planetesimal surface area, from which we obtain the growth timescales. Integrations are conducted in the potential flow limit (steady, inviscid) and in the Stokes flow regime (steady, viscid). Only particles of stopping time $t_s \\ll t_X$ where $t_X\\approx10^3$ s experience aerodynamic deflection. Even in that case, the planetesimal's gravity always ensures positive ...

  13. Control rod for a pebble bed nuclear reactor

    In order to leave the density of the pebble bed unchanged when the control rod is driven in and out, the tip of the control rod is provided with moving parts in the form of conical hemispheres or spoons. These parts move close to the control rod when it is driven in and spread out due to the effect of gravity when it is driven out. This loosens the heap of pebble shaped operating elements again. (DG)

  14. Reconstructing the transport history of pebbles on Mars

    Szabó, Tímea; Domokos, Gábor; Grotzinger, John P.; Jerolmack, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of remarkably rounded pebbles by the rover Curiosity, within an exhumed alluvial fan complex in Gale Crater, presents some of the most compelling evidence yet for sustained fluvial activity on Mars. While rounding is known to result from abrasion by inter-particle collisions, geologic interpretations of sediment shape have been qualitative. Here we show how quantitative information on the transport distance of river pebbles can be extracted from their shape alone, using a combin...

  15. Portable Beryllium Prospecting Instrument With Large Sensitive Area

    The instrument described was designed on the basis of the photoneutron method of determining beryllium in rock surfaces and developed with a view to prospecting beryllium minerals in the Ilímaussaq intrusion, south Greenland. These minerals occur,mainly in hydrothermal veins which are from 1 mm to about 2 m wide. Of the ten beryllium minerals found until now, chkalovite (12% BeO) is the most common. The distinctive feature of the prospecting instrument is a comparatively large effective measuring area (∼500 cm2). Since the instrument is intended for use in a difficult terrain without roads, it has been necessary to limit its weight and size as much as possible. The instrument consists of a detector unit and a control unit. The detector unit has the dimensions 46 x 21 x 10 cm, weighs 20 kg, and contains a 30 cm long gamma-activation device, a biological radiation shield, and two 30-cm long 3He-filled neutron proportional detectors embedded in paraffin wax. The gamma- activation device consists of 31 identical 12Sb-sources placed in a steel tube with spacings decreasing towards the ends of the tube and with a total activity of 20 mCi. During transport of the instrument the gamma-activation device is placed at the centre of the radiation shield, when the maximum dose-rate on the surface of the detector unit is 200 mR/h. When the instrument is in use, the activation device is turned to a position just above the bottom of the detector unit. The sensitivity per cm2 of the bottom surface to a 5-cm thick layer of beryllium is 20% of its value at the centre of the bottom surface along a curve which is roughly an ellipse with axes 34 and 18 cm The total sensitivity of the instrument is about 35 counts/min per % BeO per mCi 124Sb, and the background count-rate is 12-20 counts/mm. The corresponding theoretical detection limit for a single measurement of 8-min duration is 35-50 ppm BeO. (author)

  16. Steam chemical reactivity of Be pebbles and Be powder

    This paper reports the results of chemical reactivity experiments for Be pebbles (2 and 0.2 mm diameter) and Be powder (14-31 μm diameter) exposed to steam at elevated temperatures, 350-900 deg. C for pebbles and 400-500 deg. C for powders. We measured BET specific surface areas of 0.12 m2/g for 2 mm pebbles, 0.24 m2/g for 0.2 mm pebbles and 0.66-1.21 m2/g for Be powder samples. These experiments showed a complex reactivity behavior for the material, dependent primarily on the test temperature. Average H2 generation rates for powder samples, based on measured BET surface areas, were in good agreement with previous measurements for fully dense consolidated powder metallurgy (CPM)-Be. Rates for the Be pebbles, based on measured BET surface areas, were systematically lower than the CPM-Be rates, possibly because of different surface and bulk features for the pebbles, especially surface layer impurities, that contribute to the measured BET surface area and influence the oxidation process at the material surface

  17. ICT diagnostic method of beryllium welding quality

    To avoid the interference of high density material for the quality assay of beryllium welding line, a slice by slice scanning method was proposed based upon the research results of the Industrial Computerized Tomography (ICT) diagnostics for weld penetration, weld width, off-centered deviation and weld defects of beryllium-ring welding seam with high density material inside

  18. Some aspects of beryllium disposal in Kazakhstan

    Historically in Kazakhstan all disposals of used beryllium and beryllium wasted materials were stored and recycled at JSC ''Ulba Metallurgical Plant''. Since Ulba Metallurgical Plant (beside beryllium and tantalum production) is one of the world largest complex producers of fuel for nuclear power plants as well it has possibilities, technologies and experience in processing toxic and radioactive wastes related with those productions. At present time only one operating Kazakhstan research reactors (EWG1M in Kurchatov) contains beryllium made core. The results of current examination of that core allow using it without replacement long time yet (at least for next five-ten years). Nevertheless the problem how to utilize such irradiated beryllium becomes actual issue for Kazakhstan even today. Since Kazakhstan is the member of ITER/DEMO Reactors Projects and is permanently considered as possible provider of huge amount of beryllium for those reactors so that is the reason for starting studies of possibilities of large scale processing/recycling of such disposed irradiated beryllium. It is clear that the Ulba Metallurgical Plant is considered as the best site for it in Kazakhstan. The draft plan how to organize experimental studies of irradiated beryllium disposals in Kazakhstan involving National Nuclear Center, National University (Almaty), JSC ''Ulba Metallurgical Plant'' (Ust-Kamenogorsk) would be presented in this paper as well as proposals to arrange international collaboration in that field through ISTC (International Science Technology Center, Moscow). (author)

  19. Metastable defects in beryllium oxide crystals

    The metastable luminescence centers of regular lattice are investigated in binary beryllium oxide crystals. Beryllium oxide hexagonal crystals are the simplest among low-symmetry oxide scintillators and serve as a model system. The anisotropy of energy transformation and transfer is analyzed

  20. Investigation of beryllium/steam interaction

    Chekhonadskikh, A.M.; Vurim, A.D.; Vasilyev, Yu.S.; Pivovarov, O.S. [Inst. of Atomic Energy National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakstan Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan); Shestakov, V.P.; Tazhibayeva, I.L.

    1998-01-01

    In this report program on investigations of beryllium emissivity and transient processes on overheated beryllium surface attacked by water steam to be carried out in IAE NNC RK within Task S81 TT 2096-07-16 FR. The experimental facility design is elaborated in this Report. (author)

  1. Modeling of hydrogen interactions with beryllium

    Longhurst, G.R. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, improved mathematical models are developed for hydrogen interactions with beryllium. This includes the saturation effect observed for high-flux implantation of ions from plasmas and retention of tritium produced from neutronic transmutations in beryllium. Use of the models developed is justified by showing how they can replicated experimental data using the TMAP4 tritium transport code. (author)

  2. Assessment of LANL beryllium waste management documentation

    The objective of this report is to determine present status of the preparation and implementation of the various high priority documents required to properly manage the beryllium waste generated at the Laboratory. The documents being assessed are: Waste Acceptance Criteria, Waste Characterization Plan, Waste Certification Plan, Waste Acceptance Procedures, Waste Characterization Procedures, Waste Certification Procedures, Waste Training Procedures and Waste Recordkeeping Procedures. Beryllium is regulated (as a dust) under 40 CFR 261.33 as ''Discarded commercial chemical products, off specification species, container residues and spill residues thereof.'' Beryllium is also identified in the 3rd thirds ruling of June 1, 1990 as being restricted from land disposal (as a dust). The beryllium waste generated at the Laboratory is handled separately because beryllium has been identified as a highly toxic carcinogenic material

  3. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  4. Technical issues for beryllium use in fusion blanket applications

    Beryllium is an excellent non-fissioning neutron multiplier for fusion breeder and fusion electric blanket applications. This report is a compilation of information related to the use of beryllium with primary emphasis on the fusion breeder application. Beryllium resources, production, fabrication, properties, radiation damage and activation are discussed. A new theoretical model for beryllium swelling is presented

  5. Gas retention in irradiated beryllium

    Helium (an inert gas) with low solubility in beryllium is trapped in irradiated beryllium at low temperatures (22 n/cm2 (E > 1 MeV). In these samples the calculated helium generated was ∼ 14,000 appm. They are described in terms of swelling, annealing, microstructure, and helium bubble behavior (size, density and mobility). A second sample was irradiated to ∼5 x 1022 n/cm2 (E > 1 MeV). In that one the calculated helium and tritium generated were ∼24,000 appm He and ∼3720 appm, and tritium content was examined in a dissolution experiment. Most of the tritium was released as gas to the glovebox indicating the generated tritium was retained in the helium bubbles. In a third set of experiments a specimen was examined by annealing at a succession of temperatures to more than 600 degree C for tritium release. In the temperature range of 300--500 degree C little release (0.01--0.4%) occurred, but there was a massive release at just over 600 degree C. Theories of swelling appear to adequately describe bubble behavior with breakaway release occurring at high helium contents and at large bubble diameters. 8 refs., 6 figs

  6. Pebbles and Branching Programs for Tree Evaluation

    Cook, Stephen; Wehr, Dustin; Braverman, Mark; Santhanam, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the Tree Evaluation Problem, show that it is in logDCFL (and hence in P), and study its branching program complexity in the hope of eventually proving a superlogarithmic space lower bound. The input to the problem is a rooted, balanced d-ary tree of height h, whose internal nodes are labeled with d-ary functions on [k] = {1,...,k}, and whose leaves are labeled with elements of [k]. Each node obtains a value in [k] equal to its d-ary function applied to the values of its d children. The output is the value of the root. We show that the standard black pebbling algorithm applied to the binary tree of height h yields a deterministic k-way branching program with Theta(k^h) states solving this problem, and we prove that this upper bound is tight for h=2 and h=3. We introduce a simple semantic restriction called "thrifty" on k-way branching programs solving tree evaluation problems and show that the same state bound of Theta(k^h) is tight (up to a constant factor) for all h >= 2 for deterministic thrift...

  7. Status of the pebble bed modular reactor

    Eskom is the South African state electricity utility, with an installed capacity of 38397 MW at the end of 1996 (some 98% of all national generating assets). It is largely coal-based with a small proportion (5%) nuclear. As part of Eskom's long-term planning process, investigations have been made into new power generation options. On reconsidering the nuclear option, Eskom identified two key issues: cost and public acceptance. It was considered that both of these were driven by the safety issues related to potential accidents and the only way to obtain competitive costs with nuclear power was to remove the potential (however remote) for accidents with significant off-site consequences. The only reactor type that was seen to meet this safety standard was the pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR). This paper discusses the PBMR project history, plant performance and design, its benefits, safety features, and current status. It concludes that the PBMR will provide South Africa with a competitive option for coastal generation and, internationally, it will be highly competitive with virtually all other generation options. (author)

  8. Pebble red modular reactor - South Africa

    In 1995 the South African Electricity Utility, ESKOM, was convinced of the economical advantages of high temperature gas-cooled reactors as viable supply side option. Subsequently planning of a techno/economic study for the year 1996 was initiated. Continuation to the construction phase of a prototype plant will depend entirely on the outcome of this study. A reactor plant of pebble bed design coupled with a direct helium cycle is perceived. The electrical output is limited to about 100 MW for reasons of safety, economics and flexibility. Design of the reactor will be based on internationally proven, available technology. An extended research and development program is not anticipated. New licensing rules and regulations will be required. Safety classification of components will be based on the merit of HTGR technology rather than attempting to adhere to traditional LWR rules. A medium term time schedule for the design and construction of a prototype plant, commissioning and performance testing is proposed during the years 2002 and 2003. Pending the performance outcome of this plant and the current power demand, series production of 100 MWe units is foreseen. (author)

  9. Fluorimetric method for determination of Beryllium

    The old fluorimetric method for the determination of Beryllium, based essentially on the fluorescence of the Beryllium-Morine complex in a strongly alkaline solution, is still competitive and stands the comparison with more modern methods or at least three reasons: in the presence of solid or gaseous samples (powders), the times necessary to finalize an analytic determination are comparable since the stage of the process which lasts the longest is the mineralization of the solid particles containing Beryllium, the cost of a good fluorimeter is by far Inferior to the cost, e. g., of an Emission Spectrophotometer provided with ICP torch and magnets for exploiting the Zeeman effect and of an Atomic absorption Spectrophotometer provided with Graphite furnace; it is possible to determine, fluorimetrically, rather small Beryllium levels (about 30 ng of Beryllium/sample), this potentiality is more than sufficient to guarantee the respect of all the work safety and hygiene rules now in force. The study which is the subject of this publication is designed to the analysis procedure which allows one to reach good results in the determination of Beryllium, chiefly through the control and measurement of the interference effect due to the presence of some metals which might accompany the environmental samples of workshops and laboratories where Beryllium is handled, either at the pure state or in its alloys. The results obtained satisfactorily point out the merits and limits of this analytic procedure

  10. A method for estimating maximum static rainfall retention in pebble mulches used for soil moisture conservation

    Peng, Hongtao; Lei, Tingwu; Jiang, Zhiyun; Horton, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Mulching of agricultural fields and gardens with pebbles has long been practiced to conserve soil moisture in some semi-arid regions with low precipitation. Rainfall interception by the pebble mulch itself is an important part of the computation of the water balance for the pebble mulched fields and gardens. The mean equivalent diameter (MED) was used to characterize the pebble size. The maximum static rainfall retention in pebble mulch is based on the water penetrating into the pores of pebbles, the water adhering to the outside surfaces of pebbles and the water held between pebbles of the mulch. Equations describing the water penetrating into the pores of pebbles and the water adhering to the outside surface of pebbles are constructed based on the physical properties of water and the pebble characteristics. The model for the water between pebbles of the mulch is based on the basic equation to calculate the water bridge volume and the basic coordination number model. A method to calculate the maximum static rainfall retention in the pebble mulch is presented. Laboratory rain simulation experiments were performed to test the model with measured data. Paired sample t-tests showed no significant differences between the values calculated with the method and the measured data. The model is ready for testing on field mulches.

  11. Recommended design correlations for S-65 beryllium

    The properties of tritium and helium behavior in irradiated beryllium are reviewed, along with the thermal-mechanical properties needed for ITER design analysis. Correlations are developed to describe the performance of beryllium in a fusion reactor environment. While this paper focuses on the use of beryllium as a plasma-facing component (PFC) material, the correlations presented here can also be used to describe the performance of beryllium as a neutron multiplier for a tritium breeding blanket. The performance properties for beryllium are subdivided into two categories: properties which do not change with irradiation damage to the bulk of the material; and properties which are degraded by neutron irradiation. The irradiation-independent properties described within are: thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, thermal expansion, and elastic constants. Irradiation-dependent properties include: yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, plastic tangent modulus, uniform and total tensile elongation, thermal and irradiation-induced creep strength, He-induced swelling and tritium retention/release. The approach taken in developing properties correlations is to describe the behavior of dense, pressed S-65 beryllium -- the material chosen for ITER PFC application -- as a function of temperature. As there are essentially no data on the performance of porous and/or irradiated S-65 beryllium, the degradation of properties with as-fabricated porosity and irradiation are determined from the broad data base on S-200F, as well as other types and grades, and applied to S-65 beryllium by scaling factors. The resulting correlations can be used for Be produced by vacuum hot pressing (VHP) and cold-pressing (CP)/sintering(S)/hot-isostatic-pressing (HIP). The performance of plasma-sprayed beryllium is discussed but not quantified

  12. Recommended design correlations for S-65 beryllium

    Billone, M.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The properties of tritium and helium behavior in irradiated beryllium are reviewed, along with the thermal-mechanical properties needed for ITER design analysis. Correlations are developed to describe the performance of beryllium in a fusion reactor environment. While this paper focuses on the use of beryllium as a plasma-facing component (PFC) material, the correlations presented here can also be used to describe the performance of beryllium as a neutron multiplier for a tritium breeding blanket. The performance properties for beryllium are subdivided into two categories: properties which do not change with irradiation damage to the bulk of the material; and properties which are degraded by neutron irradiation. The irradiation-independent properties described within are: thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, thermal expansion, and elastic constants. Irradiation-dependent properties include: yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, plastic tangent modulus, uniform and total tensile elongation, thermal and irradiation-induced creep strength, He-induced swelling and tritium retention/release. The approach taken in developing properties correlations is to describe the behavior of dense, pressed S-65 beryllium -- the material chosen for ITER PFC application -- as a function of temperature. As there are essentially no data on the performance of porous and/or irradiated S-65 beryllium, the degradation of properties with as-fabricated porosity and irradiation are determined from the broad data base on S-200F, as well as other types and grades, and applied to S-65 beryllium by scaling factors. The resulting correlations can be used for Be produced by vacuum hot pressing (VHP) and cold-pressing (CP)/sintering(S)/hot-isostatic-pressing (HIP). The performance of plasma-sprayed beryllium is discussed but not quantified.

  13. Research of flaw assessment methods for beryllium reflector elements

    Reflector elements made from metal beryllium is widely used as neutron reflectors to increase neutron flux in test reactors. When beryllium reflector elements are irradiated by neutron, bending of reflector elements caused by swelling occurs, and beryllium reflector elements must be replaced in several years. In this report, literature search and investigation for non-destructive inspection of Beryllium and experiments for Preliminary inspection to establish post irradiation examination method for research of characteristics of metal beryllium under neutron irradiation were reported. (author)

  14. Preliminary proposal for a beryllium technology program for fusion applications

    The program was designed to provide the answers to the critical issues of beryllium technology needed in fusion blanket designs. The four tasks are as follows: (1) Beryllium property measurements needed for fusion data base. (2) Beryllium stress relaxation and creep measurements for lifetime modelling calculations. (3) Simplified recycle technique development for irradiated beryllium. (4) Beryllium neutron multiplier measurements using manganese bath absolute calibration techniques

  15. Iron-containing phases in commercial beryllium

    The effect of hot and cold rolling with subsequent heat treatment on the interrelation of iron-containing phases and texture in commercial beryllium is considered. Using the Moessbauer microscopy it has been established that iron impurities are present both in solid solution and in the composition of intermetallide AlFeBe4 the texture for iron solid solution in beryllium is determined. Beryllium quenching results in nearly complete disappearance of intermetallic phase and iron transfers into substitutional solid solution. Further cold rolling does not result in any phase transformation

  16. Neutronic features of pebble-bed reactors for transmutation applications

    Pebble-bed reactors offer very appealing characteristics for radioactivity confinement and for withstanding thermal transients. Besides that, pebble-bed reactors have a peculiar degree of freedom in the radius of the active core of the pebble (where the fuel is located) as compared to the outer radius of the pebble, which has a coating of pure graphite. By varying the aforementioned radius, very different types of neutron spectra can be formed, which in turn gives very different values of the average cross sections that govern the isotopic composition evolution, and particularly the elimination of the most relevant transuranics. Preliminary conclusions of this work show that there is a very broad design window for exploiting the transmutation capabilities of pebble-bed reactors in a scenario of inherent safety features. A 99,9% elimination of Pu-239 associated to a 99% elimination of Pu-240 and Pu-241 can be reached, with some increment of the Pu-242 contents (which is extremely long-lived, less radio-toxic and decays into the natural nuclide U-238). Am and Cm are also transmuted to a significant level, although some residual higher A actinides will remain. (authors)

  17. AzTEC/ASTE 1.1-mm Survey of the AKARI Deep Field South: source catalogue and number counts

    Hatsukade, B; Aretxaga, I; Austermann, J E; Ezawa, H; Hughes, D H; Ikarashi, S; Iono, D; Kawabe, R; Khan, S; Matsuo, H; Matsuura, S; Nakanishi, K; Oshima, T; Perera, T; Scott, K S; Shirahata, M; Takeuchi, T T; Tamura, Y; Tanaka, K; Tosaki, T; Wilson, G W; Yun, M S

    2010-01-01

    We present results of a 1.1 mm deep survey of the AKARI Deep Field South (ADF-S) with AzTEC mounted on the Atacama Submillimetre Telescope Experiment (ASTE). We obtained a map of 0.25 sq. deg area with an rms noise level of 0.32-0.71 mJy. This is one of the deepest and widest maps thus far at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths. We uncovered 198 sources with a significance of 3.5-15.6 sigma, providing the largest catalog of 1.1 mm sources in a contiguous region. Most of the sources are not detected in the far-infrared bands of the AKARI satellite, suggesting that they are mostly at z ~ 1.5 given the detection limits. We constructed differential and cumulative number counts in the ADF-S, the Subaru/XMM Newton Deep Field (SXDF), and the SSA 22 field surveyed by AzTEC/ASTE, which provide currently the tightest constraints on the faint end. The integration of the best-fit number counts in the ADF-S find that the contribution of 1.1 mm sources with fluxes >=1 mJy to the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at 1.1...

  18. Conceptual study of ferromagnetic pebbles for heat exhaust in fusion reactors with short power decay length

    Gierse, N.; Coenen, J W; C. Thomser; Panin, A.; Ch. Linsmeier; Unterberg, B.; Philipps, V

    2015-01-01

    Ferromagnetic pebbles are investigated as high heat flux (q∥) plasma facing components in fusion devices with short power decay length (λq) on a conceptual level. The ability of a pebble concept to cope with high heat fluxes is retained and extended by the acceleration of ferromagnetic pebbles in magnetic fields. An alloying concept suited for fusion application is outlined and the compatibility of ferromagnetic pebbles with plasma operation is discussed. Steel grade 1.4510 is chosen as a ...

  19. Conceptual study of ferromagnetic pebbles for heat exhaust in fusion reactors with short power decay length

    N. Gierse

    2015-03-01

    The key results of this study are that very high heat fluxes are accessible in the operation space of ferromagnetic pebbles, that ferromagnetic pebbles are compatible with tokamak operation and current divertor designs, that the heat removal capability of ferromagnetic pebbles increases as λq decreases and, finally, that for fusion relevant values of q∥ pebble diameters below 100 μm are required.

  20. Computational prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors

    Highlights: ► Finite element analysis of frictional contact. ► Plasticity taken into account for nuclear graphite at room temperature. ► Prediction of order of magnitude for dust loading in PBRs. ► Archard wear model for wear mass calculations. - Abstract: This paper describes the computational modeling and simulation of graphite pebbles in frictional contacts as anticipated in a pebble bed reactor. For the high temperature gas-cooled reactor, the potential dust generation from frictional contact at the surface of pebbles and the subsequent lift-off and transport of dust and absorbed fission products are of safety concern at elevated temperatures under an air ingress accident. The aim of this work is to perform a computational study to estimate the quantity of the nuclear grade graphite dust produces from a typical anticipated configuration.

  1. In-core fuel management for pebble-bed reactors

    Milian Perez, Daniel; Rodriguez Garcia, Lorena; Garcia Hernandez, Carlos; Milian Lorenzo, Daniel, E-mail: dperez@instec.cu, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu, E-mail: dmilian@instec.cu [Higher Institute of Technologies and Applied Sciences, Havana (Cuba); Velasco, Abanades, E-mail: abanades@etsii.upm.es [Department of Simulation of Thermo Energy Systems, Polytechnic University of Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper a calculation procedure to reduce the power peak in the core of a Very High Temperature pebble bed Reactor is presented. This procedure combines the fuel depletion and the neutronic behavior of the fuel in the reactor core, modeling once-through-then-out cycles as well as cycles in which pebbles are recirculated through the core an arbitrary number of times, obtaining the asymptotic fuel-loading pattern. The procedure consists in several coupled computational codes, which are used iteratively until convergence is reached. The utilization of the MCNPX 2.6e, as one of these computational codes, is validated through the calculation of benchmarks announced by IAEA (IAEA-TECDOC-1249, 2001). To complete the verification of the calculation procedure a base case described in (Annals of Nuclear Energy 29 (2002) 1345-1364), was performed. The procedure has been applied to a model of Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (200 MW) design. (author)

  2. Numerical simulation of ceramic breeder pebble bed thermal creep behavior

    The evolution of ceramic breeder pebble bed thermal creep deformation subjected to an external load and a differential thermal stress was studied using a modified discrete numerical code previously developed for the pebble bed thermomechanical evaluation. The rate change of creep deformation was modeled at the particle contact based on a diffusion creep mechanism. Numerical results of strain histories have compared reasonably well with those of experimentally observed data at 740 C using activation energy of 180 KJ/mole. Calculations also show that, at this activation energy level, a particle bed at an elevated temperature of 800 C may cause undesired local sintering at a later time when it is subjected to an external load of 6.3 MPa. Thus, by tracking the stress histories inside a breeder pebble bed the numerical simulation provides an indication of whether the bed may encounter an undesired condition under a typical operating condition. (orig.)

  3. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report

    Lee, S

    2012-03-29

    This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

  4. Nitrogen reactivity toward beryllium: surface reactions.

    Allouche, A

    2013-06-01

    Recent experiments with nitrogen as a seeding gas in fusion plasma devices together with the option of using beryllium as an armor material in the future ITER tokamak (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) have raised new interest in the interactions of beryllium surfaces with nitrogen (atomic or molecular). The strong reactivity of nitrogen implies the formation of beryllium nitrite and, in conjunction with oxygen and other possible impurities, experimentalists have to consider the probability of generating various complex moieties such as imine, amine or oxyamine, and amide radicals. This chemistry would obviously dramatically perturb the plasma, and quantum investigations can be of great predictive help. Nitrogen adsorption on beryllium basal surfaces is investigated through quantum density functional theory. Different situations are examined: molecular or atomic nitrogen reactions; nitride radical adsorption or formation on surfaces; hydrogen retention on surfaces; combined nitrogen/oxygen reactivity and hydrogen retention. A tentative comparison with experiment is also proposed. PMID:23594802

  5. Lithium-Beryllium-Boron : Origin and Evolution

    Vangioni-Flam, Elisabeth; Casse, Michel; Audouze, Jean

    1999-01-01

    The origin and evolution of Lithium-Beryllium-Boron is a crossing point between different astrophysical fields : optical and gamma spectroscopy, non thermal nucleosynthesis, Big Bang and stellar nucleosynthesis and finally galactic evolution. We describe the production and the evolution of Lithium-Beryllium-Boron from Big Bang up to now through the interaction of the Standard Galactic Cosmic Rays with the interstellar medium, supernova neutrino spallation and a low energy component related to...

  6. Beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children

    Ewa Nogaj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Power plant dust is believed to be the main source of the increased presence of the element beryllium in the environment which has been detected in the atmospheric air, surface waters, groundwater, soil, food, and cigarette smoke. In humans, beryllium absorption occurs mainly via the respiratory system. The pharyngeal tonsils are located on the roof of the nasopharynx and are in direct contact with dust particles in inhaled air. As a result, the concentration levels of beryllium in the pharyngeal tonsils are likely to be a good indicator of concentration levels in the air. The presented study had two primary aims: to investigate the beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children living in southern Poland, and the appropriate reference range for this element in children’s pharyngeal tonsils. Pharyngeal tonsils were extracted from a total of 379 children (age 2–17 years, mean 6.2 ± 2.7 years living in southern Poland. Tonsil samples were mineralized in a closed cycle in a pressure mineralizer PDS 6, using 65% spectrally pure nitric acid. Beryllium concentration was determined using the ICP-AES method with a Perkin Elmer Optima 5300DVTM. The software Statistica v. 9 was used for the statistical analysis. It was found that girls had a significantly greater beryllium concentration in their pharyngeal tonsils than boys. Beryllium concentration varies greatly, mostly according to the place of residence. Based on the study results, the reference value for beryllium in pharyngeal tonsils of children is recommended to be determined at 0.02–0.04 µg/g.

  7. PEBBED ANALYSIS OF HOT SPOTS IN PEBBLE-BED REACTORS

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Hans D. Gougar; William K. Terry; Frederik Reitsma; Wessel Joubert

    2005-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory’s PEBBED code and simple probability considerations are used to estimate the likelihood and consequences of the accumulation of highly reactive pebbles in the region of peak power in a pebble-bed reactor. The PEBBED code is briefly described, and the logic of the probability calculations is presented in detail. The results of the calculations appear to show that hot-spot formation produces only moderate increases in peak accident temperatures, and no increases at all in normal operating temperatures.

  8. Sanitary-hygienic and ecological aspects of beryllium production

    Dvinskykh, E.M.; Savchuk, V.V.; Sidorov, V.L.; Slobodin, D.B.; Tuzov, Y.V. [Ulba Metallurgical Plant, Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan)

    1998-01-01

    The Report describes An organization of sanitary-hygienic and ecological control of beryllium production at Ulba metallurgical plant. It involves: (1) the consideration of main methods for protection of beryllium production personnel from unhealthy effect of beryllium, (2) main kinds of filters, used in gas purification systems at different process areas, (3) data on beryllium monitoring in water, soil, on equipment. This Report also outlines problems connected with designing devices for a rapid analysis of beryllium in air as well as problems of beryllium production on ecological situation in the town. (author)

  9. Continuum Observations of M51 and M83 at 1.1 mm with AzTEC

    Wall, W F; Tilanus, R; Israel, F P; Austermann, J E; Aretxaga, I; Wilson, G; Yun, M; Scott, K S; Perera, T A; Roberts, C M; Hughes, D H

    2016-01-01

    We observed the spiral galaxies M51 and M83 at 20" spatial resolution with the bolometer array AzTEC on the JCMT in the 1.1$\\,$mm continuum, recovering the extended emission out to galactocentric radii of more than 12 kpc in both galaxies. The 1.1 mm-continuum fluxes are 5.6+/-0.7 and 9.9+/-1.4 Jy, with associated gas masses estimated at 9.4 X 10^9 Mo and 7.2 X 10^9 Mo for M51 and M83, respectively. In the interarm regions of both galaxies the N(H2)/I(CO) (or X-factor) ratios exceed those in the arms by factors of ~1.5-2. In the inner disks of both galaxies, the X-factor is about 1 X 10^20 cm^-2 / (K km s^-1). In the outer parts, the CO-dark molecular gas becomes more important. While the spiral density wave in M51 appears to influence the interstellar medium and stars in a similar way, the bar potential in M83 influences the interstellar medium and the stars differently. We confirm the result of Foyle et al. (2010) that the arms merely heighten the star formation rate and the gas surface density in the same ...

  10. CSO BOLOCAM 1.1 mm CONTINUUM MAPPING OF THE BRAID NEBULA STAR FORMATION REGION IN CYGNUS OB7

    We present a 1.1 mm map of the Braid Nebula star formation region in Cygnus OB7 taken using Bolocam on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Within the 1 deg2 covered by the map, we have detected 55 cold dust clumps all of which are new detections. A number of these clumps are coincident with IRAS point sources although the majority are not. Some of the previously studied optical/near-IR sources are detected at 1.1 mm. We estimate total dust/gas masses for the 55 clumps together with peak visual extinctions. We conclude that over the whole region, approximately 20% of the clumps are associated with IRAS sources suggesting that these are protostellar objects. The remaining 80% are classed as starless clumps. In addition, both FU Orionis (FUor) like objects in the field, the Braid Star and HH 381 IRS, are associated with strong millimeter emission. This implies that FUor eruptions can occur at very early stages of pre-main-sequence life. Finally, we determine that the cumulative clump mass function for the region is very similar to that found in both the Perseus and ρ Ophiuchus star-forming regions.

  11. Particle trackers based on 1 mm and 0.7 mm scintillating fibers readout by a multi-anode photomultiplier

    A prototype particle tracking detector was constructed at LNF with 1 mm and 0.7 mm plastic scintillating fibers with a 64 channel Hamamatsu H7546A-200 Ultra-bialkali flat-panel multi-anode photomultiplier readout. Cosmic ray tracks from an array of 11 gas-filled drift tubes were matched to signals in the scintillating fibers in order to measure the resolution and efficiency of tracks reconstructed in the fiber-based tracker. The fibers allow for two possible readout methods, a hit-based (digital) and an amplitude-based (analog) mode. A GEANT4 detector simulation was also developed to compare cosmic ray data with Monte Carlo results. These fiber tracker designs are suggested as a way to meet the resolution and efficiency goals of modern detectors, such as an upgraded LHCb Outer Tracker. Resolutions for the fiber trackers were found to be 0.236 mm and 0.175 mm for the 1 mm and 0.7 mm trackers, respectively, in analog mode

  12. Beryllium colorimetric detection for high speed monitoring of laboratory environments.

    Taylor, Tammy P; Sauer, Nancy N

    2002-08-01

    The health consequences of beryllium (Be2+) exposure can be severe. Beryllium is responsible for a debilitating and potentially fatal lung disease, chronic beryllium disease (CBD) resulting from inhalation of beryllium particles. The US Code of Federal Register (CFR), 10 CFR 850, has established a limit of 0.2 microg beryllium/100 cm(2) as the maximum amount of beryllium allowable on surfaces to be released from beryllium work areas in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The analytical technique described herein reduces the time and cost of detecting beryllium on laboratory working surfaces substantially. The technique provides a positive colorimetric response to the presence of beryllium on a 30.5 cm x 30.5 cm (1 ft(2)) surface at a minimum detection of 0.2 microg/100 cm(2). The method has been validated to provide positive results for beryllium in the presence of excess iron, calcium, magnesium, copper, nickel, chromium and lead at concentrations 100 times that of beryllium and aluminum and uranium (UO2(2+)) at lesser concentrations. The colorimetric detection technique has also been validated to effectively detect solid forms of beryllium including Be(OH)2, BeCl2, BeSO4, beryllium metal and BeO. PMID:12137989

  13. Transmutation of plutonium in pebble bed type high temperature reactors

    The pebble bed type High Temperature Reactor (HTR) has been studied as a uranium-free burner of reactor grade plutonium. In a parametric study, the plutonium loading per pebble as well as the type and size of the coated particles (CPs) have been varied to determine the plutonium consumption, the final plutonium burnup, the k∞ and the temperature coefficients as a function of burnup. The plutonium loading per pebble is bounded between 1 and 3 gr Pu per pebble. The upper limit is imposed by the maximal allowable fast fluence for the CPs. A higher plutonium loading requires a longer irradiation time to reach a desired burnup, so that the CPs are exposed to a higher fast fluence. The lower limit is determined by the temperature coefficients, which become less negative with increasing moderator-actinide ratio. A burnup of about 600 MWd/kgHM can be reached. With the HTR's high efficiency of 40%, a plutonium supply of 1520 kg/GWea is achieved. The discharges of plutonium and minor actinides are then 450 and 110 kg/GWea, respectively. (author)

  14. Pebble Bed Reactor review update. Fiscal year 1979 annual report

    Updated information is presented on the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) concept being developed in the Federal Republic of Germany for electricity generation and process heat applications. Information is presented concerning nuclear analysis and core performance, fuel cycle evaluation, reactor internals, and safety and availability

  15. Pebble Bed Reactor review update. Fiscal year 1979 annual report

    1980-01-01

    Updated information is presented on the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) concept being developed in the Federal Republic of Germany for electricity generation and process heat applications. Information is presented concerning nuclear analysis and core performance, fuel cycle evaluation, reactor internals, and safety and availability.

  16. Fabrication of Li2TiO3 pebbles by a freeze drying process

    Li2TiO3 pebbles were successfully fabricated by using a freeze drying process. The Li2TiO3 slurry was prepared using a commercial powder of particle size 0.5–1.5 μm and the pebble pre-form was prepared by dropping the slurry into liquid nitrogen through a syringe needle. The droplets were rapidly frozen, changing their morphology to spherical pebbles. The frozen pebbles were dried at −10 °C in vacuum. To make crack-free pebbles, some glycerin was employed in the slurry, and long drying time and a low vacuum condition were applied in the freeze drying process. In the process, the solid content in the slurry influenced the spheroidicity of the pebble green body. The dried pebbles were sintered at 1200 °C in an air atmosphere. The sintered pebbles showed almost 40% shrinkage. The sintered pebbles revealed a porous microstructure with a uniform pore distribution and the sintered pebbles were crushed under an average load of 50 N in a compressive strength test. In the present study, a freeze drying process for fabrication of spherical Li2TiO3 pebbles is introduced. The processing parameters, such as solid content in the slurry and the conditions of freeze drying and sintering, are also examined

  17. Pore Scale Thermal Hydraulics Investigations of Molten Salt Cooled Pebble Bed High Temperature Reactor with BCC and FCC Configurations

    Shixiong Song

    2014-01-01

    CFD results and empirical correlations’ predictions of pressure drop and local Nusselt numbers. Local pebble surface temperature distributions in several default conditions are investigated. Thermal removal capacities of molten salt are confirmed in the case of nominal condition; the pebble surface temperature under the condition of local power distortion shows the tolerance of pebble in extreme neutron dose exposure. The numerical experiments of local pebble insufficient cooling indicate that in the molten salt cooled pebble bed reactor, the pebble surface temperature is not very sensitive to loss of partial coolant. The methods and results of this paper would be useful for optimum designs and safety analysis of molten salt cooled pebble bed reactors.

  18. Modeling of realistic pebble bed reactor geometries using the Serpent Monte Carlo code

    Highlights: • The explicit stochastic geometry model in Serpent is documented. • A pebble bed criticality benchmark was calculated demonstrating the geometry model. • Stochastic pebble configurations were obtained from discrete element simulations. • Results deviate from experiments but are in line with example calculations. - Abstract: This paper documents the models available in Serpent for high temperature reactor (HTR) calculations. It is supplemented by a calculation example of ASTRA critical pebble bed experiments. In the pebble bed reactor modeling, different methods have been used to model the double heterogeneity problem occurring in pebble bed reactor calculations. A solution was sought to avoid unphysical simplifications in the pebble bed modeling and the stochastic geometry modeling features available in the Monte Carlo code Serpent were applied for exact placement of pebbles and fuel particles. Randomly packed pebble beds were produced in discrete element method (DEM) simulations and fuel particles were positioned randomly inside the pebbles. Pebbles and particles are located using a Cartesian search mesh, which provides necessary computational efficiency. Serpent uses Woodcock delta-tracking which provides efficient neutron tracking in the complicated geometries. This detailed pebble bed modeling approach was tested by calculating the ASTRA criticality benchmark experiment done at the Kurchatov Institute in 2004. The calculation results are in line with the sample calculations provided with the benchmark documentation. The material library selected for the calculations has a major effect on the results. The difference in graphite absorption cross section is considered the cause of this result. The model added in Serpent is very efficient with a calculation time slightly higher than with a regular lattice approximation. It is demonstrated that Serpent can be used for pebble bed reactor calculations with minimal geometric approximations as it

  19. Beryllium. Health hazards and their control. Pt. 2

    In this work (continuation of 'Beryllium' series) health hazards, toxic effects, limits of permissible atmospheric contamination and safe exposure to beryllium are described. Guidelines to the design, control operations and hygienic precautions of the working facilities are given. (Author)

  20. Continuum observations of M 51 and M 83 at 1.1 mm with AzTEC

    Wall, W. F.; Puerari, I.; Tilanus, R.; Israel, F. P.; Austermann, J. E.; Aretxaga, I.; Wilson, G.; Yun, M.; Scott, K. S.; Perera, T. A.; Roberts, C. M.; Hughes, D. H.

