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Sample records for 1-mm beryllium microspheres

  1. Helium analyses of 1-mm beryllium microspheres from COBRA-1A2

    Multiple helium analyses on four beryllium microspheres irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W), are reported. The purpose of the analyses was to determine the total helium content of the beryllium, and to determine the helium release characteristics of the beryllium as a function of time and temperature. For the helium release measurements, sequential helium analyses were conducted on two of the samples over a temperature range from 500 C to 1100 C in 100 C increments. Total helium measurements were conducted separately using the normal analysis method of vaporizing the material in a single analysis run. Observed helium release in the two beryllium samples was nonlinear with time at each temperature interval, with each step being characterized by a rather rapid initial release rate, followed by a gradual slowing of the rate over time. Sample Be-C03-1 released virtually all of its helium after approximately 30 minutes at 1000 C, reaching a final value of 2722 appm. Sample Be-D03-1, on the other hand, released only about 62% of its helium after about 1 hour at 1100 c, reaching a final value of 1519 appm. Combining these results with subsequent vaporization runs on the two samples, yielded total helium concentrations of 2724 and 2459 appm. Corresponding helium concentrations measured in the two other C03 and D03 samples, by vaporization alone, were 2941 and 2574 appm. Both sets of concentrations are in reasonable agreement with predicted values of 2723 and 2662 appm. Helium-3 levels measured during the latter two vaporization runs were 2.80 appm for Be-C03-2, and 2.62 appm for Be-D03-2. Calculated 3He values are slightly lower at 2.55 and 2.50 appm, respectively, suggesting somewhat higher tritium levels in the beryllium than predicted

  2. Helium analyses of 1-mm beryllium microspheres from COBRA-1A2

    Oliver, B.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Multiple helium analyses on four beryllium microspheres irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W), are reported. The purpose of the analyses was to determine the total helium content of the beryllium, and to determine the helium release characteristics of the beryllium as a function of time and temperature. For the helium release measurements, sequential helium analyses were conducted on two of the samples over a temperature range from 500 C to 1100 C in 100 C increments. Total helium measurements were conducted separately using the normal analysis method of vaporizing the material in a single analysis run. Observed helium release in the two beryllium samples was nonlinear with time at each temperature interval, with each step being characterized by a rather rapid initial release rate, followed by a gradual slowing of the rate over time. Sample Be-C03-1 released virtually all of its helium after approximately 30 minutes at 1000 C, reaching a final value of 2722 appm. Sample Be-D03-1, on the other hand, released only about 62% of its helium after about 1 hour at 1100 c, reaching a final value of 1519 appm. Combining these results with subsequent vaporization runs on the two samples, yielded total helium concentrations of 2724 and 2459 appm. Corresponding helium concentrations measured in the two other C03 and D03 samples, by vaporization alone, were 2941 and 2574 appm. Both sets of concentrations are in reasonable agreement with predicted values of 2723 and 2662 appm. Helium-3 levels measured during the latter two vaporization runs were 2.80 appm for Be-C03-2, and 2.62 appm for Be-D03-2. Calculated {sup 3}He values are slightly lower at 2.55 and 2.50 appm, respectively, suggesting somewhat higher tritium levels in the beryllium than predicted.

  3. Stepped-anneal helium release in 1-mm beryllium pebbles from COBRA-1A2

    Oliver, B.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Stepped-anneal helium release measurements on two sets of fifteen beryllium pebbles irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-w), are reported. The purpose of the measurements was to determine the helium release characteristics of the beryllium using larger sample sizes and longer anneal times relative to earlier measurements. Sequential helium analyses were conducted over a narrower temperature range from approximately 800 C to 1100 C in 100 C increments, but with longer anneal time periods. To allow for overnight and unattended operation, a temperature controller and associated circuitry were added to the experimental setup. Observed helium release was nonlinear with time at each temperature interval, with each step being generally characterized by an initial release rate followed by a slowing of the rate over time. Sample Be-C03 showed a leveling off in the helium release after approximately 3 hours at a temperature of 890 C. Sample Be-D03, on the other hand, showed a leveling off only after {approximately}12 to 24 hours at a temperature of 1100 C. This trend is consistent with that observed in earlier measurements on single microspheres from the same two beryllium lots. None of the lower temperature steps showed any leveling off of the helium release. Relative to the total helium concentrations measured earlier, the total helium releases observed here represent approximately 80% and 92% of the estimated total helium in the C03 and D03 samples, respectively.

  4. Microspheres

    1990-01-01

    Vital information on a person's physical condition can be obtained by identifying and counting the population of T-cells and B-cells, lymphocytes of the same shape and size that help the immune system protect the body from the invasion of disease. The late Dr. Alan Rembaum developed a method for identifying the cells. The method involved tagging the T-cells and B-cells with microspheres of different fluorescent color. Microspheres, which have fluorescent dye embedded in them, are chemically treated so that they can link with antibodies. With the help of a complex antibody/antigen reaction, the microspheres bind themselves to specific 'targets,' in this case the T-cells or B-cells. Each group of cells can then be analyzed by a photoelectronic instrument at different wavelengths emitted by the fluorescent dyes. Same concept was applied to the separation of cancer cells from normal cells. Microspheres were also used to conduct many other research projects. Under a patent license Magsphere, Inc. is producing a wide spectrum of microspheres on a large scale and selling them worldwide for various applications.

  5. Beryllium allergy

    Beryllium is not only a high potent allergen, but also a fotoallergen and can provoke contact allergic reactions, fotoallergic reactions, granulomatous skin reactions, pulmonary granulomatous diseases and sometimes even systemic diseases. The authors present 9 own cases of a patch test positive beryllium allergy, 7 patients with relevant allergy and 5 patients with an allergic contact stomatitis. (author)

  6. Beryllium Toxicity

    ... Favorites Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Yahoo MyWeb Beryllium Toxicity Patient Education Care Instruction Sheet ... Favorites Del.icio.us Digg Facebook Google Bookmarks Yahoo MyWeb Page last reviewed: May 23, 2008 Page ...

  7. Method for welding beryllium

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. Beryllium parts made using this method can be used as structural components in aircraft, satellites and space applications.

  8. Method for welding beryllium

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  9. Chronic Beryllium Disease

    ... an immune response or “allergy” to beryllium metal, ceramic or alloy, termed beryllium sensitization (BeS). Beryllium sensitization occurs after ... Mroz MM, Newman LS. Beryllium disease screening in ceramics industry: Blood test ... at a metal, alloy and oxide production plant. Occup Environ Med 1997; ...

  10. Absolute brightness temperature measurements at 2.1-mm wavelength

    Ulich, B. L.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute measurements of the brightness temperatures of the Sun, new Moon, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, and of the flux density of DR21 at 2.1-mm wavelength are reported. Relative measurements at 3.5-mm wavelength are also preented which resolve the absolute calibration discrepancy between The University of Texas 16-ft radio telescope and the Aerospace Corporation 15-ft antenna. The use of the bright planets and DR21 as absolute calibration sources at millimeter wavelengths is discussed in the light of recent observations.

  11. Beryllium facilities in India

    Due to its unique combination of physical, mechanical, thermal and nuclear properties, beryllium is indispensable for many applications in the fields of nuclear and space sciences. Beryllia and copper beryllium alloys have also found extensive applications in the electrical and electronic industries. Beryllium facilities at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) have been set up to meet indigenous requirements for these materials. Besides developing beryllium technology, the project team has also designed and developed a number of special purpose equipment. (Author)

  12. KEY TECHNOLOGY FOR PRACTICAL 1-mm-DIAMETER ELECTROMAGNETIC MICROMOTOR

    2000-01-01

    A l-mm-diameter electromagnetic micromotor was developed as a crux component for MEMS application. The motor has a novel layer structure with a 1-mm-diameter rotor in the middle of two stators with the same size. The stator uses multiple layers, slotless and concentrated planar winding. The rotor adopts multipolar permanent magnet with high performance. Ruby bearing is used to prolong operating lifetime of the micromotor. The stator winding, consisting of 6-layer coils, 42 turns, and 9 pairs, is fabricated with microprocessing techniques. The micromotor has long operation lifetime, its running speed is stable and controllable, and rotational direction can be easily reversed. Maximum achieved rotational speed of 18000 r/min with maximum output torque of 1. 5 μ N . m has been obtained. This paper presented the key technology for developing this kind of micromotor including the design of structure, magnetic circuit, heat problem, friction improvement, microprocessing techniques, and so on.

  13. Characteristics of microstructure and tritium release properties of different kinds of beryllium pebbles for application in tritium breeding modules

    Kurinskiy, P.; Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Applied Materials - Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP); Rolli, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Applied Materials - Materials Biomechanics (IAM-WBM); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    Beryllium pebbles with diameters of 1 mm are considered to be perspective material for the use as neutron multiplier in tritium breeding modules of fusion reactors. Up to now, the main concept of helium-cooled breeding blanket in ITER project foresees the use of 1 mm beryllium pebbles fabricated by company NGK, Japan. It is notable that beryllium pebbles of other types are commercially available at the market. Presented work is dedicated to a study of characteristics of microstructure, packaging density and parameters of tritium release of beryllium pebbles produced by Bochvar Institute, Russian Federation, and Company Materion, USA. (orig.).

  14. Beryllium chemistry and processing

    Walsh, Kenneth A

    2009-01-01

    This book introduces beryllium; its history, its chemical, mechanical, and physical properties including nuclear properties. The 29 chapters include the mineralogy of beryllium and the preferred global sources of ore bodies. The identification and specifics of the industrial metallurgical processes used to form oxide from the ore and then metal from the oxide are thoroughly described. The special features of beryllium chemistry are introduced, including analytical chemical practices. Beryllium compounds of industrial interest are identified and discussed. Alloying, casting, powder processing, forming, metal removal, joining and other manufacturing processes are covered. The effect of composition and process on the mechanical and physical properties of beryllium alloys assists the reader in material selection. The physical metallurgy chapter brings conformity between chemical and physical metallurgical processing of beryllium, metal, alloys, and compounds. The environmental degradation of beryllium and its all...

  15. Beryllium. Evaluation of beryllium hydroxide industrial processes. Pt. 3

    This work continues the 'Beryllium' series. It is a historical review of different industrial processes of beryllium hydroxide obtention from beryllium ores. Flowsheats and operative parameters of five plants are provided. These plants (Degussa, Brush Beryllium Co., Beryllium Corp., Murex Ltd., SAPPI) were selected as representative samples of diverse commercial processes in different countries. (Author)

  16. Tritium analyses of COBRA-1A2 beryllium pebbles

    Baldwin, D.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Selected tritium measurements have been completed for the COBRA-1A2 experiment C03 and D03 beryllium pebbles. The completed results, shown in Tables 1, 2, and 3, include the tritium assay results for the 1-mm and 3-mm C03 pebbles, and the 1-mm D03 pebbles, stepped anneal test results for both types of 1-mm pebbles, and the residual analyses for the stepped-anneal specimens. All results have been reported with date-of-count and are not corrected for decay. Stepped-anneal tritium release response is provided in addenda.

  17. Beryllium: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity

    Beryllium (Be) has physical-chemical properties, including low density and high tensile strength, which make it useful in the manufacture of products ranging from space shuttles to golf clubs. Despite its utility, a number of standard setting agencies have determined that beryllium is a carcinogen. Only a limited number of studies, however, have addressed the underlying mechanisms of the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of beryllium. Importantly, mutation and chromosomal aberration assays have yielded somewhat contradictory results for beryllium compounds and whereas bacterial tests were largely negative, mammalian test systems showed evidence of beryllium-induced mutations, chromosomal aberrations, and cell transformation. Although inter-laboratory differences may play a role in the variability observed in genotoxicity assays, it is more likely that the different chemical forms of beryllium have a significant effect on mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because workers are predominantly exposed to airborne particles which are generated during the machining of beryllium metal, ceramics, or alloys, testing of the mechanisms of the mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of beryllium should be performed with relevant chemical forms of beryllium

  18. Beryllium Manufacturing Processes

    Goldberg, A

    2006-06-30

    This report is one of a number of reports that will be combined into a handbook on beryllium. Each report covers a specific topic. To-date, the following reports have been published: (1) Consolidation and Grades of Beryllium; (2) Mechanical Properties of Beryllium and the Factors Affecting these Properties; (3) Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Beryllium; (4) Joining of Beryllium; (5) Atomic, Crystal, Elastic, Thermal, Nuclear, and other Properties of Beryllium; and (6) Beryllium Coating (Deposition) Processes and the Influence of Processing Parameters on Properties and Microstructure. The conventional method of using ingot-cast material is unsuitable for manufacturing a beryllium product. Beryllium is a highly reactive metal with a high melting point, making it susceptible to react with mold-wall materials forming beryllium compounds (BeO, etc.) that become entrapped in the solidified metal. In addition, the grain size is excessively large, being 50 to 100 {micro}m in diameter, while grain sizes of 15 {micro}m or less are required to meet acceptable strength and ductility requirements. Attempts at refining the as-cast-grain size have been unsuccessful. Because of the large grain size and limited slip systems, the casting will invariably crack during a hot-working step, which is an important step in the microstructural-refining process. The high reactivity of beryllium together with its high viscosity (even with substantial superheat) also makes it an unsuitable candidate for precision casting. In order to overcome these problems, alternative methods have been developed for the manufacturing of beryllium. The vast majority of these methods involve the use of beryllium powders. The powders are consolidated under pressure in vacuum at an elevated temperature to produce vacuum hot-pressed (VHP) blocks and vacuum hot-isostatic-pressed (HIP) forms and billets. The blocks (typically cylindrical), which are produced over a wide range of sizes (up to 183 cm dia. by 61

  19. Beryllium development programme in India

    India has fairly large deposits of beryl. The requirement of beryllium and copper-beryllium alloys in space and electronic industries has provided the incentive for the setting up of an indigenous base for the development of beryllium process metallurgy. The paper presents the developmental work carried out, in the Metallurgy Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, on the preparation of beryllium metal and its alloys starting from Indian beryl. A laboratory facility incorporating essential precautionary measures has been set up for the safe handling of beryllium and its compounds. Based on the laboratory investigations a flow-sheet suitable to Indian conditions has been developed. The flow-sheet involves preparation of anhydrous beryllium fluoride from beryl through the silico-fluoride route, magnesiothermic reduction of beryllium fluoride for the production of beryllium metal or its master alloy with copper or aluminium, and fabrication of beryllium metal. (author)

  20. Behavior of beryllium pebbles under irradiation

    Dalle-Donne, M.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik; Baldwin, D.L.; Gelles, D.S.; Greenwood, L.R.; Kawamura, H.; Oliver, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium pebbles are being considered in fusion reactor blanket designs as neutron multiplier. An example is the European `Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Blanket.` Several forms of beryllium pebbles are commercially available but little is known about these forms in response to fast neutron irradiation. Commercially available beryllium pebbles have been irradiated to approximately 1.3 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E>1 MeV) at 390degC. Pebbles 1-mm in diameter manufactured by Brush Wellman, USA and by Nippon Gaishi Company, Japan, and 3-mm pebbles manufactured by Brush Wellman were included. All were irradiated in the below-core area of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II in Idaho Falls, USA, in molybdenum alloy capsules containing helium. Post-irradiation results are presented on density change measurements, tritium release by assay, stepped-temperature anneal, and thermal ramp desorption tests, and helium release by assay and stepped-temperature anneal measurements, for Be pebbles from two manufacturing methods, and with two specimen diameters. The experimental results on density change and tritium and helium release are compared with the predictions of the code ANFIBE. (author)

  1. MUCOADHESIVE MICROSPHERES

    A. Senthil; V.B.Narayanaswamy; I .Ajit; Galge Deepak S; Bhosale Rahul S

    2011-01-01

    Bioadhesion can be defined as the process by which a natural or synthetic polymer can adhere to a biological substrate. When the biological substrate is a mucosal layer then it is known as mucoadhesion. Mucoadhesion is a currently used in the design of drug delivery system. Mucoadhesive microspheres provide a prolonged residence time at the site of application or absorption and facilitate an intimate contact with the underlying absorption surface and improve or better to therapeutic performan...

  2. Beryllium Project: developing in CDTN of uranium dioxide fuel pellets with addition of beryllium oxide to increase the thermal conductivity

    Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Camarano, Denise das Merces; Miranda, Odair; Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Andrade, Antonio Santos; Queiroz, Carolinne Mol; Gonzaga, Mariana de Carvalho Leal, E-mail: ranf@cdtn.br, E-mail: dmc@cdtn.br, E-mail: odairm@cdtn.br, E-mail: pabloag@cdtn.br, E-mail: antdrade@gmail.com, E-mail: carolmol@gmail.com, E-mail: mari_clgonzaga@hotmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Pampulha, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Although the nuclear fuel currently based on pellets of uranium dioxide be very safe and stable, the biggest problem is that this material is not a good conductor of heat. This results in an elevated temperature gradient between the center and its lateral surface, which leads to a premature degradation of the fuel, which restricts the performance of the reactor, being necessary to change the fuel before its full utilization. An increase of only 5 to 10 percent in its thermal conductivity, would be a significant increase. An increase of 50 percent would be a great improvement. A project entitled 'Beryllium Project' was developed in CDTN - Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, which aimed to develop fuel pellets made from a mixture of uranium dioxide microspheres and beryllium oxide powder to obtain a better heat conductor phase, filling the voids between the microspheres to increase the thermal conductivity of the pellet. Increases in the thermal conductivity in the range of 8.6% to 125%, depending on the level of addition employed in the range of 1% to 14% by weight of beryllium oxide, were obtained. This type of fuel promises to be safer than current fuels, improving the performance of the reactor, in addition to last longer, resulting in great savings. (author)

  3. Microradiographic microsphere manipulator

    A method and apparatus are provided for radiographic characterization of small hollow spherical members (microspheres), constructed of either optically transparent or opaque materials. The apparatus involves a microsphere manipulator which holds a batch of microspheres between two parallel thin plastic films for contact microradiographic characterization or projection microradiography thereof. One plastic film is translated to relative to and parallel to the other to roll the microspheres through any desired angle to allow different views of the microspheres

  4. Microradiographic microsphere manipulator

    Singleton, Russell M.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for radiographic characterization of small hollow spherical members (microspheres), constructed of either optically transparent or opaque materials. The apparatus involves a microsphere manipulator which holds a batch of microspheres between two parallel thin plastic films for contact microradiographic characterization or projection microradiography thereof. One plastic film is translated to relative to and parallel to the other to roll the microspheres through any desired angle to allow different views of the microspheres.

  5. Tritium release from highly neutron irradiated constrained and unconstrained beryllium pebbles

    Chakin, V., E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu; Rolli, R.; Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • For the irradiated constrained beryllium pebbles, the tritium release occurs easier than for the unconstrained ones. • Tritium retention in the irradiated constrained and unconstrained beryllium pebbles decreases with increasing irradiation temperature. • Formation of sub-grains in the constrained beryllium pebbles facilitate the open porosity network formation. - Abstract: Beryllium is the reference neutron multiplier material in the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) breeding blanket of fusion power plants. Significant tritium inventory accumulated in beryllium as a result of neutron-induced transmutations could become a safety issue for the operation of such blankets as well as for the nuclear waste utilization. To provide a related materials database, a neutron irradiation campaign of beryllium pebbles with diameters of 0.5 and 1 mm at 686–1006 K, the HIDOBE-01 experiment, has been performed in the HFR in Petten, the Netherlands, producing up to 3020 appm helium and 298 appm tritium. Thermal desorption tests of irradiated unconstrained and constrained beryllium pebbles were performed in a purge gas flow using a quadrupole mass-spectrometer (QMS) and an ionization chamber. Compared to unconstrained pebbles, constrained beryllium pebbles have an enhanced tritium release at all temperatures investigated. Small elongated sub-grains formed under irradiation in the constrained pebbles promote formation of numerous channels for facilitated tritium release.

  6. Tritium release from highly neutron irradiated constrained and unconstrained beryllium pebbles

    Highlights: • For the irradiated constrained beryllium pebbles, the tritium release occurs easier than for the unconstrained ones. • Tritium retention in the irradiated constrained and unconstrained beryllium pebbles decreases with increasing irradiation temperature. • Formation of sub-grains in the constrained beryllium pebbles facilitate the open porosity network formation. - Abstract: Beryllium is the reference neutron multiplier material in the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) breeding blanket of fusion power plants. Significant tritium inventory accumulated in beryllium as a result of neutron-induced transmutations could become a safety issue for the operation of such blankets as well as for the nuclear waste utilization. To provide a related materials database, a neutron irradiation campaign of beryllium pebbles with diameters of 0.5 and 1 mm at 686–1006 K, the HIDOBE-01 experiment, has been performed in the HFR in Petten, the Netherlands, producing up to 3020 appm helium and 298 appm tritium. Thermal desorption tests of irradiated unconstrained and constrained beryllium pebbles were performed in a purge gas flow using a quadrupole mass-spectrometer (QMS) and an ionization chamber. Compared to unconstrained pebbles, constrained beryllium pebbles have an enhanced tritium release at all temperatures investigated. Small elongated sub-grains formed under irradiation in the constrained pebbles promote formation of numerous channels for facilitated tritium release

  7. Characterization of constrained beryllium pebble beds after neutron irradiation at HFR at high temperatures up to helium production of 3000 appm

    Chakin, V., E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Plarz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R. [Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Plarz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Moeslang, A.; Vladimirov, P.; Kurinskiy, P. [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Plarz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Til, S. van; Magielsen, A.J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/ Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Defragmentation of beryllium pebbles at irradiation temperatures of 873 and 948 K was detected. • Formation of brittle beryllium oxide layers on neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles was detected. • Strong interaction between beryllium pebbles and platinum foil under neutron irradiation was detected. • Strong interaction between beryllium pebbles and austenitic stainless steel under neutron irradiation was detected. -- Abstract: Small constrained beryllium pebble beds as well as unconstrained beryllium pebbles have been irradiated within HIDOBE-01 experiment at HFR, Petten, the Netherlands. Beryllium pebbles with 1 mm diameter produced by Rotating Electrode Method (REM) were investigated after irradiation at 630, 740, 873, and 948 K up to helium production of 3000 appm. Intensive pore and bubble formation occurs in beryllium after 873 K irradiation. In the contact zones of the pebbles enhanced pore formation takes place. Oxidation of beryllium pebble external surfaces is accompanied by partial destruction of oxide layers owing to their high brittleness. Strong interactions between beryllium pebbles and platinum foil, as well as between beryllium and stainless steel at contact zones occur at 873 and 948 K.