    2016-06-01

    We observed the spiral galaxies M 51 and M 83 at 20 arscec spatial resolution with the bolometer array Aztronomical Thermal Emission Camera (AzTEC) on the JCMT in the 1.1 mm continuum, recovering the extended emission out to galactocentric radii of more than 12 kpc in both galaxies. The 1.1 mm-continuum fluxes are 5.6 ± 0.7 and 9.9 ± 1.4 Jy, with associated gas masses estimated at 9.4 × 109 M⊙ and 7.2 × 109 M⊙ for M 51 and M 83, respectively. In the interarm regions of both galaxies, the N(H2)/I(CO) (or X-factor) ratios exceed those in the arms by factors of ˜1.5-2. In the inner discs of both galaxies, the X-factor is about 1 × 1020 cm- 2 (K km s- 1)- 1. In the outer parts, the CO-dark molecular gas becomes more important. While the spiral density wave in M 51 appears to influence the interstellar medium and stars in a similar way, the bar potential in M 83 influences the interstellar medium and the stars differently. We confirm the result of Foyle et al. that the arms merely heighten the star formation rate (SFR) and the gas surface density in the same proportion. Our maps reveal a threshold gas surface density for an SFR increase by two or more orders of magnitude. In both galaxy centres, the molecular gas depletion time is about 1 Gyr climbing to 10-20 Gyr at radii of 6-8 kpc. This is consistent with an inside-out depletion of the molecular gas in the discs of spiral galaxies.

  1. 75 FR 80734 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program

    2010-12-23

    ... Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) (63 FR 66940). After considering the comments received, DOE... CFR Part 850 RIN 1992-AA39 Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program AGENCY: Office of Health... beryllium disease prevention program. The Department solicits comment and information on the...

  2. Spectrographic determination of impurities in beryllium oxide

    A method for the spectrographic determination of Al, B, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mg, NaNi, Si and Zn in nuclear grade beryllium oxide has been developed. The determination of Co, Al, Na and Zn is besed upon a carrier distillation technique. Better results were obtained with 2% Ga2O3 as carrier in beryllium oxide. For the elements B, Cd, Cu, Fe, Cr, Mg, Ni and Si the sample is loaded in a Scribner-Mullin shallow cup electrode, covered with graphite powder and excited in DC arc. The relative standard deviation values for different elements are in the range of 10 to 20%. The method fulfills requirements of precision and sensitivity for specification analysis of nuclear grade beryllium oxide.(Author)

  3. Low-temperature solubility of copper in beryllium, in beryllium--aluminum, and in beryllium--silicon using ion beam

    Ion implantation and ion backscattering analysis have been used to measure the solubility of copper in beryllium over the temperature range 593 to 1023 K, and to determine the effect on the copper solubility of aluminum and silicon impurities. The binary data extend 280 K lower in temperature than previous results, while the ternary measurements are unique. The information is pertinent to the use of copper for solution strengthening of beryllium. Diffusion couples were formed by ion implantation of copper into single-crystal beryllium at room temperature, followed where appropriate by implantation of aluminum or silicon. The samples were then annealed isothermally, and the time-evolution of the composition-vs-depth profile, determined by ion backscattering analysis, yielded the solubility of copper. Measurements at exceptionally low temperatures were facilitated by the short diffusion distances, approximately equal to 0.1 mu m, and the use of neon irradiation to accelerate diffusion. The resulting binary data for the solubility C0 of copper in beryllium merge smoothly into previous results at higher temperatures. The combined data, covering the temperature range 593 to 1373 K, are well described by C0 = (12.6 at. pct) . exp (-842 K/T). In the ternary regime, the effects of aluminum and silicon on the solubility of copper were found to be small

  4. Preliminary results for explosion bonding of beryllium to copper

    Butler, D.J. [Northwest Technical Industries, Inc., Sequim, WA (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This program was undertaken to determine if explosive bonding is a viable technique for joining beryllium to copper substrates. The effort was a cursory attempt at trying to solve some of the problems associated with explosive bonding beryllium and should not be considered a comprehensive research effort. There are two issues that this program addressed. Can beryllium be explosive bonded to copper substrates and can the bonding take place without shattering the beryllium? Thirteen different explosive bonding iterations were completed using various thicknesses of beryllium that were manufactured with three different techniques.

  5. Thorium and plutonium utilisation in pebble-bed modular reactor

    Thorium and plutonium utilisation in a high temperature gas-cooled pebble-bed reactor is investigated with the aim to predict the economic value of vast thorium reserves in Turkey. A pebble-bed reactor of the type designed by PBMR Pty. of South Africa is taken as the investigated system. The equilibrium core of a PBMR is considered and neutronics analyses of such a core are performed through the use of the SCALE-4.4 computer code system KENOV.a module. Various cross-section libraries are used to calculate the criticality of the core. Burn-up calculations of the core are performed by coupling the KENOV.a module with the ORIGEN-S module. Calculations are carried out for various U-Th, U-Pu-Th and U-Pu combinations. The results are preliminary in nature and the work is currently proceeding as planned. (author)

  6. The Arizona Radio Observatory 1 mm Spectral Survey of IRC (plus)10216 and VY Canis Majoris (215-285 GHz)

    Tenenbaum, E. D.; Dodd, J. L.; Milam, S. N.; Woolf, N. J.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    A low noise (1(sigma) rms approx. 3 mK) 1. nun spectral survey (214.5-285.5 GHz) of the oxygen-rich supergiant VY Canis Majoris and the carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch star IRC +10216 has been conducted using the Arizona Radio Observatory's 10 m Submillimeter Telescope. Here the complete data set is presented. This study, carried out with a new ALMA-type receiver, marks the first continuous band scan of an O-rich circumstellar envelope, and the most sensitive survey to date of IRC +10216. In VY CMa, 130 distinct molecular lines were detected, 14 of which cannot be identified; in IRC +10216, 717 lines were observed, with 126 features remaining unidentified. In the 1 mm bands of VY CMa and IRC +10216, emission is present from 18 and 32 different chemical compounds, respectively, with 10 species common to both sources. Many narrow emission lines were observed in both circumstellar shells, arising from vibrationally excited molecules and from refractory-containing species. Line profiles in VY CMa also exhibit a variety of different shapes, caused by the complex, asymmetric outflow of this object. The survey highlights the fact that C-rich and O-rich circumstellar envelopes are chemically interesting, and both are sources of new interstellar molecules. The high number of unidentified lines and the unreliable, rest frequencies for known species such as NaCN indicate the need for additional laboratory spectroscopy studies.

  7. Alpha particle energy response of 1-mm-thick polycarbonate track detectors by 50 Hz-HV electrochemical etching method

    The electrochemical etching (ECE) method enlarges charged particle tracks to enhance its applications in particular in health physics and radiation dosimetry. The ECE method is usually based on using a high frequency-high voltage (HF-HV) generator with 250-μm-thick polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs). The authors' recent studies on nitrogen and helium ions and alpha tracks in 1-mm-thick large-size PCTDs under a 50 Hz-HV ECE process provided promising results. In this study, alpha track efficiency and mean track diameter versus energy responses and registration energy range as well as alpha and background track shapes under three sets of 50 Hz-4, 5 and 6 kV applied field conditions have been studied and are reported. The efficiency versus alpha energy has a Bragg-type response from ∼15 keV to ∼4.5 MeV for the field conditions applied with an efficiency value of 40-50 % at the Bragg peak. The results are presented and discussed. (authors)

  8. Extensive Characterization of the 1 mm PIT Nb3Sn strand for the 13-T FRESCA2 Magnet

    Bordini, B; Mondonico, G; Oberli, L; Richter, D; Seeber, B; Senatore, C; Takala, E; Valentinis, D

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the EuCARD program, CERN is participating in the development of a 13 T 100-mm-aperture dipole magnet to upgrade the superconducting cable test facility FRESCA at CERN. The conductor candidates for building this magnet are two 1-mm Nb3Sn strands: the Powder In Tube (PIT) produced by Bruker-EAS and the 132/169 RRP by Oxford Superconducting Technology (OST). Recently the PIT strand has been extensively characterized by CERN in collaboration with the University of Geneva (UniGe). The critical current dependence on the magnetic field and on the axial strain e has been measured at different temperatures. Furthermore, the strand magnetization has been measured at different temperature using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Finally the magneto-thermal stability of this strand was studied by measuring the quench current between 0 T and 12 T at 1.9 K and 4.3 K. The experimental results are compared with an optimized scaling law for the critical current of Nb3Sn strands. In this paper the results obt...

  9. Coincidence measurements on detectors for microPET II: A 1 mm3 resolution PET scanner for small animal imaging

    Chatziioannou, A; Shao, Y; Doshi, N K; Silverman, B; Meadors, K; Cherry, SR

    2000-01-01

    We are currently developing a small animal PET scanner with a design goal of 1 mm3 image resolution. We have built three pairs of detectors and tested performance in terms of crystal identification, spatial, energy and timing resolution. The detectors consisted of 12 multiplied by 12 arrays of 1 multiplied by 1 multiplied by 10mm LSO crystals (1.15 mm pitch) coupled to Hamamatsu H7546 64 channel PMTs via 5cm long coherent glass fiber bundles. Optical fiber connection is necessary to allow high packing fraction in a ring geometry scanner. Fiber bundles with and without extramural absorber (EMA) were tested. The results demonstrated an intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.12 mm (direct coupled LSO array), 1.23 mm (bundle without EMA) and 1.27 mm (bundle with EMA) using a similar to 500 micron diameter Na-22 source. Using a 330 micron line source filled with F-18, intrinsic resolution for the EMA bundle improved to 1.05 mm. The respective timing and energy resolution values were 1.96 ns, 21% (direct coupled), 2.20 ...

  10. Surface-micromachined magnetic undulator with period length between 10μm and 1 mm for advanced light sources

    Harrison, Jere; Joshi, Abhijeet; Lake, Jonathan; Candler, Rob; Musumeci, Pietro

    2012-07-01

    A technological gap exists between the μm-scale wiggling periods achieved using electromagnetic waves of high intensity laser pulses and the mm scale of permanent-magnet and superconducting undulators. In the sub-mm range, surface-micromachined soft-magnetic micro-electro-mechanical system inductors with integrated solenoidal coils have already experimentally demonstrated 100 to 500 mT field amplitude across air gaps as large as 15μm. Simulations indicate that magnetic fields as large as 1.5 T across 50μm inductor gaps are feasible. A simple rearranging of the yoke and pole geometry allows for fabrication of 10+ cm long undulator structures with period lengths between 12.5μm and 1 mm. Such undulators find application both in high average power spontaneous emission sources and, if used in combination with ultrahigh-brightness electron beams, could lead to the realization of low energy compact free-electron lasers. Challenges include electron energy broadening due to wakefields and Joule heating in the electromagnet.

  11. Uranium assessment for the Precambrian pebble conglomerates in southeastern Wyoming

    This volume is a geostatistical resource estimate of uranium and thorium in quartz-pebble conglomerates, and is a companion to Volume 1: The Geology and Uranium Potential to Precambrian Conglomerates in the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming; and to Volume 2: Drill-Hole Data, Drill-Site Geology, and Geochemical Data from the Study of Precambrian Uraniferous Conglomerates of the Medicine Bow Mountains and the Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming

  12. Numerical simulation of ceramic breeder pebble bed thermal creep behavior

    The evolution of ceramic breeder pebble bed thermal creep deformation subjected to an external load and a differential thermal stress was studied using a modified discrete numerical code previously developed for the pebble bed thermomechanical evaluation. The rate change of creep deformation was modeled at the particle contact based on a diffusion creep mechanism. Numerical results of strain histories have shown lower values as compared to those of experimentally observed data at 740 deg. C using an activation energy of 180 kJ/mol. Calculations also show that, at this activation energy level, a particle bed at an elevated temperature of 800 deg. C may cause too much particle overlapping with a contact radius growth beyond 0.65 radius at a later time, when it is subjected to an external load of 6.3 MPa. Thus, by tracking the stress histories inside a breeder pebble bed the numerical simulation provides an indication of whether the bed may encounter an undesired condition under a typical operating condition

  13. Benchmark Evaluation of HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate 11 critical core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed experimental program. Various additional reactor physics measurements were performed as part of this program; currently only a total of 37 absorber rod worth measurements have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for Cores 4, 9, and 10. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the 235U enrichment of the fuel, impurities in the moderator pebbles, and the density and impurity content of the radial reflector. Calculations of keff with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron nuclear data are greater than the benchmark values but within 1% and also within the 3σ uncertainty, except for Core 4, which is the only randomly packed pebble configuration. Repeated calculations of keff with MCNP6.1 and ENDF/B-VII.1 are lower than the benchmark values and within 1% (~3σ) except for Cores 5 and 9, which calculate lower than the benchmark eigenvalues within 4σ. The primary difference between the two nuclear data libraries is the adjustment of the absorption cross section of graphite. Simulations of the absorber rod worth measurements are within 3σ of the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments

  14. Modeling of laminar forced convection in spherical- pebble packed beds

    There are many parameters that have significant effects on forced convection heat transfer in packed beds, including Reynolds and Prandtl numbers of flow, porosity, pebble geometry, local flow conditions, wall and end effects. In addition, there have been many experimental investigations on forced convection heat transfer in packed beds and each have studied the effect of some of these parameters. Yet, there is not a reliable correlation that includes the effect of main parameters: at the same time, the prediction of precise correct limits for very low and high Reynolds numbers is off hand. In this article a general well-known model of convection heat transfer from isothermal bodies, next to some previous reliable experimental data has been used as a basis for a more comprehensive and accurate correlation to calculate the laminar constant temperature pebble-fluid forced convection heat transfer in a homogeneous saturated bed with spherical pebbles. Finally, for corroboration, the present results are compared with previous works and show a very good agreement for laminar flows at any Prandtl number and all porosities

  15. Pebbling and Branching Programs Solving the Tree Evaluation Problem

    Wehr, Dustin

    2010-01-01

    We study restricted computation models related to the Tree Evaluation Problem}. The TEP was introduced in earlier work as a simple candidate for the (*very*) long term goal of separating L and LogDCFL. The input to the problem is a rooted, balanced binary tree of height h, whose internal nodes are labeled with binary functions on [k] = {1,...,k} (each given simply as a list of k^2 elements of [k]), and whose leaves are labeled with elements of [k]. Each node obtains a value in [k] equal to its binary function applied to the values of its children, and the output is the value of the root. The first restricted computation model, called Fractional Pebbling, is a generalization of the black/white pebbling game on graphs, and arises in a natural way from the search for good upper bounds on the size of nondeterministic branching programs (BPs) solving the TEP - for any fixed h, if the binary tree of height h has fractional pebbling cost at most p, then there are nondeterministic BPs of size O(k^p) solving the heigh...

  16. Studies on air ingress for pebble bed reactors

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) has been considered a critical event for helium-cooled pebbled bed reactors. Following helium depressurization, it is anticipated that unless countermeasures are taken air will enter the core through the break and then by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and graphite pebbles. Thus, without any mitigating features a LOCA will lead to an air ingress event. The INEEL is studying such an event with two well-respected light water reactor transient response codes: RELAP5/ATHENA and MELCOR. To study the degree of graphite oxidation occurring due to an air ingress event, a MELCOR model of a reference pebble bed design was constructed. A modified version of MELCOR developed at INEEL, which includes graphite oxidation capabilities, and molecular diffusion of air into helium was used for these calculations. Results show that the lower reflector graphite consumes all of the oxygen before reaching the core. The results also show a long time delay between the time that the depressurization phase of the accident is over and the time that natural circulation air through the core occurs. (author)

  17. Potential exposures and risks from beryllium-containing products.

    Willis, Henry H; Florig, H Keith

    2002-10-01

    Beryllium is the strongest of the lightweight metals. Used primarily in military applications prior to the end of the Cold War, beryllium is finding new applications in many commercial products, including computers, telecommunication equipment, and consumer and automotive electronics. The use of beryllium in nondefense consumer applications is of concern because beryllium is toxic. Inhalation of beryllium dust or vapor causes a chronic lung disease in some individuals at concentrations as low as 0.01 microg/m3 in air. As beryllium enters wider commerce, it is prudent to ask what risks this might present to the general public and to workers downstream of the beryllium materials industry. We address this question by evaluating the potential for beryllium exposure from the manufacturing, use, recycle, and disposal of beryllium-containing products. Combining a market study with a qualitative exposure analysis, we determine which beryllium applications and life cycle phases have the largest exposure potential. Our analysis suggests that use and maintenance of the most common types of beryllium-containing products do not result in any obvious exposures of concern, and that maintenance activities result in greater exposures than product use. Product disposal has potential to present significant individual risks, but uncertainties concerning current and future routes of product disposal make it difficult to be definitive. Overall, additional exposure and dose-response data are needed to evaluate both the health significance of many exposure scenarios, and the adequacy of existing regulations to protect workers and the public. Although public exposures to beryllium and public awareness and concern regarding beryllium risks are currently low, beryllium risks have psychometric qualities that may lead to rapidly heightened public concern. PMID:12442995

  18. Magnesium Cermets and Magnesium-Beryllium Alloys

    The paper describes some results of work on the development of magnesium-magnesium oxide cermets and of super heat-resistant magnesiumberyllium alloys produced by powder metallurgical methods. The introduction of even a minute quantity of finely dispersed magnesium oxide into magnesium results in a strengthening of the material, the degree of which increases with increased magnesium oxide concentration, although variation of this concentration within the limits of 0.3 to 5 wt.% has a comparatively slight effect on the corresponding variation in the short-term strength over the whole range of temperatures investigated. At 20oC, in the case of the cermets, σβ = 28 to 31 kg/mm2 and δ = 3 .5 to 4.5%; at 500oC σβ = 2.6 to 3.2 kg/mm2 and δ =30 to 40%. The positive effect of the finely dispersed oxide phase is particularly evident in protracted tests. For magnesium cermets, σ (300)/100 = 2.2 kg/mm2. Characteristic of the mixtures is the high thermal stability of the strength properties, linked chiefly with the thermodynamic stability of the strength-giving oxide phase in the metal matrix. The use of powder metallurgical methods has yielded super heat-resistant magnesium-beryllium alloys containing heightened concentrations of beryllium (PMB alloys). In their strength characteristics PMB alloys are close to Mg-MgO cermets, but the magnesium-beryllium alloys have a degree and duration of resistance to high temperature oxidation which exceeds the corresponding qualities of the magnesium alloys at present known. Thus, in air of 580oC, PMB alloys with 2 to 5% beryllium maintain a high resistance to oxidation for a period of over 12000 to 14000 h. This long-term heat resistance is chiefly a result of the amount of beryllium in the alloy, and increases with increasing beryllium content. PMB alloys are also marked by high resistance to short bursts of overheating. Magnesium cermets and magnesium-beryllium alloys, with their enhanced high-temperature stability, are capable

  19. Preliminary safety analysis of a thorium high-conversion pebble bed reactor

    An inherently safe thorium High-Conversion Pebble Bed Reactor would combine the inherent safety characteristics of the Pebble Bed Reactor with the favourable waste characteristics and resource availability of the thorium fuel cycle. Previous work by the authors showed that high conversion ratio's can be achieved within a thorium Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) at a practical operating regime. The thorium PBR core design consists of a cylindrical core with a central driver zone surrounded by a breeder zone. The breeder pebbles have a 30 g heavy metal (HM) loading to enhance conversion of Th-232 into U-233, while the driver pebbles (10 w% U-233) contain a lower metal loading to enhance fission. In previous studies, thorium PBR designs were presented for three core diameters, using a 7.5 g heavy metal (HM) loading for the driver pebbles. The current paper investigates the safety of these thorium PBR designs in terms of reactivity coefficients and possible reactivity insertion due to water ingress. Early results indicated that the values of the reactivity coefficients for the three designs with 7.5 g HM loading per driver pebble were rather small and the possible reactivity insertion due to water ingress was very large. Therefore, also a lower HM loading per driver pebble (4 g) was investigated to reduce the impact of water ingress, since the core becomes less under-moderated. For the three core diameters investigated, it is shown that reducing the metal loading in the driver pebbles to 4 g is indeed advantageous in terms of safety, water ingress leads to a smaller reactivity increase but also the reactivity coefficients become stronger negative. Secondly, the breeding performance of the cores with a 4 g driver pebble HM loading improves. On the downside, the driver pebble residence times become shorter, which could increase fuel reprocessing costs. Fuel pebbles would have to be recycled at an increased rate, which might be more challenging from a practical perspective

  20. Development of fabrication technologies for advanced tritium breeder pebbles by the sol–gel method

    Highlights: • Li2TiO3 with excess Li (Li2+xTiO3+y) was developed as an advanced tritium breeder. • Pebble fabrication by the sol–gel method is a promising technique for the mass production of advanced tritium breeder pebbles. • To increase the density of the sintered Li2+xTiO3+y pebbles, the sintering temperature was changed. • At 1353 K, the density of the pebbles increased to approximately 85% T.D. without any increase in the grain size. -- Abstract: Demonstration power plant (DEMO) reactors require advanced tritium breeders with high thermal stability. Li2TiO3 with excess Li (Li2+xTiO3+y) was developed as an advanced tritium breeder. Pebble fabrication by the sol–gel method is a promising technique for the mass production of advanced tritium breeder pebbles. I have been developing a sol–gel technique for fabricating Li2+xTiO3+y pebbles, and the next step is to optimize the granulation conditions to reach the target value. In a previous study, the average grain size on the surfaces and cross sections of sintered Li2+xTiO3+y pebbles was large whereas the theoretical density (T.D.) of these pebbles was small. To increase the density of the sintered Li2+xTiO3+y pebbles, the sintering temperature was changed, and at 1353 K, the density of the pebbles increased to approximately 85% T.D. without any increase in the grain size. This suggests that the pore size in the sintered Li2+xTiO3+y pebbles decreased because of sintering in vacuum and argon

  1. Thermal regulation of tightly packed solid-state photodetectors in a 1 mm{sup 3} resolution clinical PET system

    Freese, D. L.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Innes, D.; Lau, F. W. Y.; Hsu, D. F. C.; Reynolds, P. D.; Levin, Craig S., E-mail: cslevin@stanford.edu [Departments of Electrical Engineering, Radiology, Physics, and BioEngineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Silicon photodetectors are of significant interest for use in positron emission tomography (PET) systems due to their compact size, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and high quantum efficiency. However, one of their main disadvantages is fluctuations in temperature cause strong shifts in gain of the devices. PET system designs with high photodetector density suffer both increased thermal density and constrained options for thermally regulating the devices. This paper proposes a method of thermally regulating densely packed silicon photodetectors in the context of a 1 mm{sup 3} resolution, high-sensitivity PET camera dedicated to breast imaging. Methods: The PET camera under construction consists of 2304 units, each containing two 8 × 8 arrays of 1 mm{sup 3} LYSO crystals coupled to two position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD). A subsection of the proposed camera with 512 PSAPDs has been constructed. The proposed thermal regulation design uses water-cooled heat sinks, thermoelectric elements, and thermistors to measure and regulate the temperature of the PSAPDs in a novel manner. Active cooling elements, placed at the edge of the detector stack due to limited access, are controlled based on collective leakage current and temperature measurements in order to keep all the PSAPDs at a consistent temperature. This thermal regulation design is characterized for the temperature profile across the camera and for the time required for cooling changes to propagate across the camera. These properties guide the implementation of a software-based, cascaded proportional-integral-derivative control loop that controls the current through the Peltier elements by monitoring thermistor temperature and leakage current. The stability of leakage current, temperature within the system using this control loop is tested over a period of 14 h. The energy resolution is then measured over a period of 8.66 h. Finally, the consistency of PSAPD gain between independent

  2. An Analysis of Resistance Spot Weld Growth on Mild and Stainless Steel with 1mm and 2mm Thicknesses

    Nachimani Charde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding (RSW is an essential welding technology today for joining two or more metals in various manufacturing industries. A statistic shows that one metal assembly out of five is joined using resistance spot welding mechanism, commercially.   It uses traditionally two electrodes to hold the metal sheets and forces high current to pass through it. The growth of weld nugget is, at last obtained from a proper set up of its controlling parameters such as current, weld time, pressure of electrodes and also the tip size of electrodes. However, factors such as electrode deformation, dissimilar materials and materials with different thicknesses also affect weld growth. This paper looks into the effects of different thicknesses of two base materials .The materials that were used are mild steel and 302 authentic stainless steel with thicknesses of 1 mm and 2 mm. Mechanical tensile test and hardness test have been carried out to characterize the formation of weld nugget growth for different welding schedules. The results of the experiments showed that the growth of spot weld is strongly affected by the usage of materials with different thickness or types. The macrostructure of weld nugget also shows distinguishable differences in weld growth for the both mentioned cases. The tensile test was carried out on standard size samples but with different thicknesses and materials. It shows difference in yield strength for the same welding schedules. Meanwhile the hardness of welded materials varies from one another significantly but the hardness distribution along the welded areas seemed to almost same for each category of base metals.

  3. A COMPARISON OF PEBBLE MIXING AND DEPLETION ALGORITHMS USED IN PEBBLE-BED REACTOR EQUILIBRIUM CYCLE SIMULATION

    Hans D. Gougar; Frederik Reitsma; Wessel Joubert

    2009-05-01

    Recirculating pebble-bed reactors are distinguished from all other reactor types by the downward movement through and reinsertion of fuel into the core during operation. Core simulators must account for this movement and mixing in order to capture the physics of the equilibrium cycle core. VSOP and PEBBED are two codes used to perform such simulations, but they do so using different methods. In this study, a simplified pebble-bed core with a specified flux profile and cross sections is used as the model for conducting analyses of two types of burnup schemes. The differences between the codes are described and related to the differences observed in the nuclide densities in pebbles discharged from the core. Differences in the methods for computing fission product buildup and average number densities lead to significant differences in the computed core power and eigenvalue. These test models provide a key component of an overall equilibrium cycle benchmark involving neutron transport, cross section generation, and fuel circulation.

  4. Safety handling of beryllium for fusion technology R and D

    Feasibility of beryllium use as a blanket neutron multiplier, first wall and plasma facing material has been studied for the D-T burning experiment reactors such as ITER. Various experimental work of beryllium and its compounds will be performed under the conditions of high temperature and high energy particle exposure simulating fusion reactor conditions. Beryllium is known as a hazardous substance and its handling has been carefully controlled by various health and safe guidances and/or regulations in many countries. Japanese regulations for hazardous substance provide various guidelines on beryllium for the protection of industrial workers and environment. This report was prepared for the safe handling of beryllium in a laboratory scale experiments for fusion technology R and D such as blanket development. Major items in this report are; (1) Brief review of guidances and regulations in USA, UK and Japan. (2) Safe handling and administration manuals at beryllium facilities in INEL, LANL and JET. (3) Conceptual design study of beryllium handling facility for small to mid-scale blanket R and D. (4) Data on beryllium toxicity, example of clinical diagnosis of beryllium disease, and environmental occurence of beryllium. (5) Personnel protection tools of Japanese Industrial Standard for hazardous substance. (author) 61 refs

  5. Coated fuel particle temperature analysis of the pebble-bed modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    In the 200 MWe pebble-bed modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-PM), each sphere fuel element contains approximately 12,000 coated fuel particles scattered in the inner graphite matrix with a diameter of 50 mm to form the fuel zone, while the outer shell with a thickness of 5 mm is a fuel-free zone made up of the same graphite material. The coated fuel particle, with a diameter of less than 1 mm, consists of a UO2 kernel in 0.5 mm diameter and multiple coated ceramic layers. The HTR-PM has good inherent safety properties, one of which is exhibited like that, under some transient or accidental situations leading to an unexpected power increase, the reactor can shut down itself automatically or be brought down to a very low power level only by the negative temperature coefficient of reactivity due to the fuel temperature rise. During the calculation of the fuel element temperature with the pebble bed reactor analysis software THERMIX, which was originally developed by the German KFA-Juelich, a uniform power density in the fuel zone is assumed, without considering the temperature difference between the coated fuel particles and the surrounding graphite matrix. In this paper, the reactor temperature feedback characteristics and the nuclear power during a rapid reactivity introduction accident are analyzed in detail for two cases, i.e. taking into account the coated fuel particle temperature or not. The calculation results show that, the coated fuel particle temperature rises more quickly than the graphite matrix, and then the reactor power descends after a limited increase due to the higher negative temperature coefficient of reactivity of the fuel particle compared with that of the graphite moderator. Besides, the calculation conservation of the THERMIX code is revealed, and the safety properties of the HTR-PM are illustrated as well. (authors)

  6. Control of beryllium powder at a DOE facility

    Beryllium is contained in a number of domestic and national defense items. Although many items might contain beryllium in some manner, few people need worry about the adverse effects caused by exposure to beryllium because it is the inhalable form of beryllium that is most toxic. Chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a granulomas and fibrotic lung disease with long latency, can be developed after inhalation exposures to beryllium. It is a progressive, debilitating lung disease. Its occurrence in those exposed to beryllium has been difficult to predict because some people seem to react to low concentration exposures whereas others do not react to high concentration exposures. Onset of the disease frequently occurs between 15 to 20 years after exposure begins. Some people develop the disease after many years of low concentration exposures but others do not develop CBD even though beryllium is shown to be present in lungs and urine. Conclusions based on these experiences are that their is some immunological dependence of developing CBD in about 3--4% of the exposed population, but the exact mechanism involved has not yet been identified. Acute beryllium disease can occur after a single exposure to a concentration of greater than 0.100 mg/m3 (inhalation exposure); it is characterized by the development of chemical pneumoconiosis, a respiratory disease. The acute effect of skin contact is a dermatitis characterized by itching and reddened, elevated, or fluid-accumulated lesions which appear particularly on the exposed surfaces of the body, especially the face, neck, arms, and hands. Small particles of beryllium that enter breaks in the skin can lead to the development of granulomas and/or open sores that do not heal until the beryllium has been removed. Our interest is only airborne beryllium, which is found in areas that machine or produce beryllium

  7. Neutronic simulation of a pebble bed reactor considering its double heterogeneous nature

    Highlights: ► A new model is successfully developed for a pebble bed reactor simulation. ► In the model, the double heterogeneous nature is considered using MCNP5 code. ► The initial and full core criticality, control rod worth, etc. are calculated to validate it. ► Results confirm the capability of Monte Carlo codes in modeling complex geometries. - Abstract: In pebble bed reactors, the core is filled with thousands of graphite and fuel pebbles. Fuel pebbles in these reactors consist of TRISO particles, which are embedded in a graphite matrix stochastically. The reactor core is also stochastically filled with pebbles. These two stochastic geometries comprise the so-called double heterogeneous nature of this type of reactor. In this paper, a pebble bed reactor, the HTR-10, is used to demonstrate a treatment of this double heterogeneity using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code and MATLAB programming. In this technique, TRISO particles are modeled in a pebble using the expanded FILL and LATTICE features of MCNP5. MATLAB is used to generate random numbers which represent the location of pebbles in the core. Centers of pebbles are generated stochastically and uniformly and then transferred into the MCNP5 input file as the centers of spherical surfaces. In this model, there is no approximation to the actual geometry. In other words, the double heterogeneous nature is preserved while truncating neither the pebbles in the core nor the particles in the pebble matrix. Finally, to validate the model, benchmark problems of IAEA are used. Very good agreement with experimental results is observed.

  8. Status of material development for lifetime expansion of beryllium reflector

    Beryllium has been used as the reflector element material in the reactor, specifically S-200F structural grade beryllium manufactured by Materion Brush Beryllium and Composites (former, Brush Wellman Inc.). As a part of the reactor upgrade, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) also has carried out the cooperation experiments to extend the operating lifetime of the beryllium reflector elements. It will first be necessary to determine which of the material's physical, mechanical and chemical properties will be the most influential on that choice. The irradiation testing plans to evaluate the various beryllium grades are also briefly considered and prepared. In this paper, material selection, irradiation test plan and PEI development for lifetime expansion of beryllium are described for material testing reactors. (author)

  9. Characterization of plasma sprayed beryllium ITER first wall mockups

    Castro, R.G.; Vaidya, R.U.; Hollis, K.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Material Science and Technology Div.

    1998-01-01

    ITER first wall beryllium mockups, which were fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying the beryllium armor, have survived 3000 thermal fatigue cycles at 1 MW/m{sup 2} without damage during high heat flux testing at the Plasma Materials Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico. The thermal and mechanical properties of the plasma sprayed beryllium armor have been characterized. Results are reported on the chemical composition of the beryllium armor in the as-deposited condition, the through thickness and normal to the through thickness thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, the four-point bend flexure strength and edge-notch fracture toughness of the beryllium armor, the bond strength between the beryllium armor and the underlying heat sink material, and ultrasonic C-scans of the Be/heat sink interface. (author)

  10. Mechanisms of hydrogen retention in metallic beryllium and beryllium oxide and properties of ion-induced beryllium nitride; Rueckhaltemechanismen fuer Wasserstoff in metallischem Beryllium und Berylliumoxid sowie Eigenschaften von ioneninduziertem Berylliumnitrid

    Oberkofler, Martin

    2011-09-22

    In the framework of this thesis laboratory experiments on atomically clean beryllium surfaces were performed. They aim at a basic understanding of the mechanisms occurring upon interaction of a fusion plasma with a beryllium first wall. The retention and the temperature dependent release of implanted deuterium ions are investigated. An atomistic description is developed through simulations and through the comparison with calculations based on density functional theory. The results of these investigations are compared to the behaviour of hydrogen upon implantation into thermally grown beryllium oxide layers. Furthermore, beryllium nitride is produced by implantation of nitrogen into metallic beryllium and its properties are investigated. The results are interpreted with regard to the use of beryllium in a fusion reactor. (orig.)

  11. Plasma cleaning of beryllium coated mirrors

    Moser, L.; Marot, L.; Steiner, R.; Newman, M.; Widdowson, A.; Ivanova, D.; Likonen, J.; Petersson, P.; Pintsuk, G.; Rubel, M.; Meyer, E.; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    Cleaning systems of metallic first mirrors are needed in more than 20 optical diagnostic systems from ITER to avoid reflectivity losses. Currently, plasma sputtering is considered as one of the most promising techniques to remove deposits coming from the main wall (mainly beryllium and tungsten). This work presents the results of plasma cleaning of rhodium and molybdenum mirrors exposed in JET-ILW and contaminated with typical tokamak elements (including beryllium and tungsten). Using radio frequency (13.56 MHz) argon or helium plasma, the removal of mixed layers was demonstrated and mirror reflectivity improved towards initial values. The cleaning was evaluated by performing reflectivity measurements, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ion beam analysis.

  12. Computer simulation of electronic excitations in beryllium

    Popov, A V

    2016-01-01

    An effective method for the quantitative description of the electronic excited states of polyatomic systems is developed by using computer technology. The proposed method allows calculating various properties of matter at the atomic level within the uniform scheme. A special attention is paid to the description of beryllium atoms interactions with the external fields, comparable by power to the fields in atoms, molecules and clusters.

  13. Low cycle thermal fatigue testing of beryllium

    A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium, which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter and divertor components. The 30 kW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ''spike'' of 750 C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stresses in excess of the yield strength are generated, due to very high spot heat flux, 25 MWm-2. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S-65H, S-200F, S200F-H, SR-200, I-400, extruded high purity, HIP'd spherical powder, porous beryllium (94 and 98% dense), Be/30%, BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe12. Russian grades included: TPG-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TSHG-56. Both thenumber of cycles tocrack initiation and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be (SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis. (orig.)

  14. Oxidation behavior of plasma sintered beryllium-titanium intermetallic compounds as an advanced neutron multiplier

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Nakamichi, Masaru

    2013-07-01

    Beryllium intermetallic compounds (beryllides) such as Be12Ti are very promising candidates for advanced neutron multiplier materials in a demonstration fusion power reactor (DEMO). However, beryllides are too brittle to be fabricated either into pebble-type or rod-type shapes via conventional methods (i.e. arc melting and hot isostatic pressing). We have proposed a plasma sintering technique as a new method for beryllide fabrication, and our studies on the properties of plasma sintered beryllides are ongoing. In the present work, the oxidation properties of plasma sintered beryllides were investigated at 1273 K for 24 h in a dry air atmosphere to evaluate the high temperature properties of this material. Thermal gravimetry measurements indicate that specimens with larger fractions of Be12Ti phase corresponding to samples that have been sintered for longer time periods, exhibit superior oxidation properties. Our evaluation of the oxidation behavior of each phase in our beryllide samples is as follows: Be12Ti and Be17Ti2 both have good oxidation resistance, owing to the formation of dense and protective scales, while the Be and Be2Ti phases are mainly responsible for thermal-gravimetry (TG) weight gains, which is indicative of severe oxidation. We attribute the degradation in oxidation resistance specifically to Be2Ti that transforms into TiO2, and also find this phase to be the cause of deterioration in the mechanical properties of samples, owing to cracks near Be2Ti phase conglomerates.

  15. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program. Interim report. Safety and licensing evaluaion of German Pebble Bed Reactor concepts

    1978-09-01

    The Pebble Bed Gas Cooled Reactor, as developed in the Federal Republic of Germany, was reviewed from a United States Safety and Licensing perspective. The primary concepts considered were the steam cycle electric generating pebble bed (HTR-K) and the process heat pebble bed (PNP), although generic consideration of the direct cycle gas turbine pebble bed (HHT) was included. The study examines potential U.S. licensing issues and offers some suggestions as to required development areas.