  8. Metabolic microspheres

    Fox, Sidney W.

    1980-08-01

    A systematic review of catalytic activities in thermal proteinoids and microspheres aggregated therefrom yields some new inferences on the origins and evolution of metabolism. Experiments suggest that, instead of being inert, protocells were already biochemically and cytophysically competent. The emergence and refinement of metabolism ab initio is thus partly traced conceptually. When the principle of molecular self-instruction, as of amino acids in peptide synthesis, is taken into account as a concomitant of natural selection, an expanded theory of organismic evolution, including saltations, emerges.

  9. Thermal ramp tritium release in COBRA-1A2 C03 beryllium pebbles

    Baldwin, D.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Tritium release kinetics, using the method of thermal ramp heating at three linear ramp rates, were measured on the COBRA-1A2 C03 1-mm beryllium pebbles. This report includes a brief discussion of the test, and the test data in graph format.

  10. The natural history of beryllium sensitization and chronic beryllium disease.

    Newman, L. S.; Lloyd, J.; Daniloff, E.

    1996-01-01

    With the advent of in vitro immunologic testing, we can now detect exposed individuals who are sensitized to beryllium and those who have chronic beryllium disease (CBD) with lung pathology and impairment. Earlier detection and more accurate diagnostic tools raise new questions about the natural history of sensitization and granulomatous disease. Preliminary data suggest that early detection identifies people who are sensitized to beryllium and that these individuals are at risk for progressi...

  11. Pitch carbon microsphere composite

    Price, H. L.; Nelson, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    Petroleum pitch carbon microspheres were prepared by flash heating emulsified pitch and carbonizing the resulting microspheres in an inert atmosphere. Microsphere composites were obtained from a mixture of microspheres and tetraester precursor pyrrone powder. Scanning electron micrographs of the composite showed that it was an aggregate of microspheres bonded together by the pyrrone at the sphere contact points, with voids in and among the microspheres. Physical, thermal, and sorption properties of the composite are described. Composite applications could include use as a honeycomb filler in elevated-temperature load-bearing sandwich boards or in patient-treatment tables for radiation treatment of tumors.

  12. Reprocessing technology development for irradiated beryllium

    Kawamura, H.; Sakamoto, N. [Oarai Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Tatenuma, K. [KAKEN Co., Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    At present, beryllium is under consideration as a main candidate material for neutron multiplier and plasma facing material in a fusion reactor. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the beryllium reprocessing technology for effective resource use. And, we have proposed reprocessing technology development on irradiated beryllium used in a fusion reactor. The preliminary reprocessing tests were performed using un-irradiated and irradiated beryllium. At first, we performed beryllium separation tests using un-irradiated beryllium specimens. Un-irradiated beryllium with beryllium oxide which is a main impurity and some other impurities were heat-treated under chlorine gas flow diluted with Ar gas. As the results high purity beryllium chloride was obtained in high yield. And it appeared that beryllium oxide and some other impurities were removed as the unreactive matter, and the other chloride impurities were separated by the difference of sublimation temperature on beryllium chloride. Next, we performed some kinds of beryllium purification tests from beryllium chloride. And, metallic beryllium could be recovered from beryllium chloride by the reduction with dry process. In addition, as the results of separation and purification tests using irradiated beryllium specimens, it appeared that separation efficiency of Co-60 from beryllium was above 96%. It is considered that about 4% Co-60 was carried from irradiated beryllium specimen in the form of cobalt chloride. And removal efficiency of tritium from irradiated beryllium was above 95%.

  13. Beryllium. Its minerals. Pt. 1

    With this work a series of reports begins, under the generic name 'Beryllium', related to several aspects of beryllium technology. The target is to update, with critical sense, current bibliographic material in order to be used in further applications. Some of the most important beryllium ores, the Argentine emplacement of their deposits and world occurrence are described. Argentine and world production, resources and reserves are indicated here as well. (Author)

  14. Joining of Beryllium

    Goldberg, A

    2006-02-01

    A handbook dealing with the many aspects of beryllium that would be important for the users of this metal is currently being prepared. With an introduction on the applications, advantages and limitations in the use of this metal the following topics will be discussed in this handbook: physical, thermal, and nuclear properties; extraction from the ores; purification and casting of ingots; production and types of beryllium powders; consolidation methods, grades, and properties; mechanical properties with emphasis on the various factors affecting these properties; forming and mechanical working; welding, brazing, bonding, and fastening; machining; powder deposition; corrosion; health aspects; and examples of production of components. This report consists of ''Section X--Joining'' from the handbook. The prefix X is maintained here for the figures, tables and references. In this section the different methods used for joining beryllium and the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of each are presented. The methods discussed are fusion welding, brazing, solid state bonding (diffusion bonding and deformation bonding), soldering, and mechanical fastening. Since beryllium has a high affinity for oxygen and nitrogen with the formation of oxides and nitrides, considerable care must be taken on heating the metal, to protect it from the ambient atmosphere. In addition, mating surfaces must be cleaned and joints must be designed to minimize residual stresses as well as locations for stress concentration (notch effects). In joining any two metals the danger exists of having galvanic corrosion if the part is subjected to moisture or to any type of corroding environment. This becomes a problem if the less noble (anodic) metal has a significantly smaller area than the more noble (cathodic) metal since the ions (positive charges) from the anodic (corroding) metal must correspond to the number of electrons (negative charges) involved at the cathode. Beryllium

  15. Development of mini-tablets with 1mm and 2mm diameter.

    Tissen, Corinna; Woertz, Katharina; Breitkreutz, Joerg; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2011-09-15

    The feasibility of formulating mini-tablets with 1mm diameter on a rotary-die press in comparison to mini-tablets of 2mm was investigated. To gain insight into the production of 1mm mini-tablets, three model drugs of different compression characteristics were chosen, namely quinine hydrochloride, ibuprofen and spray-dried gentian extract. A high drug load in combination with robust and reproducible mechanical properties was requested. Depending on the individual drug substance, mini-tablets were produced by direct compression or after roll-compaction/dry granulation. The tensile strength, mass, and their variation coefficients were determined to assess the mechanical properties of the tablets. The content uniformity and the dissolution behavior of selected batches were analyzed. For the first time 1mm mini-tablets could be successfully produced by direct compression (90% quinine hydrochloride; 90% dried gentian extract) and after roll compaction (70% ibuprofen). Depending on the applied compression pressure, 1mm mini-tablets with quinine hydrochloride exhibited robust mechanical properties (e.g. median tensile strength of 2.02N/mm(2)) with equal or lower variance of distribution compared to the 2mm compacts. With respect to content uniformity of dosage forms, 1mm mini-tablets containing 80% quinine hydrochloride met the requirements of the European Pharmacopeia (AV=6.8). PMID:21726616

  16. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    Klimenkov, M., E-mail: michael.klimenkov@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A. [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R. [Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  17. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    Klimenkov, M.; Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A.; Rolli, R.

    2014-12-01

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  18. Beryllium. Beryllium oxide, obtention and properties. Pt.4

    As a continuation of the 'Beryllium' series this work reviews several methods of high purity beryllia production. Diverse methods of obtention and purification from different beryllium compounds are described. Some chemical, mechanical and electrical properties related with beryllia obtention methods are summarized. (Author)

  19. Plasma spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum-silver alloys

    A preliminary investigation on plasma-spraying of beryllium and a beryllium-aluminum 4% silver alloy was done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Beryllium Atomization and Thermal Spray Facility (BATSF). Spherical Be and Be-Al-4%Ag powders, which were produced by centrifugal atomization, were used as feedstock material for plasma-spraying. The spherical morphology of the powders allowed for better feeding of fine (<38 μm) powders into the plasma-spray torch. The difference in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the two plasma-sprayed powders will be discussed along with the effect of processing parameters on the as-deposited microstructure of the Be-Al-4%Ag. This investigation represents ongoing research to develop and characterize plasma-spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum alloys for magnetic fusion and aerospace applications

  20. Technical Basis for PNNL Beryllium Inventory

    Johnson, Michelle Lynn

    2014-07-09

    The Department of Energy (DOE) issued Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 850, “Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program” (the Beryllium Rule) in 1999 and required full compliance by no later than January 7, 2002. The Beryllium Rule requires the development of a baseline beryllium inventory of the locations of beryllium operations and other locations of potential beryllium contamination at DOE facilities. The baseline beryllium inventory is also required to identify workers exposed or potentially exposed to beryllium at those locations. Prior to DOE issuing 10 CFR 850, Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) had documented the beryllium characterization and worker exposure potential for multiple facilities in compliance with DOE’s 1997 Notice 440.1, “Interim Chronic Beryllium Disease.” After DOE’s issuance of 10 CFR 850, PNNL developed an implementation plan to be compliant by 2002. In 2014, an internal self-assessment (ITS #E-00748) of PNNL’s Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) identified several deficiencies. One deficiency is that the technical basis for establishing the baseline beryllium inventory when the Beryllium Rule was implemented was either not documented or not retrievable. In addition, the beryllium inventory itself had not been adequately documented and maintained since PNNL established its own CBDPP, separate from Hanford Site’s program. This document reconstructs PNNL’s baseline beryllium inventory as it would have existed when it achieved compliance with the Beryllium Rule in 2001 and provides the technical basis for the baseline beryllium inventory.

  1. Beryllium coprecipitation with iron hydroxide

    Coprecipitation and sorption are studied of beryllium with hydroxide of Fe(3) in solutions of NH4NO3, KNO3, NH4HCO3, and H2O2 over a wide range of pH of the medium. The conditions are found for concentrating and separating beryllium from the carrier within definite ranges of pH of the medium

  2. Fourier Analysis of the OMC1 Image at 1.1 mm Wavelength

    Youn, Soyoung

    2012-01-01

    We present a 1.1 mm emission map of the OMC1 region observed with AzTEC, a new large-format array composed of 144 silicon-nitride micromesh bolometers that was in use at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). The AzTEC observations of the OMC1 region at 1.1 mm reveal dozens of cloud cores and a tail of filaments in a manner that is almost identical to the submillimeter continuum emission of the entire OMC1 region at 450 and 850 micronm. We perform Fourier analysis of the image with a modified periodogram and the density power spectrum which provides the distribution of length scale of the structures is measured. The expected value of the periodogram converges to the resulting power spectrum in the mean squared sense. From the present analysis of the OMC1 filaments at the 1.1 mm emission, the power spectrum steepens at relatively smaller scales. At largest scales, the power spectrum flattens and the large scale power law becomes shallower. The power spectra of the 1.1 mm emission show clear deviations from ...

  3. AzTEC 1.1 mm Observations of the MBM12 Molecular Cloud

    Kim, M J; Youn, S; Yun, M S; Wilson, G W; Aretxaga, I; Williams, J P; Hughes, D H; Humphrey, A; Austermann, J E; Perera, T A; Mauskopf, P D; Magnani, L; Kang, Y -W

    2011-01-01

    We present 1.1 mm observations of the dust continuum emission from the MBM12 high-latitude molecular cloud observed with the Astronomical Thermal Emission Camera (AzTEC) mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. We surveyed a 6.34 deg$^2$ centered on MBM12, making this the largest area that has ever been surveyed in this region with submillimeter and millimeter telescopes. Eight secure individual sources were detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of over 4.4. These eight AzTEC sources can be considered to be real astronomical objects compared to the other candidates based on calculations of the false detection rate. The distribution of the detected 1.1 mm sources or compact 1.1 mm peaks is spatially anti-correlated with that of the 100 micronm emission and the $^{12}$CO emission. We detected the 1.1 mm dust continuum emitting sources associated with two classical T Tauri stars, LkHalpha262 and LkHalpha264. Observations of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) indicate that LkHalpha262 ...

  4. SXDF-ALMA 2-arcmin2 deep survey: 1.1-mm number counts

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Kohno, Kotaro; Umehata, Hideki; Aretxaga, Itziar; Caputi, Karina I.; Dunlop, James S.; Ikarashi, Soh; Iono, Daisuke; Ivison, Rob J.; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Tadaki, Ken-ich; Tamura, Yoichi; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wilson, Grant W.; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Yun, Min S.

    2016-01-01

    We report 1.1-mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studie

  5. Thermal fatigue of beryllium

    Deksnis, E.; Ciric, D.; Falter, H. [JET Joint undertaking, Abingdon (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Thermal fatigue life of S65c beryllium castellated to a geometry 6 x 6 x (8-10)mm deep has been tested for steady heat fluxes of 3 MW/m{sup 2} to 5 MW/m{sup 2} and under pulsed heat fluxes (10-20 MW/m{sup 2}) for which the time averaged heat flux is 5 MW/m{sup 2}. These tests were carried out in the JET neutral beam test facility A test sequence with peak surface temperatures {le} 600{degrees}C produced no visible fatigue cracks. In the second series of tests, with T{sub max} {le} 750{degrees}C evidence for fatigue appeared after a minimum of 1350 stress cycles. These fatigue data are discussed in view of the observed lack of thermal fatigue in JET plasma operations with beryllium PFC. JET experience with S65b and S65c is reviewed; recent operations with {Phi} = 25 MW/m{sup 2} and sustained melting/resolidification are also presented. The need for a failure criterion for finite element analyses of Be PFC lifetimes is discussed.

  6. AzTEC 1.1 mm OBSERVATIONS OF THE MBM12 MOLECULAR CLOUD

    Kim, M. J.; Kim, S.; Youn, S.; Kang, Y.-W. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Sejong University, KwangJin-gu, KunJa-dong 98, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, M. S.; Wilson, G. W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Aretxaga, I.; Hughes, D. H.; Humphrey, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisca, Optica y Electronica, Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Williams, J. P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Austermann, J. E. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Perera, T. A. [Department of Physics, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, IL 61701 (United States); Mauskopf, P. D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Magnani, L., E-mail: sek@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States)

    2012-02-10

    We present 1.1 mm observations of the dust continuum emission from the MBM12 high-latitude molecular cloud observed with the Astronomical Thermal Emission Camera (AzTEC) mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. We surveyed 6.34 deg{sup 2} centered on MBM12, making this the largest area that has ever been surveyed in this region with submillimeter and millimeter telescopes. Eight secure individual sources were detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of over 4.4. These eight AzTEC sources can be considered to be real astronomical objects compared to the other candidates based on calculations of the false detection rate. The distribution of the detected 1.1 mm sources or compact 1.1 mm peaks is spatially anti-correlated with that of the 100 {mu}m emission and the {sup 12}CO emission. We detected the 1.1 mm dust continuum emitting sources associated with two classical T Tauri stars, LkH{alpha}262 and LkH{alpha}264. Observations of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) indicate that LkH{alpha}262 is likely to be Class II (pre-main-sequence star), but there are also indications that it could be a late Class I (protostar). A flared disk and a bipolar cavity in the models of Class I sources lead to more complicated SEDs. From the present AzTEC observations of the MBM12 region, it appears that other sources detected with AzTEC are likely to be extragalactic and located behind MBM12. Some of these have radio counterparts and their star formation rates are derived from a fit of the SEDs to the photometric evolution of galaxies in which the effects of a dusty interstellar medium have been included.

  7. SXDF-ALMA 2-arcmin2 deep survey: 1.1-mm number counts

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Kohno, Kotaro; Umehata, Hideki; Aretxaga, Itziar; Caputi, Karina I.; Dunlop, James S.; Ikarashi, Soh; Iono, Daisuke; Ivison, Rob J.; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Tadaki, Ken-ich; Tamura, Yoichi; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wilson, Grant W.; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Yun, Min S.

    2016-06-01

    We report 1.1-mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studies are based on the ensemble of serendipitously detected sources in fields originally targeting different sources and could be biased due to the clustering of sources around the targets. We derive number counts in the flux range of 0.2-2 mJy by using 23 (≥4σ) sources detected in a continuous 2.0-arcmin2 area of the SXDF. The number counts are consistent with previous results within errors, suggesting that the counts derived from serendipitously detected sources are not significantly biased, although there could be field-to-field variation due to the small survey area. By using the best-fitting function of the number counts, we find that ˜40% of the extragalactic background light at 1.1 mm is resolved at S1.1mm > 0.2 mJy.

  8. Structure Analysis of OMC1 Filaments at 1.1 mm Emission

    Youn, Soyoung

    2011-01-01

    We present a 1.1 mm emission map of the OMC1 region observed with AzTEC, a new large-format array composed of 144 silicon-nitride micromesh bolometers that was in use at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). The AzTEC observations of the OMC1 region at 1.1 mm reveal dozens of cloud cores and a tail of filaments in a manner that is almost identical to the submillimeter continuum emission of the entire OMC1 region at 450 and 850 micronm. The density power spectrum provides the size distribution of the structures. We find that a single power law might be fitted to the calculated power spectrum of the 1.1 mm emission between 0.3 pc and 0.03 pc. The slope of the best fit power law is \\gamma~-2.6 and is similar to the spectral index of the power spectrum of \\gamma~-2.7 found in numerical simulations. However, there is a distinct spectral break in the power spectrum at a characteristic scale of ~0.3 pc in OMC1. The effects of beam size and noise spectrum on the shape and slope of the power spectrum are also incl...

  9. SXDF-ALMA 2 arcmin$^2$ Deep Survey: 1.1-mm Number Counts

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Umehata, Hideki; Aretxaga, Itziar; Caputi, Karina I; Dunlop, James S; Ikarashi, Soh; Iono, Daisuke; Ivison, Rob J; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Tadaki, Ken-ich; Tamura, Yoichi; Wang, Wei-Hao; Wilson, Grant W; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Yun, Min S

    2016-01-01

    We report 1.1 mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studies are based on the ensemble of serendipitously-detected sources in fields originally targeting different sources and could be biased due to the clustering of sources around the targets. We derive number counts in the flux range of 0.2-2 mJy by using 23 (>=4sigma) sources detected in a continuous 2.0 arcmin$^2$ area of the SXDF. The number counts are consistent with previous results within errors, suggesting that the counts derived from serendipitously-detected sources are not significantly biased, although there could be field-to-field variation due to the small survey area. By using the best-fit function of the number counts, we find that ~40% of the extragalactic background light at 1.1 mm is resolved at S(1.1mm)...

  10. Beryllium usage in fusion blankets and beryllium data needs

    Increasing numbers of designers are choosing beryllium for fusion reactor blankets because it, among all nonfissile materials, produces the highest number (2.5 neutron in an infinite media) of neutrons per 14-MeV incident neutron. In amounts of about 20 cm of equivalent solid density, it can be used to produce fissile material, to breed all the tritium consumed in ITER from outboard blankets only, and in designs to produce Co-60. The problem is that predictions of neutron multiplication in beryllium are off by some 10 to 20% and appear to be on the high side, which means that better multiplication measurements and numerical methods are needed. The n,2n reactions result in two helium atoms, which cause radiation damage in the form of hardening at low temperatures (300/degree/C). The usual way beryllium parts are made is by hot pressing the powder. A lower cost method is to cold press and then sinter. There is no radiation damage data on this form of beryllium. The issues of corrosion, safety relative to the release of the tritium built-up inside beryllium, and recycle of used beryllium are also discussed. 10 figs

  11. Characterization of shocked beryllium

    Explosively driven arrested beryllium experiments were performed with post mortem characterization to evaluate the failure behaviors. The test samples were encapsulated in an aluminum assembly that was large relative to the sample, and the assembly features both axial and radial momentum traps. The sample carrier was inserted from the explosively-loaded end and has features to lock the carrier to the surrounding cylinder using the induced plastic flow. Calculations with Lagrangian codes showed that the tensile stresses experienced by the Be sample were below the spall stress. Metallographic characterization of the arrested Be showed radial cracks present in the samples may have been caused by bending moments. Fractography showed the fractures propagated from the side of the sample closest to the explosives, the side with the highest tensile stress. There was evidence that the fractures may have propagated from the circumferential crack outward and downward radially.

  12. Characteristics of microstructure and tritium release properties of different kinds of beryllium pebbles for application in tritium breeding modules

    Kurinskiy, P., E-mail: petr.kurinskiy@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Rolli, R. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics (IAM-WBM), P.O. Box 3640, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, Barcelona 08019 (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Tritium release properties and characteristics of microstructure of beryllium pebbles having different sizes of grains were studied. • Fine-grained beryllium pebbles showed the best ability to release tritium compared to pebbles from another charges. • Be pebbles with the grain sizes exceeding 100 μm contain a great number of small pores and inclusions presumably referring to the history of material fabrication. • The sizes of grains are one of a key characteristic of microstructure which influences the parameters of tritium release. - Abstract: Beryllium pebbles with diameters of 1 mm are considered to be perspective material for the use as neutron multiplier in tritium breeding modules of fusion reactors. Up to now, the design of helium-cooled breeding blanket in ITER project foresees the use of 1 mm beryllium pebbles fabricated by NGK Insulators Ltd., Japan. It is notable that beryllium pebbles from Russian Federation and USA are also available and the possibility of their large-scale fabrication is under study. Presented work is dedicated to a study of characteristics of microstructure and parameters of tritium release of beryllium pebbles produced by Bochvar Institute, Russian Federation, and Materion Corporation, USA.

  13. Characteristics of microstructure and tritium release properties of different kinds of beryllium pebbles for application in tritium breeding modules

    Highlights: • Tritium release properties and characteristics of microstructure of beryllium pebbles having different sizes of grains were studied. • Fine-grained beryllium pebbles showed the best ability to release tritium compared to pebbles from another charges. • Be pebbles with the grain sizes exceeding 100 μm contain a great number of small pores and inclusions presumably referring to the history of material fabrication. • The sizes of grains are one of a key characteristic of microstructure which influences the parameters of tritium release. - Abstract: Beryllium pebbles with diameters of 1 mm are considered to be perspective material for the use as neutron multiplier in tritium breeding modules of fusion reactors. Up to now, the design of helium-cooled breeding blanket in ITER project foresees the use of 1 mm beryllium pebbles fabricated by NGK Insulators Ltd., Japan. It is notable that beryllium pebbles from Russian Federation and USA are also available and the possibility of their large-scale fabrication is under study. Presented work is dedicated to a study of characteristics of microstructure and parameters of tritium release of beryllium pebbles produced by Bochvar Institute, Russian Federation, and Materion Corporation, USA

  14. Metallic coating of microspheres

    Extremely smooth, uniform metal coatings of micrometer thicknesses on microscopic glass spheres (microspheres) are often needed as targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The first part of this paper reviews those methods used successfully to provide metal coated microspheres for ICF targets, including magnetron sputtering, electro- and electroless plating, and chemical vapor pyrolysis. The second part of this paper discusses some of the critical aspects of magnetron sputter coating of microspheres, including substrate requirements, the sticking of microspheres during coating (preventing a uniform coating), and the difficulties in growing the desired dense, smooth, uniform microstructure on continuously moving spherical substrates

  15. MUCOADHESIVE MICROSPHERES: A REVIEW

    Navita Kumari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Carrier technology provides an interesting as well as an intelligent approach for the delivery of drug. It offers delivery of drug by coupling the drug to a carrier particle such as microspheres, mucoadhesive microspheres nanoparticles, liposomes, etc. Mucoadhesive microspheres constitute an important part of this particulate drug delivery system because of their small size and other efficient properties. Mucoadhesive microspheres plays a vital role in the novel drug delivery system. Some drug delivery problems are overcome by producing controlled drug delivery system which enhances the therapeutic efficacy of a drug. From various approaches one approach is to using mucoadhesive microsphere as a carrier system for drug delivery. Mucoadhesive microspheres exhibit a prolonged residence time at the site of application or absorption and facilitate an intimate contact with the underlying absorption surface and thus contribute to improved and better therapeutic performance of drugs and also mucoadhesive microspheres have advantages like efficient absorption and enhanced bioavailability of the drugs due to a high surface to volume ratio, a much more intimate contact with the mucus layer,controlled and sustained release of drug from dosage form and specific targeting of drugs to the absorption site. Mucoadhesive microspheres have been developed for oral, buccal, nasal, ocular, rectal and vaginal for either systemic or local effects. It is an ideal targeting system with high safty profile. This review article gives the information about mucoadhesion and theories of mucoadhesion. It also contains a number of available methods of preparation of mucoadhesive microspheres.

  16. SXDF-ALMA 2 arcmin$^2$ Deep Survey: 1.1-mm Number Counts

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Kohno, Kotaro; Umehata, Hideki; Aretxaga, Itziar; Caputi, Karina I.; Dunlop, James S.; Ikarashi, Soh; Iono, Daisuke; Ivison, Rob J.; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi, Stott, John P; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji

    2016-01-01

    We report 1.1 mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studies are based on the ensemble of serendipitously-detected sources in fields originally targeting different sources and could be biased due to the clustering of sources around the targets. We derive n...

  17. A 1 mm Scintillating Fibre Tracker Readout by a Multi-anode Photomultiplier

    Leverington, B. D.; Anelli, M.; Campana, P.; Rosellini, R

    2011-01-01

    This note describes a prototype particle tracking detector constructed with 1 mm plastic scintillating fibres with a 64 channel Hamamatsu H8500 flat-panel multi-anode photomultiplier readout. Cosmic ray tracks from an array of 11 gas-filled drift tubes were matched to signals in the scintillating fibres in order to measure the resolution and efficiency of tracks reconstructed in the fibre-based tracker. A GEANT4 detector simulation was also developed to compare cosmic ray data with MC results...

  18. Beryllium technology workshop, Clearwater Beach, Florida, November 20, 1991

    This report discusses the following topics: beryllium in the ITER blanket; mechanical testing of irradiated beryllium; tritium release measurements on irradiated beryllium; beryllium needs for plasma-facing components; thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed beryllium; beryllium research at the INEL; Japanese beryllium research activities for in-pile mockup tests on ITER; a study of beryllium bonding of copper alloy; new production technologies; thermophysical properties of a new ingot metallurgy beryllium product line; implications of beryllium:steam interactions in fusion reactors; and a test program for irradiation embrittlement of beryllium at JET

  19. The source counts of submillimetre galaxies detected at 1.1 mm

    Scott, K S; Aretxaga, I; Austermann, J E; Chapin, E L; Dunlop, J S; Ezawa, H; Halpern, M; Hatsukade, B; Hughes, D H; Kawabe, R; Kim, S; Kohno, K; Lowenthal, J D; Montana, A; Nakanishi, K; Oshima, T; Sanders, D; Scott, D; Scoville, N; Tamura, Y; Welch, D; Yun, M S; Zeballos, M

    2012-01-01

    The source counts of galaxies discovered at sub-millimetre and millimetre wavelengths provide important information on the evolution of infrared-bright galaxies. We combine the data from six blank-field surveys carried out at 1.1 mm with AzTEC, totalling 1.6 square degrees in area with root-mean-square depths ranging from 0.4 to 1.7 mJy, and derive the strongest constraints to date on the 1.1 mm source counts at flux densities S(1100) = 1-12 mJy. Using additional data from the AzTEC Cluster Environment Survey to extend the counts to S(1100) ~ 20 mJy, we see tentative evidence for an enhancement relative to the exponential drop in the counts at S(1100) ~ 13 mJy and a smooth connection to the bright source counts at >20 mJy measured by the South Pole Telescope; this excess may be due to strong lensing effects. We compare these counts to predictions from several semi-analytical and phenomenological models and find that for most the agreement is quite good at flux densities > 4 mJy; however, we find significant d...

  20. Processing Irradiated Beryllium For Disposal

    T. J. Tranter; R. D. Tillotson; N. R. Mann; G. R. Longhurst

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a process for decontaminating irradiated beryllium that will allow it to be disposed of through normal radwaste channels. Thus, the primary objectives of this ongoing study are to remove the transuranic (TRU) isotopes to less than 100 nCi/g and remove {sup 60}Co, and {sup 137}Cs, to levels that will allow the beryllium to be contact handled. One possible approach that appears to have the most promise is aqueous dissolution and separation of the isotopes by selected solvent extraction followed by precipitation, resulting in a granular form for the beryllium that may be fixed to prevent it from becoming respirable and therefore hazardous. Beryllium metal was dissolved in nitric and fluorboric acids. Isotopes of {sup 241}Am, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 85}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs were then added to make a surrogate beryllium waste solution. A series of batch contacts was performed with the spiked simulant using chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (CCD) and polyethylene glycol diluted with sulfone to extract the isotopes of Cs and Sr. Another series of batch contacts was performed using a combination of octyl (phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) in tributyl phosphate (TBP) diluted with dodecane for extracting the isotopes of Pu and Am. The results indicate that greater than 99.9% removal can be achieved for each isotope with only three contact stages.

  1. Polymeric Microspheres for Medical Applications

    Ketie Saralidze

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic polymeric microspheres find application in a wide range of medical applications. Among other applications, microspheres are being used as bulking agents, embolic- or drug-delivery particles. The exact composition of the spheres varies with the application and therefore a large array of materials has been used to produce microspheres. In this review, the relation between microsphere synthesis and application is discussed for a number of microspheres that are used for different treatment strategies.

  2. Planetary brightness temperature measurements at 8.6 mm and 3.1 mm wavelengths.

    Ulich, B. L.; Cogdell, J. R.; Davis, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    New measurements of the sun, moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn at 3.1- and 8.6-mm wavelengths are given. The temperatures reported for the planets at 3.1-mm wavelength are higher than previous measurements in this wavelength range and change the interpretation of some planetary spectra. For Mercury, it is found that the mean brightness temperature is independent of wavelength and that a temperature-dependent thermal conductivity is not required to match the observations. In the case of Mars, the spectrum is shown to rise in the millimeter region, as simple models predict. For Jupiter, the need to recalculate the spectrum with recent models is demonstrated. The flux density scale proposed by Dent (1972) has been revised according to a more accurate determination of the millimeter brightness temperature of Jupiter.

  3. A 1 mm Scintillating Fibre Tracker Readout by a Multi-anode Photomultiplier

    Leverington, B D; Campana, P; Rosellini, R

    2011-01-01

    This note describes a prototype particle tracking detector constructed with 1 mm plastic scintillating fibres with a 64 channel Hamamatsu H8500 flat-panel multi-anode photomultiplier readout. Cosmic ray tracks from an array of 11 gas-filled drift tubes were matched to signals in the scintillating fibres in order to measure the resolution and efficiency of tracks reconstructed in the fibre-based tracker. A GEANT4 detector simulation was also developed to compare cosmic ray data with MC results and is discussed in the note. Using the parameters measured in this experimental setup, modified fibre tracker designs are suggested to improve resolution and efficiency in future prototypes to meet modern detector specifications.

  4. Status of beryllium materials for fusion application

    The possible use of beryllium as a material for fusion reactors is discussed. Based on the results of recent Russian elaborations, which were not covered previously in the scientific literature, an attempt of complex analysis of the techniques of using beryllium is made. The specific requirements on beryllium as a protective material for first wall and divertor are considered. Also the possibility of creating a fusion grade of beryllium is discussed and an optimum strategy is suggested. (orig.)

  5. Spectrographic measurement of beryllium in the atmosphere

    We describe here a method for the spectrographic determination of beryllium on filters which is valid for amounts varying between 0,01 and 30 μg of beryllium and which is independent of the nature of the beryllium compound involved. This is a flux method (graphite-lithium carbonate mixture), the excitation being by a direct current arc. (author)

  6. Neutron irradiation of beryllium pebbles

    Gelles, D.S.; Ermi, R.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Tsai, H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Seven subcapsules from the FFTF/MOTA 2B irradiation experiment containing 97 or 100% dense sintered beryllium cylindrical specimens in depleted lithium have been opened and the specimens retrieved for postirradiation examination. Irradiation conditions included 370 C to 1.6 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, 425 C to 4.8 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, and 550 C to 5.0 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}. TEM specimens contained in these capsules were also retrieved, but many were broken. Density measurements of the cylindrical specimens showed as much as 1.59% swelling following irradiation at 500 C in 100% dense beryllium. Beryllium at 97% density generally gave slightly lower swelling values.

  7. Microsphere Insulation Panels

    Mohling, R.; Allen, M.; Baumgartner, R.

    2006-01-01

    Microsphere insulation panels (MIPs) have been developed as lightweight, longlasting replacements for the foam and vacuum-jacketed systems heretofore used for thermally insulating cryogenic vessels and transfer ducts. The microsphere core material of a typical MIP consists of hollow glass bubbles, which have a combination of advantageous mechanical, chemical, and thermal-insulation properties heretofore available only separately in different materials. In particular, a core filling of glass microspheres has high crush strength and low density, is noncombustible, and performs well in soft vacuum.

  8. Defense programs beryllium good practice guide

    Within the DOE, it has recently become apparent that some contractor employees who have worked (or are currently working) with and around beryllium have developed chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an occupational granulomatous lung disorder. Respiratory exposure to aerosolized beryllium, in susceptible individuals, causes an immunological reaction that can result in granulomatous scarring of the lung parenchyma, shortness of breath, cough, fatigue, weight loss, and, ultimately, respiratory failure. Beryllium disease was originally identified in the 1940s, largely in the fluorescent light industry. In 1950, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) introduced strict exposure standards that generally curtailed both the acute and chronic forms of the disease. Beginning in 1984, with the identification of a CBD case in a DOE contractor worker, there was increased scrutiny of both industrial hygiene practices and individuals in this workforce. To date, over 100 additional cases of beryllium-specific sensitization and/or CBD have been identified. Thus, a disease previously thought to be largely eliminated by the adoption of permissible exposure standards 45 years ago is still a health risk in certain workforces. This good practice guide forms the basis of an acceptable program for controlling workplace exposure to beryllium. It provides (1) Guidance for minimizing worker exposure to beryllium in Defense Programs facilities during all phases of beryllium-related work, including the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of facilities. (2) Recommended controls to be applied to the handling of metallic beryllium and beryllium alloys, beryllium oxide, and other beryllium compounds. (3) Recommendations for medical monitoring and surveillance of workers exposed (or potentially exposed) to beryllium, based on the best current understanding of beryllium disease and medical diagnostic tests available. (4) Site-specific safety procedures for all processes of beryllium that is

  9. Cryogenic Properties of Aluminum Beryllium and Beryllium Materials

    Gamwell, Wayne R.; McGill, Preston B.

    2003-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation were obtained for the aluminum-beryllium alloy, AlBeMetl62 (38%Al-62%Be), at cryogenic (-195.5 C (-320 F) and (-252.8 C) (-423 F)) temperatures, and for an optical grade beryllium, O-30H (99%Be), at -252.8 C. AlBeMetl62 material was purchased to the requirements of SAE-AMS7912, "Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy, Extrusions." O-30H material was purchased to the requirements of Brush Wellman Inc. specification O-30H Optical Grade Beryllium. The ultimate tensile and yield strengths for extruded AlBeMetl62 material increased with decreasing temperature, and the percent elongation decreased with decreasing temperature. Design properties for the ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and percent elongation for extruded AlBeMetl62 were generated. It was not possible to distinguish a difference in the room and cryogenic ultimate strength for the hot isostatically pressed (HIP'ed) O-30H material. The O30H elongation decreased with decreasing temperature.

  10. Cryogenic Properties of Aluminum-Beryllium and Beryllium Materials

    Gamwell, Wayne R.; McGill, Preston B.

    2003-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation were obtained for the aluminum- beryllium alloy, AlBeMetl62 (38%Al-62%Be), at cryogenic (-195.5 C (-32O F) and (- 252.8 C) (-423 F)) temperatures, and for an optical grade beryllium, O-30H (99%Be), at -252.8 C. AlBeMet162 material was purchased to the requirements of SAE- AMs7912, "Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy, Extrusions". O-30H material was purchased to the requirements of Brush Wellman Inc. specification O-30H Optical Grade Beryllium. The ultimate tensile and yield strengths for extruded AlBeMet162 material increased with decreasing temperature, and the percent elongation decreased with decreasing temperature. Design properties for the ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and percent elongation for extruded AlBeMetl62 were generated. It was not possible to distinguish a difference in the room and cryogenic ultimate strength for the hot isostatically pressed (HIP'ed) O-30H material. The O-30H elongation decreased with decreasing temperature.

  11. Organic aerogel microspheres

    Mayer, Steven T.; Kong, Fung-Ming; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  12. Reactivity test between beryllium and copper

    Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kato, M. [NGK Insulators, Ltd., Aichi-ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium has been expected for using as plasma facing material on ITER. And, copper alloy has been proposed as heat sink material behind plasma facing components. Therefore, both materials must be joined. However, the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper alloy does not clear in detail. For example, other authors reported that beryllium reacted with copper at high temperature, but it was not obvious about the generation of reaction products and increasing of the reaction layer. In the present work, from this point, for clarifying the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper, the out-of-pile compatibility tests were conducted with diffusion couples of beryllium and copper which were inserted in the capsule filled with high purity helium gas (6N). Annealing temperatures were 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700{degrees}C, and annealing periods were 100, 300 and 1000h. Beryllium specimens were hot pressed beryllium, and copper specimens were OFC (Oxygen Free Copper).

  13. Worker Environment Beryllium Characterization Study

    This report summarizes the conclusion of regular monitoring of occupied buildings at the Nevada Test Site and North Las Vegas facility to determine the extent of beryllium (Be) contamination in accordance with Judgment of Needs 6 of the August 14, 2003, 'Minnema Report.'

  14. Worker Environment Beryllium Characterization Study

    NSTec Environment, Safety, Health & Quality

    2009-12-28

    This report summarizes the conclusion of regular monitoring of occupied buildings at the Nevada Test Site and North Las Vegas facility to determine the extent of beryllium (Be) contamination in accordance with Judgment of Needs 6 of the August 14, 2003, “Minnema Report.”

  15. Glass microspheres for brachytherapy

    We developed the capacity to produce glass microspheres containing in their structure one or more radioactive isotopes useful for brachytherapy. We studied the various facts related with their production: (Rare earth) alumino silicate glass making, glass characterization, microspheres production, nuclear activation through (n,γ) nuclear reactions, mechanical characterization before and after irradiation. Corrosion tests in simulated human plasma and mechanical properties characterization were done before and after irradiation. (author)

  16. Molecular cloning and analysis of Myc modulator 1 (Mm-1 from Bufo gargarizans (Amphibia: Anura

    Ning Wang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The protein of Myc modulator 1 (Mm-1 has been reported to repress the transcriptional activity of the proto-oncogene c-Myc in humans. Moreover, it was shown to be the subunit 5 of human prefoldin (PFD. So far, this gene and its homologs have been isolated and sequenced in many organisms, such as mammals and fish, but has not been sequenced for any amphibian or reptile. In order to better understand the function and evolution of Mm-1, we isolated a full-length Mm-1 cDNA (BgMm-1, GenBank accession no. EF211947 from Bufo gargarizans (Cantor, 1842 using RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends methods. Mm-1 in B. gargarizans is 755 bp long, comprising an open reading frame (ORF of 459 bp encoding 152 amino acids. The amino acid sequence had a prefoldin α-like domain, partially including a typical putative leucine zipper motif. BgMm-1 showed high similarity to its homolog of Mus musculus Linnaeus, 1758 (82% and Homo sapiens Linnaeus, 1758 MM-1 isoform a (81% at the amino acid level. The protein secondary structure modeled with the SWISS MODEL server revealed that there were two α-helices and four b-strands in BgMm-1 as its human orthologue, and both proteins belonged to the a class of PFD family. The phylogenetic relationships of Mm-1s from lower archaea to high mammals was consistent with the evolution of species, meanwhile the cluster result was consistent with the multiple alignment and the sequence identity analysis. RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that BgMm-1 expressed widely in ten tissues of adult toad. These results can be helpful for the further investigation on the evolution of Mm-1.

  17. Integration of glass microspheres and planar waveguides for microsphere lasers

    Panitchob, Yuwapat

    2008-01-01

    Microsphere resonators with sizes in the micrometer range are reported to support very high Q’s of more than 109 for a fused silica microsphere. This high Q value represents many promising characteristics such as low cavity loss, long cavity life time, and narrow band width. With their remarkable characteristics, microsphere resonators can be used in various applications such as the narrow band filter, add-drop multiplexer, microlasers, and etc. In this work, the integration of microspheres w...

  18. Integrated microsphere planar lightwave circuits

    J. S. Wilkinson; Murugan, G.S.; Hewak, D. W.; M. N. Zervas; Panitchob, Y.; Elliott, G. R.; Bartlett, P. N.; Tull, E.J.; Ryan, K R

    2010-01-01

    Multicomponent glass microspheres self-assembled on optical waveguides combine tailored optical properties with strong light/material interaction potentially leading to compact low-power photonic devices. Progress and prospects for microsphere/waveguide integration will be described

  19. OVERVIEW OF BERYLLIUM SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    Brisson, M

    2009-04-01

    Because of its unique properties as a lightweight metal with high tensile strength, beryllium is widely used in applications including cell phones, golf clubs, aerospace, and nuclear weapons. Beryllium is also encountered in industries such as aluminium manufacturing, and in environmental remediation projects. Workplace exposure to beryllium particulates is a growing concern, as exposure to minute quantities of anthropogenic forms of beryllium may lead to sensitization and to chronic beryllium disease, which can be fatal and for which no cure is currently known. Furthermore, there is no known exposure-response relationship with which to establish a 'safe' maximum level of beryllium exposure. As a result, the current trend is toward ever lower occupational exposure limits, which in turn make exposure assessment, both in terms of sampling and analysis, more challenging. The problems are exacerbated by difficulties in sample preparation for refractory forms of beryllium, such as beryllium oxide, and by indications that some beryllium forms may be more toxic than others. This chapter provides an overview of sources and uses of beryllium, health risks, and occupational exposure limits. It also provides a general overview of sampling, analysis, and data evaluation issues that will be explored in greater depth in the remaining chapters. The goal of this book is to provide a comprehensive resource to aid personnel in a wide variety of disciplines in selecting sampling and analysis methods that will facilitate informed decision-making in workplace and environmental settings.

  20. Beryllium - A Unique Material in Nuclear Applications

    Beryllium, due to its unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section characteristics, has been used successfully as a neutron reflector for three generations of nuclear test reactors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), the largest test reactor in the world, has utilized five successive beryllium neutron reflectors and is scheduled for continued operation with a sixth beryllium reflector. A high radiation environment in a test reactor produces radiation damage and other changes in beryllium. These changes necessitate safety analysis of the beryllium, methods to predict performance, and appropriate surveillances. Other nuclear applications also utilize beryllium. Beryllium, given its unique atomic, physical, and chemical characteristics, is widely used as a ''window'' for x-rays and gamma rays. Beryllium, intimately mixed with high-energy alpha radiation emitters has been successfully used to produce neutron sources. This paper addresses operational experience and methodologies associated with the use of beryllium in nuclear test reactors and in ''windows'' for x-rays and gamma rays. Other nuclear applications utilizing beryllium are also discussed

  1. Defense programs beryllium good practice guide

    Herr, M.