  16. Fabrication tests of Li2TiO3 pebbles by direct wet process

    Lithium titanate (Li2TiO3) pebbles are considered to be the candidate material of the tritium breeders for fusion reactor from a point of good tritium recovery, chemical stability, etc. The direct wet process that Li2TiO3 pebbles were fabricated from the Li2TiO3 solution directly was proposed. In this study, pebble fabrication tests by the direct wet process were performed. The results from the preliminary test were as follows: 1) 100% Li2TiO3 powder could be dissolved when the holding time at more than 60 C was longer. 2) Good gel shape was maintained by dropping the Li2TiO3 condensed solution liquid in acetone. 3) Adjustment of a solution influenced the cracking rate of the Li2TiO3 pebble surface. Additionally, the solvent exchange was effective to decrease the crack of Li2TiO3 pebble surface and to improve the density of Li2TiO3 pebbles. It was clear that Li2TiO3 pebbles could be fabricated by the direct wet process and the pebbles with 5 μm grain and uniform structure were obtained. (orig.)

  17. Dynamic behaviour of S200F beryllium

    Compression tests have been made on a large scale of strain, strain rate (up to 2000 s-1) and temperature (between 20 C and 300 C). From these experiences, we have calculated a constitutive model for beryllium S200F, which can be used by computer codes. Its formulation is not far from Steinberg, Cochran and Guinan's. But in our case, the influences of temperature and strain rate appear clearly within the expression. To validate our equation, we have used it in a computer code. Its extrapolation for higher strain rates is in good agreement with experiments such as Taylor impact tests or plate impact tests (strain rates greater than 104 s-1). With micrography, we could settle a link between the main strain mode within the material, and the variation of one parameter of the model. Beside the constitutive model, we have shown that shock loaded beryllium behaves in two different ways. If the strain rate is lower than 5.106 s-1, then it is proportional to the squared shock pressure. Beyond, it is a linear function of shock pressure to the power of four. By a spall study on beryllium, we have confirmed that it is excessively fragile. Its fracture is sudden, at a strength near 1 GPa. (author)

  18. Permeation behavior of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    Study on Implantation Driven Permeation (IDP) behavior of deuterium through pure beryllium was investigated as a part of the research to predict the tritium permeation through the first wall components ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The permeation experiments were carried out with two beryllium specimens, one was an unannealed specimen and the other was that annealed at 1173 K. The permeation flux was measured as a function of specimen temperature and incident ion flux. Surface analysis of specimen was also carried out after the permeation experiment. Permeation was observed only with the annealed specimen and no significant permeation was observed with unannealed specimen under the present experimental condition (maximum temperature: 685 K, detection limit: 1x1013 D atoms/m2s). It could be attributed that the intrinsic lattice defects, which act as diffusion preventing site, decreased with the specimen annealing. Based on the result of steady and transient permeation behavior and surface analysis, it was estimated that the deuterium permeation implanted into annealed beryllium was controlled by surface recombination due to the oxide layer on the surface of the permeated side. (author)

  19. Interaction of nitrogen ions with beryllium surfaces

    Dobes, Katharina [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Association EURATOM ÖAW, Vienna (Austria); Köppen, Martin [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Oberkofler, Martin [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lungu, Cristian P.; Porosnicu, Corneliu [National Institute for Laser, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Höschen, Till; Meisl, Gerd [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Linsmeier, Christian [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Aumayr, Friedrich, E-mail: aumayr@iap.tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Association EURATOM ÖAW, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of energetic nitrogen projectiles with a beryllium surface is studied using a highly sensitive quartz crystal microbalance technique. The overall mass change rate of the beryllium sample under N{sub 2}{sup +} ion impact at an ion energy of 5000 eV (i.e. 2500 eV per N) is investigated in situ and in real-time. A strong dependency of the observed mass change rate on the nitrogen fluence (at constant flux) is found and can be attributed to the formation of a nitrogen-containing mixed material layer within the ion penetration depth. The presented data elucidate the dynamics of the interaction process and the surface saturation with increasing nitrogen fluence in a unique way. Basically, distinct interaction regimes can be discriminated, which can be linked to the evolution of the surface composition upon nitrogen impact. Steady state surface conditions are obtained at a total cumulative nitrogen fluence of ∼80 × 10{sup 16} N atoms per cm{sup 2}. In dynamic equilibrium, the interaction is marked by continuous surface erosion. In this case, the observed total sputtering yield becomes independent from the applied nitrogen fluence and is of the order of 0.4 beryllium atoms per impinging nitrogen atom.

  20. Quantitative method of determining beryllium or a compound thereof in a sample

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Ehler, Deborah S.; John, Kevin D.; Burrell, Anthony K.; Collis, Gavin E.; Minogue, Edel M.; Warner, Benjamin P.

    2010-08-24

    A method of determining beryllium or a beryllium compound thereof in a sample, includes providing a sample suspected of comprising beryllium or a compound thereof, extracting beryllium or a compound thereof from the sample by dissolving in a solution, adding a fluorescent indicator to the solution to thereby bind any beryllium or a compound thereof to the fluorescent indicator, and determining the presence or amount of any beryllium or a compound thereof in the sample by measuring fluorescence.

  1. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  2. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Köberl

    2012-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  3. HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

  4. Renewable lower reflector structure for a high temperature pebble bed reactor

    The description is given of a renewable lower reflector structure for a high temperature pebble bed reactor of the type comprising a cylindrical or prismatic graphite vessel wrapped in concrete and terminating at its lower end with a conical or pyramidal bottom fitted with a central aperture allowing the pebbles to be discharged by gravity. This structure includes a bed of several layers of protective graphite pebbles on the bottom and, fitted vertically so as to be removable along the centre line of the central aperture through the reflector and the concrete, a graphite block drilled in its centre to allow the discharge of the fuel pebbles and the protective pebbles. The graphite block rises above the level of the central aperture by an extent corresponding to the thickness of the bed when the reactor is working

  5. Li ceramic pebbles chemical compatibility with Eurofer samples in fusion relevant conditions

    Information on the chemical compatibility between Li ceramic breeders and reactor structural materials is an important issue for fusion reactor technology. In this work, Eurofer samples were placed inside a Li ceramic pebble bed and kept at 600 deg. C under a reducing atmosphere obtained by the flow of a purging gas (He + 0.1vol.%H2). Titanate and orthosilicate Li pebble beds were used in the experiments and exposure time ranged from 50 to 2000 h. Surface chemical reactions were investigated with nuclear microprobe techniques. The orthosilicate pebbles present chemical reactions even with the gas mixture, whereas for the samples in close contact with Eurofer there is evidence of Eurofer elemental diffusion into the pebbles and the formation of different types of compounds. Although the titanate pebbles used in the chemical compatibility experiments present surface alterations with increasing surface irregularities along the annealing time, there is no clear indication of Eurofer constituents diffusion

  6. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    Mcwilliams, A. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  7. Challenges in Forming the Solar System's Giant Planet Cores via Pebble Accretion

    Kretke, K A

    2014-01-01

    Though ~10 Earth mass rocky/icy cores are commonly held as a prerequisite for the formation of gas giants, theoretical models still struggle to explain how these embryos can form within the lifetimes of gaseous circumstellar disks. In recent years, aerodynamic-aided accretion of "pebbles," objects ranging from centimeters to meters in size, has been suggested as a potential solution to this long-standing problem. While pebble accretion has been demonstrated to be extremely effective in local simulations that look at the detailed behavior of these pebbles in the vicinity of a single planetary embryo, to date there have been no global simulations demonstrating the effectiveness of pebble accretion in a more complicated, multi-planet environment. Therefore, we have incorporated the aerodynamic-aided accretion physics into LIPAD, a Lagrangian code which can follow the collisional / accretional / dynamical evolution of a protoplanetary system, to investigate the how pebble accretion manifests itself in the larger ...

  8. DEM simulation of pebble flow in HTR-10 core by phenomenological method

    The 10 MW High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTR-10), developed at Tsinghua University, is an important test advanced reactor in the world. The pebble flow is of fundamental significance for the HTR-10. The discrete element method validated by experiments was used to study pebble flow in the HTR-10 core by the phenomenological method. A 1 : 1 scale computational model to the HTR-10 was utilized to simulate the motion of 27000 spheres, including the flows with different frictional coefficients and base angles. It is found that the pebble flow inside the HTR-10 core is uniform. The stagnant region does not exist. The larger the frictional coefficient or the base angle is, the more uniform the pebble flow is. When the frictional coefficient is 0.8, the HTR-10 maintains a normal discharge operation without stagnant pebbles. This work is important to further optimization of HTR design and development. (authors)

  9. Characterization of the thermal conductivity for ceramic pebble beds

    Lo Frano, R.; Aquaro, D.; Scaletti, L.; Olivi, N.

    2015-11-01

    The evaluation of the thermal conductivity of breeder materials is one of the main goals to find the best candidate material for the fusion reactor technology. The aim of this paper is to evaluate experimentally the thermal conductivity of a ceramic material by applying the hot wire method at different temperatures, ranging from 50 to about 800°C. The updated experimental facility, available at the Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering (DICI) of the University of Pisa, used to determine the thermal conductivity of a ceramic material (alumina), will be described along with the measurement acquisition system. Moreover it will be also provided an overview of the current state of art of the ceramic pebble bed breeder thermos-mechanics R&D (e.g. Lithium Orthosilicate (Li4SiO4) and Lithium Metatitanate (Li2TiO3)) focusing on the up-to-date analysis. The methodological approach adopted is articulated in two phase: the first one aimed at the experimental evaluation of thermal conductivity of a ceramic material by means of hot wire method, to be subsequently used in the second phase that is based on the test rig method, through which is measured the thermal conductivity of pebble bed material. In this framework, the experimental procedure and the measured results obtained varying the temperature, are presented and discussed.

  10. Integrated design approach of the pebble bed modular using models

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is the first pebble bed reactor that will be utilised in a high temperature direct Brayton cycle configuration. This implies that there are a number of unique features in the PBMR that extend from the German experience base. One of the challenges in the design of the PBMR is managing the integrated design process between the designers, the physicists and the analysts. This integrated design process is managed through model-based development work. Three-dimensional CAD models are constructed of the components and parts in the reactor. From the CAD models, CFD models, neutronic models, shielding models, FEM models and other thermodynamic models are derived. These models range from very simple models to extremely detailed and complex models. The models are used in legacy software as well as commercial off-the-shelf software. The different models are also used in code-to-code comparisons to verify the results. This paper will briefly discuss the different models and the interaction between the models, showing the iterative design process that is used in the development of the reactor at PBMR. (author)

  11. Dynamics of a small direct cycle pebble bed HTR

    The Dutch market for combined generation of heat and power identifies a unit size of 40 MW thermal for the conceptual design of a nuclear cogeneration plant. The ACACIA system provides 14 MW(e) electricity combined with 17 t/h of high temperature steam (220 deg. C, 10 bar) with a pebble bed high temperature reactor directly coupled with a helium compressor and a helium turbine. To come to quantitative statements about the ACACIA transient behaviour, a calculational coupling between the high temperature reactor core analysis code package Panthermix (Panther-Thermix/Direkt) and the thermal hydraulic code RELAP5 for the energy conversion system has been made. This paper will present the analysis of safety related transients. The usual incident scenarios Loss of Coolant Incident (LOCI) and Loss of Flow Incident (LOFI) have been analysed. Besides, also a search for the real maximum fuel temperature (inside a fuel pebble anywhere in the core) has been made. It appears that the maximum fuel temperatures are not reached during a LOFI or LOCI with a halted mass flow rate, but for situations with a small mass flow rate, 1-0.5%. As such, a LOFI or LOCI does not represent the worst-case scenario in terms of maximal fuel temperature. (author)

  12. Design windows for accelerator driven pebble-bed transmutators

    Nuclear waste transmutation can be achieved by different strategies. In this paper, the studies are focused in the 'Once Through' scenario, consisting in the nuclear waste transmutation until a maximum burnup (BU) is achieved. After transmutation, the fuel elements can be disposed in a Deep Storage Facility (DSF.) The main advantage of this strategy is that only one reprocess step is necessary. The drawback of this strategy consists mainly in the need of a fuel element design capable of withstanding very high burn-ups. It has been demonstrated that pebbles fuel elements in a pebble bed reactor design can withstand 700 MWd/Kg BU. This reactor presents the possibility of attainment different neutron spectrum with different fuel element designs, presents good safety characteristics, and the possibility of replacing the fuel elements easily inside the reactor (necessary for recycling strategies.) The transmutation process can be achieved in two steps. The first one, as a critical reactor, and the second one, as a subcritical assembly driven by an accelerator. In this paper, the optimum spectrum for the 'Once Through' strategy is presented, and some safety characteristics of the subcritical assembly are introduced. (authors)

  13. Pressurizing Behavior on Ingress of Coolant into Pebble Bed of Blanket of Fusion DEMO Reactor

    Solid breeder blankets are being developed as candidate blankets for the Fusion DEMO reactor in Japan. JAEA is performing the development of the water cooled and helium cooled solid breeder blankets. The blanket utilizes ceramic breeder pebbles and multiplier pebbles beds cooled by high pressure water or high pressure helium in the cooling tubes placed in the blanket box structure. In the development of the blanket, it is very important to incorporate the safety technology as well as the performance improvement on tritium production and energy conversion. In the safety design and technology, coolant ingress in the blanket box structure is one of the most important events as the initiators. Especially the thermal hydraulics in the pebble bed in the case of the high pressure coolant ingress is very important to evaluate the pressure propagation and coolant flow behavior. This paper presents the preliminary results of the pressure loss characteristics by the coolant ingress in the pebble bed. Experiments have been performed by using alumina pebble bed (4 litter maximum volume of the pebble bed) and nitrogen gas to simulate the helium coolant ingress into breeder and multiplier pebble beds. Reservoir tank of 10 liter is filled with 1.0 MPa nitrogen. The nitrogen gas is released at the bottom part of the alumina pebble bed whose upper part is open to the atmosphere. The pressure change in the pebble bed is measured to identify the pressure loss. The measured values are compared with the predicted values by Ergun's equation, which is the correlation equation on pressure loss of the flow through porous medium. By the results of the experiments with no constraint on the alumina pebble bed, it was clarified that the measured value agreed in the lower flow rate. However, in the higher flow rate where the pressure loss is high, the measured value is about half of the predicted value. The differences between the measured values and the predicted values will be discussed from

  14. Experiments on studying beryllium - steam interaction, determination of oxidated beryllium emissivity factor

    The report presents results of beryllium emissivity factor measurements within 700-1300 K temperature range. The tests were conducted at Institute of Atomic Energy of the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan to receive experimental data for verification of calculation programs describing an accident involving water coolant discharge into ITER reactor vacuum cavity. (author)

  15. Ionization energies of beryllium in strong magnetic fields

    GUANXiao-xu; ZHANGYue-xia

    2004-01-01

    We have develop an effective frozen core approximation to calculate energy levels and ionization enegies of the beryllium atom in magnetic field strengths up to 2.35 × 105T. Systematic improvement over the Hartree-Fock results for the beryllium low-lying states has been accomplished.

  16. 10 CFR 850.20 - Baseline beryllium inventory.

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Baseline beryllium inventory. 850.20 Section 850.20 Energy... Baseline beryllium inventory. (a) The responsible employer must develop a baseline inventory of the... inventory, the responsible employer must: (1) Review current and historical records; (2) Interview...

  17. Joining of beryllium by braze welding technique: preliminary results

    Banaim, P.; Abramov, E. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel); Zalkind, S.; Eden, S.

    1998-01-01

    Within the framework of some applications, there is a need to join beryllium parts to each other. Gas Tungsten Arc Braze Welds were made in beryllium using 0.3 mm commercially Aluminum (1100) shim preplaced at the joint. The welds exhibited a tendency to form microcracks in the Fusion Zone and Heat Affected Zone. All the microcracks were backfilled with Aluminum. (author)

  18. Fabrication of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles by a freeze drying process

    Lee, Sang-Jin, E-mail: lee@mokpo.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Mokpo National University, Muan 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yi-Hyun [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Min-Woo [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Mokpo National University, Muan 534-729 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles were successfully fabricated by using a freeze drying process. The Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} slurry was prepared using a commercial powder of particle size 0.5–1.5 μm and the pebble pre-form was prepared by dropping the slurry into liquid nitrogen through a syringe needle. The droplets were rapidly frozen, changing their morphology to spherical pebbles. The frozen pebbles were dried at −10 °C in vacuum. To make crack-free pebbles, some glycerin was employed in the slurry, and long drying time and a low vacuum condition were applied in the freeze drying process. In the process, the solid content in the slurry influenced the spheroidicity of the pebble green body. The dried pebbles were sintered at 1200 °C in an air atmosphere. The sintered pebbles showed almost 40% shrinkage. The sintered pebbles revealed a porous microstructure with a uniform pore distribution and the sintered pebbles were crushed under an average load of 50 N in a compressive strength test. In the present study, a freeze drying process for fabrication of spherical Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} pebbles is introduced. The processing parameters, such as solid content in the slurry and the conditions of freeze drying and sintering, are also examined.

  19. Optimization of OTTO Fuel Management in Pebble-Bed Reactors Using Particle Swarm Algorithm

    Pebble-Bed nuclear reactors feature highly flexible in-core fuel management capabilities due to on-line fueling and thermo-mechanical robust fuel design. Fuel pebbles with various fissile and fertile materials can be loaded into the reactor core at different rates. The fuel pebbles may be recirculated in the core several times until reaching their target burnup, or reach their target burnup in single pass through the core (OTTO- Once-Through-Then-Out fueling Scheme). Pebble-bed reactors have relatively efficient neutron economy since they operate with low excess reactivity and hence minimize the use of neutron poisons and control rods. Moreover, the fuel pebble robust design permits high burnup levels (up to 140000 MWD/THM). The flexibility of the fuel management operations allows enhancing fuel utilization. Traditionally fuel cycle design decisions were made using expert opinions and parametric studies. In this work, we have used the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm to optimize fuel utilization of pebble-bed reactors running OTTO fuel management. Optimization was carried out also for cores with Th232 as fertile material. Preliminary calculations were performed for a large core with 2 radial fuel loading zones. Results of the optimal fuel utilization performed for cores with UO2 fuel and cores with (Th- U)O2. Future work will include optimization of cores fuelled with separate seed (U) and blanket (Th) fuel pebbles and with advanced modular core configuration, like the PBMR400

  20. Particle flow of ceramic breeder pebble beds in bi-axial compression experiments

    Pebble beds of Tritium breeding ceramic material are investigated within the framework of developing solid breeder blankets for future nuclear fusion power plants. For the thermo-mechanical characterisation of such pebble beds, bed compression experiments are the standard tools. New bi-axial compression experiments on 20 and 30 mm high pebble beds show pebble flow effects much more pronounced than in previous 10 mm beds. Owing to the greater bed height, conditions are reached where the bed fails in cross direction and unhindered flow of the pebbles occurs. The paper presents measurements for the orthosilicate and metatitanate breeder materials that are envisaged to be used in a solid breeder blanket. The data are compared with calculations made with a Drucker-Prager soil model within the finite-element code ABAQUS, calibrated with data from other experiments. It is investigated empirically whether internal bed friction angles can be determined from pebble beds of the considered heights, which would simplify, and broaden the data base for, the calibration of the Drucker-Prager pebble bed models

  1. METHODS FOR MODELING THE PACKING OF FUEL ELEMENTS IN PEBBLE BED REACTORS

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Joshua J. Cogliati; Jan-Leen Kloosterman

    2005-09-01

    Two methods for the modeling of the packing of pebbles in the pebble bed reactors are presented and compared. The first method is based on random generation of potential centers for the pebbles, followed by rejection of points that are not compatible with the geometric constraint of no (or limited) pebbles overlap. The second method models the actual physical packing process, accounting for the dynamic of pebbles as they are dropped onto the pebble bed and as they settle therein. A simplification in the latter model is the assumption of a starting point with very dilute packing followed by settling. The results from the two models are compared and the properties of the second model and the dependence of its results on many of the modeling parameters are presented. The first model (with no overlap allowed) has been implemented into a code to compute Dancoff factors. The second model will soon be implemented into that same code and will also be used to model flow of pebbles in a reactor and core densification in the simulation of earthquakes. Both methods reproduce experimental values well, with the latter displaying a high level of fidelity.

  2. Preparation and characterization of beryllium doped organic plasma polymer coatings

    We report the formation of beryllium doped plasma polymerized coatings derived from a helical resonator deposition apparatus, using diethylberyllium as the organometaric source. These coatings had an appearance not unlike plain plasma polymer and were relatively stable to ambient exposure. The coatings were characterized by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Coating rates approaching 0.7 μm hr-1 were obtained with a beryllium-to-carbon ratio of 1:1.3. There is also a significant oxygen presence in the coating as well which is attributed to oxidation upon exposure of the coating to air. The XPS data show only one peak for beryllium with the preponderance of the XPS data suggesting that the beryllium exists as BeO. Diethylberyllium was found to be inadequate as a source for beryllium doped plasma polymer, due to thermal decomposition and low vapor recovery rates

  3. Protection of air in premises and environment against beryllium aerosols

    Bitkolov, N.Z.; Vishnevsky, E.P.; Krupkin, A.V. [Research Inst. of Industrial and Marine Medicine, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1998-01-01

    First and foremost, the danger of beryllium aerosols concerns a possibility of their inhalation. The situation is aggravated with high biological activity of the beryllium in a human lung. The small allowable beryllium aerosols` concentration in air poses a rather complex and expensive problem of the pollution prevention and clearing up of air. The delivery and transportation of beryllium aerosols from sites of their formation are defined by the circuit of ventilation, that forms aerodynamics of air flows in premises, and aerodynamic links between premises. The causes of aerosols release in air of premises from hoods, isolated and hermetically sealed vessels can be vibrations, as well as pulses of temperature and pressure. Furthermore, it is possible the redispersion of aerosols from dirty surfaces. The effective protection of air against beryllium aerosols at industrial plants is provided by a complex of hygienic measures: from individual means of breath protection up to collective means of the prevention of air pollution. (J.P.N.)

  4. Polarizabilities of the beryllium clock transition

    The polarizabilities of the three lowest states of the beryllium atom are determined from a large basis configuration interaction calculation. The polarizabilities of the 2s21Se ground state (37.73a03) and the 2s2p 3P0o metastable state (39.04a03) are found to be very similar in size and magnitude. This leads to an anomalously small blackbody radiation shift at 300 K of -0.018(4) Hz for the 2s21Se-2s2p 3P0o clock transition. Magic wavelengths for simultaneous trapping of the ground and metastable states are also computed.

  5. Trial examination of direct pebble fabrication for advanced tritium breeders by the emulsion method

    Hoshino, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: hoshino.tsuyoshi@jaea.go.jp

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The integration of raw material preparation and granulation is proposed as a new direct pebble fabrication process. • The emulsion method granulates gel spheres of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} or SiO{sub 2}. • The gel spheres are calcined and sintered in air. • The crush load of the sintered Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} or Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles obtained is 37.2 or 59.3 N, respectively. - Abstract: Demonstration power plant reactors require advanced tritium breeders with high thermal stability. For the mass production of advanced tritium breeder pebbles, pebble fabrication by the emulsion method is a promising technique. To develop the most efficient pebble fabrication method, a new direct pebble fabrication process utilizing the emulsion method was implemented. A prior pebble fabrication process consisted of the preparation of raw materials followed by granulation. The new process integrates the preparation and granulation of raw materials. The slurry for the emulsion granulation of Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} or Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} as a tritium breeder consists of mixtures of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} or SiO{sub 2} at specific ratios. Subsequently, gel spheres of tritium breeders are fabricated by controlling the relative flow speeds of slurry and oil. The average diameter and crush load of the obtained sintered Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} or Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles were 1.0 or 1.5 mm and 37.2 or 59.3 N, respectively. The trial fabrication results suggest that the new process has the potential to increase the fabrication efficiency of advanced tritium breeder pebbles.

  6. Trial examination of direct pebble fabrication for advanced tritium breeders by the emulsion method

    Highlights: • The integration of raw material preparation and granulation is proposed as a new direct pebble fabrication process. • The emulsion method granulates gel spheres of Li2CO3 and TiO2 or SiO2. • The gel spheres are calcined and sintered in air. • The crush load of the sintered Li2TiO3 or Li4SiO4 pebbles obtained is 37.2 or 59.3 N, respectively. - Abstract: Demonstration power plant reactors require advanced tritium breeders with high thermal stability. For the mass production of advanced tritium breeder pebbles, pebble fabrication by the emulsion method is a promising technique. To develop the most efficient pebble fabrication method, a new direct pebble fabrication process utilizing the emulsion method was implemented. A prior pebble fabrication process consisted of the preparation of raw materials followed by granulation. The new process integrates the preparation and granulation of raw materials. The slurry for the emulsion granulation of Li2TiO3 or Li4SiO4 as a tritium breeder consists of mixtures of Li2CO3 and TiO2 or SiO2 at specific ratios. Subsequently, gel spheres of tritium breeders are fabricated by controlling the relative flow speeds of slurry and oil. The average diameter and crush load of the obtained sintered Li2TiO3 or Li4SiO4 pebbles were 1.0 or 1.5 mm and 37.2 or 59.3 N, respectively. The trial fabrication results suggest that the new process has the potential to increase the fabrication efficiency of advanced tritium breeder pebbles

  7. Preparation and characterization of Li4SiO4 ceramic pebbles by graphite bed method

    Highlights: • Lithium orthosilicate pebbles were fabricated by a new graphite bed process. • Two routes using different raw materials have been conducted in this work. • The fabricated pebbles exhibit a high relative density with uniform microstructure. • This method is short and simple as the pebbles could be fabricated in a continuous process. - Abstract: Lithium-based ceramics have long been recognized as tritium breeding materials in fusion reactor blankets. Lithium orthosilicate (Li4SiO4) is one of these materials and has been recommended by many ITER research teams as the first selection for the solid tritium breeder. In this paper, the fabrication of Li4SiO4 pebbles used as tritium breeder by a graphite bed method was studied for the first time. Ceramic powders and deionized water were mixed and ball milled to obtain homogeneous suspensions. And then the ceramic suspensions were dispersed on spread graphite powder through nozzles. Spherical droplets with highly uniform size were formed by the surface tension of the liquid droplets. The droplets converted into green pebbles after drying. After calcination and sintering, Li4SiO4 pebbles with desired size and shape were prepared. The obtained Li4SiO4 pebbles had narrow size distribution and favorable sphericity. Thermal analysis, phase analysis and microstructure observation of the pebbles were carried out systematically. Properties of the prepared pebbles were also characterized for crushing load strength, density and porosity, etc. The values were found to be conforming to the desired properties for used as solid breeder

  8. Monte Carlo criticality calculation for Pebble-type HTR-PROTEUS core

    These days, pebble-bed and other High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) designs are once again in vogue in connection with hydrogen production. In this study, as a part of establishing Monte Carlo computation system for HTGR core analysis, some criticality calculations for pebble-type HTGR were carried out using MCNP code. Firstly, the pebble-bed cores of HTR-PROTEUS critical facility in Swiss were selected for the benchmark model, and, after the detailed MCNP modeling of the whole facility, criticality calculations were performed. It was also investigated the homogenization effect of TRISO fuel on criticality

  9. Effect of non-uniform porosity distribution on thermalhydraulics in a pebble bed reactor

    In pebble bed reactors, the porosity profile shows strong fluctuations near the wall. These changes in fuel density affect local power density, coolant velocity, and temperature distribution. This paper describes the pebFoam code, capable of calculating pebble bed thermohydraulics including non-uniform porosity distributions for arbitrary geometries, and investigates the changes in velocity, pressure drop, and helium and pebble temperatures when using a nonuniform porosity distribution instead of a uniform distribution. Results show only minor changes in temperature profiles and pressure drop for full power steady state calculations, though the velocity profile shows a clear increase in velocity near the wall. (author)

  10. Uranium deposits in Proterozoic quartz-pebble conglomerates

    This report is the result of an effort to gather together the most important information on uranium deposits in Proterozoic quartz-pebble conglomerates in the United States of America, Canada, Finland, Ghana, South Africa and Australia. The paper discusses the uranium potential (and in some cases also the gold potential in South Africa, Western Australia and Ghana) in terms of ores, sedimentation, mineralization, metamorphism, placers, geologic formations, stratigraphy, petrology, exploration, tectonics and distribution. Geologic history and application of geologic models are also discussed. Glacial outwash and water influx is also mentioned. The uranium deposits in a number of States in the USA are covered. The Witwatersrand placers are discussed in several papers. Refs, figs, tabs

  11. Pebble bed reactor with one-zone core

    The claim deals with measures to differentiate the flow rate and to remove spherical fuel elements in the core of a pebble bed reactor. Hence the vertical rate of the fuel elements in the border region is for example twice as much as in the centre. A central funnel-shaped outlet on the floor of the core container over which a conical body is placed with its peak pointing upwards, or also the forming of several outlets can be used to adjust to a certain exit rate for the fuel elements. The main target of the invention is a radially extensively constant coolant outlet temperature at the outlet of the core which determines the effectiveness of the connected heat exchanger and thus contributes to economy. (orig./PW)

  12. Pebble Bed Reactor: core physics and fuel cycle analysis

    The Pebble Bed Reactor is a gas-cooled, graphite-moderated high-temperature reactor that is continuously fueled with small spherical fuel elements. The projected performance was studied over a broad range of reactor applicability. Calculations were done for a burner on a throwaway cycle, a converter with recycle, a prebreeder and breeder. The thorium fuel cycle was considered using low, medium (denatured), and highly enriched uranium. The base calculations were carried out for electrical energy generation in a 1200 MW/sub e/ plant. A steady-state, continuous-fueling model was developed and one- and two-dimensional calculations were used to characterize performance. Treating a single point in time effects considerable savings in computer time as opposed to following a long reactor history, permitting evaluation of reactor performance over a broad range of design parameters and operating modes

  13. Neutron wave experiment in a graphite pebble-bed system

    The propagation of neutron waves through a Type-AVR graphite pebble-bed is studied. Use of a sinusoidally modulated source of neutrons is equivalent to 'poisoning' a moderator with a 1/v poison. The inverse relaxation length of the neutron wave amplitude and the variation of the phase angle as function of position are dependent upon the frequency of modulation and the neutron diffusion and thermalization parameters of the media in which the waves are being propagated. The diffusion coefficient D0 of a system of graphite spheres is determined to a high accuracy. In the termal energy range a streaming correction of 14,8% is necessary if for calculation the graphite of the spheres is homogenized. (orig.)

  14. 'Once through' cycles in the pebble bed HTR

    In the pebble bed HTR the 'Once Through' cycles achieve a favorable conservation of uranium resources due to their high burnup and due to the relatively low fissile inventory. A detailed study is given for cycles with highly enriched uranium and thorium, 20% enriched uranium and thorium, and for the low (approximately 8%) enriched cycle. The recommended cycle is based on the known THTR fuel element in the Th/U (93%) cycle. The variant with separate Seed elements and Breed elements presents the best pioneer in view of later recycling and thermal breeding. The minimum proliferation risk is achieved in the Th/U (20%) cycle basing on the fuel element type of the AVR, due to the low amount and high denaturization of the disloaded plutonium. (orig.)

  15. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    Peterson, Per [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-02-09

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m3. This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X

  16. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m3. This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X-PREX facility uses novel digital

  17. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORE 4: RANDOM PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2013-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  18. HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORE 4: RANDOM PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO

    John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

    2014-03-01

    In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering

  19. Status of beryllium study for fusion in RF

    The main directions of research activities in the field of beryllium application science and technology carried out in Russia during 2001-2003 have been reviewed. The main results of these investigations have been highlighted. First wall and port-limier. The investigation on the actively cooled components with beryllium cladding is under progress objecting on the clarification of their ultimate thermo cycling capabilities. The study of behavior of bulk beryllium and the boundary region of the contact with the cooling structure under the intensive thermo cycling loading and neutron irradiation have been the object of consideration in particular. The works on the optimization and modification of industrial fabrication processes for commercial scaled production of beryllium tile were also under way. The influence of neutron irradiation. The new experimental data on the nuclear properties of several Russian beryllium grades has been obtained. The samples have been subjected to the high neutron dozes. The influence of low temperature (70-200degree C) neutron irradiation on the thermal conductivity has been examined in particular. The interrelations of the helium inventory and temperature of neutron irradiation with tritium release out of irradiated beryllium samples have been analyzed. The beryllium associated safety questions. The experiments on the modeling of normal working conditions and conditions imitating the plasma disruption events in ITER performance scenario have been continued. The new experimental information on the coefficient of pulverization of beryllium and the accumulation of deuterium in beryllium under the action of proton beam has been collected. The dependence of the reaction rate constant for the beryllium oxidation by the water vapor for different conditions has been analyzed. The compact, porous and powder beryllium samples have been tested at the wide range of temperature, pressure and duration of reaction with water vapor. The calculating

  20. Physical properties of beryllium oxide - Irradiation effects

    This work has been carried out in view of determining several physical properties of hot-pressed beryllium oxide under various conditions and the change of these properties after irradiation. Special attention has been paid on to the measurement of the thermal conductivity coefficient and thermal diffusivity coefficient. Several designs for the measurement of the thermal conductivity coefficient have been achieved. They permit its determination between 50 and 300 deg. C, between 400 and 800 deg. C. Some measurements have been made above 1000 deg. C. In order to measure the thermal diffusivity coefficient, we heat a perfectly flat surface of a sample in such a way that the heat flux is modulated (amplitude and frequency being adjustable). The thermal diffusivity coefficient is deduced from the variations of temperature observed on several spots. Tensile strength; compressive strength; expansion coefficient; sound velocity and crystal parameters have been also measured. Some of the measurements have been carried out after neutron irradiation. Some data have been obtained on the change of the properties of beryllium oxide depending on the integrated neutron flux. (author)

  1. Beryllium containing plasma interactions with ITER materials

    A beryllium-seeded deuterium plasma is used in PISCES-B to investigate mixed-material erosion and redeposition properties of ITER relevant divertor materials. The beryllium containing plasma simulates the erosion of first wall material into the ITER sol plasma and its subsequent flow toward the carbon divertor plates. The experiments are designed to quantify the behavior of plasma created mixed Be/C and Be/W surfaces. Developing an understanding of the mixed material surface behavior is crucial to accurately predicting the tritium accumulation rate within the ITER vacuum vessel. The temporal evolution of the plasma interactions with the various mixed surfaces are examined to better understand the fundamental mechanisms in play at the surface and to allow scaling of these results to the conditions expected in the ITER divertor. A new periodic heat pulse deposition system is also installed on PISCES-B to simulate the transient temperature excursions of surfaces expected to occur in the ITER divertor during ELMs and other off-normal events. These periodically applied heat pulses allow us to study the effects of transient power loading on the formation, stability and tritium content of mixed-material surfaces that are created during the experiments. (author)

  2. Fluorimetric method for determination of Beryllium; Determinazione fluorimetrica del berillio

    Sparacino, N.; Sabbioneda, S. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Saluggia, Vercelli (Italy). Dip. Energia

    1996-10-01

    The old fluorimetric method for the determination of Beryllium, based essentially on the fluorescence of the Beryllium-Morine complex in a strongly alkaline solution, is still competitive and stands the comparison with more modern methods or at least three reasons: in the presence of solid or gaseous samples (powders), the times necessary to finalize an analytic determination are comparable since the stage of the process which lasts the longest is the mineralization of the solid particles containing Beryllium, the cost of a good fluorimeter is by far Inferior to the cost, e. g., of an Emission Spectrophotometer provided with ICP torch and magnets for exploiting the Zeeman effect and of an Atomic absorption Spectrophotometer provided with Graphite furnace; it is possible to determine, fluorimetrically, rather small Beryllium levels (about 30 ng of Beryllium/sample), this potentiality is more than sufficient to guarantee the respect of all the work safety and hygiene rules now in force. The study which is the subject of this publication is designed to the analysis procedure which allows one to reach good results in the determination of Beryllium, chiefly through the control and measurement of the interference effect due to the presence of some metals which might accompany the environmental samples of workshops and laboratories where Beryllium is handled, either at the pure state or in its alloys. The results obtained satisfactorily point out the merits and limits of this analytic procedure.

  3. Flow distribution of pebble bed high temperature gas cooled reactors using Large Eddy Simulation

    The simulation of complex three-dimensional gas flow through the gaps of the spherical fuel elements (fuel pebbles) of Pebble Bed Modulator Reactor is performed. This will help in understanding the highly three-dimensional, complex flow phenomena in pebble bed caused by flow curvature. The flow of this type has distinctive features, which strongly affect the boundary layer behavior. The transition from a laminar to turbulent flow around this curved flow occurs at different Reynolds (Re) numbers. Noncircular curved flows as in the pebble-bed situation need to be investigated. In this study, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is used in modeling the turbulence to overcome the shortcoming of the Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes approach. (author)

  4. Computational and experimental prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors, Part II

    Highlights: • Custom-built high temperature, high pressure tribometer is designed. • Two different wear phenomena at high temperatures are observed. • Experimental wear results for graphite are presented. • The graphite wear dust production in a typical Pebble Bed Reactor is predicted. -- Abstract: This paper is the continuation of Part I, which describes the high temperature and high pressure helium environment wear tests of graphite–graphite in frictional contact. In the present work, it has been attempted to simulate a Pebble Bed Reactor core environment as compared to Part I. The experimental apparatus, which is a custom-designed tribometer, is capable of performing wear tests at PBR relevant higher temperatures and pressures under a helium environment. This environment facilitates prediction of wear mass loss of graphite as dust particulates from the pebble bed. The experimental results of high temperature helium environment are used to anticipate the amount of wear mass produced in a pebble bed nuclear reactor

  5. Who cracked the pebbles in the gravel pit - lithostatic pressure or a bunch of faults?

    Tuitz, Christoph; Exner, Ulrike; Grasemann, Bernhard; Preh, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    The occurrence of radially, brittle fractured pebbles from unconsolidated sediments were investigated in a gravel pit south of St. Margarethen (Burgenland, Austria). The outcrop is located in the Neogene Eisenstadt-Sopron Basin, which is a sub-basin on the SE border of the Vienna Basin. The sediments, which were deposited during the Sarmatian and Pannonian (12.7-7.2 Ma), represent a succession of deltaic gravels with intercalations of shallow-marine calcareous sands. Extensional tectonics in these sediments resulted in the generation of conjugate sets of predominately WNW- and subordinate ESE-dipping normal faults (shear deformation bands). These faults were primarily localized in meter-thick gravel layers and, with increasing displacement, eventually cross-cut other lithologies. The gravel layers contain a significant number of cracked pebbles. Detailed structural mapping of the distribution of cracked pebbles revealed their preferential occurrence in the vicinity of the normal faults and, in these, within zones of roughly uniform-sized pebbles. The findings indicated a strong relation to the mechanics of faulting within the sediment. To find the controlling factors for the localization of pebble fracturing, the grain-size distribution and shape and the number of point contacts of the pebbles were statistically measured. Furthermore, on the basis of point load tests, a breakage criterion was statistically defined which characterizes the breakage behaviour of the pebbles. The results were then used as input parameters for numerical modelling. The Discrete Element Method was applied to simulate the effect of overburden on a certain volume of particles (i.e. the pebbles). In numerical uniaxial compression simulations, the magnitude and the distribution of contact forces between the particles were monitored during compressive loading and repetitively compared with the breakage criterion. If a particle in the simulation reached the criterion, it was automatically

  6. Modularity of the MIT Pebble Bed Reactor for use by the commercial power industry

    Hanlon-Hyssong, Jaime E.

    2008-01-01

    CIVINS The Modular Pebble Bed Reactor is a small high temperature helium cooled reactor that is being considered for both electric power and hydrogen production. Pebble bed reactors are being developed in South Africa, China and the US. To make smaller 120 Mwe reactors economically competitive with larger 1500 Mwe traditional light water reactors changes in the way these plants are built are needed. Economies of production need to be sufficiently large to compete with economies of sca...

  7. STUDI PEMODELAN DAN PERHITUNGAN TRANSPORT MONTE CARLO DALAM TERAS HTR PEBBLE BED

    Zuhair .

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Konsep sistem energi VHTR baik yang berbahan bakar pebble (VHTR pebble bed maupun blok prismatik (VHTR prismatik menarik perhatian fisikawan reaktor nuklir. Salah satu kelebihan teknologi bahan bakar bola adalah menawarkan terobosan teknologi pengisian bahan bakar tanpa harus menghentikan produksi listrik. Selain itu, partikel bahan bakar pebble dengan kernel uranium oksida (UO2 atau uranium oksikarbida (UCO yang dibalut TRISO dan pelapisan silikon karbida (SiC dianggap sebagai opsi utama dengan pertimbangan performa tinggi pada burn-up bahan bakar dan temperatur tinggi. Makalah ini mendiskusikan pemodelan dan perhitungan transport Monte Carlo dalam teras HTR pebble bed. HTR pebble bed adalah reaktor berpendingin gas temperatur tinggi dan bermoderator grafit dengan kemampuan kogenerasi. Perhitungan dikerjakan dengan program MCNP5 pada temperatur 1200 K. Pustaka data nuklir energi kontinu ENDF/B-V dan ENDF/B-VI dimanfaatkan untuk melengkapi analisis. Hasil perhitungan secara keseluruhan menunjukkan konsistensi dengan nilai keff yang hampir sama untuk pustaka data nuklir yang digunakan. Pustaka ENDF/B-VI (66c selalu memproduksi keff lebih besar dibandingkan ENDF/B-V (50c maupun ENDF/B-VI (60c dengan bias kurang dari 0,25%. Kisi BCC memprediksi keff hampir selalu lebih kecil daripada kisi lainnya, khususnya FCC. Nilai keff kisi BCC lebih dekat dengan kisi FCC dengan bias kurang dari 0,19% sedangkan dengan kisi SH bias perhitungannya kurang dari 0,22%. Fraksi packing yang sedikit berbeda (BCC= 61%, SH= 60,459% tidak membuat bias perhitungan menjadi berbeda jauh. Estimasi keff ketiga model kisi menyimpulkan bahwa model BCC lebih bisa diadopsi dalam perhitungan HTR pebble bed dibandingkan model FCC dan SH. Verifikasi hasil estimasi ini perlu dilakukan dengan simulasi Monte Carlo atau bahkan program deterministik lainnya guna optimisasi perhitungan teras reaktor temperatur tinggi.   Kata-kunci: kernel, TRISO, bahan bakar pebble, HTR pebble bed

  8. Prototype studies on the nondestructive online burnup determination for the modular pebble bed reactors

    Highlights: • Prototype study of online burnup measurement for HTR proves its feasibility. • Calibration and its correction of burnup assay device is discussed and verified. • Analysis of simulated gamma spectra shows good performance of spectra-unfolding method. - Abstract: The online fuel pebble burnup determination in future modular pebble bed reactor is implemented by measuring nondestructively the activity of the monitoring nuclide Cs-137 with HPGe detector on a pebble-by-pebble basis. Based on a full size prototype the feasibility is investigated. The prototype was first tested by using double sources to show that a precision of 2.8% (1σ) can be achieved in the determination of the Cs-137 net counting rate. Then, the relationship between the Cs-137 activity and the net counting rate recorded in the HPGe detector is calibrated with a standard Cs-137 source contained in the center of a graphite sphere with the same dimension as a real fuel pebble. Because the self attenuation of the calibration source differs with a fuel pebble, a correction factor of 1.07 ± 0.02 (p = 0.95) to the calibration is derived by using the efficiency transfer method. Last, by analyzing the spectra generated with KORIGEN software followed by Monte Carlo simulation, it is predicted that the relative standard deviation of the Cs-137 net counting rate can be still controlled below 3.5% despite of the presence of all the interfering peaks. The results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing HPGe gamma spectrometry in the online determination of the pebble burnup in future modular pebble bed reactors

  9. Experimental studies on heat transfer and pressure drop in pebble bed test facility

    Indian program for development of high temperature reactor and its utilization to supply process heat aimed to develop alternate fuel carrier to substitute petroleum based transport fuel, which has very small reserves in India and results in large import bills. Hydrogen is an attractive energy carrier for transport applications. It can be produced by splitting water which requires either electricity or process heat at high temperatures or both depending upon the process selected. BARC is carrying out design of a 600 MWth reactor capable of supplying process heat at around 1000 °C as required for hydrogen production. For this reactor various design options with respect to fuel configurations, such as prismatic bed and pebble bed were considered for thermal hydraulics analysis. Coolant options such as molten lead and molten salt were analyzed. Studies carried out indicate selection of pebble bed reactor core with molten salt as coolant. Thermal-hydraulic studies are required for pebble bed reactor. With this in view, a pebble bed test facility has been setup to study the heat transfer and pressure drop in pebble bed. Water is used as a working medium for the facility. The paper deals with the description of the pebble bed test facility and the experimental results of heat transfer and pressure drop. It also deals with the assessment of correlations for heat transfer and pressure drop in pebble bed geometry. Pressure drop experiments in the pebble bed test facility have been performed for Raynolds number ranges from 3000-12000. Various pressure drop correlations have been compared with the experimental data. It has been found that that the correlation given by Leva et. al. matches well with the experimental data. Various heat transfer correlations have also been compared. Heat transfer experiments are nearing completion

  10. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade

  11. Development of Beryllium Vacuum Chamber Technology for the LHC

    Veness, R; Dorn, C

    2011-01-01

    Beryllium is the material of choice for the beam vacuum chambers around collision points in particle colliders due to a combination of transparency to particles, high specific stiffness and compatibility with ultra-high vacuum. New requirements for these chambers in the LHC experiments have driven the development of new methods for the manufacture of beryllium chambers. This paper reviews the requirements for experimental vacuum chambers. It describes the new beryllium technology adopted for the LHC and experience gained in the manufacture and installation.

  12. Analysis of surface contaminants on beryllium and aluminum windows

    An effort has been made to document the types of contamination which form on beryllium windows surfaces due to interaction with a synchrotron radiation beam. Beryllium windows contaminated in a variety of ways (exposure to water and air) exhibited surface powders, gels, crystals and liquid droplets. These contaminants were analyzed by electron diffraction, electron energy loss spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and wet chemical methods. Materials found on window surfaces include beryllium oxide, amorphous carbon, cuprous oxide, metallic copper and nitric acid. Aluminum window surface contaminants were also examined. (orig.)

  13. Beryllium Health and Safety Committee Data Reporting Task Force

    MacQueen, D H

    2007-02-21

    On December 8, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) published Title 10 CFR 850 (hereafter referred to as the Rule) to establish a chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP) to: {sm_bullet} reduce the number of workers currently exposed to beryllium in the course of their work at DOE facilities managed by DOE or its contractors, {sm_bullet} minimize the levels of, and potential for, expos exposure to beryllium, and {sm_bullet} establish medical surveillance requirements to ensure early detection of the disease.

  14. Cosmis Lithium-Beryllium-Boron Story

    Vangioni-Flam, E.; Cassé, M.

    Light element nucleosynthesis is an important chapter of nuclear astrophysics. Specifically, the rare and fragile light nuclei Lithium, Beryllium and Boron (LiBeB) are not generated in the normal course of stellar nucleosynthesis (except Lithium-7) and are, in fact, destroyed in stellar interiors. This characteristic is reflected in the low abundance of these simple species. Up to recently, the most plausible interpretation was that galactic cosmic rays (GCR) interact with interstellar CNO to form LiBeB. Other origins have been also identified, primordial and stellar (Lithium-7) and supernova neutrino spallation (Lithium-7 and Boron-11). In contrast, Beryllium-9, Boron-10 and Lithium-6 are pure spallative products. This last isotope presents a special interest since the Lithium-7/Lithium-6 ratio has been measured in a few halo stars offering a new constraint on the early galactic evolution. However, in the nineties, new observations prompted astrophysicists to reassess the question. Optical measurements of the beryllium and boron abundances in halo stars have been achieved by the 10 meters KECK telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope. These observations indicate a quasi linear correlation between Be and B vs Fe, at least at low metallicity, unexpected on the basis of GCR scenario, predicting a quadratic relationship. As a consequence, the origin and the evolution of the LiBeB nuclei has been revisited. This linearity implies the acceleration of C and O nuclei freshly synthesized and their fragmentation on the the interstellar Hydrogen and Helium. Wolf-Rayet stars and supernovae via the shock waves induced, are the best candidates to the acceleration of their own material enriched into C and O; so LiBeB is produced independently of the Interstellar Medium chemical composition. Moreover, neutrinos emitted by the newly born neutron stars interacting with the C layer of the supernova could produce specifically Lithium-7 and Boron-11. This process is supported by the

  15. An AzTEC 1.1 mm survey of the GOODS-N field -- II. Multi-wavelength identifications and redshift distribution

    Chapin, E L; Scott, D; Aretxaga, I; Austermann, J E; Chary, R-R; Coppin, K; Halpern, M; Hughes, D H; Lowenthal, J D; Morrison, G E; Perera, T A; Scott, K S; Wilson, G W; Yun, M S

    2009-01-01

    We present results from a multi-wavelength study of 29 sources (false detection probabilities <5%) from a survey of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North field at 1.1mm using the AzTEC camera. Comparing with existing 850um SCUBA studies in the field, we examine differences in the source populations selected at the two wavelengths. The AzTEC observations uniformly cover the entire survey field to a 1-sigma depth of ~1mJy. Searching deep 1.4GHz VLA, and Spitzer 3--24um catalogues, we identify robust counterparts for 21 1.1mm sources, and tentative associations for the remaining objects. The redshift distribution of AzTEC sources is inferred from available spectroscopic and photometric redshifts. We find a median redshift of z=2.7, somewhat higher than z=2.0 for 850um-selected sources in the same field, and our lowest redshift identification lies at a spectroscopic redshift z=1.1460. We measure the 850um to 1.1mm colour of our sources and do not find evidence for `850um dropouts', which can be exp...

  16. An AzTEC 1.1 mm Survey of the GOODS-N Field I: Maps, Catalogue, and Source Statistics

    Perera, T A; Austermann, J E; Scott, K S; Wilson, G W; Halpern, M; Pope, A; Scott, D; Yun, M S; Lowenthal, J D; Morrison, G; Aretxaga, I; Bock, J J; Coppin, K; Crowe, M; Frey, L; Hughes, D H; Kang, Y; Kim, S; Mauskopf, P D

    2008-01-01

    We have conducted a deep and uniform 1.1 mm survey of the GOODS-N field with AzTEC on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Here we present the first results from this survey including maps, the source catalogue, and 1.1 mm number-counts. The results presented here were obtained from a 245 sq-arcmin region with near uniform coverage to a depth of 0.96-1.16 mJy/beam. Our robust catalogue contains 28 source candidates detected with S/N >= 3.75, only 1-2 of which are expected to be spurious detections. Of these source candidates, 8 are also detected by SCUBA at 850 um in regions where there is good overlap between the two surveys. The major advantage of our survey over that with SCUBA is the uniformity of coverage. We calculate number counts using two different techniques: the first using a frequentist parameter estimation, and the second using a Bayesian method. The two sets of results are in good agreement. We find that the 1.1 mm differential number counts are well described in the 2-6 mJy range by the fu...

  17. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic of pebble bed blanket on hybrid reactor

    This paper gives thermal-hydraulic studies of pebble bed blanket on Hybrid Reactor. The concept of whole pebble bed blanket and the cooling methods are presented. The thermal-hydraulic characteristics of pebble bed are summarized. The theoretical model and code for solving heat transfer and flowing are presented. By using this code the calculation and analysis of thermal hydraulic of pebble bed Blanket of Hybrid Reactor are also given. In order to improve the flexibility, safety and economy, the authors select pebble beds not only to breed Tritium, but also to breed fission material and to multiply neutron. 5 MPa Helium is used as coolant and 0.05 MPa-0.1 MPa Helium is used as Purge gas. The heat transfer mechanisms of pebble bed are very complicated which include conduction, convection and radiation. In order to study the thermal-hydraulic of the bed, the authors just simply consider it as homogeneous and continuous binary phase medium as that used in the porous medium at the condition that the size of the bed is much greater than that of the balls. The coolant or the purge gas flowing through the bed is just considered existing a cooling source in the bed. It also significantly influences the effective conductivity's of the bed. Porous fraction, the main factor of the bed depends on the geometry position and parameters. From this model, one can obtain the thermal-hydraulic governing equations of the bed

  18. Thermal-hydraulics numerical analyses of Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor hot channel

    Background: The thermal hydraulics behavior of the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) hot channel was studied. Purpose: We aim to analyze the thermal-hydraulics behavior of the PB-AHTR, such as pressure drop, temperature distribution of coolant and pebble bed as well as thermal removal capacity in the condition of loss of partial coolant. Methods: We used a modified FLUENT code which was coupled with a local non-equilibrium porous media model by introducing a User Defined Scalar (UDS) in the calculation domain of the reactor core and subjoining different resistance terms (Ergun and KTA) to calculate the temperature of coolant, solid phase of pebble bed and pebble center in the core. Results: Computational results showed that the resistance factor has great influence on pressure drop and velocity distribution, but less impact on the temperature of coolant, solid phase of pebble bed and pebble center. We also confirmed the heat removal capacity of the PB-AHTR in the condition of nominal and loss of partial coolant conditions. Conclusion: The numerical analyses results can provide a useful proposal to optimize the design of PB-AHTR. (authors)

  19. Deep 1.1mm-wavelength imaging of the GOODS-S field by AzTEC/ASTE - I. Source catalogue and number counts

    Scott, K. S.; Yun, M. S.; Wilson, G. W.; Austermann, J. E.; Aguilar, E.; Aretxaga, I.; Ezawa, H.; Ferrusca, D.; Hatsukade, B.; Hughes, D. H.; Iono, D.; Giavalisco, M.; Kawabe, R.; Kohno, K.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Oshima, T.; Perera, T. A.; Rand, J.; Tamura, Y.; Tosaki, T.; Velazquez, M.; Williams, C. C.; Zeballos, M.

    2010-07-01

    We present the first results from a confusion-limited map of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) taken with the AzTEC camera on the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment. We imaged a field to a 1σ depth of 0.48-0.73 mJybeam-1, making this one of the deepest blank-field surveys at mm-wavelengths ever achieved. Although by traditional standards our GOODS-S map is extremely confused due to a sea of faint underlying sources, we demonstrate through simulations that our source identification and number counts analyses are robust, and the techniques discussed in this paper are relevant for other deeply confused surveys. We find a total of 41 dusty starburst galaxies with signal-to-noise ratios S/N >= 3. 5 within this uniformly covered region, where only two are expected to be false detections, and an additional seven robust source candidates located in the noisier (1σ ~ 1 mJybeam-1) outer region of the map. We derive the 1.1 mm number counts from this field using two different methods: a fluctuation or ``P(d)'' analysis and a semi-Bayesian technique and find that both methods give consistent results. Our data are well fit by a Schechter function model with . Given the depth of this survey, we put the first tight constraints on the 1.1 mm number counts at S1.1mm = 0.5 mJy, and we find evidence that the faint end of the number counts at from various SCUBA surveys towards lensing clusters are biased high. In contrast to the 870μm survey of this field with the LABOCA camera, we find no apparent underdensity of sources compared to previous surveys at 1.1mm the estimates of the number counts of SMGs at flux densities >1mJy determined here are consistent with those measured from the AzTEC/SHADES survey. Additionally, we find a significant number of SMGs not identified in the LABOCA catalogue. We find that in contrast to observations at λ ~ 3 dust-obscured galaxies that are unaccounted for at these shorter wavelengths potentially contribute to a

  20. Stellar abundances of beryllium and CUBES

    Smiljanic, R

    2014-01-01

    Stellar abundances of beryllium are useful in different areas of astrophysics, including studies of the Galactic chemical evolution, of stellar evolution, and of the formation of globular clusters. Determining Be abundances in stars is, however, a challenging endeavor. The two Be II resonance lines useful for abundance analyses are in the near UV, a region strongly affected by atmospheric extinction. CUBES is a new spectrograph planned for the VLT that will be more sensitive than current instruments in the near UV spectral region. It will allow the observation of fainter stars, expanding the number of targets where Be abundances can be determined. Here, a brief review of stellar abundances of Be is presented together with a discussion of science cases for CUBES. In particular, preliminary simulations of CUBES spectra are presented, highlighting its possible impact in investigations of Be abundances of extremely metal-poor stars and of stars in globular clusters.

  1. Beryllium reflector elements for PARR-1

    The LEU fuel of PARR-1 was designed for a discharge burnup of 35% of initial /sup 235/U loading. Recently some of the fuel elements have been discharged from the PARR-1 core after attaining the burnup closed to the design value. These fuel elements were discharged due to diminished excess reactivity although they were physically intact. After satisfactory performance of these fuel elements there has been a desire to explore the possibility of enhancing the discharge burnup by boosting up the core reactivity. Use of better reflector elements is one of the methods to obtain this goal. In this report properties of various reflector elements have been compared and it is found that use of Beryllium metal reflector elements may be a promising choice for this purpose. (author)

  2. Investigation of the ion beryllium surface interaction

    Guseva, M.I.; Birukov, A.Yu.; Gureev, V.M. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The self -sputtering yield of the Be was measured. The energy dependence of the Be self-sputtering yield agrees well with that calculated by W. Eckstein et. al. Below 770 K the self-sputtering yield is temperature independent; at T{sub irr}.> 870 K it increases sharply. Hot-pressed samples at 370 K were implanted with monoenergetic 5 keV hydrogen ions and with a stationary plasma (flux power {approximately} 5 MW/m{sup 2}). The investigation of hydrogen behavior in beryllium shows that at low doses hydrogen is solved, but at doses {ge} 5x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} the bubbles and channels are formed. It results in hydrogen profile shift to the surface and decrease of its concentration. The sputtering results in further concentration decrease at doses > 10{sup 25}m{sup -2}.

  3. Advances in beryllium powder consolidation simulations

    A fuzzy logic based multiobjective genetic algorithm (GA) is introduced and the algorithm is used to optimize micromechanical densification modeling parameters for warm isopressed beryllium powder, HIPed copper powder and CIPed/sintered and HIPed tantalum powder. In addition to optimizing the main model parameters using the experimental data points as objective functions, the GA provides a quantitative measure of the sensitivity of the model to each parameter, estimates the mean particle size of the powder, and determines the smoothing factors for the transition between stage 1 and stage 2 densification. While the GA does not provide a sensitivity analysis in the strictest sense, and is highly stochastic in nature, this method is reliable and reproducible in optimizing parameters given any size data set and determining the impact on the model of slight variations in each parameter

  4. Geochemistry of beryllium in Bulgarian coals

    Eskenazy, Greta M. [Geology Department, University of Sofia ' St. Kl. Ohridski' , Tzar Osvoboditel 15, Sofia 1504 (Bulgaria)

    2006-04-03

    The beryllium content of about 3000 samples (coal, coaly shales, partings, coal lithotypes, and isolated coalified woods) from 16 Bulgarian coal deposits was determined by atomic emission spectrography. Mean Be concentrations in coal show great variability: from 0.9 to 35 ppm for the deposits studied. There was no clear-cut relationship between Be content and rank. The following mean and confidence interval Be values were measured: lignites, 2.6+/-0.8 ppm; sub-bituminous coals, 8.2+/-3.3 ppm; bituminous coals, 3.0+/-1.2 ppm; and anthracites, 19+/-9.0 ppm. The Be contents in coal and coaly shales for all deposits correlated positively suggesting a common source of the element. Many samples of the coal lithotypes vitrain and xylain proved to be richer in Be than the hosting whole coal samples as compared on ash basis. Up to tenfold increase in Be levels was routinely recorded in fusain. The ash of all isolated coalified woods was found to contain 1.1 to 50 times higher Be content relative to its global median value for coal inclusions. Indirect evidence shows that Be occurs in both organic and inorganic forms. Beryllium is predominantly organically bound in deposits with enhanced Be content, whereas the inorganic form prevails in deposits whose Be concentration approximates Clarke values. The enrichment in Be exceeding the coal Clarke value 2.4 to 14.5 times in some of the Bulgarian deposits is attributed to subsynchronous at the time of coal deposition hydrothermal and volcanic activity. (author)

  5. Electron microscope study of irradiated beryllium oxide

    The beryllium oxide is studied first by fractography, before and after irradiation, using sintered samples. The fractures are examined under different aspects. The higher density sintered samples, with transgranular fractures are the most interesting for a microscopic study. It is possible to mark the difference between the 'pores' left by the sintering process and the 'bubbles' of gases that can be produced by former thermal treatments. After irradiation, the grain boundaries are very much weakened. By annealing, it is possible to observe the evolution of the gases produced by the reaction (n, 2n) and (n. α) and gathered on the grain boundaries. The irradiated beryllium oxide is afterwards studied by transmission. For that, a simple method has been used: little chips of the crushed material are examined. Clusters of point defects produced by neutrons are thus detected in crystals irradiated at the three following doses: 6 x 1019, 9 x 1019 and 2 x 1020 nf cm-2 at a temperature below 100 deg. C. For the irradiation at 6 x 1019 nf cm-2, the defects are merely visible, but at 2 x l020 nf cm-2 the crystals an crowded with clusters and the Kikuchi lines have disappeared from the micro-diffraction diagrams. The evolution of the clusters into dislocation loops is studied by a series of annealings. The activation energy (0,37 eV) calculated from the annealing curves suggests that it must be interstitials that condense into dislocation loops. Samples irradiated at high temperatures (650, 900 and 1100 deg. C) are also studied. In those specimens the size of the loops is not the same as the equilibrium size obtained after out of pile annealing at the same temperature. Those former loops are more specifically studied and their Burgers vector is determined by micro-diffraction. (author)

  6. Age hardening in beryllium-aluminum-silver alloys

    Three different alloys of beryllium-aluminum-silver were processed to powder by centrifugal atomization in a helium atmosphere. Alloy compositions were, by weight percent, Be-47.5Al-2.5Ag, Be-47Al-3Ag, and Be-46Al-4Ag. Due to the low solubility of both aluminum and silver in beryllium, the silver was concentrated in the aluminum phase, which separates from the beryllium in the liquid phase. A fine, continuous composite beryllium-aluminum microstructure was formed, which did not significantly change after hot isostatic pressing. Samples of hot isostatically pressed material were solution treated at 550 C for 1 h, followed by a water quench. Aging temperatures were 150, 175, 200, and 225 C for times ranging from half an hour to 65 h. Results indicate that peak hardness was reached in 36--40 h at 175 C and 12--16 h at 200 C aging temperature, relatively independent of alloy composition

  7. Design alternatives for cryogenic beryllium windows in an ICF cryostat

    We propose three backup design options for the cryogenic beryllium windows in a cryostat. The first, a beryllium flange option, reduces peak tensile stresses to 1/3 of that in the original design. The second, a fiberglass flange option, reduces peak tensile stresses to 1/2 of that in the original design and is also low cost. A third option, replacing the beryllium windows with spherical Mylar caps, would require a development program. Even though Mylar has been used previously at cryogenic temperature, this option is still considered unreliable. The near-zero ductility of beryllium at cryogenic temperature makes the reduction of peak tensile stresses particularly desirable. The orginal window design did function satisfactorily and the backup options were not needed. However, these options remain open for possible incorporation in future cryostat designs

  8. New facility for post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi [Oarai Research Establishment, Ibaraki-Ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium is expected as a neutron multiplier and plasma facing materials in the fusion reactor, and the neutron irradiation data on properties of beryllium up to 800{degrees}C need for the engineering design. The acquisition of data on the tritium behavior, swelling, thermal and mechanical properties are first priority in ITER design. Facility for the post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium was constructed in the hot laboratory of Japan Materials Testing Reactor to get the engineering design data mentioned above. This facility consist of the four glove boxes, dry air supplier, tritium monitoring and removal system, storage box of neutron irradiated samples. Beryllium handling are restricted by the amount of tritium;7.4 GBq/day and {sup 60}Co;7.4 MBq/day.

  9. Development of Biomarkers for Chronic Beryllium Disease in Mice

    Gordon, Terry

    2013-01-25

    Beryllium is a strategic metal, indispensable for national defense programs in aerospace, telecommunications, electronics, and weaponry. Exposure to beryllium is an extensively documented occupational hazard that causes irreversible, debilitating granulomatous lung disease in as much as 3 - 5% of exposed workers. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships has been severely limited by a general lack of a sufficient CBD animal model. We have now developed and tested an animal model which can be used for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new diagnostic and treatment paradigms. We have created 3 strains of transgenic mice in which the human antigen-presenting moiety, HLA-DP, was inserted into the mouse genome. Each mouse strain contains HLA-DPB1 alleles that confer different magnitude of risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD): HLA-DPB1*0401 (odds ratio = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (odds ratio = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (odds ratio = 240). Our preliminary work has demonstrated that the *1701 allele, as predicted by human studies, results in the greatest degree of sensitization in a mouse ear swelling test. We have also completed dose-response experiments examining beryllium-induced lung granulomas and identified susceptible and resistant inbred strains of mice (without the human transgenes) as well as quantitative trait loci that may contain gene(s) that modify the immune response to beryllium. In this grant application, we propose to use the transgenic and normal inbred strains of mice to identify biomarkers for the progression of beryllium sensitization and CBD. To achieve this goal, we propose to compare the sensitivity and accuracy of the lymphocyte proliferation test (blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) with the ELISPOT test in the three HLA-DP transgenic mice strains throughout a 6 month treatment with beryllium particles. Because of the availability of high-throughput proteomics, we will also identify

  10. Characterisation of thermal radiation in the near-wall region of a packed pebble bed / Maritza de Beer

    De Beer, Maritza

    2014-01-01

    The heat transfer phenomena in the near-wall region of a randomly packed pebble bed are important in the design of a Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR), especially when considering the safety case during accident conditions. At higher temperatures the contribution of the radiation heat transfer component to the overall heat transfer in a PBR increases significantly. The wall effect present in the near-wall region of a packed pebble bed affects the heat transfer in this region. Various correlations e...

  11. Beryllium nitride thin film grown by reactive laser ablation

    G. Soto; Diaz, J.A.; Machorro, R.; Reyes-Serrato, A.; de la Cruz, W.

    2001-01-01

    Beryllium nitride thin films were grown on silicon substrates by laser ablating a beryllium foil in molecular nitrogen ambient. The composition and chemical state were determined with Auger (AES), X-Ray photoelectron (XPS) and energy loss (EELS) spectroscopies. A low absorption coefficient in the visible region, and an optical bandgap of 3.8 eV, determined by reflectance ellipsometry, were obtained for films grown at nitrogen pressures higher than 25 mTorr. The results show that the reaction ...

  12. Beryllium foils for windows in counter of nuclear radiation

    Based on the optimization of the main structural characteristics (grain structure, texture, dislocation substructure) are defined modes of deformation and heat treatment of beryllium foils (purity > 99.95%), providing their excellent mechanical properties and optimized modes of deformation and heat treatment. Analyzed various technological methods rolling foils to their rational use for the practical implementation of the results of the study. It is shown that the strength and plastic properties of the foils beryllium higher than that of similar foils foreign manufacture

  13. The beryllium production at Ulba metallurgical plant (Ust-Kamenogrsk, Kazakhstan)

    Dvinskykh, E.M.; Savchuk, V.V.; Tuzov, Y.V. [Ulba Metallurgical Plant (Zavod), Ust-Kamenogorsk, Abay prospect 102 (Kazakhstan)

    1998-01-01

    The Report includes data on beryllium production of Ulba metallurgical plant, located in Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan). Beryllium production is showed to have extended technological opportunities in manufacturing semi-products (beryllium ingots, master alloys, metallic beryllium powders, beryllium oxide) and in production of structural beryllium and its parts. Ulba metallurgical plant owns a unique technology of beryllium vacuum distillation, which allows to produce reactor grades of beryllium with a low content of metallic impurities. At present Ulba plant does not depend on raw materials suppliers. The quantity of stored raw materials and semi-products will allow to provide a 25-years work of beryllium production at a full capacity. The plant has a satisfactory experience in solving ecological problems, which could be useful in ITER program. (author)

  14. Beryllium pressure vessels for creep tests in magnetic fusion energy

    Beryllium has interesting applications in magnetic fusion experimental machines and future power-producing fusion reactors. Chief among the properties of beryllium that make these applications possible is its ability to act as a neutron multiplier, thereby increasing the tritium breeding ability of energy conversion blankets. Another property, the behavior of beryllium in a 14-MeV neutron environment, has not been fully investigated, nor has the creep behavior of beryllium been studied in an energetic neutron flux at thermodynamically interesting temperatures. This small beryllium pressure vessel could be charged with gas to test pressures around 3, 000 psi to produce stress in the metal of 15,000 to 20,000 psi. Such stress levels are typical of those that might be reached in fusion blanket applications of beryllium. After contacting R. Powell at HEDL about including some of the pressure vessels in future test programs, we sent one sample pressure vessel with a pressurizing tube attached (Fig. 1) for burst tests so the quality of the diffusion bond joints could be evaluated. The gas used was helium. Unfortunately, budget restrictions did not permit us to proceed in the creep test program. The purpose of this engineering note is to document the lessons learned to date, including photographs of the test pressure vessel that show the tooling necessary to satisfactorily produce the diffusion bonds. This document can serve as a starting point for those engineers who resume this task when funds become available

  15. Impurities effect on the swelling of neutron irradiated beryllium

    Donne, M.D.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F. [Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    An important factor controlling the swelling behaviour of fast neutron irradiated beryllium is the impurity content which can strongly affect both the surface tension and the creep strength of this material. Being the volume swelling of the old beryllium (early sixties) systematically higher than that of the more modem one (end of the seventies), a sensitivity analysis with the aid of the computer code ANFIBE (ANalysis of Fusion Irradiated BEryllium) to investigate the effect of these material properties on the swelling behaviour of neutron irradiated beryllium has been performed. Two sets of experimental data have been selected: the first one named Western refers to quite recently produced Western beryllium, whilst the second one, named Russian refers to relatively old (early sixties) Russian beryllium containing a higher impurity rate than the Western one. The results obtained with the ANFIBE Code were assessed by comparison with experimental data and the used material properties were compared with the data available in the literature. Good agreement between calculated and measured values has been found.

  16. Rapid growth of gas-giant cores by pebble accretion

    Lambrechts, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    The observed lifetimes of gaseous protoplanetary discs place strong constraints on gas and ice giant formation in the core accretion scenario. The approximately 10-Earth-mass solid core responsible for the attraction of the gaseous envelope has to form before gas dissipation in the protoplanetary disc is completed within 1-10 million years. Building up the core by collisions between km-sized planetesimals fails to meet this time-scale constraint, especially at wide stellar separations. Nonetheless, gas-giant planets are detected by direct imaging at wide orbital distances. In this paper, we numerically study the growth of cores by the accretion of cm-sized pebbles loosely coupled to the gas. We measure the accretion rate onto seed masses ranging from a large planetesimal to a fully grown 10-Earth-mass core and test different particle sizes. The numerical results are in good agreement with our analytic expressions, indicating the existence of two accretion regimes, one set by the azimuthal and radial particle ...

  17. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas, Jr.