    1997-07-01

    Within the DOE, it has recently become apparent that some contractor employees who have worked (or are currently working) with and around beryllium have developed chronic beryllium disease (CBD), an occupational granulomatous lung disorder. Respiratory exposure to aerosolized beryllium, in susceptible individuals, causes an immunological reaction that can result in granulomatous scarring of the lung parenchyma, shortness of breath, cough, fatigue, weight loss, and, ultimately, respiratory failure. Beryllium disease was originally identified in the 1940s, largely in the fluorescent light industry. In 1950, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) introduced strict exposure standards that generally curtailed both the acute and chronic forms of the disease. Beginning in 1984, with the identification of a CBD case in a DOE contractor worker, there was increased scrutiny of both industrial hygiene practices and individuals in this workforce. To date, over 100 additional cases of beryllium-specific sensitization and/or CBD have been identified. Thus, a disease previously thought to be largely eliminated by the adoption of permissible exposure standards 45 years ago is still a health risk in certain workforces. This good practice guide forms the basis of an acceptable program for controlling workplace exposure to beryllium. It provides (1) Guidance for minimizing worker exposure to beryllium in Defense Programs facilities during all phases of beryllium-related work, including the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities. (2) Recommended controls to be applied to the handling of metallic beryllium and beryllium alloys, beryllium oxide, and other beryllium compounds. (3) Recommendations for medical monitoring and surveillance of workers exposed (or potentially exposed) to beryllium, based on the best current understanding of beryllium disease and medical diagnostic tests available. (4) Site-specific safety procedures for all processes of beryllium that is likely to

  2. Compatibility problems with beryllium in ceramic blankets

    Compatibility of beryllium with structural materials (316L austenitic steel and 1.4914 martensitic steel) and with tritium breeding ceramics (lithium aluminate or silicate) has been studied in contact tests between 550 C and 700 C and for durations reaching 3000 hours. Beryllium-ceramic interaction is negligeable in all the temperature range with aluminate and up to 600 C with silicates. On the other hand, noticeable interaction is observed between beryllium and 316L steel at 580 C and above. Beryllium interaction with 1.4914 steel is visible only at 650 C and above and its amplitude is lower than 316L steel one. In these two cases, the superficial layer is brittle, and adherent to the steel. Comparison between beryllium - 0.4 wt% calcium alloy and beryllium at 700 C shows that interaction with steels or ceramics is qualitatively the same but slightly weaker. (author). 6 refs.; 6 figs.; 3 tabs

  3. Belgian research on fusion beryllium waste

    Future fusion power plants will generate important quantities of neutron irradiated beryllium. Although recycling is the preferred management option for this waste, this may not be technically feasible for all of the beryllium, because of its radiological characteristics. Therefore, at SCK·CEN, we initiated a research programme aimed at studying aspects of the disposal of fusion beryllium, including waste characterisation, waste acceptance criteria, conditioning methods, and performance assessment. One of the main issues to be resolved is the development of fusion-specific waste acceptance criteria for surface or deep geological disposal, in particular with regard to the tritium content. In case disposal is the only solution, critical nuclides can be immobilised by conditioning the waste. As a first approach to immobilising beryllium waste, we investigated the vitrification of beryllium. Corrosion tests were performed on both metallic and vitrified beryllium to provide source data for performance assessment. Finally, a first step in performance assessment was undertaken. (author)

  4. Advances in Identifying Beryllium Sensitization and Disease

    Peter Kowalski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Beryllium is a lightweight metal with unique qualities related to stiffness, corrosion resistance, and conductivity. While there are many useful applications, researchers in the 1930s and l940s linked beryllium exposure to a progressive occupational lung disease. Acute beryllium disease is a pulmonary irritant response to high exposure levels, whereas chronic beryllium disease (CBD typically results from a hypersensitivity response to lower exposure levels. A blood test, the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT, was an important advance in identifying individuals who are sensitized to beryllium (BeS and thus at risk for developing CBD. While there is no true "gold standard" for BeS, basic epidemiologic concepts have been used to advance our understanding of the different screening algorithms.

  5. Thermodynamic properties of beryllium hydroxide

    The study of the hydro-thermal decomposition of beryllium hydroxide has made it possible to determine the free energy of formation and the entropy. The results obtained are in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated from the solubility product of this substance. They give furthermore the possibility of acquiring a better understanding of the BeO-H2O-Be (OH)2 system between 20 and 1500 C. (authors)

  6. Development of UO2 microsphere production process by external gelation method

    Experiments on production of uranium dioxide microspheres by external gelation method were conducted. This method, gel microspheres were formed by compressing sol prepared by using uranyl nitrate solution, methocel, tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and nitric acid through a capillary nozzle. The studies included : Gel microsphere size distribution from various pore sizes of capillary nozzles and sol concentration, method of drying and sintering of microspheres, carbon contents, O/U ratio and density of the microsphere products after calcining and sintering. The results revealed that for the sol concentration of 0.86 mole U/litre, capillary nozzle diameter of 0.6 - 1.0 mm dropped sol into concentrated ammonium hydroxide solution in a glass column of 3 cm diameter, 100 cm high, sol drop size between 2.1 - 3.0 mm were obtained. After washing drying and finally sintering in Ar-4% H2 at 1200 c, 2 - 3 hrs, the microspheres sizes obtained were 0.8 - 1.1 mm in diameter, the average carbon contents of microspheres were reduced from 1.251% before sintering to 0.164%, the ratio of O/U were 2.00 - 2.19 and densities were in the range of 73.18% to 85.86% of theoretical density

  7. Current Treatment of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Sood, Akshay

    2009-01-01

    The current mainstay of management of chronic beryllium disease involves cessation of beryllium exposure and use of systemic corticosteroids. However, there are no randomized controlled trials to assess the effect of these interventions on the natural history of this disease. Despite this limitation, it is prudent to remove patients with chronic beryllium disease from further exposure and consider treating progressive disease early with long-term corticosteroids. The effect of treatment shoul...

  8. MEASUREMENTS OF THE PROPERTIES OF BERYLLIUM FOIL

    The electrical conductivity of beryllium at radio frequency (800 MHz) and liquid nitrogen temperature were investigated and measured. This summary addresses a collection of beryllium properties in the literature, an analysis of the anomalous skin effect, the test model, the experimental setup and improvements, MAFIA simulations, the measurement results and data analyses. The final results show that the conductivity of beryllium is not as good as indicated by the handbook, yet very close to copper at liquid nitrogen temperature

  9. New audio applications of beryllium metal

    The major applications of beryllium metal in the field of audio appliances are for the vibrating cones for the two types of speakers 'TWITTER' for high range sound and 'SQUAWKER' for mid range sound, and also for beryllium cantilever tube assembled in stereo cartridge. These new applications are based on the characteristic property of beryllium having high ratio of modulus of elasticity to specific gravity. The production of these audio parts is described, and the audio response is shown. (author)

  10. The beryllium "double standard" standard.

    Egilman, David S; Bagley, Sarah; Biklen, Molly; Golub, Alison Stern; Bohme, Susanna Rankin

    2003-01-01

    Brush Wellman, the world's leading producer and supplier of beryllium products, has systematically hidden cases of beryllium disease that occurred below the threshold limit value (TLV) and lied about the efficacy of the TLV in published papers, lectures, reports to government agencies, and instructional materials prepared for customers and workers. Hypocritically, Brush Wellman instituted a zero exposure standard for corporate executives while workers and customers were told the 2 microgram standard was "safe." Brush intentionally used its workers as "canaries for the plant," and referred to them as such. Internal documents and corporate depositions indicate that these actions were intentional and that the motive was money. Despite knowledge of the inadequacy of the TLV, Brush has successfully used it as a defense against lawsuits brought by injured workers and as a sales device to provide reassurance to customers. Brush's policy has reaped an untold number of victims and resulted in mass distribution of beryllium in consumer products. Such corporate malfeasance is perpetuated by the current market system, which is controlled by an organized oligopoly that creates an incentive for the neglect of worker health and safety in favor of externalizing costs to victimized workers, their families, and society at large. PMID:14758859

  11. Recommended design correlations for S-65 beryllium

    The properties of tritium and helium behavior in irradiated beryllium are reviewed, along with the thermal-mechanical properties needed for ITER design analysis. Correlations are developed to describe the performance of beryllium in a fusion reactor environment. While this paper focuses on the use of beryllium as a plasma-facing component (PFC) material, the correlations presented here can also be used to describe the performance of beryllium as a neutron multiplier for a tritium breeding blanket. The performance properties for beryllium are subdivided into two categories: properties which do not change with irradiation damage to the bulk of the material; and properties which are degraded by neutron irradiation. The approach taken in developing properties correlations is to describe the behavior of dense, pressed S-65 beryllium as a function of temperature. As there are essentially no data on the performance of porous and/or irradiated S-65 beryllium, the degradation of properties with as-fabricated porosity and irradiation are determined form the broad data base on S-200F, as well as other types and grades, and applied to S-65 beryllium by scaling factors. The resulting correlations can be used for Be produced by vacuum hot pressing (VHP) and cold-pressing (CP)/sintering(S)/hot-isostatic-pressing(HIP). The performance of plasma-sprayed beryllium is discussed but not quantified

  12. Doppler cooling a microsphere

    Barker, P F

    2010-01-01

    Doppler cooling the center-of-mass motion of an optically levitated microsphere via the velocity dependent scattering force from narrow whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonances is described. Light that is red detuned from the WGM resonance can be used to damp the center-of-mass motion in a process analogous to the Doppler cooling of atoms. Leakage of photons out of the microsphere when the incident field is near resonant with the narrow WGM resonance acts to damp the motion of the sphere. The scattering force is not limited by saturation, but can be controlled by the incident power. Cooling times on the order of seconds are calculated for a 20 micron diameter silica microsphere trapped within optical tweezers, with a Doppler temperature limit in the microKelvin regime.

  13. (Beryllium). Internal Report No. 137, Jan. 15, 1958

    After a brief summary of the physical and chemical properties of beryllium, the various chemical treatments which can be applied to beryllium minerals either directly or after a physical enrichment are discussed. These various treatments give either the hydroxide or beryllium salts, from which either beryllium oxide or metallic beryllium can easily be obtained. The purification, analysis and uses of beryllium are also briefly discussed. (author)

  14. Doppler Cooling a Microsphere

    Barker, P F

    2010-01-01

    Doppler cooling the center-of-mass motion of an optically levitated microsphere via the velocity dependent scattering force from narrow whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonances is described. Light that is red detuned from the WGM resonance can be used to damp the center-of-mass motion in a process analogous to the Doppler cooling of atoms. Leakage of photons out of the microsphere when the incident field is near resonant with the narrow WGM resonance acts to damp the motion of the sphere. The...

  15. Method for preparing hollow metal oxide microsphere

    Schmitt, C.R.

    1974-02-12

    Hollow refractory metal oxide microspheres are prepared by impregnating resinous microspheres with a metallic compound, drying the impregnated microspheres, heating the microspheres slowly to carbonize the resin, and igniting the microspheres to remove the carbon and to produce the metal oxide. Zirconium oxide is given as an example. (Official Gazette)

  16. Microsphere insulation systems

    Allen, Mark S. (Inventor); Willen, Gary S. (Inventor); Mohling, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A new insulation system is provided that contains microspheres. This insulation system can be used to provide insulated panels and clamshells, and to insulate annular spaces around objects used to transfer, store, or transport cryogens and other temperature-sensitive materials. This insulation system provides better performance with reduced maintenance than current insulation systems.

  17. Portable Beryllium Prospecting Instrument With Large Sensitive Area

    The instrument described was designed on the basis of the photoneutron method of determining beryllium in rock surfaces and developed with a view to prospecting beryllium minerals in the Ilímaussaq intrusion, south Greenland. These minerals occur,mainly in hydrothermal veins which are from 1 mm to about 2 m wide. Of the ten beryllium minerals found until now, chkalovite (12% BeO) is the most common. The distinctive feature of the prospecting instrument is a comparatively large effective measuring area (∼500 cm2). Since the instrument is intended for use in a difficult terrain without roads, it has been necessary to limit its weight and size as much as possible. The instrument consists of a detector unit and a control unit. The detector unit has the dimensions 46 x 21 x 10 cm, weighs 20 kg, and contains a 30 cm long gamma-activation device, a biological radiation shield, and two 30-cm long 3He-filled neutron proportional detectors embedded in paraffin wax. The gamma- activation device consists of 31 identical 12Sb-sources placed in a steel tube with spacings decreasing towards the ends of the tube and with a total activity of 20 mCi. During transport of the instrument the gamma-activation device is placed at the centre of the radiation shield, when the maximum dose-rate on the surface of the detector unit is 200 mR/h. When the instrument is in use, the activation device is turned to a position just above the bottom of the detector unit. The sensitivity per cm2 of the bottom surface to a 5-cm thick layer of beryllium is 20% of its value at the centre of the bottom surface along a curve which is roughly an ellipse with axes 34 and 18 cm The total sensitivity of the instrument is about 35 counts/min per % BeO per mCi 124Sb, and the background count-rate is 12-20 counts/mm. The corresponding theoretical detection limit for a single measurement of 8-min duration is 35-50 ppm BeO. (author)

  18. ICT diagnostic method of beryllium welding quality

    To avoid the interference of high density material for the quality assay of beryllium welding line, a slice by slice scanning method was proposed based upon the research results of the Industrial Computerized Tomography (ICT) diagnostics for weld penetration, weld width, off-centered deviation and weld defects of beryllium-ring welding seam with high density material inside

  19. Some aspects of beryllium disposal in Kazakhstan

    Historically in Kazakhstan all disposals of used beryllium and beryllium wasted materials were stored and recycled at JSC ''Ulba Metallurgical Plant''. Since Ulba Metallurgical Plant (beside beryllium and tantalum production) is one of the world largest complex producers of fuel for nuclear power plants as well it has possibilities, technologies and experience in processing toxic and radioactive wastes related with those productions. At present time only one operating Kazakhstan research reactors (EWG1M in Kurchatov) contains beryllium made core. The results of current examination of that core allow using it without replacement long time yet (at least for next five-ten years). Nevertheless the problem how to utilize such irradiated beryllium becomes actual issue for Kazakhstan even today. Since Kazakhstan is the member of ITER/DEMO Reactors Projects and is permanently considered as possible provider of huge amount of beryllium for those reactors so that is the reason for starting studies of possibilities of large scale processing/recycling of such disposed irradiated beryllium. It is clear that the Ulba Metallurgical Plant is considered as the best site for it in Kazakhstan. The draft plan how to organize experimental studies of irradiated beryllium disposals in Kazakhstan involving National Nuclear Center, National University (Almaty), JSC ''Ulba Metallurgical Plant'' (Ust-Kamenogorsk) would be presented in this paper as well as proposals to arrange international collaboration in that field through ISTC (International Science Technology Center, Moscow). (author)

  20. Metastable defects in beryllium oxide crystals

    The metastable luminescence centers of regular lattice are investigated in binary beryllium oxide crystals. Beryllium oxide hexagonal crystals are the simplest among low-symmetry oxide scintillators and serve as a model system. The anisotropy of energy transformation and transfer is analyzed

  1. Investigation of beryllium/steam interaction

    Chekhonadskikh, A.M.; Vurim, A.D.; Vasilyev, Yu.S.; Pivovarov, O.S. [Inst. of Atomic Energy National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakstan Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan); Shestakov, V.P.; Tazhibayeva, I.L.

    1998-01-01

    In this report program on investigations of beryllium emissivity and transient processes on overheated beryllium surface attacked by water steam to be carried out in IAE NNC RK within Task S81 TT 2096-07-16 FR. The experimental facility design is elaborated in this Report. (author)

  2. Modeling of hydrogen interactions with beryllium

    Longhurst, G.R. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, improved mathematical models are developed for hydrogen interactions with beryllium. This includes the saturation effect observed for high-flux implantation of ions from plasmas and retention of tritium produced from neutronic transmutations in beryllium. Use of the models developed is justified by showing how they can replicated experimental data using the TMAP4 tritium transport code. (author)

  3. Assessment of LANL beryllium waste management documentation

    The objective of this report is to determine present status of the preparation and implementation of the various high priority documents required to properly manage the beryllium waste generated at the Laboratory. The documents being assessed are: Waste Acceptance Criteria, Waste Characterization Plan, Waste Certification Plan, Waste Acceptance Procedures, Waste Characterization Procedures, Waste Certification Procedures, Waste Training Procedures and Waste Recordkeeping Procedures. Beryllium is regulated (as a dust) under 40 CFR 261.33 as ''Discarded commercial chemical products, off specification species, container residues and spill residues thereof.'' Beryllium is also identified in the 3rd thirds ruling of June 1, 1990 as being restricted from land disposal (as a dust). The beryllium waste generated at the Laboratory is handled separately because beryllium has been identified as a highly toxic carcinogenic material

  4. Beryllium for fusion application - recent results

    Khomutov, A.; Barabash, V.; Chakin, V.; Chernov, V.; Davydov, D.; Gorokhov, V.; Kawamura, H.; Kolbasov, B.; Kupriyanov, I.; Longhurst, G.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Shestakov, V.

    2002-12-01

    The main issues for the application of beryllium in fusion reactors are analyzed taking into account the latest results since the ICFRM-9 (Colorado, USA, October 1999) and presented at 5th IEA Be Workshop (10-12 October 2001, Moscow Russia). Considerable progress has been made recently in understanding the problems connected with the selection of the beryllium grades for different applications, characterization of the beryllium at relevant operational conditions (irradiation effects, thermal fatigue, etc.), and development of required manufacturing technologies. The key remaining problems related to the application of beryllium as an armour in near-term fusion reactors (e.g. ITER) are discussed. The features of the application of beryllium and beryllides as a neutron multiplier in the breeder blanket for power reactors (e.g. DEMO) in pebble-bed form are described.

  5. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  6. Postirradiation examination of beryllium pebbles

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Postirradiation examinations of COBRA-1A beryllium pebbles irradiated in the EBR-II fast reactor at neutron fluences which generated 2700--3700 appm helium have been performed. Measurements included density change, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The major change in microstructure is development of unusually shaped helium bubbles forming as highly non-equiaxed thin platelet-like cavities on the basal plane. Measurement of the swelling due to cavity formation was in good agreement with density change measurements.

  7. Technical issues for beryllium use in fusion blanket applications

    Beryllium is an excellent non-fissioning neutron multiplier for fusion breeder and fusion electric blanket applications. This report is a compilation of information related to the use of beryllium with primary emphasis on the fusion breeder application. Beryllium resources, production, fabrication, properties, radiation damage and activation are discussed. A new theoretical model for beryllium swelling is presented

  8. Gas retention in irradiated beryllium

    Helium (an inert gas) with low solubility in beryllium is trapped in irradiated beryllium at low temperatures (22 n/cm2 (E > 1 MeV). In these samples the calculated helium generated was ∼ 14,000 appm. They are described in terms of swelling, annealing, microstructure, and helium bubble behavior (size, density and mobility). A second sample was irradiated to ∼5 x 1022 n/cm2 (E > 1 MeV). In that one the calculated helium and tritium generated were ∼24,000 appm He and ∼3720 appm, and tritium content was examined in a dissolution experiment. Most of the tritium was released as gas to the glovebox indicating the generated tritium was retained in the helium bubbles. In a third set of experiments a specimen was examined by annealing at a succession of temperatures to more than 600 degree C for tritium release. In the temperature range of 300--500 degree C little release (0.01--0.4%) occurred, but there was a massive release at just over 600 degree C. Theories of swelling appear to adequately describe bubble behavior with breakaway release occurring at high helium contents and at large bubble diameters. 8 refs., 6 figs

  9. Fluorimetric method for determination of Beryllium

    The old fluorimetric method for the determination of Beryllium, based essentially on the fluorescence of the Beryllium-Morine complex in a strongly alkaline solution, is still competitive and stands the comparison with more modern methods or at least three reasons: in the presence of solid or gaseous samples (powders), the times necessary to finalize an analytic determination are comparable since the stage of the process which lasts the longest is the mineralization of the solid particles containing Beryllium, the cost of a good fluorimeter is by far Inferior to the cost, e. g., of an Emission Spectrophotometer provided with ICP torch and magnets for exploiting the Zeeman effect and of an Atomic absorption Spectrophotometer provided with Graphite furnace; it is possible to determine, fluorimetrically, rather small Beryllium levels (about 30 ng of Beryllium/sample), this potentiality is more than sufficient to guarantee the respect of all the work safety and hygiene rules now in force. The study which is the subject of this publication is designed to the analysis procedure which allows one to reach good results in the determination of Beryllium, chiefly through the control and measurement of the interference effect due to the presence of some metals which might accompany the environmental samples of workshops and laboratories where Beryllium is handled, either at the pure state or in its alloys. The results obtained satisfactorily point out the merits and limits of this analytic procedure

  10. Recommended design correlations for S-65 beryllium

    The properties of tritium and helium behavior in irradiated beryllium are reviewed, along with the thermal-mechanical properties needed for ITER design analysis. Correlations are developed to describe the performance of beryllium in a fusion reactor environment. While this paper focuses on the use of beryllium as a plasma-facing component (PFC) material, the correlations presented here can also be used to describe the performance of beryllium as a neutron multiplier for a tritium breeding blanket. The performance properties for beryllium are subdivided into two categories: properties which do not change with irradiation damage to the bulk of the material; and properties which are degraded by neutron irradiation. The irradiation-independent properties described within are: thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, thermal expansion, and elastic constants. Irradiation-dependent properties include: yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, plastic tangent modulus, uniform and total tensile elongation, thermal and irradiation-induced creep strength, He-induced swelling and tritium retention/release. The approach taken in developing properties correlations is to describe the behavior of dense, pressed S-65 beryllium -- the material chosen for ITER PFC application -- as a function of temperature. As there are essentially no data on the performance of porous and/or irradiated S-65 beryllium, the degradation of properties with as-fabricated porosity and irradiation are determined from the broad data base on S-200F, as well as other types and grades, and applied to S-65 beryllium by scaling factors. The resulting correlations can be used for Be produced by vacuum hot pressing (VHP) and cold-pressing (CP)/sintering(S)/hot-isostatic-pressing (HIP). The performance of plasma-sprayed beryllium is discussed but not quantified

  11. Recommended design correlations for S-65 beryllium

    Billone, M.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The properties of tritium and helium behavior in irradiated beryllium are reviewed, along with the thermal-mechanical properties needed for ITER design analysis. Correlations are developed to describe the performance of beryllium in a fusion reactor environment. While this paper focuses on the use of beryllium as a plasma-facing component (PFC) material, the correlations presented here can also be used to describe the performance of beryllium as a neutron multiplier for a tritium breeding blanket. The performance properties for beryllium are subdivided into two categories: properties which do not change with irradiation damage to the bulk of the material; and properties which are degraded by neutron irradiation. The irradiation-independent properties described within are: thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, thermal expansion, and elastic constants. Irradiation-dependent properties include: yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, plastic tangent modulus, uniform and total tensile elongation, thermal and irradiation-induced creep strength, He-induced swelling and tritium retention/release. The approach taken in developing properties correlations is to describe the behavior of dense, pressed S-65 beryllium -- the material chosen for ITER PFC application -- as a function of temperature. As there are essentially no data on the performance of porous and/or irradiated S-65 beryllium, the degradation of properties with as-fabricated porosity and irradiation are determined from the broad data base on S-200F, as well as other types and grades, and applied to S-65 beryllium by scaling factors. The resulting correlations can be used for Be produced by vacuum hot pressing (VHP) and cold-pressing (CP)/sintering(S)/hot-isostatic-pressing (HIP). The performance of plasma-sprayed beryllium is discussed but not quantified.

  12. Research of flaw assessment methods for beryllium reflector elements

    Reflector elements made from metal beryllium is widely used as neutron reflectors to increase neutron flux in test reactors. When beryllium reflector elements are irradiated by neutron, bending of reflector elements caused by swelling occurs, and beryllium reflector elements must be replaced in several years. In this report, literature search and investigation for non-destructive inspection of Beryllium and experiments for Preliminary inspection to establish post irradiation examination method for research of characteristics of metal beryllium under neutron irradiation were reported. (author)

  13. Preliminary proposal for a beryllium technology program for fusion applications

    The program was designed to provide the answers to the critical issues of beryllium technology needed in fusion blanket designs. The four tasks are as follows: (1) Beryllium property measurements needed for fusion data base. (2) Beryllium stress relaxation and creep measurements for lifetime modelling calculations. (3) Simplified recycle technique development for irradiated beryllium. (4) Beryllium neutron multiplier measurements using manganese bath absolute calibration techniques

  14. Chalcogenide glass microsphere laser

    Elliott, Gregor R.; Murugan, G.Senthil; Wilkinson, James S.; Zervas, Michalis N.; Hewak, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    Laser action has been demonstrated in chalcogenide glass microsphere. A sub millimeter neodymium-doped gallium lanthanum sulphide glass sphere was pumped at 808 nm with a laser diode and single and multimode laser action demonstrated at wavelengths between 1075 and 1086 nm. The gallium lanthanum sulphide family of glass offer higher thermal stability compared to other chalcogenide glasses, and this, along with an optimized Q-factor for the microcavity allowed laser action to be achieved. When...

  15. Iron-containing phases in commercial beryllium

    The effect of hot and cold rolling with subsequent heat treatment on the interrelation of iron-containing phases and texture in commercial beryllium is considered. Using the Moessbauer microscopy it has been established that iron impurities are present both in solid solution and in the composition of intermetallide AlFeBe4 the texture for iron solid solution in beryllium is determined. Beryllium quenching results in nearly complete disappearance of intermetallic phase and iron transfers into substitutional solid solution. Further cold rolling does not result in any phase transformation

  16. AzTEC/ASTE 1.1-mm Survey of the AKARI Deep Field South: source catalogue and number counts

    Hatsukade, B; Aretxaga, I; Austermann, J E; Ezawa, H; Hughes, D H; Ikarashi, S; Iono, D; Kawabe, R; Khan, S; Matsuo, H; Matsuura, S; Nakanishi, K; Oshima, T; Perera, T; Scott, K S; Shirahata, M; Takeuchi, T T; Tamura, Y; Tanaka, K; Tosaki, T; Wilson, G W; Yun, M S

    2010-01-01

    We present results of a 1.1 mm deep survey of the AKARI Deep Field South (ADF-S) with AzTEC mounted on the Atacama Submillimetre Telescope Experiment (ASTE). We obtained a map of 0.25 sq. deg area with an rms noise level of 0.32-0.71 mJy. This is one of the deepest and widest maps thus far at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths. We uncovered 198 sources with a significance of 3.5-15.6 sigma, providing the largest catalog of 1.1 mm sources in a contiguous region. Most of the sources are not detected in the far-infrared bands of the AKARI satellite, suggesting that they are mostly at z ~ 1.5 given the detection limits. We constructed differential and cumulative number counts in the ADF-S, the Subaru/XMM Newton Deep Field (SXDF), and the SSA 22 field surveyed by AzTEC/ASTE, which provide currently the tightest constraints on the faint end. The integration of the best-fit number counts in the ADF-S find that the contribution of 1.1 mm sources with fluxes >=1 mJy to the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at 1.1...

  17. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program Report

    Lee, S

    2012-03-29

    This document describes how Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) meets the requirements and management practices of federal regulation 10 CFR 850, 'Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP).' This revision of the LLNL CBDPP incorporates clarification and editorial changes based on lessons learned from employee discussions, observations and reviews of Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and commercial industry beryllium (Be) safety programs. The information is used to strengthen beryllium safety practices at LLNL, particularly in the areas of: (1) Management of small parts and components; and (2) Communication of program status to employees. Future changes to LLNL beryllium activities and on-going operating experience will be incorporated into the program as described in Section S, 'Performance Feedback.'

  18. Nitrogen reactivity toward beryllium: surface reactions.

    Allouche, A

    2013-06-01

    Recent experiments with nitrogen as a seeding gas in fusion plasma devices together with the option of using beryllium as an armor material in the future ITER tokamak (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) have raised new interest in the interactions of beryllium surfaces with nitrogen (atomic or molecular). The strong reactivity of nitrogen implies the formation of beryllium nitrite and, in conjunction with oxygen and other possible impurities, experimentalists have to consider the probability of generating various complex moieties such as imine, amine or oxyamine, and amide radicals. This chemistry would obviously dramatically perturb the plasma, and quantum investigations can be of great predictive help. Nitrogen adsorption on beryllium basal surfaces is investigated through quantum density functional theory. Different situations are examined: molecular or atomic nitrogen reactions; nitride radical adsorption or formation on surfaces; hydrogen retention on surfaces; combined nitrogen/oxygen reactivity and hydrogen retention. A tentative comparison with experiment is also proposed. PMID:23594802

  19. Lithium-Beryllium-Boron : Origin and Evolution

    Vangioni-Flam, Elisabeth; Casse, Michel; Audouze, Jean

    1999-01-01

    The origin and evolution of Lithium-Beryllium-Boron is a crossing point between different astrophysical fields : optical and gamma spectroscopy, non thermal nucleosynthesis, Big Bang and stellar nucleosynthesis and finally galactic evolution. We describe the production and the evolution of Lithium-Beryllium-Boron from Big Bang up to now through the interaction of the Standard Galactic Cosmic Rays with the interstellar medium, supernova neutrino spallation and a low energy component related to...

  20. Beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children

    Ewa Nogaj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Power plant dust is believed to be the main source of the increased presence of the element beryllium in the environment which has been detected in the atmospheric air, surface waters, groundwater, soil, food, and cigarette smoke. In humans, beryllium absorption occurs mainly via the respiratory system. The pharyngeal tonsils are located on the roof of the nasopharynx and are in direct contact with dust particles in inhaled air. As a result, the concentration levels of beryllium in the pharyngeal tonsils are likely to be a good indicator of concentration levels in the air. The presented study had two primary aims: to investigate the beryllium concentration in pharyngeal tonsils in children living in southern Poland, and the appropriate reference range for this element in children’s pharyngeal tonsils. Pharyngeal tonsils were extracted from a total of 379 children (age 2–17 years, mean 6.2 ± 2.7 years living in southern Poland. Tonsil samples were mineralized in a closed cycle in a pressure mineralizer PDS 6, using 65% spectrally pure nitric acid. Beryllium concentration was determined using the ICP-AES method with a Perkin Elmer Optima 5300DVTM. The software Statistica v. 9 was used for the statistical analysis. It was found that girls had a significantly greater beryllium concentration in their pharyngeal tonsils than boys. Beryllium concentration varies greatly, mostly according to the place of residence. Based on the study results, the reference value for beryllium in pharyngeal tonsils of children is recommended to be determined at 0.02–0.04 µg/g.

  1. Tritium release from neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik

    1998-01-01

    One of the most important open issues related to beryllium for fusion applications refers to the kinetics of the tritium release as a function of neutron fluence and temperature. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating the beryllium response under neutron irradiation. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from the above mentioned irradiation experiments, trying to elucidate the tritium release controlling processes. In agreement with previous studies it has been found that release starts at about 500-550degC and achieves a maximum at about 700-750degC. The observed release at about 500-550degC is probably due to tritium escaping from chemical traps, while the maximum release at about 700-750degC is due to tritium escaping from physical traps. The consequences of a direct contact between beryllium and ceramics during irradiation, causing tritium implanting in a surface layer of beryllium up to a depth of about 40 mm and leading to an additional inventory which is usually several times larger than the neutron-produced one, are also presented and the effects on the tritium release are discussed. (author)

  2. Sanitary-hygienic and ecological aspects of beryllium production

    Dvinskykh, E.M.; Savchuk, V.V.; Sidorov, V.L.; Slobodin, D.B.; Tuzov, Y.V. [Ulba Metallurgical Plant, Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan)

    1998-01-01

    The Report describes An organization of sanitary-hygienic and ecological control of beryllium production at Ulba metallurgical plant. It involves: (1) the consideration of main methods for protection of beryllium production personnel from unhealthy effect of beryllium, (2) main kinds of filters, used in gas purification systems at different process areas, (3) data on beryllium monitoring in water, soil, on equipment. This Report also outlines problems connected with designing devices for a rapid analysis of beryllium in air as well as problems of beryllium production on ecological situation in the town. (author)

  3. Continuum Observations of M51 and M83 at 1.1 mm with AzTEC

    Wall, W F; Tilanus, R; Israel, F P; Austermann, J E; Aretxaga, I; Wilson, G; Yun, M; Scott, K S; Perera, T A; Roberts, C M; Hughes, D H

    2016-01-01

    We observed the spiral galaxies M51 and M83 at 20" spatial resolution with the bolometer array AzTEC on the JCMT in the 1.1$\\,$mm continuum, recovering the extended emission out to galactocentric radii of more than 12 kpc in both galaxies. The 1.1 mm-continuum fluxes are 5.6+/-0.7 and 9.9+/-1.4 Jy, with associated gas masses estimated at 9.4 X 10^9 Mo and 7.2 X 10^9 Mo for M51 and M83, respectively. In the interarm regions of both galaxies the N(H2)/I(CO) (or X-factor) ratios exceed those in the arms by factors of ~1.5-2. In the inner disks of both galaxies, the X-factor is about 1 X 10^20 cm^-2 / (K km s^-1). In the outer parts, the CO-dark molecular gas becomes more important. While the spiral density wave in M51 appears to influence the interstellar medium and stars in a similar way, the bar potential in M83 influences the interstellar medium and the stars differently. We confirm the result of Foyle et al. (2010) that the arms merely heighten the star formation rate and the gas surface density in the same ...

  4. CSO BOLOCAM 1.1 mm CONTINUUM MAPPING OF THE BRAID NEBULA STAR FORMATION REGION IN CYGNUS OB7

    We present a 1.1 mm map of the Braid Nebula star formation region in Cygnus OB7 taken using Bolocam on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Within the 1 deg2 covered by the map, we have detected 55 cold dust clumps all of which are new detections. A number of these clumps are coincident with IRAS point sources although the majority are not. Some of the previously studied optical/near-IR sources are detected at 1.1 mm. We estimate total dust/gas masses for the 55 clumps together with peak visual extinctions. We conclude that over the whole region, approximately 20% of the clumps are associated with IRAS sources suggesting that these are protostellar objects. The remaining 80% are classed as starless clumps. In addition, both FU Orionis (FUor) like objects in the field, the Braid Star and HH 381 IRS, are associated with strong millimeter emission. This implies that FUor eruptions can occur at very early stages of pre-main-sequence life. Finally, we determine that the cumulative clump mass function for the region is very similar to that found in both the Perseus and ρ Ophiuchus star-forming regions.

  5. Particle trackers based on 1 mm and 0.7 mm scintillating fibers readout by a multi-anode photomultiplier

    A prototype particle tracking detector was constructed at LNF with 1 mm and 0.7 mm plastic scintillating fibers with a 64 channel Hamamatsu H7546A-200 Ultra-bialkali flat-panel multi-anode photomultiplier readout. Cosmic ray tracks from an array of 11 gas-filled drift tubes were matched to signals in the scintillating fibers in order to measure the resolution and efficiency of tracks reconstructed in the fiber-based tracker. The fibers allow for two possible readout methods, a hit-based (digital) and an amplitude-based (analog) mode. A GEANT4 detector simulation was also developed to compare cosmic ray data with Monte Carlo results. These fiber tracker designs are suggested as a way to meet the resolution and efficiency goals of modern detectors, such as an upgraded LHCb Outer Tracker. Resolutions for the fiber trackers were found to be 0.236 mm and 0.175 mm for the 1 mm and 0.7 mm trackers, respectively, in analog mode

  6. Beryllium colorimetric detection for high speed monitoring of laboratory environments.

    Taylor, Tammy P; Sauer, Nancy N

    2002-08-01

    The health consequences of beryllium (Be2+) exposure can be severe. Beryllium is responsible for a debilitating and potentially fatal lung disease, chronic beryllium disease (CBD) resulting from inhalation of beryllium particles. The US Code of Federal Register (CFR), 10 CFR 850, has established a limit of 0.2 microg beryllium/100 cm(2) as the maximum amount of beryllium allowable on surfaces to be released from beryllium work areas in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The analytical technique described herein reduces the time and cost of detecting beryllium on laboratory working surfaces substantially. The technique provides a positive colorimetric response to the presence of beryllium on a 30.5 cm x 30.5 cm (1 ft(2)) surface at a minimum detection of 0.2 microg/100 cm(2). The method has been validated to provide positive results for beryllium in the presence of excess iron, calcium, magnesium, copper, nickel, chromium and lead at concentrations 100 times that of beryllium and aluminum and uranium (UO2(2+)) at lesser concentrations. The colorimetric detection technique has also been validated to effectively detect solid forms of beryllium including Be(OH)2, BeCl2, BeSO4, beryllium metal and BeO. PMID:12137989

  7. Particle Tracking of Fluorescent Microspheres

    Kaminski, Zofia; Mueller, Joachim; Berk, Serkan

    2010-10-01

    In this research, the diffusion coefficients of the fluorescent microspheres and the relation of those coefficients to particle radius were investigated. An additional focus was to see how well the measured radius of the microspheres compared to the radius as reported by the manufacturer and to measure the distribution of radii in a sample. This study further developed the critical process of ensuring particle movement within the sample volume and made preliminary sample measurements.The methods developed for tracking microspheres will later be used to determine the radii of virus like particles (VLPs), which are a non-infectious model system of the HIV virus. Results from our measurements will be reported.

  8. Review: microspheres for radioembolization therapy

    Radioembolization of liver cancer has been proven to be an effective therapy in nuclear medicine. The yttrium-90 glass microspheres has been used to treat both primary and metastatic liver tumors in clinic which shown encouraging results. The preparation, stability, degradation and application for medical purpose of radioactive microspheres are reviewed. At first, the theory of radioem- bolization treating cancer is discussed; and then three major radiolabled micro- sphere materials are expounded: viz. glass, resin-based and polymer-based; Future improvements in the preparation and use of radioactive microspheres are prospected at last. (authors)

  9. Mucoadhesive Microsphere - Review

    Ratnaparkhi M P

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Several approaches have been immerged to prolong the residence time of the dosage forms at the absorption site and one of them is the development of oral controlled release mucoadhesive system. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems are used to enhance drug absorption in a site-specific manner. Bioadhesion has been defined as the attachment of synthetic or biological macromolecules to a biological tissue. The biological surface can be epithelial tissue or the mucous coat on the surface of a tissue. If adhesive attachment is to a mucous coat, the phenomenon is referred to as mucoadhesion. Mucus is a thin blanket covering all epithelia that are in contact with the external environment in the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and urogenital tracts. This approach involves the use of mucoadhesive polymers, which can adhere to the epithelial surface in the stomach. Carrier technology offers an intelligent approach for drug delivery by coupling the drug to a carrier particle such as microspheres, nanospheres, liposomes, nanoparticles, etc., which modulates the release and absorption of the drug. Microspheres constitute an important part of these particulate drug delivery systems by virtue of their small size and efficient carrier capacity.

  10. Beryllium. Health hazards and their control. Pt. 2

    In this work (continuation of 'Beryllium' series) health hazards, toxic effects, limits of permissible atmospheric contamination and safe exposure to beryllium are described. Guidelines to the design, control operations and hygienic precautions of the working facilities are given. (Author)

  11. Mechanical performance of irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Dalle-Donne, M.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-01-01

    For the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Blanket, which is one of the two reference concepts studied within the European Fusion Technology Programme, the neutron multiplier consists of a mixed bed of about 2 and 0.1-0.2 mm diameter beryllium pebbles. Beryllium has no structural function in the blanket, however microstructural and mechanical properties are important, as they might influence the material behavior under neutron irradiation. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating it. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from these irradiation experiments, emphasizing the effects of irradiation of essential material properties and trying to elucidate the processes controlling the property changes. The microstructure, the porosity distribution, the impurity content, the behavior under compression loads and the compatibility of the beryllium pebbles with lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) during the in-pile irradiation are presented and critically discussed. Qualitative information on ductility and creep obtained by hardness-type measurements are also supplied. (author)

  12. Continuum observations of M 51 and M 83 at 1.1 mm with AzTEC

    Wall, W. F.; Puerari, I.; Tilanus, R.; Israel, F. P.; Austermann, J. E.; Aretxaga, I.; Wilson, G.; Yun, M.; Scott, K. S.; Perera, T. A.; Roberts, C. M.; Hughes, D. H.

    2016-06-01

    We observed the spiral galaxies M 51 and M 83 at 20 arscec spatial resolution with the bolometer array Aztronomical Thermal Emission Camera (AzTEC) on the JCMT in the 1.1 mm continuum, recovering the extended emission out to galactocentric radii of more than 12 kpc in both galaxies. The 1.1 mm-continuum fluxes are 5.6 ± 0.7 and 9.9 ± 1.4 Jy, with associated gas masses estimated at 9.4 × 109 M⊙ and 7.2 × 109 M⊙ for M 51 and M 83, respectively. In the interarm regions of both galaxies, the N(H2)/I(CO) (or X-factor) ratios exceed those in the arms by factors of ˜1.5-2. In the inner discs of both galaxies, the X-factor is about 1 × 1020 cm- 2 (K km s- 1)- 1. In the outer parts, the CO-dark molecular gas becomes more important. While the spiral density wave in M 51 appears to influence the interstellar medium and stars in a similar way, the bar potential in M 83 influences the interstellar medium and the stars differently. We confirm the result of Foyle et al. that the arms merely heighten the star formation rate (SFR) and the gas surface density in the same proportion. Our maps reveal a threshold gas surface density for an SFR increase by two or more orders of magnitude. In both galaxy centres, the molecular gas depletion time is about 1 Gyr climbing to 10-20 Gyr at radii of 6-8 kpc. This is consistent with an inside-out depletion of the molecular gas in the discs of spiral galaxies.

  13. Glass microsphere lubrication

    Geiger, Michelle; Goode, Henry; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Sorrells, Cindy; Willette, Chris

    1991-01-01

    The harsh lunar environment eliminated the consideration of most lubricants used on earth. Considering that the majority of the surface of the moon consists of sand, the elements that make up this mixture were analyzed. According to previous space missions, a large portion of the moon's surface is made up of fine grained crystalline rock, about 0.02 to 0.05 mm in size. These fine grained particles can be divided into four groups: lunar rock fragments, glasses, agglutinates (rock particles, crystals, or glasses), and fragments of meteorite material (rare). Analysis of the soil obtained from the missions has given chemical compositions of its materials. It is about 53 to 63 percent oxygen, 16 to 22 percent silicon, 10 to 16 percent sulfur, 5 to 9 percent aluminum, and has lesser amounts of magnesium, carbon, and sodium. To be self-supporting, the lubricant must utilize one or more of the above elements. Considering that the element must be easy to extract and readily manipulated, silicon or glass was the most logical choice. Being a ceramic, glass has a high strength and excellent resistance to temperature. The glass would also not contaminate the environment as it comes directly from it. If sand entered a bearing lubricated with grease, the lubricant would eventually fail and the shaft would bind, causing damage to the system. In a bearing lubricated with a solid glass lubricant, sand would be ground up and have little effect on the system. The next issue was what shape to form the glass in. Solid glass spheres was the only logical choice. The strength of the glass and its endurance would be optimal in this form. To behave as an effective lubricant, the diameter of the spheres would have to be very small, on the order of hundreds of microns or less. This would allow smaller clearances between the bearing and the shaft, and less material would be needed. The production of glass microspheres was divided into two parts, production and sorting. Production includes the

  14. Microsphere Super-resolution Imaging

    Wang, Zengbo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it was discovered that microsphere can generate super-resolution focusing beyond diffraction limit. This has led to the development of an exciting super-resolution imaging technique -microsphere nanoscopy- that features a record resolution of 50 nm under white lights. Different samples have been directly imaged in high resolution and real time without labelling, including both non-biological (nano devices, structures and materials) and biological (subcellular details, viruses) sampl...

  15. 75 FR 80734 - Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program

    2010-12-23

    ... Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) (63 FR 66940). After considering the comments received, DOE... CFR Part 850 RIN 1992-AA39 Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program AGENCY: Office of Health... beryllium disease prevention program. The Department solicits comment and information on the...