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids---flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF)---from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate in a high-temperature low-pressure design space that has beneficial safety and economic implications. In 2012, UC Berkeley was charged with developing a pre-conceptual design of a commercial prototype FHR---the Pebble Bed- Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)---as part of the Nuclear Energy University Programs' (NEUP) integrated research project. The Mark 1 design of the PB-FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR) is 236 MWt flibe cooled pebble bed nuclear heat source that drives an open-air Brayton combine-cycle power conversion system. The PB-FHR's pebble bed consists of a 19.8% enriched uranium fuel core surrounded by an inert graphite pebble reflector that shields the outer solid graphite reflector, core barrel and reactor vessel. The fuel reaches an average burnup of 178000 MWt-d/MT. The Mk1 PB-FHR exhibits strong negative temperature reactivity feedback from the fuel, graphite moderator and the flibe coolant but a small positive temperature reactivity feedback of the inner reflector and from the outer graphite pebble reflector. A novel neutronics and depletion methodology---the multiple burnup state methodology was developed for an accurate and efficient search for the equilibrium composition of an arbitrary continuously refueled pebble bed reactor core. The Burnup Equilibrium Analysis Utility (BEAU) computer program was developed to implement this methodology. BEAU was successfully benchmarked against published results generated with existing equilibrium depletion codes VSOP

  18. Preliminary neutronic design of high burnup OTTO cycle pebble bed reactor

    The pebble bed type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is among the interesting nuclear reactor designs in terms of safety and flexibility for co-generation applications. In addition, the strong inherent safety characteristics of the pebble bed reactor (PBR) which is based on natural mechanisms improve the simplicity of the PBR design, in particular for the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO) cycle PBR design. One of the important challenges of the OTTO cycle PBR design, and nuclear reactor design in general, is improving the nuclear fuel utilization which is shown by attaining a higher burnup value. This study performed a preliminary neutronic design study of a 200 MWt OTTO cycle PBR with high burnup while fulfilling the safety criteria of the PBR design.The safety criteria of the design was represented by the per-fuel-pebble maximum power generation of 4.5 kW/pebble. The maximum burnup value was also limited by the tested maximum burnup value which maintained the integrity of the pebble fuel. Parametric surveys were performed to obtain the optimized parameters used in this study, which are the fuel enrichment, per-pebble heavy metal (HM) loading, and the average axial speed of the fuel. An optimum design with burnup value of 131.1 MWd/Kg-HM was achieved in this study which is much higher compare to the burnup of the reference design HTR-MODUL and a previously proposed OTTO-cycle PBR design. This optimum design uses 17% U-235 enrichment with 4 g HM-loading per fuel pebble. (author)

  19. Preliminary Neutronic Design of High Burnup OTTO Cycle Pebble Bed Reactor

    T. Setiadipura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The pebble bed type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR is among the interesting nuclear reactor designs in terms of safety and flexibility for co-generation applications. In addition, the strong inherent safety characteristics of the pebble bed reactor (PBR which is based on natural mechanisms improve the simplicity of the PBR design, in particular for the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO cycle PBR design. One of the important challenges of the OTTO cycle PBR design, and nuclear reactor design in general, is improving the nuclear fuel utilization which is shown by attaining a higher burnup value. This study performed a preliminary neutronic design study of a 200 MWt OTTO cycle PBR with high burnup while fulfilling the safety criteria of the PBR design.The safety criteria of the design was represented by the per-fuel-pebble maximum power generation of 4.5 kW/pebble. The maximum burnup value was also limited by the tested maximum burnup value which maintained the integrity of the pebble fuel. Parametric surveys were performed to obtain the optimized parameters used in this study, which are the fuel enrichment, per-pebble heavy metal (HM loading, and the average axial speed of the fuel. An optimum design with burnup value of 131.1 MWd/Kg-HM was achieved in this study which is much higher compare to the burnup of the reference design HTR-MODUL and a previously proposed OTTO-cycle PBR design. This optimum design uses 17% U-235 enrichment with 4 g HM-loading per fuel pebble

  20. Blanket concept of water-cooled lithium lead with beryllium for the SlimCS fusion DEMO reactor

    As an advanced option for SlimCS blanket, conceptual design study of water-cooled lithium lead (WCLL) blanket was performed. In SlimCS, the net tritium breeding ratio (TBR) supplied from WCLL blanket was not enough because the thickness of blanket in SlimCS was limited to about 0.5 m so as to allocate the conducting shell position near the plasma for high beta access and vertical stability of plasma. Therefore, the beryllium (Be) pebble bed was adopted as additional multiplier to reach a required TBR (≥ 1.05). Considering the operating temperature of blanket materials, a double pipe structure was adopted. The nuclear and thermal analysis were carried out by a nuclear-thermal-coupled code, ANIHEAT and DOHEAT so that blanket materials were appropriately arranged to satisfy the acceptable operation temperatures. The temperatures of materials were kept in appropriate range for the neutron wall load Pn = 5 MW/m2. It was found that the local TBR of WCLL with Be blanket was comparable with that of solid breeder blanket. (author)

  1. Beryllium data base for in-pile mockup test on blanket of fusion reactor, (1)

    Beryllium has been used in the fusion blanket designs with ceramic breeder as a neutron multiplier to increase the net tritium breeding ratio (TBR). The properties of beryllium, that is physical properties, chemical properties, thermal properties, mechanical properties, nuclear properties, radiation effects, etc. are necessary for the fusion blanket design. However, the properties of beryllium have not been arranged for the fusion blanket design. Therefore, it is indispensable to check and examine the material data of beryllium reported previously. This paper is the first one of the series of papers on beryllium data base, which summarizes the reported material data of beryllium. (author)

  2. Conceptual design of a passively safe thorium breeder Pebble Bed Reactor

    Highlights: • This work proposes three possible designs for a thorium Pebble Bed Reactor. • A high-conversion PBR (CR > 0.96), passively safe and within practical constraints. • A thorium breeder PBR (220 cm core) in practical regime, but not passively safe. • A passively safe breeder, requiring higher fuel reprocessing and recycling rates. - Abstract: More sustainable nuclear power generation might be achieved by combining the passive safety and high temperature applications of the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) design with the resource availability and favourable waste characteristics of the thorium fuel cycle. It has already been known that breeding can be achieved with the thorium fuel cycle inside a Pebble Bed Reactor if reprocessing is performed. This is also demonstrated in this work for a cylindrical core with a central driver zone, with 3 g heavy metal pebbles for enhanced fission, surrounded by a breeder zone containing 30 g thorium pebbles, for enhanced conversion. The main question of the present work is whether it is also possible to combine passive safety and breeding, within a practical operating regime, inside a thorium Pebble Bed Reactor. Therefore, the influence of several fuel design, core design and operational parameters upon the conversion ratio and passive safety is evaluated. A Depressurized Loss of Forced Cooling (DLOFC) is considered the worst safety scenario that can occur within a PBR. So, the response to a DLOFC with and without scram is evaluated for several breeder PBR designs using a coupled DALTON/THERMIX code scheme. With scram it is purely a heat transfer problem (THERMIX) demonstrating the decay heat removal capability of the design. In case control rods cannot be inserted, the temperature feedback of the core should also be able to counterbalance the reactivity insertion by the decaying xenon without fuel temperatures exceeding 1600 °C. Results show that high conversion ratios (CR > 0.96) and passive safety can be combined in

  3. Penn State geoPebble system: Design,Implementation, and Initial Results

    Urbina, J. V.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Bilen, S. G.; Fleishman, A.; Burkett, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Penn State geoPebble system is a new network of wirelessly interconnected seismic and GPS sensor nodes with flexible architecture. This network will be used for studies of ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland, as well as to investigate mountain glaciers. The network will consist of ˜150 geoPebbles that can be deployed in a user-defined spatial geometry. We present our design methodology, which has enabled us to develop these state-of- the art sensors using commercial-off-the-shelf hardware combined with custom-designed hardware and software. Each geoPebble is a self- contained, wirelessly connected sensor for collecting seismic measurements and position information. Key elements of each node encompasses a three-component seismic recorder, which includes an amplifier, filter, and 24- bit analog-to-digital converter that can sample up to 10 kHz. Each unit also includes a microphone channel to record the ground-coupled airwave. The timing for each node is available from GPS measurements and a local precision oscillator that is conditioned by the GPS timing pulses. In addition, we record the carrier-phase measurement of the L1 GPS signal in order to determine location at sub-decimeter accuracy (relative to other geoPebbles within a few kilometers radius). Each geoPebble includes 16 GB of solid-state storage, wireless communications capability to a central supervisory unit, and auxiliary measurements capability (including tilt from accelerometers, absolute orientation from magnetometers and temperature). A novel aspect of the geoPebble is a wireless charging system for the internal battery (using inductive coupling techniques). The geoPebbles include all the sensors (geophones, GPS, microphone), communications (WiFi), and power (battery and charging) internally, so the geoPebble system can operate without any cabling connections (though we do provide an external connector so that different geophones can be used). We report initial field-deployment results and

  4. Single-phase convection heat transfer characteristics of pebble-bed channels with internal heat generation

    Graphical abstract: The core of the water-cooled pebble bed reactor is the porous channels which stacked with spherical fuel elements. The gaps between the adjacent fuel elements are complex because they are stochastic and often shift. We adopt electromagnetic induction heating method to overall heat the pebble bed. By comparing and analyzing the experimental data, we get the rule of power distribution and the rule of heat transfer coefficient with particle diameter, heat flux density, inlet temperature and working fluid's Re number. Highlights: ► We adopt electromagnetic induction heating method to overall heat the pebble bed to be the internal heat source. ► The ball diameter is smaller, the effect of the heat transfer is better. ► With Re number increasing, heat transfer coefficient is also increasing and eventually tends to stabilize. ► The changing of heat power makes little effect on the heat transfer coefficient of pebble bed channels. - Abstract: The reactor core of a water-cooled pebble bed reactor includes porous channels that are formed by spherical fuel elements. This structure has notably improved heat transfer. Due to the variability and randomness of the interstices in pebble bed channels, heat transfer is complex, and there are few studies regarding this topic. To study the heat transfer characters of pebble bed channels with internal heat sources, oxidized stainless steel spheres with diameters of 3 and 8 mm and carbon steel spheres with 8 mm diameters are used in a stacked pebble bed. Distilled water is used as a refrigerant for the experiments, and the electromagnetic induction heating method is used to heat the pebble bed. By comparing and analyzing the experimental results, we obtain the governing rules for the power distribution and the heat transfer coefficient with respect to particle diameter, heat flux density, inlet temperature and working fluid Re number. From fitting of the experimental data, we obtain the dimensionless average

  5. AzTEC 1.1 mm images of 16 radio galaxies at 0.5

    Humphrey, A; Aretxaga, I; Hughes, D H; Yun, M S; Cybulski, R; Wilson, Grant W; Austermann, J; Ezawa, H; Kawabe, R; Kohno, K; Perera, T; Scott, K; Sánchez-Arguelles, D; Gutermuth, R

    2011-01-01

    We present 1.1 mm observations for a sample of 16 powerful radio galaxies at 0.51 mm flux density is anticorrelated with the largest angular size of the radio source. We also present new Spitzer imaging observations of several active galax...

  6. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Gokalp, Gokhan, E-mail: drgokhangokalp@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Demirag, Burak, E-mail: bdemirag@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Nas, Omer Fatih, E-mail: omerfatihnas@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Aydemir, Mehmet Fatih, E-mail: fatiha@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Yazici, Zeynep, E-mail: zyazici@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p < 0.001). No significant difference was detected for oblique coronal images when compared with arthroscopy results (p = 0.180). Sensitivity and specificity values for ACL tear diagnosis were 37.04% and 95.65% for sagittal images; 74.07% and 91.30% for oblique coronal images. There was no significant difference between arthroscopy and oblique coronal MR images in grading AMB and PLB injuries (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade.

  7. Deep 1.1 mm-wavelength imaging of the GOODS-S field by AzTEC/ASTE - I. Source catalogue and number counts

    Scott, K S; Wilson, G W; Austermann, J E; Aguilar, E; Aretxaga, I; Ezawa, H; Ferrusca, D; Hatsukade, B; Hughes, D H; Iono, D; Giavalisco, M; Kawabe, R; Kohno, K; Mauskopf, P D; Oshima, T; Perera, T A; Rand, J; Tamura, Y; Tosaki, T; Velazquez, M; Williams, C C; Zeballos, M

    2010-01-01

    [Abridged] We present the first results from a 1.1 mm confusion-limited map of the GOODS-S field taken with AzTEC on the ASTE telescope. We imaged a 270 sq. arcmin field to a 1\\sigma depth of 0.48 - 0.73 mJy/beam, making this one of the deepest blank-field surveys at mm-wavelengths ever achieved. Although our GOODS-S map is extremely confused, we demonstrate that our source identification and number counts analyses are robust, and the techniques discussed in this paper are relevant for other deeply confused surveys. We find a total of 41 dusty starburst galaxies with S/N >= 3.5 within this uniformly covered region, where only two are expected to be false detections. We derive the 1.1mm number counts from this field using both a "P(d)" analysis and a semi-Bayesian technique, and find that both methods give consistent results. Our data are well-fit by a Schechter function model with (S', N(3mJy), \\alpha) = (1.30+0.19 mJy, 160+27 (mJy/deg^2)^(-1), -2.0). Given the depth of this survey, we put the first tight con...

  8. Origins of the extragalactic background at 1mm from a combined analysis of the AzTEC and MAMBO data in GOODS-N

    Penner, Kyle; Chapin, Edward L; Greve, Thomas R; Bertoldi, Frank; Brodwin, Mark; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Conselice, Christopher J; Coppin, Kristen; Giavalisco, Mauro; Hughes, David H; Ivison, Rob J; Perera, Thushara; Scott, Douglas; Scott, Kimberly; Wilson, Grant

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of the cosmic infrared background, which is a measure of the dust obscured activity in all galaxies in the Universe. We venture to isolate the galaxies responsible for the background at 1mm; with spectroscopic and photometric redshifts we constrain the redshift distribution of these galaxies. We create a deep 1.16mm map (sigma ~ 0.5mJy) by combining the AzTEC 1.1mm and MAMBO 1.2mm datasets in GOODS-N. This combined map contains 41 secure detections, 13 of which are new. By averaging the 1.16mm flux densities of individually undetected galaxies with 24um flux densities > 25uJy, we resolve 31--45 per cent of the 1.16mm background. Repeating our analysis on the SCUBA 850um map, we resolve a higher percentage (40--64 per cent) of the 850um background. A majority of the background resolved (attributed to individual galaxies) at both wavelengths comes from galaxies at z > 1.3. If the ratio of the resolved submillimeter to millimeter background is applied to a reasonable scenario for the origins o...

  9. Helium ion distributions in a 4 kJ plasma focus device by 1 mm-thick large-size polycarbonate detectors

    Helium ion beam profile, angular and iso-ion beam distributions in 4 kJ Amirkabir plasma focus (APF) device were effectively observed by the unaided eyes and studied in single 1 mm-thick large-diameter (20 cm) polycarbonate track detectors (PCTD). The PCTDs were processed by 50 Hz–HV electrochemical etching using a large-size ECE chamber. The results show that helium ions produced in the APF device have a ring-shaped angular distribution peaked at an angle of ∼±60° with respect to the top of the anode. Some information on the helium ion energy and distributions is also provided. The method is highly effective for ion beam studies. - Highlights: • Helium iso-ion beam profile and angular distributions were studied in the 4 kJ APF device. • Large-area 1 mm-thick polycarbonate detectors were processed by 50 Hz-HV ECE. • Helium ion beam profile and distributions were observed by unaided eyes in a single detector. • Helium ion profile has ring-shaped distributions with energies lower at the ring location. • Helium iso-ion track density, diameter and energy distributions are estimated

  10. The importance of the AVR pebble-bed reactor for the future of nuclear power

    Pohl, P. [Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor AVR GmbH, Postfach 1160, 52412 Juelich (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The AVR pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) at Juelich (Germany)) operated from 1967 to 1988 and was certainly the most important HTGR project of the past. The reactor was the mass test bed for all development steps of HTGR pebble fuel. Some early fuel charges failed under high temperature conditions and contaminated the reactor. An accurate pebble measurement (Cs 137) allowed to clean the core from unwanted pebbles after 1981. The coolant activity went down and remained very low for the remaining reactor operation. A melt-wire experiment in 1986 revealed max. coolant temperatures of >1280 deg. C and fuel temperatures of >1350 deg. C, explained by under-estimated bypasses. The fuel still in the core achieved high burn-ups and showed under the extreme temperature conditions excellent fission product retention. Thus, the AVR operation qualified the HTGR fuel, and an average discharge burn-up of 112% fifa revealed an excellent fuel economy of the pebble-bed reactor. Furthermore, the AVR operation offers many meaningful data for code-to-experiment comparisons. (authors)

  11. Temperature transients of a fusion-fission ITER pebble bed reactor in loss of coolant accident

    In this preliminary scoping study, post-accident temperature transients of several fusion-fission designs utilizing ITER-FEAT-like parameters and fission pebble bed fuel technology are examined using a 1-D cylindrical MATLAB heat transfer code along with conventional fission decay heat approximations. Scenarios studied include systems with no additional passive safety features to systems with melting reflectors designed to increase emissivity after reaching a specified temperature. Results show that for a total fission power of ∼1400-2800 MW, two of the realistic variants investigated are passively safe. The crucial time, defined as the time when either any structural part of the fusion-fission tokamak reaches melting point, or when the pebble fuel reaches 1873 K, ranges from 5.7 to 76 h for the unsafe configurations. Additionally, it is illustrated that, fundamentally, the LOCA characteristics of pure fission pebble beds and fusion-fission pebble beds are different. Namely, the former depends on the pebble fuel's large thermal capacity, along with external radiation and natural convective cooling, while the latter depends significantly more on the tokamak's sizeable total internal heat capacity. This difference originates from the fusion-fission reactor's conflicting goal of having to minimize heat transfer to the magnets during normal operation. These results are discussed in the context of overall fusion-fission reactor design and safety

  12. Stability and convergence analysis of the quasi-dynamics method for the initial pebble packing

    The simulation for the pebble flow recirculation within Pebble Bed Reactors (PBRs) requires an efficient algorithm to generate an initial overlap-free pebble configuration within the reactor core. In the previous work, a dynamics-based approach, the Quasi-Dynamics Method (QDM), has been proposed to generate densely distributed pebbles in PBRs with cylindrical and annular core geometries. However, the stability and the efficiency of the QDM were not fully addressed. In this work, the algorithm is reformulated with two control parameters and the impact of these parameters on the algorithm performance is investigated. Firstly, the theoretical analysis for a 1-D packing system is conducted and the range of the parameter in which the algorithm is convergent is estimated. Then, this estimation is verified numerically for a 3-D packing system. Finally, the algorithm is applied to modeling the PBR fuel loading configuration and the convergence performance at different packing fractions is presented. Results show that the QDM is efficient in packing pebbles within the realistic range of the packing fraction in PBRs, and it is capable in handling cylindrical geometry with packing fractions up to 63.5%. (authors)

  13. On the water delivery to terrestrial embryos by ice pebble accretion

    Sato, Takao; Ida, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Standard accretion disk models suggest that the snow line in the solar nebula migrated interior to the Earth's orbit in a late stage of nebula evolution. In this late stage, a significant amount of ice could have been delivered to 1 AU from outer regions in the form of mm to dm-sized "pebbles." This raises the question why the present Earth is so depleted of water (with the ocean mass being as small as 0.023% of the Earth mass). Here we quantify the amount of icy pebbles accreted by terrestrial embryos after the migration of the snow line assuming that no mechanism halts the pebble flow in outer disk regions. We use a simplified version of the coagulation equation to calculate the formation and radial inward drift of icy pebbles in a protoplanetary disk. The pebble accretion cross section of an embryo is calculated using analytic expressions presented by recent studies. We find that the final mass and water content of terrestrial embryos strongly depends on the radial extent of the gas disk, the strength of d...

  14. Packed fluidization, enhancement of heat transfer in pebble bed and thermonuclear fusion technology

    Packed fluidization is a technique in which small particles (size: 100-800 μm) are allowed to fluidize in the interstices of stationary pebbles (size: >1.0 mm). Packed fluidization enhances the rate of heat transfer in pebble bed at low operative gas velocity as well as at low pressure drop across the bed. Experiments were conducted to study heat transfer in unary packed bed and binary packed fluidized bed using lithium titanate and alumina pebbles (size: 3-10 mm) and lithium titanate and silica particles (size: 231-780 μm). It was found that due to packed fluidization the rate of heat transfer is enhanced and arms of the effective thermal conductivity this enhancement was up to 260%. Low thermal conductivity of pebble bed of solid breeder materials is one of the adverse key issues which must be addressed properly for the successful development of the thermonuclear fusion technology. Packed fluidization enhances the effective thermal conductivity of the pebble bed of solid breeder materials in the Test Blanket Module (TBM) of ITER type fusion reactor. (author)

  15. Nuclear Safeguards Considerations For The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    Phillip Casey Durst; David Beddingfield; Brian Boyer; Robert Bean; Michael Collins; Michael Ehinger; David Hanks; David L. Moses; Lee Refalo

    2009-10-01

    High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been considered since the 1940s, and have been constructed and demonstrated in the United Kingdom (Dragon), United States (Peach Bottom and Fort Saint Vrain), Japan (HTTR), Germany (AVR and THTR-300), and have been the subject of conceptual studies in Russia (VGM). The attraction to these reactors is that they can use a variety of reactor fuels, including abundant thorium, which upon reprocessing of the spent fuel can produce fissile U-233. Hence, they could extend the stocks of available uranium, provided the fuel is reprocessed. Another attractive attribute is that HTRs typically operate at a much higher temperature than conventional light water reactors (LWRs), because of the use of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coated (TRISO) fuel particles embedded in ceramic graphite. Rather than simply discharge most of the unused heat from the working fluid in the power plant to the environment, engineers have been designing reactors for 40 years to recover this heat and make it available for district heating or chemical conversion plants. Demonstrating high-temperature nuclear energy conversion was the purpose behind Fort Saint Vrain in the United States, THTR-300 in Germany, HTTR in Japan, and HTR-10 and HTR-PM, being built in China. This resulted in nuclear reactors at least 30% or more thermodynamically efficient than conventional LWRs, especially if the waste heat can be effectively utilized in chemical processing plants. A modern variant of high temperature reactors is the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Originally developed in the United States and Germany, it is now being redesigned and marketed by the Republic of South Africa and China. The team examined historical high temperature and high temperature gas reactors (HTR and HTGR) and reviewed safeguards considerations for this reactor. The following is a preliminary report on this topic prepared under the ASA-100 Advanced Safeguards Project in support of the NNSA Next

  16. A panoptic model for planetesimal formation and pebble delivery

    Krijt, S.; Ormel, C. W.; Dominik, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The journey from dust particle to planetesimal involves physical processes acting on scales ranging from micrometers (the sticking and restructuring of aggregates) to hundreds of astronomical units (the size of the turbulent protoplanetary nebula). Considering these processes simultaneously is essential when studying planetesimal formation. Aims: The goal of this work is to quantify where and when planetesimal formation can occur as the result of porous coagulation of icy grains and to understand how the process is influenced by the properties of the protoplanetary disk. Methods: We develop a novel, global, semi-analytical model for the evolution of the mass-dominating dust particles in a turbulent protoplanetary disk that takes into account the evolution of the dust surface density while preserving the essential characteristics of the porous coagulation process. This panoptic model is used to study the growth from sub-micron to planetesimal sizes in disks around Sun-like stars. Results: For highly porous ices, unaffected by collisional fragmentation and erosion, rapid growth to planetesimal sizes is possible in a zone stretching out to ~10 AU for massive disks. When porous coagulation is limited by erosive collisions, the formation of planetesimals through direct coagulation is not possible, but the creation of a large population of aggregates with Stokes numbers close to unity might trigger the streaming instability (SI). However, we find that reaching conditions necessary for SI is difficult and limited to dust-rich disks, (very) cold disks, or disks with weak turbulence. Conclusions: Behind the snow-line, porosity-driven aggregation of icy grains results in rapid (~104 yr) formation of planetesimals. If erosive collisions prevent this, SI might be triggered for specific disk conditions. The numerical approach introduced in this work is ideally suited for studying planetesimal formation and pebble delivery simultaneously and will help build a coherent

  17. The unusual properties of beryllium surfaces

    Be is a ''marginal metal.'' The stable phase, hcp-Be, has a low Fermi-level density of states and very anisotropic structural and elastic properties, similar to a semiconductor's. At the Be(0001) surface, surface states drastically increase the Fermi-level density of states. The different nature of bonding in bulk-Be and at the Be(0001) surface explains the large outward relaxation. The presence of surface states causes large surface core-level shifts by inducing a higher electrostatic potential in the surface layers and by improving the screening at the surface. The authors experimental and theoretical investigations of atomic vibrations at the Be(0001) surface demonstrate clearly that Be screening of atomic motion by the surface states makes the surface phonon dispersion fundamentally different from that of the bulk. Properties of Be(0001) are so different from those of the bulk that the surface can be considered a new ''phase'' of beryllium with unique electronic and structural characteristics. For comparison they also study Be(11 bar 20), a very open surface without important surface states. Be(11 bar 20) is the only clean s-p metal surface known to reconstruct (1 x 3 missing row reconstruction)

  18. Beryllium Abundances of Solar-Analog Stars

    Takeda, Yoichi; Honda, Satoshi; Kawanomoto, Satoshi; Ando, Hiroyasu; Sakurai, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    An extensive beryllium abundance analysis was conducted for 118 solar analogs (along with 87 FGK standard stars) by applying the spectrum synthesis technique to the near-UV region comprising the Be II line at 3131.066 A, in an attempt to investigate whether Be suffers any depletion such as the case of Li showing a large diversity. We found that, while most of these Sun-like stars are superficially similar in terms of their A(Be) (Be abundances) around the solar value within ~ +/- 0.2dex, 4 out of 118 samples turned out strikingly Be-deficient (by more than ~2 dex) and these 4 stars belong to the group of lowest v_e sin i (projected rotation velocity). Moreover, even for the other majority showing an apparent similarity in Be, we can recognize a tendency that A(Be) gradually increases with an increase in v_e sin i. These observational facts suggest that any solar analog star (including the Sun) generally suffers some kind of Be depletion during their lives, where the rotational velocity (or the angular momentu...

  19. Interaction of beryllium and hydrogen isotopes

    It has been considered that in the plasma nuclear fusion experimental devices of magnetic field confinement type, in order to reduce the energy loss due to bremsstrahlung, the use of the plasma-facing materials (PFM) of low atomic number like carbon is indispensable at present. Attention is paid to beryllium which is one of the PFMs, and its effectiveness was rocognized by the practical use in JET. When Be is considered as a PFM, it is necessary to accumulate many data on the diffusion, dissolution, permeation and surface recoupling of hydrogen isotopes, which regulate the recycling and inventory of deuterium and tritium fuel, and the relation of these factors with the physical and chemical states of Be. In this research, as the first phase of understanding the characteristics of Be as a PFM, the change of the surface condition by heating Be was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the chemical form of the Be-related substances emitted from the surface by argon or deuterium ion sputtering and their thermal behavior were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The sample, the measurement and the results are reported. The diversified secondary ions of Be, Be cluster, Be oxide, hydroxide, hydride and deuteride were observed by the measurement, and their features are shown. (K.I.)

  20. Electronic band structure of beryllium oxide

    Sashin, V A; Kheifets, A S; Ford, M J

    2003-01-01

    The energy-momentum resolved valence band structure of beryllium oxide has been measured by electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS). Band dispersions, bandwidths and intervalence bandgap, electron momentum density (EMD) and density of occupied states have been extracted from the EMS data. The experimental results are compared with band structure calculations performed within the full potential linear muffin-tin orbital approximation. Our experimental bandwidths of 2.1 +- 0.2 and 4.8 +- 0.3 eV for the oxygen s and p bands, respectively, are in accord with theoretical predictions, as is the s-band EMD after background subtraction. Contrary to the calculations, however, the measured p-band EMD shows large intensity at the GAMMA point. The measured full valence bandwidth of 19.4 +- 0.3 eV is at least 1.4 eV larger than the theory. The experiment also finds a significantly higher value for the p-to-s-band EMD ratio in a broad momentum range compared to the theory.

  1. Development of Interatomic Potentials for Beryllium

    Full text of publication follows: To be able to benefit from fusion as a clean and safe power source, we need a comprehensive understanding of the dynamic region of a fusion reactor. Knowing the interplay between the fuel plasma and the reactor components, such as the first wall and the divertor, one can minimize the resulting degradation. The atom-level mechanisms behind the reactions, (e.g. erosion and redeposition) are, however, not accessible to experiments. Hence, computational methods, including molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, are needed. The interactions in a system of particles are within MD described by an interatomic potential. The study of reactor processes requires models for the mixed interaction between the first wall and divertor materials beryllium, carbon and tungsten, as well as for the interaction of these with hydrogen. The absence of proper models for the Be system motivated us to develop potentials for pure Be, Be-C, Be-W and Be-H. We present a Tersoff-like bond order potential for pure Be and the same formalism applied to Be-C and Be-H. The performance of the potentials is discussed and an outlook for the remaining potential is also given. (authors)

  2. Lightweight beryllium wins wings as real heavyweight

    Development of Be materials with improved strength and ductility levels is possible by exploitation of new consolidation techniques, such as cold and hot isostatic pressing and plasma spraying followed by sintering. Working the vacuum hot pressed billet by cross-rolling or extruding and by forging improves the mechanical properties. The valuable contributions of Be in aerospace and nuclear applications are considered. SNAP-8 and SNAP-10A applications, replacement of an Al alloy on the Minuteman spacer ring by Be, aircraft (flight testing of F-4 Phantom with a Be rudder and actual structural application of Be wrought mill product in F-14 Tomcat) and communication satellite (despin platforms, spinning arms, russ structures) applications are discussed together with instrument applications (guidance systems for Saturn V, Minuteman and the Boeing 747, proportional counters for space-oriented x-ray experiments), Be applications in lunar explorations, expanding use of Be in space applications as a mirror blank material and Be disks for the brakes of giant aircraft. Beryllium has the highest specific heat of all structural metals and it shows chemical inertness to many of the common ocket propellants and their combustion products. Its handicaps are high cost and poor impact behavior. (U.S.)

  3. Steam-chemical reactivity for irradiated beryllium

    Anderl, R.A.; McCarthy, K.A.; Oates, M.A.; Petti, D.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Smolik, G.R. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental investigation to determine the influence of neutron irradiation effects and annealing on the chemical reactivity of beryllium exposed to steam. The work entailed measurements of the H{sub 2} generation rates for unirradiated and irradiated Be and for irradiated Be that had been previously annealed at different temperatures ranging from 450degC to 1200degC. H{sub 2} generation rates were similar for irradiated and unirradiated Be in steam-chemical reactivity experiments at temperatures between 450degC and 600degC. For irradiated Be exposed to steam at 700degC, the chemical reactivity accelerated rapidly and the specimen experienced a temperature excursion. Enhanced chemical reactivity at temperatures between 400degC and 600degC was observed for irradiated Be annealed at temperatures of 700degC and higher. This reactivity enhancement could be accounted for by the increased specific surface area resulting from development of a surface-connected porosity in the irradiated-annealed Be. (author)

  4. Beryllium abundances in stars hosting giant planets

    Santos, N C; Israelian, G; Mayor, M; Rebolo, R; García-Gíl, A; Pérez de Taoro, M R; Randich, S

    2002-01-01

    We have derived beryllium abundances in a wide sample of stars hosting planets, with spectral types in the range F7V-K0V, aimed at studying in detail the effects of the presence of planets on the structure and evolution of the associated stars. Predictions from current models are compared with the derived abundances and suggestions are provided to explain the observed inconsistencies. We show that while still not clear, the results suggest that theoretical models may have to be revised for stars with Teff<5500K. On the other hand, a comparison between planet host and non-planet host stars shows no clear difference between both populations. Although preliminary, this result favors a ``primordial'' origin for the metallicity ``excess'' observed for the planetary host stars. Under this assumption, i.e. that there would be no differences between stars with and without giant planets, the light element depletion pattern of our sample of stars may also be used to further investigate and constraint Li and Be deple...

  5. Pebble Accretion Rates for Planetesimals: Hydrodynamics Calculations with Direct Particle Integration

    Hughes, Anna; Boley, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    The formation and growth of planetesimals are fundamental to planet building. However, in our understanding of planet formation, there are a number of processes that limit the formation of planetesimals such as particle bouncing, fragmentation, and inward radial drift due to gas drag. Such processes seemingly make growth beyond mm to cm sizes difficult. In this case, the protoplanetary disk may become rich in pebble-sized solids as opposed to km-sized planetesimals. If a small number of large planetesimals do manage to form, then gas-drag effects can allow those seeds to efficiently accrete the abundant pebbles from the nebula and grow to planet sizes. We present self-consistent hydrodynamic simulations with direct particle integration and gas-drag coupling to evaluate the rate of planetesimal growth due to pebble accretion. We explore a range of particle sizes and nebular conditions using wind tunnel numerical experiments.

  6. The growth of planets by pebble accretion in evolving protoplanetary discs

    Bitsch, Bertram; Johansen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The formation of planets depends on the underlying protoplanetary disc structure, which influences both the accretion and migration rates of embedded planets. The disc itself evolves on time-scales of several Myr during which both temperature and density profiles change as matter accretes onto the central star. Here we use a detailed model of an evolving disc to determine the growth of planets by pebble accretion and their migration through the disc. Cores that reach their pebble isolation mass accrete gas to finally form giant planets with extensive gas envelopes, while planets that do not reach pebble isolation mass are stranded as ice giants and ice planets containing only minor amounts of gas in their envelopes. Unlike earlier population synthesis models, our model works without any artificial reductions in migration speed and for protoplanetary discs with gas and dust column densities similar to those inferred from observations. We find that in our nominal disc model the emergence of planetary embryos pr...

  7. Study of the fracture behavior of mortar and concretes with crushed rock or pebble aggregates

    Sebastião Ribeiro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to compare the fracture energy of mortar and concretes produced with crushed rock and pebble aggregates using zero, 10, 20, 30 and 40% of aggregates mixed with standard mortar and applying the wedge splitting method to achieve stable crack propagation. The samples were cast in a special mold and cured for 28 days, after which they were subjected to crack propagation tests by the wedge splitting method to determine the fracture energies of the mortar and concrete. The concretes showed higher fracture energy than the mortar, and the concretes containing crushed rock showed higher resistance to crack propagation than all the compositions containing pebbles. The fracture energy varied from 38 to 55 J.m-2. A comparison of the number of aggregates that separated from the two concrete matrices with the highest fracture energies indicated that the concrete containing pebbles crumbled more easily and was therefore less resistant to crack propagation.

  8. A Report on the Validation of Beryllium Strength Models

    Armstrong, Derek Elswick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-05

    This report discusses work on validating beryllium strength models with flyer plate and Taylor rod experimental data. Strength models are calibrated with Hopkinson bar and quasi-static data. The Hopkinson bar data for beryllium provides strain rates up to about 4000 per second. A limitation of the Hopkinson bar data for beryllium is that it only provides information on strain up to about 0.15. The lack of high strain data at high strain rates makes it difficult to distinguish between various strength model settings. The PTW model has been calibrated many different times over the last 12 years. The lack of high strain data for high strain rates has resulted in these calibrated PTW models for beryllium exhibiting significantly different behavior when extrapolated to high strain. For beryllium, the α parameter of PTW has recently been calibrated to high precision shear modulus data. In the past the α value for beryllium was set based on expert judgment. The new α value for beryllium was used in a calibration of the beryllium PTW model by Sky Sjue. The calibration by Sjue used EOS table information to model the temperature dependence of the heat capacity. Also, the calibration by Sjue used EOS table information to model the density changes of the beryllium sample during the Hopkinson bar and quasi-static experiments. In this paper, the calibrated PTW model by Sjue is compared against experimental data and other strength models. The other strength models being considered are a PTW model calibrated by Shuh- Rong Chen and a Steinberg-Guinan type model by John Pedicini. The three strength models are used in a comparison against flyer plate and Taylor rod data. The results show that the Chen PTW model provides better agreement to this data. The Chen PTW model settings have been previously adjusted to provide a better fit to flyer plate data, whereas the Sjue PTW model has not been changed based on flyer plate data. However, the Sjue model provides a reasonable fit to

  9. Erosion of beryllium under ITER – Relevant transient plasma loads

    Kupriyanov, I.B., E-mail: igkupr@gmail.com [A.A. Bochvar High Technology Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Rogova St. 5a, 123060 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nikolaev, G.N.; Kurbatova, L.A.; Porezanov, N.P. [A.A. Bochvar High Technology Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Rogova St. 5a, 123060 Moscow (Russian Federation); Podkovyrov, V.L.; Muzichenko, A.D.; Zhitlukhin, A.M. [TRINITI, Troitsk, Moscow reg. (Russian Federation); Gervash, A.A. [Efremov Research Institute, S-Peterburg (Russian Federation); Safronov, V.M. [Project Center of ITER, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We study the erosion, mass loss/gain and surface structure evolution of Be/CuCrZr mock-ups, armored with beryllium of TGP-56FW grade after irradiation by deuterium plasma heat load of 0.5 MJ/m{sup 2} at 250 °C and 500 °C. • Beryllium mass loss/erosion under plasma heat load at 250 °C is rather small (no more than 0.2 g/m{sup 2} shot and 0.11 μm/shot, correspondingly, after 40 shots) and tends to decrease with increasing number of shots. • Beryllium mass loss/erosion under plasma heat load at 500 °C is much higher (∼2.3 g/m{sup 2} shot and 1.2 μm/shot, correspondingly, after 10 shot) and tends to decrease with increasing the number of shots (∼0.26 g/m{sup 2} pulse and 0.14 μm/shot, correspondingly, after 100 shot). • Beryllium erosion value derived from the measurements of profile of irradiated surface is much higher than erosion value derived from mass loss data. - Abstract: Beryllium will be used as a armor material for the ITER first wall. It is expected that erosion of beryllium under transient plasma loads such as the edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions will mainly determine a lifetime of the ITER first wall. This paper presents the results of recent experiments with the Russian beryllium of TGP-56FW ITER grade on QSPA-Be plasma gun facility. The Be/CuCrZr mock-ups were exposed to up to 100 shots by deuterium plasma streams (5 cm in diameter) with pulse duration of 0.5 ms and heat loads range of 0.2–0.5 MJ/m{sup 2} at different temperature of beryllium tiles. The temperature of Be tiles has been maintained about 250 and 500 °C during the experiments. After 10, 40 and 100 shots, the beryllium mass loss/gain under erosion process were investigated as well as evolution of surface microstructure and cracks morphology.

  10. Controlling Beryllium Contaminated Material And Equipment For The Building 9201-5 Legacy Material Disposition Project

    Reynolds, T. D.; Easterling, S. D.

    2010-10-01

    This position paper addresses the management of beryllium contamination on legacy waste. The goal of the beryllium management program is to protect human health and the environment by preventing the release of beryllium through controlling surface contamination. Studies have shown by controlling beryllium surface contamination, potential airborne contamination is reduced or eliminated. Although there are areas in Building 9201-5 that are contaminated with radioactive materials and mercury, only beryllium contamination is addressed in this management plan. The overall goal of this initiative is the compliant packaging and disposal of beryllium waste from the 9201-5 Legacy Material Removal (LMR) Project to ensure that beryllium surface contamination and any potential airborne release of beryllium is controlled to levels as low as practicable in accordance with 10 CFR 850.25.

  11. Validation of cleaning method for various parts fabricated at a Beryllium facility

    Davis, Cynthia M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-15

    This study evaluated and documented a cleaning process that is used to clean parts that are fabricated at a beryllium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The purpose of evaluating this cleaning process was to validate and approve it for future use to assure beryllium surface levels are below the Department of Energy’s release limits without the need to sample all parts leaving the facility. Inhaling or coming in contact with beryllium can cause an immune response that can result in an individual becoming sensitized to beryllium, which can then lead to a disease of the lungs called chronic beryllium disease, and possibly lung cancer. Thirty aluminum and thirty stainless steel parts were fabricated on a lathe in the beryllium facility, as well as thirty-two beryllium parts, for the purpose of testing a parts cleaning method that involved the use of ultrasonic cleaners. A cleaning method was created, documented, validated, and approved, to reduce beryllium contamination.

  12. Beryllium processing technology review for applications in plasma-facing components

    Materials research and development activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), i.e., the next generation fusion reactor, are investigating beryllium as the first-wall containment material for the reactor. Important in the selection of beryllium is the ability to process, fabricate and repair beryllium first-wall components using existing technologies. Two issues that will need to be addressed during the engineering design activity will be the bonding of beryllium tiles in high-heat-flux areas of the reactor, and the in situ repair of damaged beryllium tiles. The following review summarizes the current technology associated with welding and joining of beryllium to itself and other materials, and the state-of-the-art in plasma-spray technology as an in situ repair technique for damaged beryllium tiles. In addition, a review of the current status of beryllium technology in the former Soviet Union is also included

  13. The structure, properties and performance of plasma-sprayed beryllium for fusion applications

    Plasma-spray technology is under investigation as a method for producing high thermal conductivity beryllium coatings for use in magnetic fusion applications. Recent investigations have focused on optimizing the plasma-spray process for depositing beryllium coatings on damaged beryllium surfaces. Of particular interest has been optimizing the processing parameters to maximize the through-thickness thermal conductivity of the beryllium coatings. Experimental results will be reported on the use of secondary H2 gas additions to improve the melting of the beryllium powder and transferred-arc cleaning to improve the bonding between the beryllium coatings and the underlying surface. Information will also be presented on thermal fatigue tests which were done on beryllium coated ISX-B beryllium limiter tiles using 10 sec cycle times with 60 sec cooldowns and an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) relevant divertor heat flux slightly in excess of 5 MW/m2

  14. Beryllium processing technology review for applications in plasma-facing components

    Castro, R.G.; Jacobson, L.A.; Stanek, P.W.

    1993-07-01

    Materials research and development activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), i.e., the next generation fusion reactor, are investigating beryllium as the first-wall containment material for the reactor. Important in the selection of beryllium is the ability to process, fabricate and repair beryllium first-wall components using existing technologies. Two issues that will need to be addressed during the engineering design activity will be the bonding of beryllium tiles in high-heat-flux areas of the reactor, and the in situ repair of damaged beryllium tiles. The following review summarizes the current technology associated with welding and joining of beryllium to itself and other materials, and the state-of-the-art in plasma-spray technology as an in situ repair technique for damaged beryllium tiles. In addition, a review of the current status of beryllium technology in the former Soviet Union is also included.