  16. Spectrographic determination of impurities in beryllium oxide

    A method for the spectrographic determination of Al, B, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mg, NaNi, Si and Zn in nuclear grade beryllium oxide has been developed. The determination of Co, Al, Na and Zn is besed upon a carrier distillation technique. Better results were obtained with 2% Ga2O3 as carrier in beryllium oxide. For the elements B, Cd, Cu, Fe, Cr, Mg, Ni and Si the sample is loaded in a Scribner-Mullin shallow cup electrode, covered with graphite powder and excited in DC arc. The relative standard deviation values for different elements are in the range of 10 to 20%. The method fulfills requirements of precision and sensitivity for specification analysis of nuclear grade beryllium oxide.(Author)

  17. Low-temperature solubility of copper in beryllium, in beryllium--aluminum, and in beryllium--silicon using ion beam

    Ion implantation and ion backscattering analysis have been used to measure the solubility of copper in beryllium over the temperature range 593 to 1023 K, and to determine the effect on the copper solubility of aluminum and silicon impurities. The binary data extend 280 K lower in temperature than previous results, while the ternary measurements are unique. The information is pertinent to the use of copper for solution strengthening of beryllium. Diffusion couples were formed by ion implantation of copper into single-crystal beryllium at room temperature, followed where appropriate by implantation of aluminum or silicon. The samples were then annealed isothermally, and the time-evolution of the composition-vs-depth profile, determined by ion backscattering analysis, yielded the solubility of copper. Measurements at exceptionally low temperatures were facilitated by the short diffusion distances, approximately equal to 0.1 mu m, and the use of neon irradiation to accelerate diffusion. The resulting binary data for the solubility C0 of copper in beryllium merge smoothly into previous results at higher temperatures. The combined data, covering the temperature range 593 to 1373 K, are well described by C0 = (12.6 at. pct) . exp (-842 K/T). In the ternary regime, the effects of aluminum and silicon on the solubility of copper were found to be small

  18. Beryllium Target for Accelerator - Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    This work is part of a project for developing Accelerator Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB- BNCT) for which the generation of neutrons through nuclear reactions like 9Be(d,n) is necessary. In this paper first results of the design and development of such neutron production targets are presented. For this purpose, the neutron production target has to be able to withstand the mechanical and thermal stresses produced by intense beams of deuterons (of 1.4 MeV with a total current of about 30mA). In particular, the target should be able to dissipate an energy density of up to 1 kW/cm2 and preserve its physical and mechanical properties for a sufficient length of time under irradiation conditions and hydrogen damage. The target is proposed to consist of a thin Be deposit (neutron producing material) on a thin W or Mo layer to stop the beam and a Cu backing to help carry away the heat load. To achieve the adhesion of the Be films on W, Mo and Cu substrates, a powder blasting technique was applied with quartz and alumina microspheres. On the other hand, Ag deposits were made on some of the substrates previously blasted to favor the chemical affinity between Beryllium and the substrate thus improving adhesion. Be deposits were characterized by means of different techniques including Electron Microscopy (Sem) and Xr Diffraction. Roughness and thickness measurements were also made. To satisfy the power dissipation requirements for the neutron production target, a microchannel system model is proposed. The simulation based on this model permits to determine the geometric parameters of the prototype complying with the requirements of a microchannel system. Results were compared with those in several publications and discrepancies lower than 10% were found in all cases. A prototype for model validation is designed here for which simulations of fluid and structural mechanics were carried out and discussed

  19. Preliminary results for explosion bonding of beryllium to copper

    Butler, D.J. [Northwest Technical Industries, Inc., Sequim, WA (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This program was undertaken to determine if explosive bonding is a viable technique for joining beryllium to copper substrates. The effort was a cursory attempt at trying to solve some of the problems associated with explosive bonding beryllium and should not be considered a comprehensive research effort. There are two issues that this program addressed. Can beryllium be explosive bonded to copper substrates and can the bonding take place without shattering the beryllium? Thirteen different explosive bonding iterations were completed using various thicknesses of beryllium that were manufactured with three different techniques.

  20. The Arizona Radio Observatory 1 mm Spectral Survey of IRC (plus)10216 and VY Canis Majoris (215-285 GHz)

    Tenenbaum, E. D.; Dodd, J. L.; Milam, S. N.; Woolf, N. J.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2010-01-01

    A low noise (1(sigma) rms approx. 3 mK) 1. nun spectral survey (214.5-285.5 GHz) of the oxygen-rich supergiant VY Canis Majoris and the carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch star IRC +10216 has been conducted using the Arizona Radio Observatory's 10 m Submillimeter Telescope. Here the complete data set is presented. This study, carried out with a new ALMA-type receiver, marks the first continuous band scan of an O-rich circumstellar envelope, and the most sensitive survey to date of IRC +10216. In VY CMa, 130 distinct molecular lines were detected, 14 of which cannot be identified; in IRC +10216, 717 lines were observed, with 126 features remaining unidentified. In the 1 mm bands of VY CMa and IRC +10216, emission is present from 18 and 32 different chemical compounds, respectively, with 10 species common to both sources. Many narrow emission lines were observed in both circumstellar shells, arising from vibrationally excited molecules and from refractory-containing species. Line profiles in VY CMa also exhibit a variety of different shapes, caused by the complex, asymmetric outflow of this object. The survey highlights the fact that C-rich and O-rich circumstellar envelopes are chemically interesting, and both are sources of new interstellar molecules. The high number of unidentified lines and the unreliable, rest frequencies for known species such as NaCN indicate the need for additional laboratory spectroscopy studies.

  1. Alpha particle energy response of 1-mm-thick polycarbonate track detectors by 50 Hz-HV electrochemical etching method

    The electrochemical etching (ECE) method enlarges charged particle tracks to enhance its applications in particular in health physics and radiation dosimetry. The ECE method is usually based on using a high frequency-high voltage (HF-HV) generator with 250-μm-thick polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs). The authors' recent studies on nitrogen and helium ions and alpha tracks in 1-mm-thick large-size PCTDs under a 50 Hz-HV ECE process provided promising results. In this study, alpha track efficiency and mean track diameter versus energy responses and registration energy range as well as alpha and background track shapes under three sets of 50 Hz-4, 5 and 6 kV applied field conditions have been studied and are reported. The efficiency versus alpha energy has a Bragg-type response from ∼15 keV to ∼4.5 MeV for the field conditions applied with an efficiency value of 40-50 % at the Bragg peak. The results are presented and discussed. (authors)

  2. Extensive Characterization of the 1 mm PIT Nb3Sn strand for the 13-T FRESCA2 Magnet

    Bordini, B; Mondonico, G; Oberli, L; Richter, D; Seeber, B; Senatore, C; Takala, E; Valentinis, D

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the EuCARD program, CERN is participating in the development of a 13 T 100-mm-aperture dipole magnet to upgrade the superconducting cable test facility FRESCA at CERN. The conductor candidates for building this magnet are two 1-mm Nb3Sn strands: the Powder In Tube (PIT) produced by Bruker-EAS and the 132/169 RRP by Oxford Superconducting Technology (OST). Recently the PIT strand has been extensively characterized by CERN in collaboration with the University of Geneva (UniGe). The critical current dependence on the magnetic field and on the axial strain e has been measured at different temperatures. Furthermore, the strand magnetization has been measured at different temperature using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Finally the magneto-thermal stability of this strand was studied by measuring the quench current between 0 T and 12 T at 1.9 K and 4.3 K. The experimental results are compared with an optimized scaling law for the critical current of Nb3Sn strands. In this paper the results obt...

  3. Coincidence measurements on detectors for microPET II: A 1 mm3 resolution PET scanner for small animal imaging

    Chatziioannou, A; Shao, Y; Doshi, N K; Silverman, B; Meadors, K; Cherry, SR

    2000-01-01

    We are currently developing a small animal PET scanner with a design goal of 1 mm3 image resolution. We have built three pairs of detectors and tested performance in terms of crystal identification, spatial, energy and timing resolution. The detectors consisted of 12 multiplied by 12 arrays of 1 multiplied by 1 multiplied by 10mm LSO crystals (1.15 mm pitch) coupled to Hamamatsu H7546 64 channel PMTs via 5cm long coherent glass fiber bundles. Optical fiber connection is necessary to allow high packing fraction in a ring geometry scanner. Fiber bundles with and without extramural absorber (EMA) were tested. The results demonstrated an intrinsic spatial resolution of 1.12 mm (direct coupled LSO array), 1.23 mm (bundle without EMA) and 1.27 mm (bundle with EMA) using a similar to 500 micron diameter Na-22 source. Using a 330 micron line source filled with F-18, intrinsic resolution for the EMA bundle improved to 1.05 mm. The respective timing and energy resolution values were 1.96 ns, 21% (direct coupled), 2.20 ...

  4. Surface-micromachined magnetic undulator with period length between 10μm and 1 mm for advanced light sources

    Harrison, Jere; Joshi, Abhijeet; Lake, Jonathan; Candler, Rob; Musumeci, Pietro

    2012-07-01

    A technological gap exists between the μm-scale wiggling periods achieved using electromagnetic waves of high intensity laser pulses and the mm scale of permanent-magnet and superconducting undulators. In the sub-mm range, surface-micromachined soft-magnetic micro-electro-mechanical system inductors with integrated solenoidal coils have already experimentally demonstrated 100 to 500 mT field amplitude across air gaps as large as 15μm. Simulations indicate that magnetic fields as large as 1.5 T across 50μm inductor gaps are feasible. A simple rearranging of the yoke and pole geometry allows for fabrication of 10+ cm long undulator structures with period lengths between 12.5μm and 1 mm. Such undulators find application both in high average power spontaneous emission sources and, if used in combination with ultrahigh-brightness electron beams, could lead to the realization of low energy compact free-electron lasers. Challenges include electron energy broadening due to wakefields and Joule heating in the electromagnet.

  5. 21 CFR 870.1360 - Trace microsphere.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trace microsphere. 870.1360 Section 870.1360 Food... DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1360 Trace microsphere. (a) Identification. A trace microsphere is a radioactively tagged nonbiodegradable particle that is intended to...

  6. Floating microspheres: a review

    Jagtap Yogesh Mukund

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastric emptying is a complex process, one that is highly variable and that makes in vivo performance of drug delivery systems uncertain. A controlled drug delivery system with prolonged residence time in the stomach can be of great practical importance for drugs with an absorption window in the upper small intestine. The main limitations are attributed to the inter- and intra-subject variability of gastro-intestinal (GI transit time and to the non-uniformity of drug absorption throughout the alimentary canal. Floating or hydrodynamically controlled drug delivery systems are useful in such applications. Various gastroretentive dosage forms are available, including tablets, capsules, pills, laminated films, floating microspheres, granules and powders. Floating microspheres have been gaining attention due to the uniform distribution of these multiple-unit dosage forms in the stomach, which results in more reproducible drug absorption and reduced risk of local irritation. Such systems have more advantages over the single-unit dosage forms. The present review briefly addresses the physiology of the gastric emptying process with respect to floating drug delivery systems. The purpose of this review is to bring together the recent literature with respect to the method of preparation, and various parameters affecting the performance and characterization of floating microspheres.O esvaziamento gástrico é um processo complexo, com elevada variabilidade e responsável pela incerteza do desempenho dos medicamentos in vivo. Dessa forma, os sistemas de liberação modificada de fármacos, com tempo de residência prolongado no estômago, em especial, considerando aqueles fármacos com janela de absorção na porção superior do intestino delgado, apresentam fundamental importância. As principais limitações relativas à absorção do fármaco são, no geral, atribuídas à variabilidade inter e intra-paciente do tempo de trânsito gastro-intestinal (GI e

  7. Potential exposures and risks from beryllium-containing products.

    Willis, Henry H; Florig, H Keith

    2002-10-01

    Beryllium is the strongest of the lightweight metals. Used primarily in military applications prior to the end of the Cold War, beryllium is finding new applications in many commercial products, including computers, telecommunication equipment, and consumer and automotive electronics. The use of beryllium in nondefense consumer applications is of concern because beryllium is toxic. Inhalation of beryllium dust or vapor causes a chronic lung disease in some individuals at concentrations as low as 0.01 microg/m3 in air. As beryllium enters wider commerce, it is prudent to ask what risks this might present to the general public and to workers downstream of the beryllium materials industry. We address this question by evaluating the potential for beryllium exposure from the manufacturing, use, recycle, and disposal of beryllium-containing products. Combining a market study with a qualitative exposure analysis, we determine which beryllium applications and life cycle phases have the largest exposure potential. Our analysis suggests that use and maintenance of the most common types of beryllium-containing products do not result in any obvious exposures of concern, and that maintenance activities result in greater exposures than product use. Product disposal has potential to present significant individual risks, but uncertainties concerning current and future routes of product disposal make it difficult to be definitive. Overall, additional exposure and dose-response data are needed to evaluate both the health significance of many exposure scenarios, and the adequacy of existing regulations to protect workers and the public. Although public exposures to beryllium and public awareness and concern regarding beryllium risks are currently low, beryllium risks have psychometric qualities that may lead to rapidly heightened public concern. PMID:12442995

  8. Magnesium Cermets and Magnesium-Beryllium Alloys

    The paper describes some results of work on the development of magnesium-magnesium oxide cermets and of super heat-resistant magnesiumberyllium alloys produced by powder metallurgical methods. The introduction of even a minute quantity of finely dispersed magnesium oxide into magnesium results in a strengthening of the material, the degree of which increases with increased magnesium oxide concentration, although variation of this concentration within the limits of 0.3 to 5 wt.% has a comparatively slight effect on the corresponding variation in the short-term strength over the whole range of temperatures investigated. At 20oC, in the case of the cermets, σβ = 28 to 31 kg/mm2 and δ = 3 .5 to 4.5%; at 500oC σβ = 2.6 to 3.2 kg/mm2 and δ =30 to 40%. The positive effect of the finely dispersed oxide phase is particularly evident in protracted tests. For magnesium cermets, σ (300)/100 = 2.2 kg/mm2. Characteristic of the mixtures is the high thermal stability of the strength properties, linked chiefly with the thermodynamic stability of the strength-giving oxide phase in the metal matrix. The use of powder metallurgical methods has yielded super heat-resistant magnesium-beryllium alloys containing heightened concentrations of beryllium (PMB alloys). In their strength characteristics PMB alloys are close to Mg-MgO cermets, but the magnesium-beryllium alloys have a degree and duration of resistance to high temperature oxidation which exceeds the corresponding qualities of the magnesium alloys at present known. Thus, in air of 580oC, PMB alloys with 2 to 5% beryllium maintain a high resistance to oxidation for a period of over 12000 to 14000 h. This long-term heat resistance is chiefly a result of the amount of beryllium in the alloy, and increases with increasing beryllium content. PMB alloys are also marked by high resistance to short bursts of overheating. Magnesium cermets and magnesium-beryllium alloys, with their enhanced high-temperature stability, are capable

  9. Status of beryllium development for fusion applications

    Beryllium is a leading candidate material for the neutron multiplier of tritium breeding blankets and the plasma-facing component of first-wall and divertor systems. Depending on the application, the fabrication methods proposed include hot-pressing, hot-isostatic-pressing, cold-isostatic-pressing/sintering, rotary electrode processing and plasma spraying. Product forms include blocks, tubes, pebbles, tiles and coatings. While, in general, beryllium is not a leading structural material candidate, its mechanical performance, as well as its performance with regard to sputtering, heat transport, tritium retention/release, helium-induced swelling and chemical compatibility, is an important consideration in first-wall/blanket design. Differential expansion within the beryllium causes internal stresses which may result in cracking, thereby affecting the heat transport and barrier performance of the material. Overall deformation can result in loading of neighboring structural material. Thus, in assessing the performance of beryllium for fusion applications, it is important to have a good database in all of these performance areas, as well as a set of properties correlations and models for the purpose of interpolation/extrapolation.In this current work, the range of anticipated fusion operating conditions is reviewed. The thermal, mechanical, chemical compatibility, tritium retention/release, and helium retention/swelling databases are then reviewed for fabrication methods and fusion operating conditions of interest. Properties correlations and uncertainty ranges are also discussed. In the case of the more complex phenomena of tritium retention/release and helium-induced swelling, fundamental mechanisms and models are reviewed in more detail. Areas in which additional data are needed are highlighted, along with some trends which suggest ways of optimizing the performance of beryllium for fusion applications. (orig.)

  10. Thermal regulation of tightly packed solid-state photodetectors in a 1 mm{sup 3} resolution clinical PET system

    Freese, D. L.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Innes, D.; Lau, F. W. Y.; Hsu, D. F. C.; Reynolds, P. D.; Levin, Craig S., E-mail: cslevin@stanford.edu [Departments of Electrical Engineering, Radiology, Physics, and BioEngineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Silicon photodetectors are of significant interest for use in positron emission tomography (PET) systems due to their compact size, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and high quantum efficiency. However, one of their main disadvantages is fluctuations in temperature cause strong shifts in gain of the devices. PET system designs with high photodetector density suffer both increased thermal density and constrained options for thermally regulating the devices. This paper proposes a method of thermally regulating densely packed silicon photodetectors in the context of a 1 mm{sup 3} resolution, high-sensitivity PET camera dedicated to breast imaging. Methods: The PET camera under construction consists of 2304 units, each containing two 8 × 8 arrays of 1 mm{sup 3} LYSO crystals coupled to two position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD). A subsection of the proposed camera with 512 PSAPDs has been constructed. The proposed thermal regulation design uses water-cooled heat sinks, thermoelectric elements, and thermistors to measure and regulate the temperature of the PSAPDs in a novel manner. Active cooling elements, placed at the edge of the detector stack due to limited access, are controlled based on collective leakage current and temperature measurements in order to keep all the PSAPDs at a consistent temperature. This thermal regulation design is characterized for the temperature profile across the camera and for the time required for cooling changes to propagate across the camera. These properties guide the implementation of a software-based, cascaded proportional-integral-derivative control loop that controls the current through the Peltier elements by monitoring thermistor temperature and leakage current. The stability of leakage current, temperature within the system using this control loop is tested over a period of 14 h. The energy resolution is then measured over a period of 8.66 h. Finally, the consistency of PSAPD gain between independent

  11. An Analysis of Resistance Spot Weld Growth on Mild and Stainless Steel with 1mm and 2mm Thicknesses

    Nachimani Charde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding (RSW is an essential welding technology today for joining two or more metals in various manufacturing industries. A statistic shows that one metal assembly out of five is joined using resistance spot welding mechanism, commercially.   It uses traditionally two electrodes to hold the metal sheets and forces high current to pass through it. The growth of weld nugget is, at last obtained from a proper set up of its controlling parameters such as current, weld time, pressure of electrodes and also the tip size of electrodes. However, factors such as electrode deformation, dissimilar materials and materials with different thicknesses also affect weld growth. This paper looks into the effects of different thicknesses of two base materials .The materials that were used are mild steel and 302 authentic stainless steel with thicknesses of 1 mm and 2 mm. Mechanical tensile test and hardness test have been carried out to characterize the formation of weld nugget growth for different welding schedules. The results of the experiments showed that the growth of spot weld is strongly affected by the usage of materials with different thickness or types. The macrostructure of weld nugget also shows distinguishable differences in weld growth for the both mentioned cases. The tensile test was carried out on standard size samples but with different thicknesses and materials. It shows difference in yield strength for the same welding schedules. Meanwhile the hardness of welded materials varies from one another significantly but the hardness distribution along the welded areas seemed to almost same for each category of base metals.

  12. Polarization Dependent Whispering Gallery Modes in Microspheres

    Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor); Wrbanek, Susan Y. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A tunable resonant system is provided and includes a microsphere that receives an incident portion of a light beam generated via a light source, the light beam having a fundamental mode, a waveguide medium that transmits the light beam from the light source to the microsphere, and a polarizer disposed in a path of the waveguide between the light source and the microsphere. The incident portion of the light beam creates a fundamental resonance inside the microsphere. A change in a normalized frequency of the wavelength creates a secondary mode in the waveguide and the secondary mode creates a secondary resonance inside the microsphere.

  13. Porous microsphere and its applications

    Cai Y

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Yunpeng Cai,1,2* Yinghui Chen,3* Xiaoyun Hong,2 Zhenguo Liu,1 Weien Yuan2 1Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai JiaoTong University, 3Department of Neurology Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Porous microspheres have drawn great attention in the last two decades for their potential applications in many fields, such as carriers for drugs, absorption and desorption of substances, pulmonary drug delivery, and tissue regeneration. The application of porous microspheres has become a feasible way to address existing problems. In this essay, we give a brief introduction of the porous microsphere, its characteristics, preparation methods, applications, and a brief summary of existing problems and research tendencies.Keywords: pore, porosity, porogen, suspension polymerization, seed swelling, pulmonary drug delivery, tissue regeneration

  14. Safety handling of beryllium for fusion technology R and D

    Feasibility of beryllium use as a blanket neutron multiplier, first wall and plasma facing material has been studied for the D-T burning experiment reactors such as ITER. Various experimental work of beryllium and its compounds will be performed under the conditions of high temperature and high energy particle exposure simulating fusion reactor conditions. Beryllium is known as a hazardous substance and its handling has been carefully controlled by various health and safe guidances and/or regulations in many countries. Japanese regulations for hazardous substance provide various guidelines on beryllium for the protection of industrial workers and environment. This report was prepared for the safe handling of beryllium in a laboratory scale experiments for fusion technology R and D such as blanket development. Major items in this report are; (1) Brief review of guidances and regulations in USA, UK and Japan. (2) Safe handling and administration manuals at beryllium facilities in INEL, LANL and JET. (3) Conceptual design study of beryllium handling facility for small to mid-scale blanket R and D. (4) Data on beryllium toxicity, example of clinical diagnosis of beryllium disease, and environmental occurence of beryllium. (5) Personnel protection tools of Japanese Industrial Standard for hazardous substance. (author) 61 refs

  15. Polyacrolein microspheres: preparation and characteristics

    Polyacrolein microspheres can be prepared by means of ionizing radiation. Acrolein polymerized quite readily under cobalt 60 radiation. The irradiation dose of 0.5 Mrad was found to be sufficient to obtain over 90% conversion. The polymer is obtained in the form of a stable dispersion of cross-linked microspheres. The size of the spheres can be controlled by the type of surfactant, surfactant concentration, monomer concentration, and radiation dosage rate. A Fourier transform spectrophotometer and solid-phase NMR equipped with cross-polarization magic angle was employed to elucidate the structure difference

  16. Fiber-coupled microsphere laser

    Cai, M.; Painter, O.; Vahala, K. J.; Sercel, P. C.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate a 1.5-mm-wavelength fiber laser formed by placement of glass microsphere resonators along a fiber taper. The fiber taper serves the dual purpose of transporting optical pump power into the spheres and extracting the resulting laser emission. A highly doped erbium:ytterbium phosphate glass was used to form microsphere resonant cavities with large gain at 1.5 mm. Laser threshold pump powers of 60 mW and fiber-coupled output powers as high as 3 mW with single-mode operation were o...