  15. The results of medical surveillance of beryllium production personnel

    The report presents results of surveillance of 1836 workers of beryllium production of Ulba Metallurgical Plant JSC with the acute and chronic forms of occupation diseases for 52 years of its operation. The dependence of acute and chronic occupation lesions on the protection degree is shown. It has been found out that, the risk of getting an occupation disease increases sharply at the moments of experimental works and at the time of reconstruction and some other extreme conditions in the production, that is supported by fixed lesions of eye mucous coat, skin and lung lesions. In this case, the readiness of people for their work in deleterious conditions and their personal responsibility for following the regulations of safety occupational standards plays a definite role. Therefore, the issues of protection are of paramount importance in prophylaxis both of acute and chronic exposure to beryllium. An influence of duration of service and occupation on chronic beryllium diseases is shown. A parallel between the lung beryllium disease and skin lesions by insoluble beryllium compounds is drawn for the first time. (author)

  16. Preparation of copper-beryllium alloys from Indian beryl

    The report presents the results of laboratory scale investigations on the preparation of copper-beryllium and aluminium-beryllium master alloys starting from Indian beryl and adopting the fluoride process. The flow-sheet involves : (1) conversion of the Be-values in beryl into water soluble sodium beryllium fluoride (2) preparation of beryllium hydroxide by alkali treatment of aqueous Na2BeF4 (3) conversion of Be(OH)2 to (NH4)2BeF4 by treatment with NH4HF2 (4) thermal decomposition of (NH4)2BeF4 to BeF2 and (5) magnesium reduction of BeF2 (with the addition of copper/aluminium) to obtain beryllium alloys. The method has been successfully employed for the preparation of Cu-Be master alloys containing about 8% Be and free of Mg on a 200 gm scale. An overall Be-recovery of about 80% has been achieved. Al-8% Be master alloys have also been prepared by this method. Toxicity and health hazards associated with Be are discussed and the steps taken to ensure safe handling of Be are described. (author)

  17. Preparation of Beryllium Targets by Vacuum Evaporation

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus is shown in Fig.1, which is mounted within a conventional metal bell jar 45 cm in diameter and 70 cm high. The boat source could be seen through the windows of the appratus and the bell jar.There was no straight-line exit from the apparatus to the interor of the bell jar for Be vapor originating at the boat.Tantalum boat, 13 mm wide, 28 mm long, and 0.1 mm thick, was used as evaporation source. The distance from the boat to the substrate was 15 cm. Microscope glass slide coated with betaine as substrate.The Be foils produced by resistance heating were removed from the glass by dissolving the

  18. Challenges in forming the solar system's giant planet cores via pebble accretion

    Kretke, K. A.; Levison, H. F., E-mail: kretke@boulder.swri.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Though ∼10 M {sub ⊕} mass rocky/icy cores are commonly held as a prerequisite for the formation of gas giants, theoretical models still struggle to explain how these embryos can form within the lifetimes of gaseous circumstellar disks. In recent years, aerodynamic-aided accretion of 'pebbles', objects ranging from centimeters to meters in size, has been suggested as a potential solution to this long-standing problem. While pebble accretion has been demonstrated to be extremely effective in local simulations that look at the detailed behavior of these pebbles in the vicinity of a single planetary embryo, to date there have been no global simulations demonstrating the effectiveness of pebble accretion in a more complicated, multi-planet environment. Therefore, we have incorporated the aerodynamic-aided accretion physics into LIPAD, a Lagrangian code that can follow the collisional/accretional/dynamical evolution of a protoplanetary system, to investigate how pebble accretion manifests itself in the larger planet formation picture. We find that under generic circumstances, pebble accretion naturally leads to an 'oligarchic' type of growth in which a large number of planetesimals grow to similar-sized planets. In particular, our simulations tend to form hundreds of Mars- and Earth-mass objects between 4 and 10 AU. While merging of some oligarchs may grow massive enough to form giant planet cores, leftover oligarchs lead to planetary systems that cannot be consistent with our own solar system. We investigate various ideas presented in the literature (including evaporation fronts and planet traps) and find that none easily overcome this tendency toward oligarchic growth.

  19. Challenges in forming the solar system's giant planet cores via pebble accretion

    Though ∼10 M ⊕ mass rocky/icy cores are commonly held as a prerequisite for the formation of gas giants, theoretical models still struggle to explain how these embryos can form within the lifetimes of gaseous circumstellar disks. In recent years, aerodynamic-aided accretion of 'pebbles', objects ranging from centimeters to meters in size, has been suggested as a potential solution to this long-standing problem. While pebble accretion has been demonstrated to be extremely effective in local simulations that look at the detailed behavior of these pebbles in the vicinity of a single planetary embryo, to date there have been no global simulations demonstrating the effectiveness of pebble accretion in a more complicated, multi-planet environment. Therefore, we have incorporated the aerodynamic-aided accretion physics into LIPAD, a Lagrangian code that can follow the collisional/accretional/dynamical evolution of a protoplanetary system, to investigate how pebble accretion manifests itself in the larger planet formation picture. We find that under generic circumstances, pebble accretion naturally leads to an 'oligarchic' type of growth in which a large number of planetesimals grow to similar-sized planets. In particular, our simulations tend to form hundreds of Mars- and Earth-mass objects between 4 and 10 AU. While merging of some oligarchs may grow massive enough to form giant planet cores, leftover oligarchs lead to planetary systems that cannot be consistent with our own solar system. We investigate various ideas presented in the literature (including evaporation fronts and planet traps) and find that none easily overcome this tendency toward oligarchic growth.

  20. Report of a technical evaluation panel on the use of beryllium for ITER plasma facing material and blanket breeder material

    Beryllium because of its low atomic number and high thermal conductivity, is a candidate for both ITER first wall and divertor surfaces. This study addresses the following: why beryllium; design requirements for the ITER divertor; beryllium supply and unirradiated physical/mechanical property database; effects of irradiation on beryllium properties; tritium issues; beryllium health and safety; beryllium-coolant interactions and safety; thermal and mechanical tests; plasma erosion of beryllium; recommended beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components; proposed manufacturing methods to produce beryllium parts for ITER; emerging beryllium materials; proposed inspection and maintenance techniques for beryllium components and coatings; time table and costs; and the importance of integrating materials and manufacturing personnel with designers

  1. Report of a technical evaluation panel on the use of beryllium for ITER plasma facing material and blanket breeder material

    Ulrickson, M.A. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Manly, W.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Beryllium because of its low atomic number and high thermal conductivity, is a candidate for both ITER first wall and divertor surfaces. This study addresses the following: why beryllium; design requirements for the ITER divertor; beryllium supply and unirradiated physical/mechanical property database; effects of irradiation on beryllium properties; tritium issues; beryllium health and safety; beryllium-coolant interactions and safety; thermal and mechanical tests; plasma erosion of beryllium; recommended beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components; proposed manufacturing methods to produce beryllium parts for ITER; emerging beryllium materials; proposed inspection and maintenance techniques for beryllium components and coatings; time table and costs; and the importance of integrating materials and manufacturing personnel with designers.

  2. Experimental studies and modeling of processes of hydrogen isotopes interaction with beryllium

    Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Chikhray, Y.V.; Romanenko, O.G.; Klepikov, A.Kh.; Shestakov, V.P.; Kulsartov, T.V. [Science Research Inst. of Experimental and Theoretical Physics of Kazakh State Univ., Almaty (Kazakhstan); Kenzhin, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this work was to clarify the surface beryllium oxide influence on hydrogen-beryllium interaction characteristics. Analysis of experimental data and modeling of processes of hydrogen isotopes accumulation, diffusion and release from neutron irradiated beryllium was used to achieve this purpose as well as the investigations of the changes of beryllium surface element composition being treated by H{sup +} and Ar{sup +} plasma glowing discharge. (author)

  3. Interim report on core physics and fuel cycle analysis of the pebble bed reactor power plant concept

    Calculations were made to predict the performance of a pebble bed reactor operated in a mode to produce fissile fuel (high conversion or breeding). Both a one pebble design and a design involving large primary feed pebbles and small fertile pebbles were considered. A relatively short residence time of the primary pebbles loaded with 233U fuel was found to be necessary to achieve a high breeding ratio, but this leads to relatively high fuel costs. A high fissile inventory is associated with a low C/Th ratio and a high thorium loading, causing the doubling time to be long, even though the breeding ratio is high, and the fuel cost of electrical product to be high. Production of 233U fuel from 235U feed was studied and performances of the converter and breeder reactor concepts were examined varying the key parameters

  4. An analysis of the thermal behaviour of pebble-bed nuclear reactors in the case of emergencies

    In this paper, the performance of pebble-bed nuclear reactors under very severe emergencies will be analysed. Calculated hypotheses take into consideration total failure of decay heat removal systems and any other active equipment, including electric power supply. It has been shown that pebble temperatures will remain well below safety limits if the reactor design embodies a core catcher with a passive cooling reservoir and a pebble draining system which would be naturally activated by a lack of a power supply. Although these features apply to any pebble-bed reactor, particular attention is paid to accelerator-driven sub-critical assemblies, where reactivity noise produced pebble quivering has a practical negligible effect. (authors)

  5. Apply Burnable Poison For Fuel Pebble Of PBMR-400 With OTTO Refueling

    A new fuel pebble was designed by adding spherical Gd2O3 particles for obtaining the minimum reactivity swing. Optimization is done in a lattice model to determine the combination of radius and number of burnable poison (BP) particles per pebble to obtain the minimum reactivity swing. The numerical calculation so that with 740 μm and 13 particles of Gd2O3. The reactivity swing is reduced from 38% to 2.0%, whereas the k∞ is 1.06 - 1.08 for a fuel lattice with the target burnup of 55 GWd/t. (author)

  6. Absorber rod for nuclear reactors in a pebble bed of spherical operating elements

    The claim refers to the constructional configuration of an absorber rod, whose and penetrating into the pebble bed has an opening to reduce the fracture rate, so that the operating elements can escape into a channel within the absorber rod. To suit this to the direction of movement of the elements a part of the end of the rod is flexibly connected to the hollow absorber rod via a joint. In this way the mechanical load of the element particles is reduced and simultaneously one achieves that much lower force is required to insert the absorber rod into the pebble bed. (UA)

  7. Hydrologic and Aquatic Species Implications of the Proposed Pebble Mine, Bristol Bay, Alaska

    Cundy, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    Bristol Bay, Alaska is one of the last ecosystems left on earth that haqs gone unaltered by human impacts.  Bristol Bay watershed supports the largest wild sockeye salmon runs on the planet with nearly 42 million salmon migrating to the watersheds headwaters every year.  The proposed Pebble Mine, containing gold, copper, and molybdenum has threatened the health of this watershed.  This project asks what effects the proposed Pebble Mine will have on water quality and quantity, and more specifi...

  8. Optimization of a radially cooled pebble bed reactor - HTR2008-58117

    By altering the coolant flow direction in a pebble bed reactor from axial to radial, the pressure drop can be reduced tremendously. In this case the coolant flows from the outer reflector through the pebble bed and finally to flow paths in the inner reflector. As a consequence, the fuel temperatures are elevated due to the reduced heat transfer of the coolant. However, the power profile and pebble size in a radially cooled pebble bed reactor can be optimized to achieve lower fuel temperatures than current axially cooled designs, while the low pressure drop can be maintained. The radial power profile in the core can be altered by adopting multi-pass fuel management using several radial fuel zones in the core. The optimal power profile yielding a flat temperature profile is derived analytically and is approximated by radial fuel zoning. In this case, the pebbles pass through the outer region of the core first and each consecutive pass is located in a fuel zone closer to the inner reflector. Thereby, the resulting radial distribution of the fissile material in the core is influenced and the temperature profile is close to optimal. The fuel temperature in the pebbles can be further reduced by reducing the standard pebble diameter from 6 cm to a value as low as I cm. An analytical investigation is used to demonstrate the effects on the fuel temperature and pressure drop for both radial and axial cooling. Finally, two-dimensional numerical calculations were performed, using codes for neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and fuel depletion analysis, in order to validate the results for the optimized design that were obtained from the analytical investigations. It was found that for a radially cooled design with an optimized power profile and reduced pebble diameter (below 3.5 cm) both a reduction in the pressure drop (Δp = -2.6 bar), which increases the reactor efficiency with several percent, and a reduction in the maximum fuel temperature (ΔT = -50 deg. C) can be achieved

  9. In-core fuel management optimization of a Very High Temperature pebble-bed Reactor

    A new calculation procedure was developed to reduce the power peak in the core of a Very High Temperature pebble-bed Reactor. The procedure consists in several coupled computational codes, which are used iteratively until convergence is reached. This procedure combines the fuel depletion and the neutronic behavior of the fuel in the reactor core, modeling once-through-then-out cycles as well as cycles in which pebbles are recirculated through the core an arbitrary number of times, obtaining the asymptotic fuel-loading pattern directly, without any intermediate loading pattern. (Author)

  10. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's beryllium control program for high-explosive test firing bunkers and tables

    This report on the control program to minimize beryllium levels in Laboratory workplaces includes an outline of beryllium surface, soil, and air levels and an 11-y summary of sampling results from two high-use, high-explosive test firing bunkers. These sampling data and other studies demonstrate that the beryllium control program is functioning effectively

  11. Estimation of beryllium ground state energy by Monte Carlo simulation

    Quantum Monte Carlo method represent a powerful and broadly applicable computational tool for finding very accurate solution of the stationary Schrödinger equation for atoms, molecules, solids and a variety of model systems. Using variational Monte Carlo method we have calculated the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom. Our calculation are based on using a modified four parameters trial wave function which leads to good result comparing with the few parameters trial wave functions presented before. Based on random Numbers we can generate a large sample of electron locations to estimate the ground state energy of Beryllium. Our calculation gives good estimation for the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom comparing with the corresponding exact data

  12. Ab Initio Simulation Beryllium in Solid Molecular Hydrogen: Elastic Constant

    Guerrero, Carlo L.; Perlado, Jose M.

    2016-03-01

    In systems of inertial confinement fusion targets Deuterium-Tritium are manufactured with a solid layer, it must have specific properties to increase the efficiency of ignition. Currently there have been some proposals to model the phases of hydrogen isotopes and hence their high pressure, but these works do not allow explaining some of the structures present at the solid phase change effect of increased pressure. By means of simulation with first principles methods and Quantum Molecular Dynamics, we compare the structural difference of solid molecular hydrogen pure and solid molecular hydrogen with beryllium, watching beryllium inclusion in solid hydrogen matrix, we obtain several differences in mechanical properties, in particular elastic constants. For C11 the difference between hydrogen and hydrogen with beryllium is 37.56%. This may produce a non-uniform initial compression and decreased efficiency of ignition.

  13. Measurement of the ultracold neutron loss coefficient in beryllium powder

    The ultracold neutron (UCN) reflection from beryllium powder at different slab thicknesses and different packing densities is measured. The reduced UCN loss coefficient η=(1.75±0.35)x10-4 for thermally untreated beryllium is extracted from experimental data. The formerly obtained experimental results on UCN reflection from beryllium after high temperature annealing are reconsidered. The loss coefficient η at room temperature in this case is obtained to be (6.4±2.5)x10-5, which is an order of magnitude higher than the theoretical one. The extraction of the loss coefficient from the experimental data is based on the modified diffusion theory where albedo reflection depends on packing density

  14. Estimation of beryllium ground state energy by Monte Carlo simulation

    Kabir, K. M. Ariful [Department of Physical Sciences, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Independent University, Bangladesh (IUB) Dhaka (Bangladesh); Halder, Amal [Department of Mathematics, University of Dhaka Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2015-05-15

    Quantum Monte Carlo method represent a powerful and broadly applicable computational tool for finding very accurate solution of the stationary Schrödinger equation for atoms, molecules, solids and a variety of model systems. Using variational Monte Carlo method we have calculated the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom. Our calculation are based on using a modified four parameters trial wave function which leads to good result comparing with the few parameters trial wave functions presented before. Based on random Numbers we can generate a large sample of electron locations to estimate the ground state energy of Beryllium. Our calculation gives good estimation for the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom comparing with the corresponding exact data.

  15. Elemental composition in sealed plutonium–beryllium neutron sources

    Five sealed plutonium–beryllium (PuBe) neutron sources from various manufacturers were disassembled. Destructive chemical analyses for recovered PuBe materials were conducted for disposition purposes. A dissolution method for PuBe alloys was developed for quantitative plutonium (Pu) and beryllium (Be) assay. Quantitation of Be and trace elements was performed using plasma based spectroscopic instruments, namely inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Pu assay was accomplished by an electrochemical method. Variations in trace elemental contents among the five PuBe sources are discussed. - Highlights: • A destructive chemical analysis of the PuBe neutron sources includes the solubilization and digestion of the PuBe alloy material. • Plutonium was assayed by an electrochemical method. • Beryllium assay and trace elemental contents were determined by ICP instruments. • A large variation in trace elemental composition was observed among the five PuBe source materials

  16. Extraction of beryllium sulfate by a long chain amine

    The extraction of sulfuric acid in aqueous solution by a primary amine in benzene solution, 3-9 (diethyl) - 6-amino tri-decane (D.E.T. ) - i.e., with American nomenclature 1-3 (ethyl-pentyl) - 4-ethyl-octyl amine (E.P.O.) - has made it possible to calculate the formation constants of alkyl-ammonium sulfate and acid sulfate. The formula of the beryllium and alkyl-ammonium sulfate complex formed in benzene has next been determined, for various initial acidity of the aqueous solution. Lastly, evidence has been given of negatively charged complexes of beryllium and sulfate in aqueous solution, through the dependence of the aqueous sulfate ions concentration upon beryllium extraction. The formation constant of these anionic complexes has been evaluated. (author)

  17. Photochemical Behavior of Beryllium Complexes with Subporphyrazines and Subphthalocyanines.

    Montero-Campillo, M Merced; Lamsabhi, Al Mokhtar; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel

    2016-07-14

    Structures of beryllium subphthalocyanines and beryllium subporphyrazines complexes with different substituents are explored for the first time. Their photochemical properties are studied using time-dependent density functional theory calculations and compared to boron-related compounds for which their photochemical activity is already known. These beryllium compounds were found to be thermodynamically stable in a vacuum and present features similar to those of boron-containing analogues, although the nature of bonding between the cation and the macrocycle presents subtle differences. Most important contributions to the main peak in the Q-band region arise from HOMO to LUMO transitions in the case of subphthalocyanines and alkyl subporphyrazine complexes, whereas a mixture of that contribution and a HOMO-2 to LUMO contribution are present in the case of thioalkyl subporphyrazines. The absorption in the visible region could make these candidates suitable for photochemical devices if combined with appropriate donor groups. PMID:26812068

  18. Beryllium Abundances in Solar Mass Stars

    Krugler, J. A.; Boesgaard, A. M.

    2008-08-01

    Light element abundance analysis allows for a deeper understanding of the chemical composition of a star beneath its surface. Beryllium provides a probe down to 3.5×106 K, where it fuses with protons. In this study, Be abundances were determined for 52 F and G dwarfs selected from a sample of local thin disc stars. These stars were selected by mass to range from 0.9 to 1.1 M⊙. They have effective temperatures from 5600 to 6400 K, and their metallicities [Fe/H]=-0.65 to +0.11. The data were taken with the Keck HIRES instrument and the Gecko spectrograph on the Canada France Hawaii Telescope. The abundances were calculated via spectral synthesis and were analyzed to investigate the Be abundance as a function of age, temperature, metallicity, and its relation to the lithium abundance for this narrow mass range. Be is found to decrease linearly with metallicity down to [Fe/H]˜-4.0 with slope 0.86 ± 0.02. The relation of the Be abundance to effective temperature is dependent upon metallicity, but when metallicity effects are taken into account, there is a spread ˜1.2 dex. We find a 1.5 dex spread in A(Be) when plotted against age, with the largest spread occurring from 6-8 Gyr. The relation with Li is found to be linear with slope 0.36 ± 0.06 for the temperature regime of 5900-6300 K.

  19. Neutron irradiation behavior of ITER candidate beryllium grades

    Kupriyanov, I.B.; Gorokhov, V.A.; Nikolaev, G.N. [A.A.Bochvar All-Russia Scientific Research Inst. of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Moscow (Russian Federation); Melder, R.R.; Ostrovsky, Z.E.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium is one of the main candidate materials both for the neutron multiplier in a solid breeding blanket and for the plasma facing components. That is why its behaviour under the typical for fusion reactor loading, in particular, under the neutron irradiation is of a great importance. This paper presents mechanical properties, swelling and microstructure of six beryllium grades (DshG-200, TR-30, TshG-56, TRR, TE-30, TIP-30) fabricated by VNIINM, Russia and also one - (S-65) fabricated by Brush Wellman, USA. The average grain size of the beryllium grades varied from 8 to 25 {mu}m, beryllium oxide content was 0.8-3.2 wt. %, initial tensile strength was 250-680 MPa. All the samples were irradiated in active zone of SM-3 reactor up to the fast neutron fluence (5.5-6.2) {center_dot} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} (2.7-3.0 dpa, helium content up to 1150 appm), E > 0.1 MeV at two temperature ranges: T{sub 1} = 130-180degC and T{sub 2} = 650-700degC. After irradiation at 130-180degC no changes in samples dimensions were revealed. After irradiation at 650-700degC swelling of the materials was found to be in the range 0.1-2.1 %. Beryllium grades TR-30 and TRR, having the smallest grain size and highest beryllium oxide content, demonstrated minimal swelling, which was no more than 0.1 % at 650-700degC and fluence 5.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. Tensile and compression test results and microstructure parameters measured before and after irradiation are also presented. (author)

  20. CHAPTER 7. BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS BY NON-PLASMA BASED METHODS

    Ekechukwu, A

    2009-04-20

    The most common method of analysis for beryllium is inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). This method, along with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), is discussed in Chapter 6. However, other methods exist and have been used for different applications. These methods include spectroscopic, chromatographic, colorimetric, and electrochemical. This chapter provides an overview of beryllium analysis methods other than plasma spectrometry (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry or mass spectrometry). The basic methods, detection limits and interferences are described. Specific applications from the literature are also presented.

  1. The uses and adverse effects of beryllium on health

    Cooper, Ross G.; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2009-01-01

    the current review for selecting articles were adopted from proposed criteria in The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. Articles were classified based on acute and chronic exposure and toxicity of beryllium. Results: The proportions of utilized and nonutilized...... articles were published in sources unobtainable through requests at the British Library, and some had no impact factor and were excluded. Conclusion: Beryllium has some useful but undoubtedly harmful effects on health and well-being. Measures needed to be taken to prevent hazardous exposure to this element...

  2. Method for removal of beryllium contamination from an article

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Hollenbeck, Scott M.

    2012-12-25

    A method of removal of beryllium contamination from an article is disclosed. The method typically involves dissolving polyisobutylene in a solvent such as hexane to form a tackifier solution, soaking the substrate in the tackifier to produce a preform, and then drying the preform to produce the cleaning medium. The cleaning media are typically used dry, without any liquid cleaning agent to rub the surface of the article and remove the beryllium contamination below a non-detect level. In some embodiments no detectible residue is transferred from the cleaning wipe to the article as a result of the cleaning process.

  3. Radiation Damage of Beryllium Reflector for Research Reactor Application

    Kang, Suk Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Beryllium is considered as a reflector material for the research reactor. The neutron fluence results in significant damage of material structure and corresponding degradation of physical.mechanical properties. In this study, the proton radiation damage of the beryllium grade manufactured by hot extrusion was investigated to emulate the effect of neutron radiation. The samples were irradiated by protons at room temperature; the acceleration voltage, and the proton amounts were 120keV, and 2.0 Χ 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The neutron irradiation experiment also have been conducted in HANARO, their results will be discussed in terms of swelling, and microstructure evolution.

  4. Plutonium destruction with pebble bed type HTGRs using Pu burner balls and breeder balls

    It was made clear that pebble bed type HTGRs using Pu burner balls (pu balls) and breeder balls (Th balls) possesses a potential to burn weapons-grade Pu to 740 Gwd/TPu. The total amounts of Pu and 239Pu of can reduced to about 20 and 1%, respectively. (author). 10 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  5. Optimized Core Design and Fuel Management of a Pebble-Bed Type Nuclear Reactor

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) has been selected by the international Generation IV research initiative as one of the six most promising nuclear reactor concepts that are expected to enter service in the second half of the 21st century. The VHTR is characterized by a high plant efficiency and a high fuel discharge burnup level. More specifically, the (pebble-bed type) High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is known for its inherently safe characteristics, coming from a negative temperature reactivity feedback, a low power density and a large thermal inertia of the core. The core of a pebble-bed reactor consists of graphite spheres (pebbles) that form a randomly packed porous bed, which is cooled by high pressure helium. The pebbles contain thousands of fuel particles, which are coated with several pyrocarbon and silicon carbon layers that are designed to contain the fission products that are formed during operation of the reactor. The inherent safety concept has been demonstrated in small pebble-bed reactors in practice, but an increase in the reactor size and power is required for cost-effective power production. An increase of the power density in order to increase the helium coolant outlet temperature is attractive with regard to the efficiency and possible process heat applications. However, this increase leads in general to higher fuel temperatures, which could lead to a consequent increase of the fuel coating failure probability. This thesis deals with the pebble-bed type VHTR that aims at an increased coolant outlet temperature of 1000 degrees C and beyond. For the simulation of the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor the DALTON-THERMIX coupled code system has been developed and has been validated against experiments performed in the AVR and HTR-10 reactors. An analysis of the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) design shows that the inherent safety concept that has been demonstrated in practice in the smaller AVR and HTR-10

  6. Separating gas-giant and ice-giant planets by halting pebble accretion

    Lambrechts, Michiel; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    In the Solar System giant planets come in two flavours: 'gas giants' (Jupiter and Saturn) with massive gas envelopes and 'ice giants' (Uranus and Neptune) with much thinner envelopes around their cores. It is poorly understood how these two classes of planets formed. High solid accretion rates, necessary to form the cores of giant planets within the life-time of protoplanetary discs, heat the envelope and prevent rapid gas contraction onto the core, unless accretion is halted. We find that, in fact, accretion of pebbles (~ cm-sized particles) is self-limiting: when a core becomes massive enough it carves a gap in the pebble disc. This halt in pebble accretion subsequently triggers the rapid collapse of the super-critical gas envelope. As opposed to gas giants, ice giants do not reach this threshold mass and can only bind low-mass envelopes that are highly enriched by water vapour from sublimated icy pebbles. This offers an explanation for the compositional difference between gas giants and ice giants in the S...

  7. CORE ANALYSIS, DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION OF A DEEP-BURN PEBBLE BED REACTOR

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-05-01

    Achieving a high burnup in the Deep-Burn pebble bed reactor design, while remaining within the limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback, is challenging. The high content of Pu and Minor Actinides in the Deep-Burn fuel significantly impacts the thermal neutron energy spectrum. This can result in power and temperature peaking in the pebble bed core in locally thermalized regions near the graphite reflectors. Furthermore, the interplay of the Pu resonances of the neutron absorption cross sections at low-lying energies can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator at certain operating conditions. To investigate the aforementioned effects a code system using existing codes has been developed for neutronic, thermal-hydraulic and fuel depletion analysis of Deep-Burn pebble bed reactors. A core analysis of a Deep-Burn Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (400 MWth) design has been performed for two Deep-Burn fuel types and possible improvements of the design with regard to power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback are identified.

  8. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    Aines, Roger D

    2015-03-31

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  9. Catalyst functionalized buffer sorbent pebbles for rapid separation of carbon dioxide from gas mixtures

    Aines, Roger D.

    2013-03-12

    A method for separating CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures uses a slurried media impregnated with buffer compounds and coating the solid media with a catalyst or enzyme that promotes the transformation of CO.sub.2 to carbonic acid. Buffer sorbent pebbles with a catalyst or enzyme coating are provided for rapid separation of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures.

  10. Status of the beryllium replacement project

    Currently, beryllium (Be) is used as the filler metal for brazing appendages on the sheaths of CANDU® fuel elements. Because of its toxicity, occupational exposure limits for Be are being reduced to very low levels, resulting in significant challenges to CANDU® fuel fabricators. The CANDU® Owners Group (COG) initiated a test program to identify a filler material to replace Be and confirm that the brazed joints meet the established technical requirements for CANDU® fuel. Together with eliminating health risks associated with the use of Be, the industry needs to be assured that continuation of fuel supply remains unaffected and that fuel fabrication processes continue to comply with health and safety standards. A literature survey of studies on brazing and joining of Zircaloy identified potential filler materials that can meet or exceed existing design requirements of the brazed joint, including the required mechanical, microstructural, corrosion resistance, and irradiation properties equivalent to those obtained with Be as braze material. Candidate materials were evaluated against several criteria, including manufacturability, melting point, wettability, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, effect on neutron economy, potential activation products, and interaction with fuel channels and other related disciplines. This exercise resulted in a list of promising candidate materials that were recommended for the first phase of testing. These materials include stainless steel (304 or 316), Al-Si, Ni-P, and Zr-Mn alloys. To allow a CANDU® utility have sufficient confidence in considering implementation of a different braze filler material, a Be Replacement Test Program, involving out-reactor and in-reactor tests, is being undertaken as a collaborative endeavour by the Canadian nuclear industry. The out-reactor tests consist of: a constructability assessment to determine the material’s suitability with current fuel manufacturing methods; evaluation of

  11. Irradiation effects on aluminium and beryllium

    .6%. Besides, due to the effects of embrittlement and swelling induced by irradiation, the HFR beryllium reflector elements had to be replaced after more than 25 years of operation. Operational and practical experiences with these reflector elements are commented, as well as main engineering features of the new reflector elements: upper-end fittings of both filler element and insert in stainless steel, no radially drilled holes and no roll pins

  12. Fabrication of Li2TiO3 pebbles using PVA–boric acid reaction for solid breeding materials

    Highlights: • Li2TiO3 pebbles were successfully fabricated by the slurry droplet wetting method. • Boron was used as hardening agent of PVA and completely removed during sintering. • Microstructure of fabricated Li2TiO3 pebble was exceptionally homogeneous. • Suitable process conditions for high-quality Li2TiO3 pebble were summarized. - Abstract: Lithium metatitanate (Li2TiO3) is a candidate breeding material of the Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) Test Blanket Module (TBM). The breeding material is used in pebble-bed form to reduce the uncertainty of the interface thermal conductance. In this study, Li2TiO3 pebbles were successfully fabricated by the slurry droplet wetting method using the cross-linking reaction between polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and boric acid. The effects of fabrication parameters on the shaping of Li2TiO3 green body were investigated. In addition, the basic characteristics of the sintered pebble were also evaluated. The shape of Li2TiO3 green bodies was affected by slurry viscosity, PVA content and boric acid content. The grain size and average crush load of sintered Li2TiO3 pebble were controlled by the sintering time. The boron was completely removed during the final sintering process

  13. Thermo-mechanical and neutron lifetime modelling and design of Be pebbles in the neutron multiplier for the LIFE engine

    Concept designs for the laser inertial fusion/fission energy (LIFE) engine include a neutron multiplication blanket containing Be pebbles flowing in a molten salt coolant. These pebbles must be designed to withstand the extreme irradiation and temperature conditions in the blanket to enable a reliable and cost-effective operation of LIFE. In this work, we develop design criteria for spherical Be pebbles on the basis of their thermo-mechanical behaviour under continued neutron exposure. We consider the effects of high fluence and fast fluxes on the elastic, thermal and mechanical properties of nuclear-grade Be. Our results suggest a maximum pebble diameter of 30 mm to avoid tensile failure, coated with an anti-corrosive, high-strength metallic shell to avoid failure by pebble contact. Moreover, we find that the operation temperature must always be kept above 450 deg. C to enable creep to relax the stresses induced by swelling. Under these circumstances, we estimate the pebble lifetime to be at least 16 months if uncoated, and up to six years when coated. We identify the sources of uncertainty on the properties used and discuss the advantages of new intermetallic beryllides and their use in LIFE's neutron multiplier. To establish Be-pebble lifetimes with improved confidence, reliable experiments to measure irradiation creep must be performed.

  14. High-contrast X-ray radiography using hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors with 1 mm thick Si sensor as a tool for monitoring liquids in natural building stones

    For the preservation of buildings and other cultural heritage, the application of various conservation products such as consolidants or water repellents is often used. X-ray radiography utilizing semiconductor particle-counting detectors stands out as a promising tool in research of consolidants inside natural building stones. However, a clear visualization of consolidation products is often accomplished by doping with a contrast agent, which presents a limitation. This approach causes a higher attenuation for X-rays, but also alters the penetration ability of the original consolidation product. In this contribution, we focus on the application of Medipix type detectors newly equipped with a 1 mm thick Si sensor. This thicker sensor has enhanced detection efficiency leading to extraordinary sensitivity for monitoring consolidants and liquids in natural building stones even without any contrast agent. Consequently, methods for the direct monitoring of organosilicon consolidants and dynamic visualization of the water uptake in the Opuka stone using high-contrast X-ray radiography are demonstrated. The presented work demonstrates a significant improvement in the monitoring sensitivity of X-ray radiography in stone consolidation studies and also shows advantages of this detector configuration for X-ray radiography in general

  15. AzTEC/ASTE 1.1 mm survey of SSA22: Counterpart identification and photometric redshift survey of submillimeter galaxies

    Umehata, H; Kohno, K; Hatsukade, B; Scott, K S; Kubo, M; Yamada, T; Ivison, R J; Cybulski, R; Aretxaga, I; Austermann, J; Hughes, D H; Ezawa, H; Hayashino, T; Ikarashi, S; Iono, D; Kawabe, R; Matsuda, Y; Matsuo, H; Nakanishi, K; Oshima, T; Perera, T; Takata, T; Wilson, G W; Yun, M S

    2014-01-01

    We present the results from a 1.1 mm imaging survey of the SSA22 field, known for having an overdensity of z=3.1 Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs), taken with the AzTEC camera on the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). We imaged a 950 arcmin$^2$ field down to a 1 sigma sensitivity of 0.7-1.3 mJy/beam to find 125 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) with a signal to noise ratio >= 3.5. Counterpart identification using radio and near/mid-infrared data was performed and one or more counterpart candidates were found for 59 SMGs. Photometric redshifts based on optical to near-infrared images were evaluated for 45 SMGs of these SMGs with Spitzer/IRAC data, and the median value is found to be z=2.4. By combining these estimation with estimates from the literature we determined that 10 SMGs might lie within the large-scale structure at z=3.1. The two-point angular cross-correlation function between LAEs and SMGs indicates that the positions of the SMGs are correlated with the z=3.1 protocluster. These resu...

  16. An AzTEC 1.1-mm Survey for ULIRGs in the field of the Galaxy Cluster MS 0451.6-0305

    Wardlow, J L; Wilson, G W; Yun, M S; Coppin, K E K; Cybulski, R; Geach, J E; Ivison, R J; Aretxaga, I; Austermann, J E; Edge, A C; Fazio, G G; Huang, J; Hughes, D H; Kodama, T; Kang, Y; Kim, S; Mauskopf, P D; Perera, T A; Scott, K S

    2009-01-01

    We have undertaken a deep (sigma~1.1 mJy) 1.1-mm survey of the z=0.54 cluster MS 0451.6-0305 using the AzTEC camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. We detect 36 sources with S/N>3.5 in the central 0.10 deg^2 and present the AzTEC map, catalogue and number counts. We identify counterparts to 18 sources (50%) using radio, mid-infrared, Spitzer IRAC and Submillimeter Array data. Optical, near- and mid-infrared spectral energy distributions are compiled for the 14 of these galaxies with detectable counterparts, which are expected to contain all likely cluster members. We then use photometric redshifts and colour selection to separate background galaxies from potential cluster members and test the reliability of this technique using archival observations of submillimetre galaxies. We find two potential MS 0451-03 members, which, if they are both cluster galaxies have a total star-formation rate (SFR) of ~100 solar masses per year -- a significant fraction of the combined SFR of all the other galaxies in MS 0...

  17. The ALMA Frontier Fields Survey I: 1.1 mm Continuum Detections in Abell 2744, MACSJ0416.1-2403 and MACSJ1149.5+2223

    González-López, J; Romero-Cañizales, C; Kneissl, R; Villard, E; Carvajal, R; Kim, S; Laporte, N; Anguita, T; Aravena, M; Bouwens, R J; Bradley, L; Carrasco, M; Demarco, R; Ford, H; Ibar, E; Infante, L; Messias, H; Arancibia, A M Muñoz; Nagar, N; Padilla, N; Treister, E; Troncoso, P; Zitrin, A

    2016-01-01

    Dusty star-forming galaxies are among the most prodigious systems at high redshift (z>1), characterized by high star formation rates and huge dust reservoirs. The bright end of this population has been well characterized in recent years, but considerable uncertainties remain for fainter dusty star-forming galaxies, which are responsible for the bulk of star formation at high redshift and thus play a key role in galaxy growth and evolution. In this first paper of our series, we describe our methods for finding high redshift faint dusty galaxies using millimeter observations with ALMA. We obtained ALMA 1.1 mm mosaic images for three strong-lensing galaxy clusters from the Frontier Fields survey. The 2'x2' mosaics overlap with the deep HST WFC3/IR footprints and encompass the high magnification regions of each cluster. The combination of extremely high ALMA sensitivity and the magnification power of these clusters allows us to systematically probe the sub-mJy population of dusty star-forming galaxies over a larg...

  18. Tritium release from beryllium discs and lithium ceramics irradiated in the SIBELIUS experiment

    The SIBELIUS experiment was designed to obtain information on the compatibility between beryllium and ceramics, as well as beryllium and steel, in a neutron environment. This experiment comprised irradiation of eight capsules, seven of which were independently purged with a He/0.1% H2 gas mixture. Four capsules were used to examine beryllium/ceramic (Li2O, LiAlO2, Li4SiO4, and Li2ZrO3) and beryllium/steel (Types 316L and 1.4914) compacts. Isothermal anneal experiments have been run on representative beryllium and ceramic disks from each of the four capsules at 550 degrees C to 850 degrees C in steps of 100 degrees C. The results indicate that tritium release from the beryllium did not exhibit burst release behavior, as previously reported, but rather a progressive release with increasing temperature. Generally, ∼99% of the tritium was released by 850 degrees C. Tritium release from the ceramic discs was quite similar to the behavior shown in other dynamic tritium release experiments on lithium ceramics. The tritium content in beryllium discs adjacent to a steel sample was found to be significantly lower than that found in a beryllium disc adjacent to a ceramic sample. Recoil of tritium from the ceramic into the beryllium appears to be the source of tritium entering the beryllium, probably residing in the beryllium oxide layer

  19. Beryllium solubility in occupational airborne particles: Sequential extraction procedure and workplace application.

    Rousset, Davy; Durand, Thibaut

    2016-01-01

    Modification of an existing sequential extraction procedure for inorganic beryllium species in the particulate matter of emissions and in working areas is described. The speciation protocol was adapted to carry out beryllium extraction in closed-face cassette sampler to take wall deposits into account. This four-step sequential extraction procedure aims to separate beryllium salts, metal, and oxides from airborne particles for individual quantification. Characterization of the beryllium species according to their solubility in air samples may provide information relative to toxicity, which is potentially related to the different beryllium chemical forms. Beryllium salts (BeF(2), BeSO(4)), metallic beryllium (Bemet), and beryllium oxide (BeO) were first individually tested, and then tested in mixtures. Cassettes were spiked with these species and recovery rates were calculated. Quantitative analyses with matched matrix were performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Method Detection Limits (MDLs) were calculated for the four matrices used in the different extraction steps. In all cases, the MDL was below 4.2 ng/sample. This method is appropriate for assessing occupational exposure to beryllium as the lowest recommended threshold limit values are 0.01 µg.m(-3) in France([) (1) (]) and 0.05 µg.m(-3) in the USA.([ 2 ]) The protocol was then tested on samples from French factories where occupational beryllium exposure was suspected. Beryllium solubility was variable between factories and among the same workplace between different tasks. PMID:26327570

  20. Comparison of elevated temperature properties of HIP'd impact ground beryllium (S-65-H) and HIP'd gas atomized (GA) beryllium

    Fusion designers have been limited to simple tensile properties and physical properties for modern beryllium grades. The work reported here expands the elevated temperature database to more complicated mechanical tests. The elevated temperature (ambient to 648 C) thermomechanical properties of two beryllium grades made by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) are compared: S-65H (made from impact ground powder) and GA (made from gas atomized powder). Successful measurements of elevated temperature smooth and notched fatigue were made for the first time on modern beryllium grades. Valid beryllium KIC fracture toughness results were obtained for the first time at temperatures above room temperature. Elevated temperature creep, and tensile are also presented. (orig.)

  1. Reducing the cost of S-65C grade beryllium for ITER first wall applications

    Beryllium is the current material of choice for plasma-facing components in ITER. The present design is for 10 mm thick beryllium tiles bonded to an actively cooled copper substrate. Brush Wellman grade S65C beryllium is preferred grade off beryllium for these tiles. S65C has the best resistance to low-cycle thermal fatigue than any other beryllium grad in the world. S65C grade beryllium has been successfully deployed in fusion reactors for more than two decades, most recently in the JET reactor. This paper will detail a supply chain to produce the most cost-effective S65C plasma facing components for ITER. This paper will also propose some future work too demonstrate the best technology for bonding beryllium to copper. (author)

  2. Preparation and characterization of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} ceramic pebbles by graphite bed method

    Hong, Ming; Zhang, Yingchun, E-mail: zycustb@163.com; Xiang, Maoqiao; Liu, Zhiang

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Lithium orthosilicate pebbles were fabricated by a new graphite bed process. • Two routes using different raw materials have been conducted in this work. • The fabricated pebbles exhibit a high relative density with uniform microstructure. • This method is short and simple as the pebbles could be fabricated in a continuous process. - Abstract: Lithium-based ceramics have long been recognized as tritium breeding materials in fusion reactor blankets. Lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) is one of these materials and has been recommended by many ITER research teams as the first selection for the solid tritium breeder. In this paper, the fabrication of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles used as tritium breeder by a graphite bed method was studied for the first time. Ceramic powders and deionized water were mixed and ball milled to obtain homogeneous suspensions. And then the ceramic suspensions were dispersed on spread graphite powder through nozzles. Spherical droplets with highly uniform size were formed by the surface tension of the liquid droplets. The droplets converted into green pebbles after drying. After calcination and sintering, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles with desired size and shape were prepared. The obtained Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles had narrow size distribution and favorable sphericity. Thermal analysis, phase analysis and microstructure observation of the pebbles were carried out systematically. Properties of the prepared pebbles were also characterized for crushing load strength, density and porosity, etc. The values were found to be conforming to the desired properties for used as solid breeder.

  3. Growing the gas-giant planets by the gradual accumulation of pebbles.

    Levison, Harold F; Kretke, Katherine A; Duncan, Martin J

    2015-08-20

    It is widely held that the first step in forming gas-giant planets, such as Jupiter and Saturn, was the production of solid 'cores' each with a mass roughly ten times that of the Earth. Getting the cores to form before the solar nebula dissipates (in about one to ten million years; ref. 3) has been a major challenge for planet formation models. Recently models have emerged in which 'pebbles' (centimetre-to-metre-sized objects) are first concentrated by aerodynamic drag and then gravitationally collapse to form objects 100 to 1,000 kilometres in size. These 'planetesimals' can then efficiently accrete left-over pebbles and directly form the cores of giant planets. This model is known as 'pebble accretion'; theoretically, it can produce cores of ten Earth masses in only a few thousand years. Unfortunately, full simulations of this process show that, rather than creating a few such cores, it produces a population of hundreds of Earth-mass objects that are inconsistent with the structure of the Solar System. Here we report that this difficulty can be overcome if pebbles form slowly enough to allow the planetesimals to gravitationally interact with one another. In this situation, the largest planetesimals have time to scatter their smaller siblings out of the disk of pebbles, thereby stifling their growth. Our models show that, for a large and physically reasonable region of parameter space, this typically leads to the formation of one to four gas giants between 5 and 15 astronomical units from the Sun, in agreement with the observed structure of the Solar System. PMID:26289203

  4. The growth of planets by pebble accretion in evolving protoplanetary discs

    Bitsch, Bertram; Lambrechts, Michiel; Johansen, Anders

    2015-10-01

    The formation of planets depends on the underlying protoplanetary disc structure, which in turn influences both the accretion and migration rates of embedded planets. The disc itself evolves on time scales of several Myr, during which both temperature and density profiles change as matter accretes onto the central star. Here we used a detailed model of an evolving disc to determine the growth of planets by pebble accretion and their migration through the disc. Cores that reach their pebble isolation mass accrete gas to finally form giant planets with extensive gas envelopes, while planets that do not reach pebble isolation mass are stranded as ice giants and ice planets containing only minor amounts of gas in their envelopes. Unlike earlier population synthesis models, our model works without any artificial reductions in migration speed and for protoplanetary discs with gas and dust column densities similar to those inferred from observations. We find that in our nominal disc model, the emergence of planetary embryos preferably should occur after approximately 2 Myr in order to not exclusively form gas giants, but also ice giants and smaller planets. The high pebble accretion rates ensure that critical core masses for gas accretion can be reached at all orbital distances. Gas giant planets nevertheless experience significant reduction in semi-major axes by migration. Considering instead planetesimal accretion for planetary growth, we show that formation time scales are too long to compete with the migration time scales and the dissipation time of the protoplanetary disc. All in all, we find that pebble accretion overcomes many of the challenges in the formation of ice and gas giants in evolving protoplanetary discs. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Fission Product Transport and Source Terms in HTRs: Experience from AVR Pebble Bed Reactor

    Rainer Moormann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fission products deposited in the coolant circuit outside of the active core play a dominant role in source term estimations for advanced small pebble bed HTRs, particularly in design basis accidents (DBA. The deposited fission products may be released in depressurization accidents because present pebble bed HTR concepts abstain from a gas tight containment. Contamination of the circuit also hinders maintenance work. Experiments, performed from 1972 to 88 on the AVR, an experimental pebble bed HTR, allow for a deeper insight into fission product transport behavior. The activity deposition per coolant pass was lower than expected and was influenced by fission product chemistry and by presence of carbonaceous dust. The latter lead also to inconsistencies between Cs plate out experiments in laboratory and in AVR. The deposition behavior of Ag was in line with present models. Dust as activity carrier is of safety relevance because of its mobility and of its sorption capability for fission products. All metal surfaces in pebble bed reactors were covered by a carbonaceous dust layer. Dust in AVR was produced by abrasion in amounts of about 5 kg/y. Additional dust sources in AVR were ours oil ingress and peeling of fuel element surfaces due to an air ingress. Dust has a size of about 1  m, consists mainly of graphite, is partly remobilized by flow perturbations, and deposits with time constants of 1 to 2 hours. In future reactors, an efficient filtering via a gas tight containment is required because accidents with fast depressurizations induce dust mobilization. Enhanced core temperatures in normal operation as in AVR and broken fuel pebbles have to be considered, as inflammable dust concentrations in the gas phase.

  6. Quasi-direct numerical simulation of a pebble bed configuration, Part-II: Temperature field analysis

    Highlights: ► Quasi direct numerical simulations (q-DNSs) of a pebble bed configuration have been performed. ► This q-DNS database may serve as a reference for the validation of different turbulence modeling approaches. ► A wide range of qualitative and quantitative data throughout the computational domain has been generated. ► Results for mean, RMS of temperature and respective turbulent heat fluxes are extensively reported in this paper. -- Abstract: Good prediction of the flow and heat transfer phenomena in the pebble bed core of a high temperature reactor (HTR) is a challenge for available turbulence models, which still require to be validated. While experimental data are generally desirable in this validation process, due to the complex geometric configuration and measurement difficulties, a very limited amount of data is currently available. On the other hand, direct numerical simulation (DNS) is considered an accurate simulation technique, which may serve as an alternative for validating turbulence models. In the framework of the present study, quasi-direct numerical simulation (q-DNS) of a single face cubic centered pebble bed is performed, which will serve as a reference for the validation of different turbulence modeling approaches in order to perform calculations for a randomly arranged pebble bed. These simulations were performed at a Reynolds number of 3088, based on pebble diameter, with a porosity level of 0.42. Results related to flow field (mean, RMS and covariance of velocity) have been presented in Part-I, whereas, in the present article, we focus our attention to the analysis of the temperature field. A wide range of qualitative and quantitative data for the thermal field (mean, RMS and turbulent heat flux) has been generated

  7. Proliferation Resistant Fuel for Pebble Bed Modular Reactors

    Proliferation of nuclear weapons produced with power reactors plutonium has always been amajor problem of the nuclear energy industry. This includes the PebbleBed Modular Reactor(PBMR), which is a specific design of a GenIV High-Temperature Reactor (HTR), mainly due to its online refueling feature, which may be misused for the production of weapons gradeplutonium. A promising approach toward preventing the proliferation of power reactorplutoniumis to denaturate the plutonium by increasing the ratio of 238Pu to total Pu in the spentfuel(1). The 238Pu isotope is characterized by a high heat rate (approximately 567 W/kg) due to thealpha decay of the 238Pu with half-life of 87.74 yr, in addition to its high spontaneous fissionneutron emission, which is higher than that of 240Pu. Thus, the presence of 238Pu in Pu considerably complicates the design and construction of nuclear weapons based on Pu, owing tothese characteristics of 238Pu. Recent papers(2,3) show that a Pu mixture is proliferation resistant given that the weight ratio of 238Pu to Pu is larger than 6%. In this paper we have studied afeasible technique for ensuring that the 238Pu to Pu ratio, in the Pu produced in PBMR, is larger than 6% during the entire fuel cycle. Contamination of the spent fuel with 238Pu may be achieved by doping the nuclear fuel witheither 241Am or 237Np(4-13). The 238Pu isotope is obtained from both 241Am and 237Np by a neutron-capture reaction and the subsequent decay of the reaction products(13).The 237Np isotopeis by itself a potential weapons grade material. However, its large critical mass of 57±4 kg(14) andthe difficulty of extracting it from irradiated fuel elements make it impractical for weapons purposes. On the other hand, the critical mass of 241Am is smaller, i.e. 34 to 45 kg. However, withdecay heat production of 114W/kg, the critical mass becomes a heat source of 3.9 to 5.1 KW,which makes 241Am unsuitable for weapons applications(3). As a result, it is a non

  8. Beryllium abundances in stars with planets:Extending the sample

    Gálvez-Ortiz, M C; Hernández, J I González; Israelian, G; Santos, N C; Rebolo, R; Ecuvillon, A

    2011-01-01

    Context: Chemical abundances of light elements as beryllium in planet-host stars allow us to study the planet formation scenarios and/or investigate possible surface pollution processes. Aims: We present here an extension of previous beryllium abundance studies. The complete sample consists of 70 stars hosting planets and 30 stars without known planetary companions. The aim of this paper is to further assess the trends found in previous studies with less number of objects. This will provide more information on the processes of depletion and mixing of light elements in the interior of late type stars, and will provide possible explanations for the abundance differences between stars that host planets and "single" stars. Methods: Using high resolution UVES spectra, we measure beryllium abundances of 26 stars that host planets and 1 "single" star mainly using the \\lambda 3131.065 A Be II line, by fitting synthetic spectra to the observational data. We also compile beryllium abundance measurements of 44 stars hos...

  9. Influence of impurities in Beryllium on tritium breeding ratio

    Several neutronics experiments simulating fusion blankets have been conducted with 14 MeV neutron source to assess the reliability of nuclear analysis codes. However, the analyses have not always presented good agreements so far between calculated and measured tritium production rates. One of the reasons was considered as impurities in beryllium which has negligibly small neutron absorption cross section in low energy range. Chemical compositions of beryllium were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) method, and a pulsed neutron decay experiment discovered that the macroscopic neutron absorption cross section for beryllium medium may be about 30% larger than the value calculated by the data specified by manufacturing company. The influence of the impurities on the calculations was studied on the basis of the fusion DEMO-reactor blanket design. As a result of the study, it was made clear that the impurities affect the local tritium production rates when the size of beryllium medium is more than 20-30 mean free paths (30-40 cm) in thickness. In case of some blanket designs that meet the above condition, the effect on tritium breeding ratio may become as large as about 4%. (author)

  10. Thermal cycling tests of actively cooled beryllium copper joints

    Screening tests (steady state heating) and thermal fatigue tests with several kinds of beryllium-copper joints have been performed in an electron beam facility. Joining techniques under investigation were brazing with silver containing and silver-free braze materials, hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and diffusion bonding (hot pressing). Best thermal fatigue performance was found for the brazed samples. (author)

  11. Extraction of lead and beryllium from a firing site soil

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) program is being implemented at LANL to conduct tests for evaluating the stability of the nation's aging nuclear stockpile. In order to reduce impact on the environment, containment of the non-fissile explosives tests is being phased in. The resulting shot debris can contain a mix of depleted uranium, lead, and beryllium. We are developing a treatment scheme to separate the radioactive and RCRA-hazardous components in order to recover the uranium, re-use some materials in future shots, and minimize waste for disposal. Our experience using a proprietary water soluble polymer to extract lead from contaminated soil to below TCLP levels has been extended to a surrogate soil from an open-air firing site that contains both lead and beryllium. Results for lead removal from this soil by dendrimers and molecular chelators will also be shown. Because of the potentially severe inhalation hazard associated with beryllium, the fate of this metal in our treatment scheme has been investigated, as well as extraction of beryllium using a variety of chemical agents

  12. Correlation of acoustic emission and dislocation damping in beryllium

    In a study of the acoustic emission generated in beryllium during tensile deformation, there is substantial evidence showing that the burst rate peak at yield is due to the generation of new dislocations and the burst rate peak at higher strains is due to the breakaway of dislocation line segments from deformation produce pins

  13. Biogeochemistry of beryllium in a forested catchment, Czech Republic

    Navrátil, Tomáš; Skřivan, Petr; Vach, Marek; Filippi, Michal

    Edinburg : University of Edinburg, 2003. s. 94. [International Symposium on Environmental Geochemistry.. 07.09.2003-11.09.2003, Edinburg] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB3013203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Keywords : biogeochemistry * experimental catchment * beryllium Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry

  14. Thermal cycling tests of actively cooled beryllium copper joints

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Linke, J.; Schuster, A.; Wiechers, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    Screening tests (steady state heating) and thermal fatigue tests with several kinds of beryllium-copper joints have been performed in an electron beam facility. Joining techniques under investigation were brazing with silver containing and silver-free braze materials, hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and diffusion bonding (hot pressing). Best thermal fatigue performance was found for the brazed samples. (author)

  15. Beryllium Wipe Sampling (differing methods - differing exposure potentials)

    Kerr, Kent

    2005-03-09

    This research compared three wipe sampling techniques currently used to test for beryllium contamination on room and equipment surfaces in Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling without a wetting agent, with water-moistened wipe materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Analysis indicated that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed about twice as much beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes, which removed about twice as much residue as dry wipes. Criteria at 10 CFR 850.30 and .31 were established on unspecified wipe sampling method(s). The results of this study reveal a need to identify criteria-setting method and equivalency factors. As facilities change wipe sampling methods among the three compared in this study, these results may be useful for approximate correlations. Accurate decontamination decision-making depends on the selection of appropriate wetting agents for the types of residues and surfaces. Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced removal efficiency such as methanol when surface contamination includes oil mist residue.

  16. Identification of an abnormal beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test

    The potential hazards from exposure to beryllium or beryllium compounds in the workplace were first reported in the 1930s. The tritiated thymidine beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) is an in vitro blood test that is widely used to screen beryllium exposed workers in the nuclear industry for sensitivity to beryllium. The clinical significance of the BeLPT was described and a standard protocol was developed in the late 1980s. Cell proliferation is measured by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine into dividing cells on two culture dates and using three concentrations of beryllium sulfate. Results are expressed as a 'stimulation index' (SI) which is the ratio of the amount of tritiated thymidine (measured by beta counts) in the simulated cells divided by the counts for the unstimulated cells on the same culture day. Several statistical methods for use in the routine analysis of the BeLPT were proposed in the early 1990s. The least absolute values (LAV) method was recommended for routine analysis of the BeLPT. This report further evaluates the LAV method using new data, and proposes a new method for identification of an abnormal or borderline test. This new statistical-biological positive (SBP) method reflects the clinical judgment that: (i) at least two SIs show a 'positive' response to beryllium; and (ii) that the maximum of the six SIs must exceed a cut-point that is determined from a reference data set of normal individuals whose blood has been tested by the same method in the same serum. The new data is from the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge (Y-12) and consists of 1080 workers and 33 non-exposed control BeLPTs (all tested in the same serum). Graphical results are presented to explain the statistical method, and the new SBP method is applied to the Y-12 group. The true positive rate and specificity of the new method were estimated to be 86% and 97%, respectively. An electronic notebook that is accessible via the Internet was used in

  17. Kinetics of tritium release from irradiated Li2TiO3 pebbles in out-of-pile TPD tests

    The rate of tritium release from Li2TiO3 pebbles was examined by post irradiation thermal desorption spectroscopy (the Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) method). Pre-treatments before and even after irradiation were found useful to gain insight on the behavior of these pebbles at different temperatures, as good spectrum de-convolution is achieved and kinetic parameters for the rate determining pseudo-first-order steps can be estimated. We show the results concerning Li2TiO3 pebbles bed specimens developed in the frame of the European fusion technology program

  18. Some features of beryllium corrosion behavior in Be-liquid Li-V-4Ti-4Cr alloy system

    Recent experimental results on beryllium corrosion behavior in a V-4Ti-4Cr alloy, liquid lithium static system during testing for 200-500 h at temperatures from 600 to 800 deg. C are presented. The influence of test conditions (temperature, duration and lithium purity) and beryllium characteristics (microstructure, grain size and chemical composition) on weight loss of beryllium and penetration of lithium into beryllium are discussed. Results of compressive tests for beryllium specimens before and after corrosion testing are also introduced

  19. Hanford Site Beryllium Program: Past, Present, and Future - 12428

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a long history of beryllium use because of the element's broad application to many nuclear operations and processes. At the Hanford Site beryllium alloy was used to fabricate parts for reactors, including fuel rods for the N-Reactor during plutonium production. Because of continued confirmed cases of chronic beryllium disease (CBD), and data suggesting CBD occurs at exposures to low-level concentrations, the DOE decided to issue a rule to further protect federal and contractor workers from hazards associated with exposure to beryllium. When the beryllium rule was issued in 1999, each of the Hanford Site contractors developed a Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) and initial site wide beryllium inventories. A new site-wide CBDPP, applicable to all Hanford contractors, was issued in May, 2009. In the spring of 2010 the DOE Headquarters Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) conducted an independent inspection to evaluate the status of implementation of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP). The report identified four Findings and 12 cross-cutting Opportunities for Improvement (OFIs). A corrective action plan (CAP) was developed to address the Findings and crosscutting OFIs. The DOE directed affected site contractors to identify dedicated resources to participate in development of the CAP, along with involving stakeholders. The CAP included general and contractor-specific recommendations. Following initiation of actions to implement the approved CAP, it became apparent that additional definition of product deliverables was necessary to assure that expectations were adequately addressed and CAP actions could be closed. Consequently, a supplement to the original CAP was prepared and transmitted to DOE-HQ for approval. Development of the supplemental CAP was an eight month effort. From the onset a core group of CAP development members were identified to develop a mechanism for

  20. Nuclear analyses for two 'look-alike' helium-cooled pebble bed test blanket sub-modules proposed by the US for testing in ITER

    The US is proposing two 'look-alike' sub-modules, based on helium-cooled pebble bed (HCPB) ceramic breeder, to be tested in the same test blanket module (TBM) that will occupy a quarter of a port in ITER and placed next to the Japanese TBM. The TBM has a toroidal width of 73 cm, a radial depth of 60 cm and a poloidal height of 91 cm. The ceramic breeder is made of Li4SiO4 with 75% Li-6 enrichment (60% packing factor) and beryllium is used as the multiplier. The two sub-modules are arranged in two configurations, namely a layered configuration and an edge-on configuration. In the present work, we analyze these two sub-modules using two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport codes in R-θ model that accounts for the presence of the ITER shielding blanket and the surrounding frame of the port. The objectives are: (1) to examine the profiles of heating and tritium production rates in the two sub-modules, both in the radial and toroidal direction, in order to identify locations where neutronics measurements can be best performed with least perturbation from the surroundings (2) to provide both local and integrated values for nuclear heating rates required for subsequent thermo-mechanics analysis, and (3) to compare the tritium production capabilities of two variants for the HCPB blanket concept, mainly the parallel and the edge-on configurations. We present the main findings from this study in this paper

  1. Investigations of the ternary system beryllium-carbon-tungsten and analyses of beryllium on carbon surfaces; Untersuchung des ternaeren Systems Beryllium-Kohlenstoff-Wolfram und Betrachtungen von Beryllium auf Kohlenstoffoberflaechen

    Kost, Florian

    2009-05-25

    Beryllium, carbon and tungsten are planned to be used as first wall materials in the future fusion reactor ITER. The aim of this work is a characterization of mixed material formation induced by thermal load. To this end, model systems (layers) were prepared and investigated, which give insight into the basic physical and chemical concepts. Before investigating ternary systems, the first step was to analyze the binary systems Be/C and Be/W (bottom-up approach), where the differences between the substrates PG (pyrolytic graphite) and HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) were of special interest. Particularly X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy ion scattering (ISS) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) were used as analysis methods. Beryllium evaporated on carbon shows an island growth mode, whereas a closed layer can be assumed for layer thicknesses above 0.7 nm. Annealing of the Be/C system induces Be{sub 2}C island formation for T{>=}770 K. At high temperatures (T{>=}1170 K), beryllium carbide dissociates, resulting in (metallic) beryllium desorption. For HOPG, carbide formation starts at higher temperatures compared to PG. Activation energies for the diffusion processes were determined by analyzing the decreasing beryllium amount versus annealing time. Surface morphologies were characterized using angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments were performed to study processes in the Be/W system in the temperature range from 570 to 1270 K. Be{sub 2}W formation starts at 670 K, a complete loss of Be{sub 2}W is observed at 1170 K due to dissociation (and subsequent beryllium desorption). Regarding ternary systems, particularly Be/C/W and C/Be/W were investigated, attaching importance to layer thickness (reservoir) variations. At room temperature, Be{sub 2}C, W{sub 2}C, WC and Be{sub 2}W formation at the respective interfaces was observed. Further Be{sub 2}C is forming with increasing annealing temperatures

  2. Fallout beryllium-7 as a soil and sediment tracer in river basins: current status and needs

    Taylor, Alex; Blake, Will H.; Smith, Hugh G.; Mabit, Lionel; Keith-Roach, Miranda J.

    2013-04-01

    Beryllium-7 is a cosmogenic radionuclide formed in the upper atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation of nitrogen and oxygen. Its constant natural production and fallout via precipitation coupled with its ability to bind to soil particles have underpinned its application as a sediment tracer. The short half-life of beryllium-7 (53.3 days) lends itself to tracing sediment dynamics over short time periods, thus, enabling assessment of the effect of land use change upon soil redistribution. Although beryllium-7 has been widely applied as a tracer to date, there remain crucial gaps in understanding relating to the assumptions for its use. To further support the application of beryllium-7 as a tracer across a range of environments requires consideration of both the current strengths and shortcomings of the technique to direct research needs. Here we review research surrounding the assumptions underpinning beryllium-7 use as a tracer and identify key knowledge gaps relating to i) the effects of rain shadowing and vegetation interception upon beryllium-7 fallout uniformity at the hillslope-scale; ii) the effect of preferential flow pathways upon beryllium-7 depth distribution in soil and overland flow upon beryllium-7 inventory uniformity and iii) the potential for beryllium-7 desorption in saline and reducing environments. To provide continued support for the use of beryllium-7 as a hillslope and catchment-scale tracer, there is an urgent need to undertake further research to quantify the effect of these factors upon tracer estimates.

  3. Proposal for an international experimental pebble bed reactor - HTR2008-58174

    HTRs, both prismatic block fuelled and pebble fuelled, feature a number of uniquely beneficial characteristics that will be discussed in this paper. In this paper the construction of an international experimental pebble bed reactor is proposed, possible experiments suggested and an invitation extended to interested partners for co-operation in the project. Experimental verification by nuclear regulators in order to facilitate licensing and the development of a new generation of reactors create a strong need for such a reactor. Suggested experiments include: Optimized incineration of waste Pu in a pebble bed reactor: The capability to incineration pure reactor grade plutonium by means of ultra high burn-up in pebble bed reactors will be presented at this conference in the track on fuel and fuel cycles. This will enable incineration of the global stockpile of separated reactor grade Pu within a relatively short time span. Testing of fuel sphere geometries, aimed at improving neutron moderation and a decrease in fuel temperatures. Th/Pu fuel cycles: Previous HTR programs demonstrated the viability of a Th-232 fuel-cycle, using highly enriched uranium (HEU) as driver material. However, considerations favoring proliferation resistance limit the enrichment level of uranium in commercial reactors to 20 %, thereby lowering the isotopic efficiency. Therefore, Pu driver material should be developed to replace the HEU component. Instead of deploying a (Th, Pu)O fuel concept, the proposal is to use the unique capability offered by pebble bed reactors in deploying separate Th- and Pu-containing pebbles, which can be cycled differently. Testing of carbon-fiber-carbon (CFC) structures for in-core or near-core applications, such as guide tubes for reserve shutdown systems, thus creating the possibility to safely shutdown reactors with increased diameter. Development of very high temperature reactor components for process heat applications. Advanced decay heat removal systems e

  4. Experimental study on single-phase convection heat transfer characteristics of pebble bed channels with internal heat generation

    The water-cooled pebble bed reactor core is the porous channels stacked with spherical fuel elements, having evident effect on enhancing heat transfer. Owing to the variability and randomness characteristics of it's interstice, pebble bed channels have a very complex heat transfer situation and have little correlative research. In order to research the heat transfer characters of pebble bed channels with internal heat source, electromagnetic induction heating method was adopted for overall heating the pebble bed which was composed of 8 mm diameter steel balls, and the internal heat transfer characteristics were researched. By comparing and analyzing the experimental data, the rule of power distribution and heat transfer coefficient with heat flux density, inlet temperature and working fluid's Re were got. According to the experimental data fitting, the dimensionless average heat transfer coefficient correlation criteria was got. The fitting results are good agreement with the experimental results within 12% difference. (authors)

  5. Automated control of a pebble bed core thermal flow test unit / by Jan H.J. Prinsloo

    Prinsloo, Jan Hendrik Jacobus

    2006-01-01

    The HTTF (Heat Transfer Test Facility) is a unique project verifying the only pebble bed correlations currently used by PBMR (Pty) LTD. They are developing a new concept nuclear power station and are at present in the preparation phase of the conshuction of the worlds first PBMR (Pebble Bed Modular Reactor). The PBMR required the HTTF to be built at the North-West University in Potchefstroom. The HTTF consists of two separate test facilities: the H7TU (High Temperature Test Uni...

  6. Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report

    Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

    2002-11-01

    This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

  7. The preliminary analysis on the steady-state and kinetic features of the molten salt pebble-bed reactor

    A novel design concept of molten salt pebble-bed reactor with an ultra-simplified integral primary circuit called 'Nuclear Hot Spring' has been proposed, featured by horizontal coolant flow in a deep pool pebble-bed reactor, providing 'natural safety' features with natural circulation under full power operation and less expensive primary circuit arrangement. In this work, the steady-state physical properties of the equilibrium state of the molten salt pebble-bed reactor are calculated by using the VSOP code, and the steady-state thermo-hydraulic analysis is carried out based on the approximation of absolutely horizontal flow of the coolant through the core. A new concept of 2-dimensional, both axial and radial, multi-pass on-line fuelling scheme is presented. The result reveals that the radial multi-pass scheme provides more flattened power distribution and safer temperature distribution than the one-pass scheme. A parametric analysis is made corresponding to different pebble diameters, the key parameter of the core resistance and the temperature at the pebble center. It is verified that within a wide range of pebble diameters, the maximum pebble center temperatures are far below the safety limit of the fuel, and the core resistance is considerably less than the buoyant force, indicating that the natural circulation under full power operation is achievable and the ultra-simplified integral primary circuit without any pump is possible. For the kinetic properties, it is verified that the negative temperature coefficient is achieved in sufficient under-moderated condition through the preliminary analysis on the temperature coefficients of fuel, coolant and moderator. The requirement of reactivity compensation at the shutdown stages of the operation period is calculated for the further studies on the reactivity control. The molten salt pebble-bed reactor with horizontal coolant flow can provide enhanced safety and economical features. (authors)

  8. The radial dependence of pebble accretion rates: a source of diversity in planetary systems I. Analytical formulation

    Ida, Shigeru; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Context. The classical "planetesimal" accretion scenario for the formation of planets has recently evolved with the idea that "pebbles", centimeter- to meter-sized icy grains migrating in protoplanetary disks, can control planetesimal and/or planetary growth. Aims. We investigate how pebble accretion depends on disk properties and affects the formation of planetary systems Methods. We construct analytical models of pebble accretion onto planetary embryos that consistently account for the mass and orbital evolution of the pebble flow and reflect disk structure. Results. We derive simple formulas for pebble accretion rates in the so-called "settling" regime for planetary embryos with more than 100 km in size. For relatively smaller embryos or in outer disk regions, the accretion mode is 3D, meaning that the thickness of the pebble flow must be taken into account, and resulting in an accretion rate that is independent of the embryo mass. For larger embryos or in inner regions, the accretion is in a 2D mode, i.e....

  9. Thermo-mechanical and neutron lifetime modeling and design of Be pebbles in the neutron multiplier for the LIFE engine

    DeMange, P; Marian, J; de Caro, M S; Caro, A

    2009-03-16

    Concept designs for the laser-initiated fusion/fission engine (LIFE) include a neutron multiplication blanket containing Be pebbles flowing in a molten salt coolant. These pebbles must be designed to withstand the extreme irradiation and temperature conditions in the blanket to enable a safe and cost-effective operation of LIFE. In this work, we develop design criteria for spherical Be pebbles on the basis of their thermomechanical behavior under continued neutron exposure. We consider the effects of high fluence/fast flux on the elastic, thermal and mechanical properties of nuclear-grade Be. Our results suggest a maximum pebble diameter of 30 mm to avoid tensile failure, coated with an anti-corrosive, high-strength metallic shell to avoid failure by pebble contact. Moreover, we find that the operation temperature must always be kept above 450 C to enable creep to relax the stresses induced by swelling, which we estimate to be at least 16 months if uncoated and up to six years when coated. We identify the sources of uncertainty on the properties used and discuss the advantages of new intermetallic beryllides and their use in LIFE's neutron multiplier. To establish Be-pebble lifetimes with improved confidence, reliable experiments to measure irradiation creep must be performed.

  10. Thermo-mechanical and neutron lifetime modeling and design of Be pebbles in the neutron multiplier for the LIFE engine

    Concept designs for the laser-initiated fusion/fission engine (LIFE) include a neutron multiplication blanket containing Be pebbles flowing in a molten salt coolant. These pebbles must be designed to withstand the extreme irradiation and temperature conditions in the blanket to enable a safe and cost-effective operation of LIFE. In this work, we develop design criteria for spherical Be pebbles on the basis of their thermomechanical behavior under continued neutron exposure. We consider the effects of high fluence/fast flux on the elastic, thermal and mechanical properties of nuclear-grade Be. Our results suggest a maximum pebble diameter of 30 mm to avoid tensile failure, coated with an anti-corrosive, high-strength metallic shell to avoid failure by pebble contact. Moreover, we find that the operation temperature must always be kept above 450 C to enable creep to relax the stresses induced by swelling, which we estimate to be at least 16 months if uncoated and up to six years when coated. We identify the sources of uncertainty on the properties used and discuss the advantages of new intermetallic beryllides and their use in LIFE's neutron multiplier. To establish Be-pebble lifetimes with improved confidence, reliable experiments to measure irradiation creep must be performed

  11. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program: German Pebble Bed Reactor Technology review update

    This report provides a review of the German pebble bed reactor technology, and updates the information provided in the Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program Interim Report COO-4057-6, German Pebble Bed Reactor Design and Technology Review, dated September 1978. Most of the updated information is for the PNP-500 and the HHT-Prototype plants. The PNP-500 is a 500 MW(t) multi-purpose demonstration plant for coal conversion applications. The HHT-Prototype is a 1640 MWt reactor designed to produce 675 MWe of electricity using a direct cycle gas turbine. The report provides a description and evaluation of the overall plant and the nuclear reactor for both the PNP-500 and HHT-Prototype. A description and evaluation of the primary system components is presented for the process heat and gas turbine applications

  12. Pebble bed reactors simulation using MCNP: The Chinese HTR-10 reactor

    SA Hosseini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Given the role of Gas-Graphite reactors as the fourth generation reactors and their recently renewed importance, in 2002 the IAEA proposed a set of Benchmarking problems. In this work, we propose a model both efficient in time and resources and exact to simulate the HTR-10 reactor using MCNP-4C code. During the present work, all of the pressing factors in PBM reactor design such as the inter-pebble leakage, fuel particle distribution and fuel pebble packing fraction effects have been taken into account to obtain an exact and easy to run model. Finally, the comparison between the results of the present work and other calculations made at INEEL proves the exactness of the proposed model.

  13. Transuranics elimination in an optimised pebble-bed sub-critical reactor

    In a nuclear energy economy the nuclear waste is a big burden to its further development and deployment. The possibility of eliminating the long-term part of the waste presents an appealing opportunity to the sustainability and acceptance of a better and cleaner source of energy. It is shown that the proposed pebble-bed transmutator has suitable characteristics to transmute most of the isotopes that contribute to the long-term radioactivity. This proposed reactor presents also inherent safety characteristics, which is a necessary element in a new reactor design to be accepted by the society. Throughout this paper, we will characterise the new reactor concept, and present some of the neutronics and safety characteristics of an accelerator driven pebble-bed reactor, (ADS) for transuranics elimination. (author)

  14. Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report. Pebble bed reactor fuel cycle evaluation

    Nuclear fuel cycles were evaluated for the Pebble Bed Gas Cooled Reactor under development in the Federal Republic of Germany. The basic fuel cycle specified for the HTR-K and PNP is well qualified and will meet the requirements of these reactors. Twenty alternate fuel cycles are described, including high-conversion cycles, net-breeding cycles, and proliferation-resistant cycles. High-conversion cycles, which have a high probability of being successfully developed, promise a significant improvement in resource utilization. Proliferation-resistant cycles, also with a high probability of successful development, compare very favorably with those for other types of reactors. Most of the advanced cycles could be adapted to first-generation pebble bed reactors with no significant modifications

  15. Experimental Investigations on Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Welding of C17300 Copper-Beryllium and 49Ni-Fe Soft Magnetic Alloys

    Copper-beryllium and soft magnetic alloys must be joined in electrical and electro-mechanical applications. There is a high difference in melting temperatures of these alloys which cause to make the joining process very difficult. In addition, copper-beryllium alloys are of age hardenable alloys and precipitations can brittle the weld. 49Ni-Fe alloy is very hot crack sensitive. Moreover, these alloys have different heat transfer coefficients and reflection of laser beam in laser welding process. Therefore, the control of welding parameters on the formation of adequate weld puddle composition is very difficult. Laser welding is an advanced technique for joining of dissimilar materials since it can precisely control and adjust the welding parameters. In this study, a 100W Nd:YAG pulsed laser machine was used for joining 49Ni-Fe soft magnetic to C17300 copper-beryllium alloys. Welding of samples was carried out autogenously by changing the pulse duration, diameter of beam, welding speed, voltage and frequency. The spacing between samples was set to almost zero. The ample were butt welded. It was required to apply high voltage in this study due to high reflection coefficient of copper alloys. Metallography, SEM analysis, XRD and microhardness measurement was used for survey of results. The results show that the weld strength depends upon the chemical composition of the joints. To change the wells composition and heat input of the welds, it was attempted to deviate the laser focus away from the weld centerline. The best strength was achieved by deviation of the laser beam away about 0.1mm from the weld centerline. The result shows no intermetallic compounds if the laser beam is deviated away from the joint.