  17. Microsphere Super-resolution Imaging

    Wang, Zengbo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it was discovered that microsphere can generate super-resolution focusing beyond diffraction limit. This has led to the development of an exciting super-resolution imaging technique -microsphere nanoscopy- that features a record resolution of 50 nm under white lights. Different samples have been directly imaged in high resolution and real time without labelling, including both non-biological (nano devices, structures and materials) and biological (subcellular details, viruses) samples. This chapter reviews the technique, which covers its background, fundamentals, experiments, mechanisms as well as the future outlook.

  18. Control of beryllium powder at a DOE facility

    Beryllium is contained in a number of domestic and national defense items. Although many items might contain beryllium in some manner, few people need worry about the adverse effects caused by exposure to beryllium because it is the inhalable form of beryllium that is most toxic. Chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a granulomas and fibrotic lung disease with long latency, can be developed after inhalation exposures to beryllium. It is a progressive, debilitating lung disease. Its occurrence in those exposed to beryllium has been difficult to predict because some people seem to react to low concentration exposures whereas others do not react to high concentration exposures. Onset of the disease frequently occurs between 15 to 20 years after exposure begins. Some people develop the disease after many years of low concentration exposures but others do not develop CBD even though beryllium is shown to be present in lungs and urine. Conclusions based on these experiences are that their is some immunological dependence of developing CBD in about 3--4% of the exposed population, but the exact mechanism involved has not yet been identified. Acute beryllium disease can occur after a single exposure to a concentration of greater than 0.100 mg/m3 (inhalation exposure); it is characterized by the development of chemical pneumoconiosis, a respiratory disease. The acute effect of skin contact is a dermatitis characterized by itching and reddened, elevated, or fluid-accumulated lesions which appear particularly on the exposed surfaces of the body, especially the face, neck, arms, and hands. Small particles of beryllium that enter breaks in the skin can lead to the development of granulomas and/or open sores that do not heal until the beryllium has been removed. Our interest is only airborne beryllium, which is found in areas that machine or produce beryllium

  19. Study on neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium as neutron multiplier

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    More than 300 tons beryllium is expected to be used as a neutron multiplier in ITER, and study on the neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium as the neutron multiplier with Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) were performed to get the engineering data for fusion blanket design. This study started as the study on the tritium behavior in beryllium neutron reflector in order to make clear the generation mechanism on tritium of JMTR primary coolant since 1985. These experiences were handed over to beryllium studies for fusion study, and overall studies such as production technology of beryllium pebbles, irradiation behavior evaluation and reprocessing technology have been started since 1990. In this presentation, study on the neutron irradiation behavior of beryllium as the neutron multiplier with JMTR was reviewed from the point of tritium release, thermal properties, mechanical properties and reprocessing technology. (author)

  20. Status of material development for lifetime expansion of beryllium reflector

    Beryllium has been used as the reflector element material in the reactor, specifically S-200F structural grade beryllium manufactured by Materion Brush Beryllium and Composites (former, Brush Wellman Inc.). As a part of the reactor upgrade, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) also has carried out the cooperation experiments to extend the operating lifetime of the beryllium reflector elements. It will first be necessary to determine which of the material's physical, mechanical and chemical properties will be the most influential on that choice. The irradiation testing plans to evaluate the various beryllium grades are also briefly considered and prepared. In this paper, material selection, irradiation test plan and PEI development for lifetime expansion of beryllium are described for material testing reactors. (author)

  1. Characterization of plasma sprayed beryllium ITER first wall mockups

    Castro, R.G.; Vaidya, R.U.; Hollis, K.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Material Science and Technology Div.

    1998-01-01

    ITER first wall beryllium mockups, which were fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying the beryllium armor, have survived 3000 thermal fatigue cycles at 1 MW/m{sup 2} without damage during high heat flux testing at the Plasma Materials Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico. The thermal and mechanical properties of the plasma sprayed beryllium armor have been characterized. Results are reported on the chemical composition of the beryllium armor in the as-deposited condition, the through thickness and normal to the through thickness thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, the four-point bend flexure strength and edge-notch fracture toughness of the beryllium armor, the bond strength between the beryllium armor and the underlying heat sink material, and ultrasonic C-scans of the Be/heat sink interface. (author)

  2. Mechanisms of hydrogen retention in metallic beryllium and beryllium oxide and properties of ion-induced beryllium nitride; Rueckhaltemechanismen fuer Wasserstoff in metallischem Beryllium und Berylliumoxid sowie Eigenschaften von ioneninduziertem Berylliumnitrid

    Oberkofler, Martin

    2011-09-22

    In the framework of this thesis laboratory experiments on atomically clean beryllium surfaces were performed. They aim at a basic understanding of the mechanisms occurring upon interaction of a fusion plasma with a beryllium first wall. The retention and the temperature dependent release of implanted deuterium ions are investigated. An atomistic description is developed through simulations and through the comparison with calculations based on density functional theory. The results of these investigations are compared to the behaviour of hydrogen upon implantation into thermally grown beryllium oxide layers. Furthermore, beryllium nitride is produced by implantation of nitrogen into metallic beryllium and its properties are investigated. The results are interpreted with regard to the use of beryllium in a fusion reactor. (orig.)

  3. Plasma cleaning of beryllium coated mirrors

    Moser, L.; Marot, L.; Steiner, R.; Newman, M.; Widdowson, A.; Ivanova, D.; Likonen, J.; Petersson, P.; Pintsuk, G.; Rubel, M.; Meyer, E.; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    Cleaning systems of metallic first mirrors are needed in more than 20 optical diagnostic systems from ITER to avoid reflectivity losses. Currently, plasma sputtering is considered as one of the most promising techniques to remove deposits coming from the main wall (mainly beryllium and tungsten). This work presents the results of plasma cleaning of rhodium and molybdenum mirrors exposed in JET-ILW and contaminated with typical tokamak elements (including beryllium and tungsten). Using radio frequency (13.56 MHz) argon or helium plasma, the removal of mixed layers was demonstrated and mirror reflectivity improved towards initial values. The cleaning was evaluated by performing reflectivity measurements, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ion beam analysis.

  4. TEM study of beryllium pebbles after neutron irradiation up to 3000 appm helium production

    Klimenkov, M., E-mail: michael.klimenkov@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A. [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R. [Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) European concept of a breeding blanket of DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron irradiated at temperatures typical for fusion blanket. Beryllium pebbles with a diameter of 1 mm produced by the Rotating Electrode Method were subjected to a TEM study after irradiation at the HFR, Petten, at temperatures of 686, 753, 861, and 968 K. The helium production in the pebbles was calculated in the range from 2090 to 3090 appm. Gas bubbles as disks of hexagonal shape were observed for all four irradiation temperatures. The disks were oriented in the (0 0 0 1) basal plane with a height directed along the [0 0 0 1] “c” axis. The average diameters of the bubbles increase from 7.5 to 80 nm with increasing irradiation temperature, the bulk densities accordingly decrease from 4.4 × 10{sup 22} to 3.8 × 10{sup 20} m{sup −3}. With increasing irradiation temperature, the swelling of the pebbles increases from 0.6% at 686 K up to 6.5% at 968 K.

  5. Development of Risperidone PLGA Microspheres

    Susan D’Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to design and evaluate biodegradable PLGA microspheres for sustained delivery of Risperidone, with an eventual goal of avoiding combination therapy for the treatment of schizophrenia. Two PLGA copolymers (50 : 50 and 75 : 25 were used to prepare four microsphere formulations of Risperidone. The microspheres were characterized by several in vitro techniques. In vivo studies in male Sprague-Dawley rats at 20 and 40 mg/kg doses revealed that all formulations exhibited an initial burst followed by sustained release of the active moiety. Additionally, formulations prepared with 50 : 50 PLGA had a shorter duration of action and lower cumulative AUC levels than the 75 : 25 PLGA microspheres. A simulation of multiple dosing at weekly or 15-day regimen revealed pulsatile behavior for all formulations with steady state being achieved by the second dose. Overall, the clinical use of Formulations A, B, C, or D will eliminate the need for combination oral therapy and reduce time to achieve steady state, with a smaller washout period upon cessation of therapy. Results of this study prove the suitability of using PLGA copolymers of varying composition and molecular weight to develop sustained release formulations that can tailor in vivo behavior and enhance pharmacological effectiveness of the drug.

  6. Computer simulation of electronic excitations in beryllium

    Popov, A V

    2016-01-01

    An effective method for the quantitative description of the electronic excited states of polyatomic systems is developed by using computer technology. The proposed method allows calculating various properties of matter at the atomic level within the uniform scheme. A special attention is paid to the description of beryllium atoms interactions with the external fields, comparable by power to the fields in atoms, molecules and clusters.

  7. Low cycle thermal fatigue testing of beryllium

    A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium, which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter and divertor components. The 30 kW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ''spike'' of 750 C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stresses in excess of the yield strength are generated, due to very high spot heat flux, 25 MWm-2. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S-65H, S-200F, S200F-H, SR-200, I-400, extruded high purity, HIP'd spherical powder, porous beryllium (94 and 98% dense), Be/30%, BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe12. Russian grades included: TPG-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TSHG-56. Both thenumber of cycles tocrack initiation and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be (SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis. (orig.)

  8. Dynamic behaviour of S200F beryllium

    Compression tests have been made on a large scale of strain, strain rate (up to 2000 s-1) and temperature (between 20 C and 300 C). From these experiences, we have calculated a constitutive model for beryllium S200F, which can be used by computer codes. Its formulation is not far from Steinberg, Cochran and Guinan's. But in our case, the influences of temperature and strain rate appear clearly within the expression. To validate our equation, we have used it in a computer code. Its extrapolation for higher strain rates is in good agreement with experiments such as Taylor impact tests or plate impact tests (strain rates greater than 104 s-1). With micrography, we could settle a link between the main strain mode within the material, and the variation of one parameter of the model. Beside the constitutive model, we have shown that shock loaded beryllium behaves in two different ways. If the strain rate is lower than 5.106 s-1, then it is proportional to the squared shock pressure. Beyond, it is a linear function of shock pressure to the power of four. By a spall study on beryllium, we have confirmed that it is excessively fragile. Its fracture is sudden, at a strength near 1 GPa. (author)

  9. Permeation behavior of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    Study on Implantation Driven Permeation (IDP) behavior of deuterium through pure beryllium was investigated as a part of the research to predict the tritium permeation through the first wall components ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The permeation experiments were carried out with two beryllium specimens, one was an unannealed specimen and the other was that annealed at 1173 K. The permeation flux was measured as a function of specimen temperature and incident ion flux. Surface analysis of specimen was also carried out after the permeation experiment. Permeation was observed only with the annealed specimen and no significant permeation was observed with unannealed specimen under the present experimental condition (maximum temperature: 685 K, detection limit: 1x1013 D atoms/m2s). It could be attributed that the intrinsic lattice defects, which act as diffusion preventing site, decreased with the specimen annealing. Based on the result of steady and transient permeation behavior and surface analysis, it was estimated that the deuterium permeation implanted into annealed beryllium was controlled by surface recombination due to the oxide layer on the surface of the permeated side. (author)

  10. Interaction of nitrogen ions with beryllium surfaces

    Dobes, Katharina [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Association EURATOM ÖAW, Vienna (Austria); Köppen, Martin [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Oberkofler, Martin [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lungu, Cristian P.; Porosnicu, Corneliu [National Institute for Laser, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Höschen, Till; Meisl, Gerd [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Linsmeier, Christian [Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Aumayr, Friedrich, E-mail: aumayr@iap.tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Association EURATOM ÖAW, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of energetic nitrogen projectiles with a beryllium surface is studied using a highly sensitive quartz crystal microbalance technique. The overall mass change rate of the beryllium sample under N{sub 2}{sup +} ion impact at an ion energy of 5000 eV (i.e. 2500 eV per N) is investigated in situ and in real-time. A strong dependency of the observed mass change rate on the nitrogen fluence (at constant flux) is found and can be attributed to the formation of a nitrogen-containing mixed material layer within the ion penetration depth. The presented data elucidate the dynamics of the interaction process and the surface saturation with increasing nitrogen fluence in a unique way. Basically, distinct interaction regimes can be discriminated, which can be linked to the evolution of the surface composition upon nitrogen impact. Steady state surface conditions are obtained at a total cumulative nitrogen fluence of ∼80 × 10{sup 16} N atoms per cm{sup 2}. In dynamic equilibrium, the interaction is marked by continuous surface erosion. In this case, the observed total sputtering yield becomes independent from the applied nitrogen fluence and is of the order of 0.4 beryllium atoms per impinging nitrogen atom.

  11. Quantitative method of determining beryllium or a compound thereof in a sample

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Ehler, Deborah S.; John, Kevin D.; Burrell, Anthony K.; Collis, Gavin E.; Minogue, Edel M.; Warner, Benjamin P.

    2010-08-24

    A method of determining beryllium or a beryllium compound thereof in a sample, includes providing a sample suspected of comprising beryllium or a compound thereof, extracting beryllium or a compound thereof from the sample by dissolving in a solution, adding a fluorescent indicator to the solution to thereby bind any beryllium or a compound thereof to the fluorescent indicator, and determining the presence or amount of any beryllium or a compound thereof in the sample by measuring fluorescence.

  12. High Resolutions Obtained by Microspheres, and Phase Contrast Microscope with a Microsphere

    Ben-Aryeh, Y.

    2015-01-01

    High resolutions obtained in optical systems with microspheres are studied by Helmholtz equation and boundary conditions for the EM fields, which are emitted from the object and incident on the microsphere surface. We develop the condition under which the evanescent waves are converted at the microsphere surface into propagating waves which conserve the fine structures of the object. The enhancement of the resolution limit with microspheres relative to the Abbe resolution limit is developed i...

  13. PREPARATION OF REFRACTORY OXIDE MICROSPHERE

    Haws, C.C. Jr.

    1963-09-24

    A method is described of preparing thorium oxide in the form of fused spherical particles about 1 to 2 microns in diameter. A combustible organic solution of thorium nitrate containing additive metal values is dispersed into a reflected, oxygen-fed flame at a temperature above the melting point of the resulting oxide. The metal additive is aluminum at a proportion such as to provide 1 to 10 weight per cent aluminum oxide in the product, silicon at the same proportion, or beryllium at a proportion of 12 to 25 weight per cent beryllium oxide in the product. A minor proportion of uranium values may also be provided in the solution. The metal additive lowers the oxide melting point and allows fusion and sphere formation in conventional equipment. The product particles are suitable for use in thorium oxide slurries for nuclear reactors. (AEC)

  14. Design and Evaluation of Niacin Microspheres

    Maravajhala Vidyavathi; Dasari Nirmala; Sepuri Asha; Joginapalli S

    2009-01-01

    Present study aims to prepare and evaluate niacin microspheres. Niacin-ethyl cellulose microspheres were prepared by water-in-oil-in-oil double emulsion solvent diffusion method. Spherical, free flowing microspheres having an entrapment efficiency of 72% were obtained. The effect of polymer-drug ratio, surfactant concentration for secondary emulsion process and stirring speed of emulsification process were evaluated with respect to entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release behavior ...

  15. Nanostructuring GaN using microsphere lithography

    Ng, WN; Leung, CH; Lai, PT; Choi, HW

    2008-01-01

    The authors report on the fabrication and characterization of nanopillar arrays on GaN substrates using the technique of microsphere lithography. Self-assembled hexagonally packed silica microsphere arrays were formed on GaN wafers by spin coating and tilting. By precision control of process parameters, a monolayer can be formed over a wide region. The silica microspheres act as a hard mask for pattern transfer of the nanostructures. After dry etching, arrays of nanopillars were formed on the...

  16. Laser-Induced Spallation of Microsphere Monolayers

    Hiraiwa, Morgan; Stossel, Melicent; Khanolkar, Amey; Wang, Junlan; Boechler, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The detachment of a semi-ordered monolayer of polystyrene microspheres adhered to an aluminum-coated glass substrate is studied using a laser-induced spallation technique. The microsphere-substrate adhesion force is estimated from substrate surface displacement measurements obtained using optical interferometry, and a rigid-body model that accounts for the inertia of the microspheres. The estimated adhesion force is compared with estimates obtained from interferometric measurement of the out-...

  17. Microsphere coated substrate containing reactive aldehyde groups

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Richard C. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A synthetic organic resin is coated with a continuous layer of contiguous, tangential, individual microspheres having a uniform diameter preferably between 100 Angstroms and 2000 Angstroms. The microspheres are an addition polymerized polymer of an unsaturated aldehyde containing 4 to 20 carbon atoms and are covalently bonded to the substrate by means of high energy radiation grafting. The microspheres contain reactive aldehyde groups and can form conjugates with proteins such as enzymes or other aldehyde reactive materials.

  18. Formulation and evaluation of mucoadhesive glipizide microspheres

    Patel, Jayvadan K.; Patel, Rakesh P.; Amin, Avani F; Madhabhai M Patel

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to formulate and system-atically evaluate in vitro and in vivo performances of mucoadhesive microspheres of glipizide. Glipizide microspheres containing chitosan were prepared by simple emulsification phase separation technique using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linking agent. Results of preliminary trials indicate that volume of cross-linking agent, time for cross-linking, polymer-to-drug ratio, and speed of rotation affected characteristics of microspheres. Mic...

  19. Preparation of radio-therapeutical glass microspheres for curing malignant tumor. Pt.3: Study on the transformation from gel microspheres to glass microspheres

    The heat-treatment schedule for transforming gel microspheres to glass microspheres is determined based on the result of DTA; the change relationship of glass microspheres density with heating rate is investigated and the effects of heating rate, treatment atmosphere on the quality of glass microspheres are discussed. It is shown from there experiments that low heating rate and oxygen flow can prevent breaking microsphere and carbonizing organic materials before 400 degree C, and that higher heating rate can lead to low density of microsphere after 400 degree C. Therefore desirable size of glass microspheres can be obtained by adjusting heating rate in the heating heat-treatment process

  20. Aceclofenac microspheres: Quality by design approach

    The purpose of this study was to prepare polymeric microspheres containing aceclofenac by single emulsion [oil-in-water (o/w)] solvent evaporation method. Two biocompatible polymers, ethylcellulose, and Eudragit® RS100 were used in combination. Seven processing factors were investigated by Plackett–Burman design (PBD) in order to enhance the encapsulation efficiency of the microspheres. A Plackett–Burman design was employed by using the Design-Expert® software (Version-8.0.7.1). The resultant microspheres were characterized for their size, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, and drug release. Imaging of particles was performed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Interaction between the drug and polymers were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD). Graphical and mathematical analyses of the design showed that Eudragit® RS100, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were significant negative effect on the encapsulation efficiency and identified as the significant factor determining the encapsulation efficiency of the microspheres. The low magnitudes of error and the significant values of R2 in the present investigation prove the high prognostic ability of the design. The microspheres showed high encapsulation efficiency (70.15% to 83.82%). The microspheres were found to be discrete, oval with smooth surface. The FTIR analysis confirmed the compatibility of aceclofenac with the polymers. The XRPD revealed the dispersion of drug within microspheres formulation. Perfect prolonged drug release profile over 12 h was achieved by a combination of ethylcellulose, and Eudragit® RS100 polymers. In conclusion, polymeric microspheres containing aceclofenac can be successfully prepared using the technique of experimental design, and these results helped in finding the optimum formulation variables for encapsulation efficiency of microspheres. - Graphical abstract: The polymeric microspheres, containing

  1. Aceclofenac microspheres: Quality by design approach

    Deshmukh, Rameshwar K.; Naik, Jitendra B., E-mail: jitunaik@gmail.com

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare polymeric microspheres containing aceclofenac by single emulsion [oil-in-water (o/w)] solvent evaporation method. Two biocompatible polymers, ethylcellulose, and Eudragit® RS100 were used in combination. Seven processing factors were investigated by Plackett–Burman design (PBD) in order to enhance the encapsulation efficiency of the microspheres. A Plackett–Burman design was employed by using the Design-Expert® software (Version-8.0.7.1). The resultant microspheres were characterized for their size, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, and drug release. Imaging of particles was performed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Interaction between the drug and polymers were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD). Graphical and mathematical analyses of the design showed that Eudragit® RS100, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were significant negative effect on the encapsulation efficiency and identified as the significant factor determining the encapsulation efficiency of the microspheres. The low magnitudes of error and the significant values of R{sup 2} in the present investigation prove the high prognostic ability of the design. The microspheres showed high encapsulation efficiency (70.15% to 83.82%). The microspheres were found to be discrete, oval with smooth surface. The FTIR analysis confirmed the compatibility of aceclofenac with the polymers. The XRPD revealed the dispersion of drug within microspheres formulation. Perfect prolonged drug release profile over 12 h was achieved by a combination of ethylcellulose, and Eudragit® RS100 polymers. In conclusion, polymeric microspheres containing aceclofenac can be successfully prepared using the technique of experimental design, and these results helped in finding the optimum formulation variables for encapsulation efficiency of microspheres. - Graphical abstract: The polymeric microspheres

  2. Experiments on studying beryllium - steam interaction, determination of oxidated beryllium emissivity factor

    The report presents results of beryllium emissivity factor measurements within 700-1300 K temperature range. The tests were conducted at Institute of Atomic Energy of the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan to receive experimental data for verification of calculation programs describing an accident involving water coolant discharge into ITER reactor vacuum cavity. (author)

  3. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner is disclosed. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50--800 kg/m{sup 3} (0.05--0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization. 4 figs.

  4. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50-800 kg/m.sup.3 (0.05-0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization.

  5. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner is disclosed. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50--800 kg/m3 (0.05--0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization. 4 figs

  6. Ionization energies of beryllium in strong magnetic fields

    GUANXiao-xu; ZHANGYue-xia

    2004-01-01

    We have develop an effective frozen core approximation to calculate energy levels and ionization enegies of the beryllium atom in magnetic field strengths up to 2.35 × 105T. Systematic improvement over the Hartree-Fock results for the beryllium low-lying states has been accomplished.

  7. 10 CFR 850.20 - Baseline beryllium inventory.