  16. Experimental Investigations on Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Welding of C17300 Copper-Beryllium and 49Ni-Fe Soft Magnetic Alloys

    Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; Ebrahimzadeh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Copper-beryllium and soft magnetic alloys must be joined in electrical and electro-mechanical applications. There is a high difference in melting temperatures of these alloys which cause to make the joining process very difficult. In addition, copper-beryllium alloys are of age hardenable alloys and precipitations can brittle the weld. 49Ni-Fe alloy is very hot crack sensitive. Moreover, these alloys have different heat transfer coefficients and reflection of laser beam in laser welding process. Therefore, the control of welding parameters on the formation of adequate weld puddle composition is very difficult. Laser welding is an advanced technique for joining of dissimilar materials since it can precisely control and adjust the welding parameters. In this study, a 100W Nd:YAG pulsed laser machine was used for joining 49Ni-Fe soft magnetic to C17300 copper-beryllium alloys. Welding of samples was carried out autogenously by changing the pulse duration, diameter of beam, welding speed, voltage and frequency. The spacing between samples was set to almost zero. The ample were butt welded. It was required to apply high voltage in this study due to high reflection coefficient of copper alloys. Metallography, SEM analysis, XRD and microhardness measurement was used for survey of results. The results show that the weld strength depends upon the chemical composition of the joints. To change the wells composition and heat input of the welds, it was attempted to deviate the laser focus away from the weld centerline. The best strength was achieved by deviation of the laser beam away about 0.1mm from the weld centerline. The result shows no intermetallic compounds if the laser beam is deviated away from the joint.

  17. Proceedings of the 8th specialist meeting on recycling of irradiated Beryllium

    This report summarizes the documents presented in the 8th Specialist Meeting on Recycling of Irradiated Beryllium, which was held on October 28, 2013, in Bariloche, Río Negro, Argentina, hosted by INVAP and CNEA (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica). The objective of the meeting is to exchange the information of current status and future plan for beryllium study in the Research/Testing reactors, and to make a discussion of “How to cooperate”. There were 20 participants from USA, Japan, Korea, Austria and Argentina. In this meeting, information exchange of current status and future plan for beryllium study was carried out for the Research/Testing reactor fields, and evaluation results of beryllium materials were discussed based on new irradiated beryllium data such as swelling, deformation, gas release and so on. The subject of the used beryllium recycling was also discussed for the enforcement of demonstration recycling tests. (author)

  18. JET-ISX-B beryllium limiter experiment safety analysis report and operational safety requirements

    An experiment to evaluate the suitability of beryllium as a limiter material has been completed on the ISX-B tokamak. The experiment consisted of two phases: (1) the initial operation and characterization in the ISX experiment, and a period of continued operation to the specified surface fluence (1022 atoms/cm2) of hydrogen ions; and (2) the disassembly, decontamination, or disposal of the ISX facility. During these two phases of the project, the possibility existed for beryllium and/or beryllium oxide powder to be produced inside the vacuum vessel. Beryllium dust is a highly toxic material, and extensive precautions are required to prevent the release of the beryllium into the experimental work area and to prevent the contamination of personnel working on the device. Details of the health hazards associated with beryllium and the appropriate precautions are presented. Also described in appendixes to this report are the various operational safety requirements for the project

  19. Beryllium coating produced by evaporation-condensation method and some their properties

    Pepekin, G.I.; Anisimov, A.B.; Chernikov, A.S.; Mozherinn, S.I.; Pirogov, A.A. [SRI SIA Lutch., Podolsk (Russian Federation)

    1998-01-01

    The method of vacuum evaporation-condensation for deposition of beryllium coatings on metal substrates, considered in the paper, side by side with a plasma-spray method is attractive fon ITER application. In particular this technique may be useful for repair the surface of eroded tiles which is operated in a strong magnetic field. The possibility of deposition of beryllium coatings with the rate of layer growth 0.1-0.2 mm/h is shown. The compatibility of beryllium coating with copper or stainless steel substrate is provided due to intermediate barrier. The results of examination of microstructure, microhardness, porosity, thermal and physical properties and stability under thermal cycling of beryllium materials are presented. The value of thermal expansion coefficient and thermal conductivity of condensed beryllium are approximately the same as for industrial grade material produced by powder mettalurgy technique. However, the condensed beryllium has higher purity (up to 99.9-99.99 % wt.). (author)

  20. 5. IEA International workshop on beryllium technology for fusion. Book of abstracts

    The collection includes the abstracts of reports presented to the 5-th IEA international workshop on beryllium technology for fusion. The themes of reports are as follows: status of beryllium technology for fusion in Russia; manufacturing and testing of Be armoured first wall mock-up for ITER; development of the process of diffusion welding of metals stainless steel-copper-beryllium into a single composite; some features of beryllium-laser beam interaction; the effect of irradiation dose on tritium and helium release from neutron irradiated beryllium; thermal properties of neutron irradiated Be12Ti. The results of investigating the mechanical properties variation and swelling of beryllium under high temperature neutron irradiation are presented

  1. Medium voltage direct current (MVDC) converter for pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR) / Hendrik de Villiers Pretorius

    Pretorius, Hendrik de Villiers

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear and renewable energy systems will probably be used more and more extensively in future due to high environmental demands regarding pollution and exhaustion of the world's gas and coal reserves. Because most types of renewable energy systems do not supply electric power at line frequency and voltage a converter is used to connect these sources to the existing power system. The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a nuclear power plant currently using a 50 Hz synchrono...

  2. Design of a power conversion system for an indirect cycle, helium cooled pebble bed reactor system

    A design is presented for the turbomachinery for an indirect cycle, closed, helium cooled modular pebble bed reactor system. The design makes use of current technology and will operate with an overall efficiency of 45%. The design uses an intermediate heat exchanger which isolated the reactor cycle from the turbomachinery. This design excludes radioactive fission products from the turbomachinery. This minimizes the probability of an air ingress accident and greatly simplifies maintenance. (author)

  3. Influence of surface condition on deuterium release from Li2TiO3 pebble

    Highlights: • Li2TiO3 pebbles were irradiated with deuterium ions and heated repeatedly for investigating the change in deuterium desorption behavior from the pebbles. • The composition of Li decreased and those of Ti and O increased with the increase of the number of the irradiation/heating cycle. • The desorption peaks of the gases contained deuterium atoms were shifted to higher temperature region because of the defects created by the irradiation. • The amount of deuterium desorbed in forms of water increase because of the increase of the composition ratio of O near the surface. - Abstract: Lithium titanate (Li2TiO3) pebbles were irradiated with D3+ ions with energy of 5.0 keV, and the amounts of retained deuterium in the pebbles were measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy. In this research the irradiation/heating cycles were carried out repeatedly in order to investigate the influence of surface condition on deuterium release from Li2TiO3. The composition ratio of Li decreased with the increase of the number of the irradiation/heating cycle. Then, the desorption peaks of the gases contained deuterium atoms were shifted to higher temperature region, and the amount of desorbed gases in forms of water tended to increase. In addition, we carried out other experiments for the comparison. Comparing these results, we considered that the increase of the defects created by the irradiation was more responsible for the change in the desorption behavior by the irradiation/heating cycles than the lithium depletion. These results suggest that the tritium recovery efficiency would decrease with the increase of the defects and the damages especially at the low temperature region during the operation

  4. Computational and experimental prediction of dust production in pebble bed reactors—Part I

    Highlights: • A nonlinear dimensionless wear coefficient is theoretically proposed. • A material constant for the relation of asperity height and wear is introduced. • A nonlinear modification of Archard wear formula is proposed. • The graphite wear dust production in a typical pebble bed reactor is predicted. • Experimental and computational wear results for graphite are presented. -- Abstract: This paper describes the computational modeling and simulation, and experimental testing of graphite moderators in frictional contacts as anticipated in a pebble bed reactor. The potential of carbonaceous particulate generation due to frictional contact at the surface of pebbles and the ensuing entrainment and transport into the gas coolant are safety concerns at elevated temperatures under accident scenarios such as air ingress in the high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The safety concerns are due to the documented ability of carbonaceous particulates to adsorb fission products and transport them in the primary circuit of the pebble bed reactor, thus potentially giving rise to a relevant source term under accident scenarios. Here, a finite element approach is implemented to develop a nonlinear wear model in air environment. In this model, material wear coefficient is related to the changes in asperity height during wear. The present work reports a comparison between the finite element simulations and the experimental results obtained using a custom-designed tribometer. The experimental and computational results are used to estimate the quantity of nuclear grade graphite dust produced from a typical anticipated configuration. In Part II, results from a helium environment at higher temperatures and pressures are experimentally studied

  5. Generic Investigations on Transport Theory Modelling of High Temperature Reactors of Pebble Bed Type

    Sureda Sureda, Antonio Jaime

    2008-01-01

    The GRS (Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit = Company for Plant and Reactor Safety) maintains and further develops the code system DORT-TD/HERMIX-DIREKT, which is a complex tool for the simulation of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients and accident scenarios of high-temperature gas cooled reactors of pebble bed type. With this tool, GRS takes part in the international benchmark activity "OECD/NEA PBMR400 Transient Benchmark”, which aims at the simulation of transient...

  6. The study on fuel effect in discharge pipe of pebble bed reactor

    The simulation method of fuel loading in discharge pipe of pebble bed reactor is introduced. As an exemplary application case, the effect of fuel elements in the discharge pipe on reactor physics and thermohydraulic properties is calculated and analysed by CHTRP code in HTR-10 MW. The calculation gives the power and temperature distribution in the area of the discharge pipe, very useful for further analysis of reactor physics and safety

  7. Burnup performance of OTTO cycle pebble bed reactors with ROX fuel

    Highlights: • A 300 MWt Small Pebble Bed Reactor with Rock-like oxide fuel is proposed. • Using ROX fuel can achieve high discharged burnup of spent fuel. • High geological stability can be expected in direct disposal of the spent ROX fuel. • The Pebble Bed Reactor with ROX fuel can be critical at steady state operation. • All the reactor designs have a negative temperature coefficient. - Abstract: A pebble bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (PBR) with rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel was designed to achieve high discharged burnup and improve the integrity of the spent fuel in geological disposal. The MCPBR code with a JENDL-4.0 library, which developed the analysis of the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO) cycle in PBR, was used to perform the criticality and burnup analysis. Burnup calculations for eight cases were carried out for both ROX fuel and a UO2 fuel reactor with different heavy-metal loading conditions. The effective multiplication factor of all cases approximately equalled unity in the equilibrium condition. The ROX fuel reactor showed lower FIFA than the UO2 fuel reactor at the same heavy-metal loading, about 5–15%. However, the power peaking factor and maximum power per fuel ball in the ROX fuel core were lower than that of UO2 fuel core. This effect makes it possible to compensate for the lower-FIFA disadvantage in a ROX fuel core. All reactor designs had a negative temperature coefficient that is needed for the passive safety features of a pebble bed reactor

  8. Quantum-chemical approach to cohesive properties of metallic beryllium

    Calculations based upon the incremental approach, i.e. an expansion of the correlation energy in terms of one-body, two-body, and higher-order contributions from localized orbital groups, have been performed for metallic beryllium. We apply an embedding scheme which has been successfully applied recently to ground-state properties of magnesium and group 12 elements. This scheme forces localization in metallic-like model systems and allows for a gradual delocalization within the incremental approach. Quantum-chemical methods of the coupled-cluster and multi-reference configuration interaction type are used for evaluating individual increments. Results are given for the cohesive energy and lattice constants of beryllium, and it is shown that further development of the approach is needed for this difficult case

  9. Effects of beryllium-compounds on the hen. 2. Comm

    After oral application of 7Be2+ this cation is relative slowly absorbed from the intestine. The highest proportion of 7Be appeared in the feces. The absorbed 7Be has been found in the feathers, the bones and in the muscles as well as in the mucosa of the stomach and the intestine. Relative low is the accumulation in the liver and the kidneys as well as in the brain and the spinal cord. After i.v. application a high proportion of 7Be has been observed in the eggs. The rest of the applied radio-beryllium has been accumulated 7Be in the metabolically active tissues is removed very slowly. In contrast to this observation radio-beryllium disappeared relatively rapidly from the blood. (orig.)

  10. A charge-density study of crystalline beryllium

    The X-ray structure factors for crystalline beryllium measured by Brown [Phil. Mag. (1972), 26, 1377] have been analyzed with multipole deformation functions for charge-density information. Single exponential radial functions were used for the valence charge density. A valence monopole plus the three harmonics, P35(cos theta) sin 3phi, P6(cos theta) and P37(cos theta) sin 3phi, provide a least-squares fit to the data with Rsub(w)=0.0081. The superposition of these density functions describes a bonding charge density between Be atoms along the c axis through the tetrahedral vacancy. The results reported here are in qualitative agreement with a recent pseudo-potential calculation of metallic beryllium. The final residuals in the analysis are largest at high sin theta/lambda values. This suggests that core charge deformation is present and/or anharmonic motion of the nuclei is appreciable. (Auth.)

  11. Fabrication methods for beryllium spacecraft components (Series 2)

    The aims of this paper are to conserve and yet promote the use of one of the most versatile metal elements available to the practising engineer. The scope of the work described involves the selection of candidate components suitable for manufacture in beryllium. Evaluation by mathematical modelling using finite element techniques is used as an aid in determining the principal load paths in a structural component. Cost effective techniques which are objectively analysed suggest that the conservation of raw beryllia can best be achieved using recently developed plasma spray methods. The British Aircraft Corporation have been investigating methods of plasma spraying beryllium with A.W.R.E. and current developments are giving clear indications that for certain future space applications plasma spray is the technique which most nearly meets the conservation objective. (author)

  12. Fabrication of beryllium spheres and its validation tests

    A sphere-pack blanket concept using small size spheres of beryllium is one of the promising design concept of the ITER blanket, because the sphere-pack can accommodate the size deformation due to neutron irradiation damage, helium swelling and cyclic temperature changes. Preliminary R and D for an industrial fabrication technology of beryllium spheres (1.0 ± 0.3 mm in diameter) has been started as part of feasibility study of Japanese blanket concept of layered sphere-pack configuration. The following tests were performed in the several demo-fabrications; feasibility of size distribution control, material characterization such as macroscopic and microscopic structure analysis, impurity analysis, and attainable packing density, mechanical integrity under various thermal cycling conditions. (author)

  13. Low-energy electronic stopping for boron in beryllium

    The range distribution for 50-keV boron bombarding beryllium was measured by an energetic ion-beam backscattering technique using helium ions. This distribution was compared with the range calculated with computer code EDEP1, with the result k 0.101 ± 0.013 for the electronic-stopping k-value. This value is compared with the results of recent interpolations from measurements of other elements. (author)

  14. Thermal fatigue behavior of US and Russian grades of beryllium

    A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 KW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ''spike'' of 750 degrees C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stress in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m2. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S-65H, S-200F, S-300F-H, Sr-200, I-400, extruded high purity. HIP'd sperical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe12. Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be(SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis

  15. Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors

    Ilas, Dan [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

  16. Analysis of features of the deformation of auxetic beryllium

    Гунько, Михаил Николаевич; Олейнич-Лысюк, Алла Васильевна; Раранский, Николай Дмитриевич; Тащук, Александр Юрьевич

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of the linear elasticity theory using the experimentally obtained elastic stiffness modules, temperature dependences of the elastic compliance modules and tensor components of Poisson's ratios    of beryllium in a wide range of temperatures and directions in the crystal lattice were calculated, and it was shown that with increasing temperature, the value and signs of Poisson's ratios  change differently in various temperature intervals. In the interval 0-300K,  become negativ...

  17. Development and testing of analytical models for the pebble bed type HTRs

    The pebble bed type gas cooled high temperature reactor (HTR) appears to be a good candidate for the next generation nuclear reactor technology. These reactors have unique characteristics in terms of the randomness in geometry, and require special techniques to analyze their systems. This study includes activities concerning the testing of computational tools and the qualification of models. Indeed, it is essential that the validated analytical tools be available to the research community. From this viewpoint codes like MCNP, ORIGEN and RELAP5, which have been used in nuclear industry for many years, are selected to identify and develop new capabilities needed to support HTR analysis. The geometrical model of the full reactor is obtained by using lattice and universe facilities provided by MCNP. The coupled MCNP-ORIGEN code is used to estimate the burnup and the refuelling scheme. Results obtained from Monte Carlo analysis are interfaced with RELAP5 to analyze the thermal hydraulics and safety characteristics of the reactor. New models and methodologies are developed for several past and present experimental and prototypical facilities that were based on HTR pebble bed concepts. The calculated results are compared with available experimental data and theoretical evaluations showing very good agreement. The ultimate goal of the validation of the computer codes for pebble bed HTR applications is to acquire and reinforce the capability of these general purpose computer codes for performing HTR core design and optimization studies

  18. Coupling of RMC and CFX for analysis of Pebble Bed-Advanced High Temperature Reactor core

    Highlights: ► The CFD code CFX is used for whole pebble bed reactor core calculation. ► The Monte Carlo Code RMC and CFX are used for the coupling of neutronics and T-H. ► Coupled calculations for steady-state problem can reach stable results. ► Increasing the number of neutron histories is effective to improve accuracy. - Abstract: This paper introduces a steady-state coupled calculation method using the Monte Carlo Code RMC (Reactor Monte Carlo) and the Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) code CFX for the analysis of a Pebble Bed-Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) core. The RMC code is used for neutronics calculation while CFX is used for Thermal-Hydraulics (T-H) calculation. The porous media model is used in CFX modeling to simulate the pebble bed structure in PB-AHTR. The CFX model has also been validated against the RELAP5-3D model developed in the previous research. The script language PERL is used as a development tool to manipulate and control the entire coupled calculation. This research gives the conclusion that the steady-state coupled calculation using RMC and CFX is feasible and can obtain stable results within a few iterations. However, due to the statistical errors of Monte Carlo method, the fluctuation of results still occurs. For the purpose of improving the accuracy, the paper applies and discusses two methods, of which increasing the number of neutron histories is an effective method.

  19. Advanced Core Design And Fuel Management For Pebble-Bed Reactors

    Hans D. Gougar; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; William K. Terry

    2004-10-01

    A method for designing and optimizing recirculating pebble-bed reactor cores is presented. At the heart of the method is a new reactor physics computer code, PEBBED, which accurately and efficiently computes the neutronic and material properties of the asymptotic (equilibrium) fuel cycle. This core state is shown to be unique for a given core geometry, power level, discharge burnup, and fuel circulation policy. Fuel circulation in the pebble-bed can be described in terms of a few well?defined parameters and expressed as a recirculation matrix. The implementation of a few heat?transfer relations suitable for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors allows for the rapid estimation of thermal properties critical for safe operation. Thus, modeling and design optimization of a given pebble-bed core can be performed quickly and efficiently via the manipulation of a limited number key parameters. Automation of the optimization process is achieved by manipulation of these parameters using a genetic algorithm. The end result is an economical, passively safe, proliferation-resistant nuclear power plant.

  20. Deleterious Thermal Effects Due To Randomized Flow Paths in Pebble Bed, and Particle Bed Style Reactors

    Moran, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    A review of literature associated with Pebble Bed and Particle Bed reactor core research has revealed a systemic problem inherent to reactor core concepts which utilize randomized rather than structured coolant channel flow paths. For both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor designs; case studies reveal that for indeterminate reasons, regions within the core would suffer from excessive heating leading to thermal runaway and localized fuel melting. A thermal Computational Fluid Dynamics model was utilized to verify that In both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor concepts randomized coolant channel pathways combined with localized high temperature regions would work together to resist the flow of coolant diverting it away from where it is needed the most to cooler less resistive pathways where it is needed the least. In other words given the choice via randomized coolant pathways the reactor coolant will take the path of least resistance, and hot zones offer the highest resistance. Having identified the relationship between randomized coolant channel pathways and localized fuel melting it is now safe to assume that other reactor concepts that utilize randomized coolant pathways such as the foam core reactor are also susceptible to this phenomenon.

  1. Intracolonic multiple pebbles in young adults: Radiographic imaging and conventional approach to a case

    Mehmet Eryilmaz; Orkun Ozturk; Oner Mentes; Kenan Soylu; Murat Durusu; K(o)ksal Oner

    2006-01-01

    Most of the foreign bodies detected in adult gastrointestinal systems are accidentally swallowed pins. In this study, we presented a case with intracolonic multiple pebbles. A 20-year-old man was admitted to emergency surgery policlinic for abdominal pain for 2 d without any alleviation or aggravation. His upright plain abdominal radiographic imaging revealed about 30-40 overt dense opacities in lumen of colonic segments, with oval and well shaped contours, each approximately 1cm x 1cm in size. The multiplanar reconstructions and threedimensional images combined with sectional screening showed that all pebbles had passed completely into the colon and no foreign bodies had remained in the ileal segments. On psychiatric assessment, he was found to have immature personality features, difficulty in overcoming stressors and adaptation disorder. He recovered by conservative management and radiographic monitoring applied during his follow-up. Thus, it can be concluded that, in differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in adult ages, though less frequently seen than in children,gastrointestinal system foreign bodies should always be kept in mind and it should be considered that ingestion of pebbles may be one of the factors contributing to abdominal pain particularly in young adults with psychiatric problems. In such cases suspected of having foreign bodies which cannot be detected by plain films, abdominal tomography can be an alternative for diagnostic imaging.

  2. Monte Carlo Calculations of Pebble Bed Benchmark Configurations of the PROTEUS Facility

    Under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency, a series of well-documented benchmark experiments were performed at the Proteus facility of the Swiss Paul Scherrer Institute. Thirteen critical pebble bed reactor configurations were assembled, with ten of them deterministic with a precise location of the low-enriched fuel and moderator pebbles. Seven of these configurations were modeled with a very high spatial resolution with the Monte Carlo code MCNP with details that go from the fuel kernel (0.5 mm in diameter) to the walls surrounding the facility. The calculations of the k's of the configurations agree quite well with the experiments (within a fraction of a dollar). A sensitivity analysis is included to discuss the possibility of a small bias; also biases introduced by customary approximations of production codes were calculated. The experiments and the analysis of this paper might be very useful tools to check the calculational accuracy of procedures used in the emerging work related to pebble bed modular gas-cooled reactors

  3. Development of a 3D multigroup program for Dancoff factor calculation in pebble bed reactors

    Highlights: • Development of a 3D Monte Carlo based code for pebble bed reactors. • Dancoff sensitivity to clad, moderator and fuel cross sections is considered. • Sensitivity of Dancoff to number of energy groups is considered. • Sensitivity of Dancoff to number of fuel and their arrangement is considered. • Excellent agreements vs. MCNP code. - Abstract: The evaluation of multigroup constants in reactor calculations depends on several parameters. One of these parameters is the Dancoff factor which is used for calculating the resonance integral and flux depression in the resonance region in heterogeneous systems. In the current paper, a computer program (MCDAN-3D) is developed for calculating three dimensional black and gray Dancoff coefficients, based on Monte Carlo, escape probability and neutron free flight methods. The developed program is capable to calculate the Dancoff factor for an arbitrary arrangement of fuel and moderator pebbles. Moreover this program can simulate fuels with homogeneous and heterogeneous compositions. It might generate the position of Triso particles in fuel pebbles randomly as well. It could calculate the black and gray Dancoff coefficients since fuel region might have different cross sections. Finally, the effects of clad and moderator are considered and the sensitivity of Dancoff factor with fuels arrangement variation, number of TRISO particles and neutron energy has been studied

  4. Dose Rates from Plutonium Metal and Beryllium Metal in a 9975 Shipping Container

    A parametric study was performed of the radiation dose rates that might be produced if plutonium metal and beryllium metal were shipped in the 9975 shipping package. These materials consist of heterogeneous combinations plutonium metal and beryllium. The plutonium metal content varies up to 4.4 kilograms while the beryllium metal varies up to 4 kilograms. This paper presents the results of that study

  5. Elastic, micro- and macroplastic properties of polycrystalline beryllium

    Kardashev, B. K.; Kupriyanov, I. B.

    2011-12-01

    The Young's modulus and the internal friction of beryllium polycrystals (size grain from 6 to 60 μm) prepared by the powder metallurgy method have been studied as functions of the amplitude and temperature in the range from 100 to 873 K. The measurements have been performed using the composite piezoelectric vibrator method for longitudinal vibrations at frequencies about 100 kHz. Based on the acoustic measurements, the data have been obtained on the elastic and inelastic (microplastic) properties as functions of vibration stress amplitudes within the limits from 0.2 to 30-60 MPa. The microplastic deformation diagram is shown to become nonlinear at the amplitudes higher than 5 MPa. The beryllium mechanical characteristics (the yield strength σ 0.2, the ultimate strength σ u , and the conventional microscopic yield strength σ y ) obtained with various grain sizes are compared. At room temperature, all the parameters satisfactorily obey the Hall-Petch relationship, although there is no complete similarity. The temperature dependences are quite different, namely: σ 0.2( T) and σ u ( T) decrease monotonically during heating from room temperature to higher temperatures; however, σ y ( T) behaves unusually, and it has a minimum near 400 K. The different levels of stresses and the absence of similarity indicate that the scattering of the ultrasound energy and the formation of a level of the macroscopic flow stresses in beryllium occur on dislocation motion obstacles of different origins.

  6. Electron microscope study of thin beryllium lamellae (1963)

    Thin SR beryllium lamellae are examined by electron microscopy after various treatments, together with other samples made up of Be - Fe at 1 per cent and 0.2 per cent iron. The SR beryllium is examined after annealing at 750 deg C and 900 deg C, strongly cold-worked and quenched at 900 deg C. At 950 deg C the metal is perfectly annealed; at 750 deg C the polygonisation is almost complete, the dislocations are arranged either is dislocation walls in the prismatic planes, or in hexagonal lattices with non-dissociated nodes suggesting a high stacking defect energy. The cold-worked structure has a high dislocation density and already existing crystal walls. In the quenched state, the few dislocations are very straight and are aligned in the crystallographic directions. Iron-precipitation is studied in two alloys during tempering at 660 deg after quenching in salt water. The precipitate appears at the grain boundaries and then spreads through the matrix leaving a depleted zone in the neighbourhood of the joints. These precipitates, in the form of platelets parallel to the base planes of the beryllium lattice have been identified as the inter metallic phase Be11 Fe oriented in relation to the matrix (0 0 0 1)//(0 0 0 1) (1 0 1-bar 0)//(1 1 2-bar 0). (authors)

  7. Beryllium Science: US-UK agreement on the use of Atomic Energy for mutual defense

    Hanafee, J.E. (ed.)

    1988-02-19

    Twenty-seven papers are presented on beryllium supply, production, fabrication, safe handling, analysis, powder technology, and coatings. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (DLC)

  8. The impact of beryllium chloride and oxide on sexual function and offspring development in female rats

    The comparative study of the action of soluble chloride and difficultly soluble beryllium oxide on sexual cycle in female rats and their conception capability, revealing of embryotoxic and teratogenic effect of these compounds and determination of significance of terms of their impact on pregnant female as well as beryllium capability to penetrate through the placenta and accumulate in the offspring organism have been performed. A great potential danger of impact on animal reproductive function of soluble (chloride) beryllium compounds as compared with low soluble ones (oxide). In the genesis of embryotoxic teratonic effect probably along with beryllium impact on progeny through the maternal organism there occurs its direct impact on the offspring

  9. Vacuum Brazing of Beryllium Copper Components for the National Ignition Facility

    A process for vacuum brazing beryllium copper anode assemblies was required for the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell System, or PEPC, a component for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Initial problems with the joint design and wettability of the beryllium copper drove some minor design changes. Brazing was facilitated by plating the joint surface of the beryllium copper rod with silver 0.0006 inch thick. Individual air sampling during processing and swipe tests of the furnace interior after brazing revealed no traceable levels of beryllium

  10. Beryllium Science: US-UK agreement on the use of Atomic Energy for mutual defense

    Twenty-seven papers are presented on beryllium supply, production, fabrication, safe handling, analysis, powder technology, and coatings. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers

  11. Problems and future plan on material development of beryllium in materials testing reactors

    Beryllium has been utilized as a moderator and/or reflector in a number of material testing reactors. The attractive nuclear properties of beryllium are its low atomic number, low atomic weight, low parasitic capture cross section for thermal neutrons, readiness to part with one of its own neutrons, and good neutron elastic scattering characteristics. However, it is difficult to reprocess irradiated beryllium because of high induced radioactivity. Disposal has also been difficult because of toxicity issues and special nuclear material controls. In this paper, problems and future plans of beryllium technology are introduced for nuclear reactors. (author)

  12. Analysis of dust and fission products in a pebble bed NGNP

    In the HTR pebble bed reactor graphite dust is generated during normal reactor operation due to pebble-to-pebble interactions. This dust will be deposited throughout the primary system. Furthermore, the dust will become radioactive due to sorption of fission products released during normal operation. This paper presents an analysis of dust transport and deposition and fission product transport and plate-out during normal operation of a NGNP (next generation nuclear plant) Westinghouse pebble bed design. The main objective is to determine the amount and location of deposited graphite dust in the system and the amount of radioactive isotopes adsorbed on the structures and the dust during normal operation. The results will be used in planning of maintenance activities. Moreover the present results may be used in a next step to perform a depressurized loss of forced cooling (D-LOFC) analysis and to determine the amount of radioactivity released to the atmosphere during the accident. The analysis was performed using the SPECTRA code. Based on the assumed dust source term, during the 60 years lifetime of the pebble bed reactor concept which was analyzed approximately 1630 kg dust enters the primary helium flow. It was determined: (1)That 86% of the dust settles on the graphite structures inside the reactor vessel. Of the remaining graphite dust 2/3 collects in the low temperature intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and the remaining dust in the high temperature IHX and the connecting pipes of the primary system. (2)Agglomeration of dust from smaller into larger particles is observed at all locations. The resuspension of agglomerated dust particles is an important phenomenon that limits the build-up of a dust layer on the surface of the IHXs. A large deposited dust layer is observed on the control rod drive (CRD) walls in the graphite structures. The dust accumulates on the CRD walls because, due to very low gas velocities, resuspension of the agglomerated particles does

  13. Supplemental Report on Nuclear Safeguards Considerations for the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    Recent reports by Department of Energy National Laboratories have discussed safeguards considerations for the low enriched uranium (LEU) fueled Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and the need for bulk accountancy of the plutonium in used fuel. These reports fail to account effectively for the degree of plutonium dilution in the graphitized-carbon pebbles that is sufficient to meet the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) 'provisional' guidelines for termination of safeguards on 'measured discards.' The thrust of this finding is not to terminate safeguards but to limit the need for specific accountancy of plutonium in stored used fuel. While the residual uranium in the used fuel may not be judged sufficiently diluted to meet the IAEA provisional guidelines for termination of safeguards, the estimated quantities of 232U and 236U in the used fuel at the target burn-up of ∼91 GWD/MT exceed specification limits for reprocessed uranium (ASTM C787) and will require extensive blending with either natural uranium or uranium enrichment tails to dilute the 236U content to fall within specification thus making the PBMR used fuel less desirable for commercial reprocessing and reuse than that from light water reactors. Also the PBMR specific activity of reprocessed uranium isotopic mixture and its A2 values for effective dose limit if released in a dispersible form during a transportation accident are more limiting than the equivalent values for light water reactor spent fuel at 55 GWD/MT without accounting for the presence of the principal carry-over fission product (99Tc) and any possible plutonium contamination that may be present from attempted covert reprocessing. Thus, the potentially recoverable uranium from PBMR used fuel carries reactivity penalties and radiological penalties likely greater than those for reprocessed uranium from light water reactors. These factors impact the economics of reprocessing, but a more significant consideration is that reprocessing

  14. Beryllium Project: developing in CDTN of uranium dioxide fuel pellets with addition of beryllium oxide to increase the thermal conductivity

    Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Camarano, Denise das Merces; Miranda, Odair; Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Andrade, Antonio Santos; Queiroz, Carolinne Mol; Gonzaga, Mariana de Carvalho Leal, E-mail: ranf@cdtn.br, E-mail: dmc@cdtn.br, E-mail: odairm@cdtn.br, E-mail: pabloag@cdtn.br, E-mail: antdrade@gmail.com, E-mail: carolmol@gmail.com, E-mail: mari_clgonzaga@hotmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Pampulha, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Although the nuclear fuel currently based on pellets of uranium dioxide be very safe and stable, the biggest problem is that this material is not a good conductor of heat. This results in an elevated temperature gradient between the center and its lateral surface, which leads to a premature degradation of the fuel, which restricts the performance of the reactor, being necessary to change the fuel before its full utilization. An increase of only 5 to 10 percent in its thermal conductivity, would be a significant increase. An increase of 50 percent would be a great improvement. A project entitled 'Beryllium Project' was developed in CDTN - Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, which aimed to develop fuel pellets made from a mixture of uranium dioxide microspheres and beryllium oxide powder to obtain a better heat conductor phase, filling the voids between the microspheres to increase the thermal conductivity of the pellet. Increases in the thermal conductivity in the range of 8.6% to 125%, depending on the level of addition employed in the range of 1% to 14% by weight of beryllium oxide, were obtained. This type of fuel promises to be safer than current fuels, improving the performance of the reactor, in addition to last longer, resulting in great savings. (author)

  15. Validation of In-Situ Iron-Manganese Oxide Coated Stream Pebbles as Sensors for Arsenic Source Monitoring

    Blake, J.; Peters, S. C.; Casteel, A.

    2013-12-01

    Locating nonpoint source contaminant fluxes can be challenging due to the inherent heterogeneity of source and of the subsurface. Contaminants such as arsenic are a concern for drinking water quality and ecosystem health. Arsenic contamination can be the result of several natural and anthropogenic sources, and therefore it can be difficult to trace and identify major areas of arsenic in natural systems. Identifying a useful source indicator for arsenic is a crucial step for environmental remediation efforts. Previous studies have found iron-manganese oxide coated streambed pebbles as useful source indicators due to their high attraction for heavy metals in water. In this study, pebbles, surface water at baseflow and nearby rocks were sampled from the Pennypack Creek and its tributaries, in southwestern Pennsylvania, to test the ability of coated streambed pebbles as environmental source indicators for arsenic. Quartz pebbles, 5-7 cm in diameter, were sampled to minimize elemental contamination from rock chemistry. In addition, quartz provides an excellent substrate for iron and manganese coatings to form. These coatings were leached from pebbles using 4M nitric acid with 0.1% concentrated hydrochloric acid. Following sample processing, analyses were performed using an ICP-MS and the resulting data were spatially organized using ArcGIS software. Arsenic, iron and manganese concentrations in the leachate are normalized to pebble surface area and each location is reported as a ratio of arsenic to iron and manganese. Results suggest that iron-manganese coated stream pebbles are useful indicators of arsenic location within a watershed.

  16. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-09-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge

  17. Simplified models for pebble-bed HTR core burn-up calculations with Monteburns2.0©

    Highlights: ► PBMR-400 annular core is very difficult to simulate in a reliable way. ► Nuclide evolutions given by different lattice models can differ significantly. ► To split fixed lattice models into two axial zones does not affect results significantly. ► We can choose a (simplified) core model on the basis of the analysis aim. ► Monteburns gives by survey burn-up calculations reasonable nuclide evolution trends. - Abstract: This paper aims at comparing some simplified models to simulate irradiation cycles of Pu fuelled pebble-bed reactors with Monteburns2.0© code. As a reference core, the PBMR-400 (proposed in the framework of the EU PUMA project, where this kind of core fuelled by a Pu and Pu–Np fuel has been studied) was taken into account. Pebble-bed High Temperature Reactor (HTR) cores consist of hundreds of thousands pebbles arranged stochastically in a cylindrical or annular space and each pebble is a single fuel element, and it is able to reach ultra-high burn-ups, i.e. up to 750 GWd/tHM (for Pu-based fuels). Additionally, pebble-bed cores are characterised by a continuous recirculation of pebbles from the top to the bottom of the core. Modelling accurately with current computer codes such an arrangement, in order to predict the behaviour of the core itself, is a very difficult task and any depletion code specifically devoted to pebble-bed burn-up calculation is not available at the moment. Because of limitations of the most common current MCNP-based depletion codes as well as huge calculation times, simplified models have to be implemented. After an analysis of the literature available on pebble-bed models for criticality and burn-up calculations, a preliminary assessment of the impact of different kind of simplified models for a Pu-Np fuelled Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), proposed in the framework of the EU PUMA project, is shown, particularly as far as burn-up prediction with Monteburns2.0© code is concerned.

  18. Investigating the advantages and disadvantages of realistic approach and porous approach for closely packed pebbles in CFD simulation

    Wu, C.Y. [Department of Engineering and System Science, Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsingchu 30013, 325 Taiwan (China); Ferng, Y.M., E-mail: ymferng@ess.nthu.edu.t [Department of Engineering and System Science, Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsingchu 30013, 325 Taiwan (China); Chieng, C.C.; Liu, C.C. [Department of Engineering and System Science, Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2, Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsingchu 30013, 325 Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-15

    A pebble bed geometry is usually adopted for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), which exhibits inherently safe performance, high conversion efficiency, and low power density design. It is important to understand the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of HTGR core for optimum design and safe operation. Therefore, this study investigates the thermal-hydraulic behaviors in a segment of pebbles predicted by the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model using porous and realistic approaches for the complicated geometry. The advantages of each approach's methodology for the closely packed pebble geometry can be revealed by comparing the calculated results. In an engineering application, a CFD simulation with the porous approach for the pebble geometry can quickly and reasonably capture the averaged behaviors of the thermal-hydraulic parameters as the gas flows through the core, including the pressure drop and temperature increase. However, it is necessary to utilize the realistic approach for this complicated geometry to obtain the detailed and localized characteristics within the fluid and solid fuel regions. The present simulation results can provide useful information to help CFD researchers to determine an appropriate approach to be used when investigating the thermal-hydraulic characteristics within the reactor core of a closely packed pebble bed.

  19. Theoretical Chemistry to assess the risk from the Beryllium in ITER

    The Bestair project was recently awarded the IRSN prize for creativity in exploratory research. The objective of this study was to assess the potential release of beryllium, an extremely toxic element, into the environment in the event of an accident through improved knowledge of the beryllium-based chemical forms present inside the ITER containment. (author)

  20. Reduction evaporation of BeO to provide a beryllium metal sample for accelerator radiometric dating

    A technique is described for preparing beryllium metal samples from beryllium oxide for use in accelerator ion sources. These samples are used to measure minute 10Be/9Be ratios for radiometric dating at the University of Washington tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. (orig.)