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Baseline beryllium inventory. 850.20 Section 850.20 Energy... Baseline beryllium inventory. (a) The responsible employer must develop a baseline inventory of the... inventory, the responsible employer must: (1) Review current and historical records; (2) Interview...

  8. Joining of beryllium by braze welding technique: preliminary results

    Banaim, P.; Abramov, E. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel); Zalkind, S.; Eden, S.

    1998-01-01

    Within the framework of some applications, there is a need to join beryllium parts to each other. Gas Tungsten Arc Braze Welds were made in beryllium using 0.3 mm commercially Aluminum (1100) shim preplaced at the joint. The welds exhibited a tendency to form microcracks in the Fusion Zone and Heat Affected Zone. All the microcracks were backfilled with Aluminum. (author)

  9. Porous microsphere and its applications

    Cai Y; Chen Y; Hong X; Liu Z; Yuan W

    2013-01-01

    Yunpeng Cai,1,2* Yinghui Chen,3* Xiaoyun Hong,2 Zhenguo Liu,1 Weien Yuan2 1Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai JiaoTong University, 3Department of Neurology Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Porous microspheres have drawn great attention in the last two decades for their potential applications ...

  10. Preparation and characterization of beryllium doped organic plasma polymer coatings

    We report the formation of beryllium doped plasma polymerized coatings derived from a helical resonator deposition apparatus, using diethylberyllium as the organometaric source. These coatings had an appearance not unlike plain plasma polymer and were relatively stable to ambient exposure. The coatings were characterized by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Coating rates approaching 0.7 μm hr-1 were obtained with a beryllium-to-carbon ratio of 1:1.3. There is also a significant oxygen presence in the coating as well which is attributed to oxidation upon exposure of the coating to air. The XPS data show only one peak for beryllium with the preponderance of the XPS data suggesting that the beryllium exists as BeO. Diethylberyllium was found to be inadequate as a source for beryllium doped plasma polymer, due to thermal decomposition and low vapor recovery rates

  11. Protection of air in premises and environment against beryllium aerosols

    Bitkolov, N.Z.; Vishnevsky, E.P.; Krupkin, A.V. [Research Inst. of Industrial and Marine Medicine, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1998-01-01

    First and foremost, the danger of beryllium aerosols concerns a possibility of their inhalation. The situation is aggravated with high biological activity of the beryllium in a human lung. The small allowable beryllium aerosols` concentration in air poses a rather complex and expensive problem of the pollution prevention and clearing up of air. The delivery and transportation of beryllium aerosols from sites of their formation are defined by the circuit of ventilation, that forms aerodynamics of air flows in premises, and aerodynamic links between premises. The causes of aerosols release in air of premises from hoods, isolated and hermetically sealed vessels can be vibrations, as well as pulses of temperature and pressure. Furthermore, it is possible the redispersion of aerosols from dirty surfaces. The effective protection of air against beryllium aerosols at industrial plants is provided by a complex of hygienic measures: from individual means of breath protection up to collective means of the prevention of air pollution. (J.P.N.)

  12. Polarizabilities of the beryllium clock transition

    The polarizabilities of the three lowest states of the beryllium atom are determined from a large basis configuration interaction calculation. The polarizabilities of the 2s21Se ground state (37.73a03) and the 2s2p 3P0o metastable state (39.04a03) are found to be very similar in size and magnitude. This leads to an anomalously small blackbody radiation shift at 300 K of -0.018(4) Hz for the 2s21Se-2s2p 3P0o clock transition. Magic wavelengths for simultaneous trapping of the ground and metastable states are also computed.

  13. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to &apos

  14. Polarization conversion in a silica microsphere

    Bianucci, Pablo; Fietz, Chris; Robertson, John W.; Shvets, Gennady; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2007-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate controlled polarization-selective phenomena in a whispering gallery mode resonator. We observed efficient ($\\approx 75 %$) polarization conversion of light in a silica microsphere coupled to a tapered optical fiber with proper optimization of the polarization of the propagating light. A simple model treating the microsphere as a ring resonator provides a good fit to the observed behavior.

  15. Status of beryllium study for fusion in RF

    The main directions of research activities in the field of beryllium application science and technology carried out in Russia during 2001-2003 have been reviewed. The main results of these investigations have been highlighted. First wall and port-limier. The investigation on the actively cooled components with beryllium cladding is under progress objecting on the clarification of their ultimate thermo cycling capabilities. The study of behavior of bulk beryllium and the boundary region of the contact with the cooling structure under the intensive thermo cycling loading and neutron irradiation have been the object of consideration in particular. The works on the optimization and modification of industrial fabrication processes for commercial scaled production of beryllium tile were also under way. The influence of neutron irradiation. The new experimental data on the nuclear properties of several Russian beryllium grades has been obtained. The samples have been subjected to the high neutron dozes. The influence of low temperature (70-200degree C) neutron irradiation on the thermal conductivity has been examined in particular. The interrelations of the helium inventory and temperature of neutron irradiation with tritium release out of irradiated beryllium samples have been analyzed. The beryllium associated safety questions. The experiments on the modeling of normal working conditions and conditions imitating the plasma disruption events in ITER performance scenario have been continued. The new experimental information on the coefficient of pulverization of beryllium and the accumulation of deuterium in beryllium under the action of proton beam has been collected. The dependence of the reaction rate constant for the beryllium oxidation by the water vapor for different conditions has been analyzed. The compact, porous and powder beryllium samples have been tested at the wide range of temperature, pressure and duration of reaction with water vapor. The calculating

  16. Assessment of the feasibility and advantages of beryllium recycling

    This paper proposes a generic route for the recycling of beryllium from fusion reactors, based on critical issues associated with beryllium pebbles after their service life in the HCPB breeding blanket. These critical issues are the high tritium inventory, the presence of long-lived radionuclides (among which transuranics due to traces of uranium in the base metal), and the chemical toxicity of beryllium. On the basis of the chemical and radiochemical characteristics of the neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles, we describe a possible recycling route. The first step is the detritiation of the material. This can be achieved by heating the pebbles to 800 oC under an argon flow. The argon gas avoids oxidation of the beryllium, and at the proposed temperature the tritium inventory is readily released from the pebbles. In a second step, the released tritium can be oxidised on a copper oxide bed to produce tritiated water, which is consistent with the current international strategy to convert all kinds of tritiated waste into tritiated water, which can subsequently be treated in a water detritiation plant. Removal of radionuclides from the beryllium pebbles may be achieved by several types of chloride processes. The first step is to pass chlorine gas (in an argon flow) over the pebbles, thus yielding volatile BeCl2. This beryllium chloride can then be purified by fractional distillation. As a small fraction of the beryllium chloride contains the long-lived 10Be isotope, 10BeCl2 has to be separated from 9BeCl2, which could be achieved by centrifugal techniques. The product can then be reduced to obtain high-purity metallic beryllium. Two candidate reduction methods were identified: fused salt electrolysis and thermal decomposition. Both these methods require laboratory parametric studies to maximise the yield and achieve a high purity metal, before either process can be upgraded to a larger scale. The eventual product of the chloride reduction process must be a high purity

  17. Physical properties of beryllium oxide - Irradiation effects

    This work has been carried out in view of determining several physical properties of hot-pressed beryllium oxide under various conditions and the change of these properties after irradiation. Special attention has been paid on to the measurement of the thermal conductivity coefficient and thermal diffusivity coefficient. Several designs for the measurement of the thermal conductivity coefficient have been achieved. They permit its determination between 50 and 300 deg. C, between 400 and 800 deg. C. Some measurements have been made above 1000 deg. C. In order to measure the thermal diffusivity coefficient, we heat a perfectly flat surface of a sample in such a way that the heat flux is modulated (amplitude and frequency being adjustable). The thermal diffusivity coefficient is deduced from the variations of temperature observed on several spots. Tensile strength; compressive strength; expansion coefficient; sound velocity and crystal parameters have been also measured. Some of the measurements have been carried out after neutron irradiation. Some data have been obtained on the change of the properties of beryllium oxide depending on the integrated neutron flux. (author)

  18. Beryllium containing plasma interactions with ITER materials

    A beryllium-seeded deuterium plasma is used in PISCES-B to investigate mixed-material erosion and redeposition properties of ITER relevant divertor materials. The beryllium containing plasma simulates the erosion of first wall material into the ITER sol plasma and its subsequent flow toward the carbon divertor plates. The experiments are designed to quantify the behavior of plasma created mixed Be/C and Be/W surfaces. Developing an understanding of the mixed material surface behavior is crucial to accurately predicting the tritium accumulation rate within the ITER vacuum vessel. The temporal evolution of the plasma interactions with the various mixed surfaces are examined to better understand the fundamental mechanisms in play at the surface and to allow scaling of these results to the conditions expected in the ITER divertor. A new periodic heat pulse deposition system is also installed on PISCES-B to simulate the transient temperature excursions of surfaces expected to occur in the ITER divertor during ELMs and other off-normal events. These periodically applied heat pulses allow us to study the effects of transient power loading on the formation, stability and tritium content of mixed-material surfaces that are created during the experiments. (author)

  19. Polymer microspheres carrying fluorescent DNA probes

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Dai, Zhao; Zhang, Jimei; Xu, Shichao; Wu, Chunrong; Zheng, Guo

    2010-07-01

    A polymer microspheres carried DNA probe, which was based on resonance energy transfer, was presented in this paper when CdTe quantum dots(QDs) were as energy donors, Au nanoparticles were as energy accepters and poly(4- vinylpyrindine-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) microspheres were as carriers. Polymer microspheres with functional group on surfaces were prepared by distillation-precipitation polymerization when ethylene glycol dimethacrylate was as crosslinker in acetonitrile. CdTe QDs were prepared when 3-mercaptopropionic acid(MPA) was as the stabilizer in aqueous solution. Because of the hydrogen-bonding between the carboxyl groups of MPA on QDs and the pyrindine groups on the microspheres, the QDs were self-assembled onto the surfaces of microspheres. Then, the other parts of DNA probe were finished according to the classic method. The DNA detection results indicated that this novel fluorescent DNA probe system could recognize the existence of complementary target DNA or not.

  20. Spectrally resolved resonant propulsion of dielectric microspheres

    Li, Yangcheng; Limberopoulos, Nicholaos I; Urbas, Augustine M; Astratov, Vasily N

    2015-01-01

    Use of resonant light forces opens up a unique approach to high-volume sorting of microspherical resonators with much higher uniformity of resonances compared to that in coupled-cavity structures obtained by the best semiconductor technologies. In this work, the spectral response of the propulsion forces exerted on polystyrene microspheres near tapered microfibers is directly observed. The measurements are based on the control of the detuning between the tunable laser and internal resonances in each sphere with accuracy higher than the width of the resonances. The measured spectral shape of the propulsion forces correlates well with the whispering-gallery mode resonances in the microspheres. The existence of a stable radial trap for the microspheres propelled along the taper is demonstrated. The giant force peaks observed for 20-{\\mu}m spheres are found to be in a good agreement with a model calculation demonstrating an efficient use of the light momentum for propelling the microspheres.

  1. U3O8 microspheres sintering kinetics

    U3O8 microspheres sintering kinetics was determined using a hot-stage optical microscopy apparatus, able to reach temperature up to 13500C in controlled atmospheres. The sintered material had its microstructure analysed by optical and electron microscopy. The microspheres were characterized initialy utilizing X-ray diffractometry and thermogravimetry. The equation which describes the microspheres shrinkage in function of the time was obtained using finite difference analysis X-ray diffractometry indicated hexagonal structure for the microspheres main starting material, ammonium diuranate thermogravimetric analysis showed reduction of this material to U3O8 at 6000C. Ceramography results showed 5 hours sintered microspheres grain sizes G vary with the temperature. Sintered U3O8 micrographs compared with published results for UO2, indicate similar homogeneity microstructural characteristics and suggest the processed micorspheres to be potentially useful as nuclear fuels. (Author)

  2. Gas foamed open porous biodegradable polymeric microspheres.

    Kim, Taek Kyoung; Yoon, Jun Jin; Lee, Doo Sung; Park, Tae Gwan

    2006-01-01

    Highly open porous biodegradable polymeric microspheres were fabricated for use as injectable scaffold microcarriers for cell delivery. A modified water-in-oil-in-water (W1/O/W2) double emulsion solvent evaporation method was employed for producing the microspheres. The incorporation of an effervescent salt, ammonium bicarbonate, in the primary W1 droplets spontaneously produced carbon dioxide and ammonia gas bubbles during the solvent evaporation process, which not only stabilized the primary emulsion, but also created well inter-connected pores in the resultant microspheres. The porous microspheres fabricated under various gas foaming conditions were characterized. The surface pores became as large as 20 microm in diameter with increasing the concentration of ammonium bicarbonate, being sufficient enough for cell infiltration and seeding. These porous scaffold microspheres could be potentially utilized for cultivating cells in a suspension manner and for delivering the seeded cells to the tissue defect site in an injectable manner. PMID:16023197

  3. Biofunctionalization of silica microspheres for protein separation

    Li, Binjie [Institute of Immunology, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Zou, Xueyan [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Zhao, Yanbao, E-mail: yanbaozhao@126.com [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Sun, Lei [Institute of Immunology, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Li, Shulian [Institute of Immunology, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2013-07-01

    Mercapto-silica (SiO{sub 2}–SH) microspheres were prepared via direct hydrolysis of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) in a basic aqueous solution. The content of surface thiol group (-SH) of SiO{sub 2}–SH microspheres was measured by Ellman's reagent method and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the content of surface thiol group of SiO{sub 2}–SH microspheres is strongly dependent on the reaction conditions. The thermal stability of SiO{sub 2}–SH microspheres was evaluated by thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, which tended to reduce with the increase of content of surface thiol groups. SiO{sub 2}–SH microspheres can be easily modified with reduced glutathione (GSH) to generate SiO{sub 2}–GSH microspheres for the affinity separation of Glutathione S-transferase (GST). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was performed to examine the validity of the separation procedure. The results showed that SiO{sub 2}–GSH microspheres were efficient in GST affinity separation from mixed proteins. - Graphical abstract: The prepared SiO{sub 2}–SH microsphere binding reduced glutathione (SiO{sub 2}–GSH) as affinity precipitation support can capture selectively Glutathione S-transferase (GST) from mixed protein solution. Highlights: ► SiO{sub 2}–SH microspheres were prepared in water using one-pot synthesis. ► The content of surface -SH was investigated by Ellman method and XPS spectra. ► The ratio of -SH to mass strongly depends on the reaction conditions. ► SiO{sub 2}–SH microspheres were biofunctionalized by glutathione. ► SiO{sub 2}–GSH can be used to capture selectively Glutathione S-transferase.

  4. Biofunctionalization of silica microspheres for protein separation

    Mercapto-silica (SiO2–SH) microspheres were prepared via direct hydrolysis of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) in a basic aqueous solution. The content of surface thiol group (-SH) of SiO2–SH microspheres was measured by Ellman's reagent method and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the content of surface thiol group of SiO2–SH microspheres is strongly dependent on the reaction conditions. The thermal stability of SiO2–SH microspheres was evaluated by thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, which tended to reduce with the increase of content of surface thiol groups. SiO2–SH microspheres can be easily modified with reduced glutathione (GSH) to generate SiO2–GSH microspheres for the affinity separation of Glutathione S-transferase (GST). Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was performed to examine the validity of the separation procedure. The results showed that SiO2–GSH microspheres were efficient in GST affinity separation from mixed proteins. - Graphical abstract: The prepared SiO2–SH microsphere binding reduced glutathione (SiO2–GSH) as affinity precipitation support can capture selectively Glutathione S-transferase (GST) from mixed protein solution. Highlights: ► SiO2–SH microspheres were prepared in water using one-pot synthesis. ► The content of surface -SH was investigated by Ellman method and XPS spectra. ► The ratio of -SH to mass strongly depends on the reaction conditions. ► SiO2–SH microspheres were biofunctionalized by glutathione. ► SiO2–GSH can be used to capture selectively Glutathione S-transferase

  5. Modification and characterization of polystyrene-based magnetic microspheres and comparison with albumin-based magnetic microspheres

    Polystyrene- and albumin-based magnetic microspheres for red blood cell separation were modified and characterized by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Albumin microspheres show higher coupling efficiency with the protein, and protein-modified albumin microspheres bind the red blood cells more efficiently than the polystyrene-based microspheres

  6. Modification and characterization of polystyrene-based magnetic microspheres and comparison with albumin-based magnetic microspheres

    Chatterjee, Jhunu; Haik, Yousef E-mail: haik@eng.fsu.edu; Chen Chingjen

    2001-07-01

    Polystyrene- and albumin-based magnetic microspheres for red blood cell separation were modified and characterized by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Albumin microspheres show higher coupling efficiency with the protein, and protein-modified albumin microspheres bind the red blood cells more efficiently than the polystyrene-based microspheres.

  7. Solid ceramic SiCO microspheres and porous rigid siloxane microspheres from swellable polysiloxane particles

    Fortuniak, Witold [Center of Molecular and Macromolecular Studies, Polish Academy of Science, 112 Sienkiewicza, 90-363 Łódź (Poland); Chojnowski, Julian, E-mail: jchojnow@cbmm.lodz.pl [Center of Molecular and Macromolecular Studies, Polish Academy of Science, 112 Sienkiewicza, 90-363 Łódź (Poland); Slomkowski, Stanislaw [Center of Molecular and Macromolecular Studies, Polish Academy of Science, 112 Sienkiewicza, 90-363 Łódź (Poland); Nyczyk-Malinowska, Anna [Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Pospiech, Piotr; Mizerska, Urszula [Center of Molecular and Macromolecular Studies, Polish Academy of Science, 112 Sienkiewicza, 90-363 Łódź (Poland)

    2015-04-01

    Solid silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) ceramic microspheres and rigid porous siloxane microspheres were obtained in a two step process. First, polysiloxane microspheres with a large number of Si–OH groups in their bulk and on their surface were synthesized from polyhydromethylsiloxane (PHMS) using a recently developed process. The process included a combination of three reactions of Si–H groups of PHMS occurring in aqueous emulsion and catalyzed by the same Karstedt Pt(0) complex: (i) hydrosilylation of 1,3-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane (DVTMDS), (ii) hydrolysis, (iii) dehydrogenocondensation involving the SiOH groups formed during the hydrolysis. DVTMDS was grafted on PHMS prior to emulsification. Microspheres had a loose structure and were able to absorb a significant amount of organic solvents. In the second step the microspheres were subjected to pyrolysis with heating in the argon atmosphere at following temperatures: 400, 700 and 1000 °C. These heated at 400 °C had micro and mezopores, while those heated at 700 and 1000 °C gave spherical solid SiCO ceramic particles. Polysiloxane microspheres and microspheres obtained by pyrolysis of the former were analyzed by {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C MAS NMR, FTIR, SEM, and N{sub 2} gas adsorption. - Highlights: • Thermal properties of cross-linked polysiloxane microspheres are studied. • New route to solid silicon oxycarbide microspheres is worked out. • New method of preparation of mezoporous siloxane microspheres is shown. • Role of silanol side groups on polysiloxane in its ceramization is explained.

  8. Solid ceramic SiCO microspheres and porous rigid siloxane microspheres from swellable polysiloxane particles

    Solid silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) ceramic microspheres and rigid porous siloxane microspheres were obtained in a two step process. First, polysiloxane microspheres with a large number of Si–OH groups in their bulk and on their surface were synthesized from polyhydromethylsiloxane (PHMS) using a recently developed process. The process included a combination of three reactions of Si–H groups of PHMS occurring in aqueous emulsion and catalyzed by the same Karstedt Pt(0) complex: (i) hydrosilylation of 1,3-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane (DVTMDS), (ii) hydrolysis, (iii) dehydrogenocondensation involving the SiOH groups formed during the hydrolysis. DVTMDS was grafted on PHMS prior to emulsification. Microspheres had a loose structure and were able to absorb a significant amount of organic solvents. In the second step the microspheres were subjected to pyrolysis with heating in the argon atmosphere at following temperatures: 400, 700 and 1000 °C. These heated at 400 °C had micro and mezopores, while those heated at 700 and 1000 °C gave spherical solid SiCO ceramic particles. Polysiloxane microspheres and microspheres obtained by pyrolysis of the former were analyzed by 29Si and 13C MAS NMR, FTIR, SEM, and N2 gas adsorption. - Highlights: • Thermal properties of cross-linked polysiloxane microspheres are studied. • New route to solid silicon oxycarbide microspheres is worked out. • New method of preparation of mezoporous siloxane microspheres is shown. • Role of silanol side groups on polysiloxane in its ceramization is explained

  9. Fluorimetric method for determination of Beryllium; Determinazione fluorimetrica del berillio

    Sparacino, N.; Sabbioneda, S. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Saluggia, Vercelli (Italy). Dip. Energia

    1996-10-01

    The old fluorimetric method for the determination of Beryllium, based essentially on the fluorescence of the Beryllium-Morine complex in a strongly alkaline solution, is still competitive and stands the comparison with more modern methods or at least three reasons: in the presence of solid or gaseous samples (powders), the times necessary to finalize an analytic determination are comparable since the stage of the process which lasts the longest is the mineralization of the solid particles containing Beryllium, the cost of a good fluorimeter is by far Inferior to the cost, e. g., of an Emission Spectrophotometer provided with ICP torch and magnets for exploiting the Zeeman effect and of an Atomic absorption Spectrophotometer provided with Graphite furnace; it is possible to determine, fluorimetrically, rather small Beryllium levels (about 30 ng of Beryllium/sample), this potentiality is more than sufficient to guarantee the respect of all the work safety and hygiene rules now in force. The study which is the subject of this publication is designed to the analysis procedure which allows one to reach good results in the determination of Beryllium, chiefly through the control and measurement of the interference effect due to the presence of some metals which might accompany the environmental samples of workshops and laboratories where Beryllium is handled, either at the pure state or in its alloys. The results obtained satisfactorily point out the merits and limits of this analytic procedure.

  10. Characterization of a Polyamine Microsphere and Its Adsorption for Protein

    Huixian Wei; Zhenggang Cui; Tingting Nie; Pei Liu; Feng Wang

    2012-01-01

    A novel polyamine microsphere, prepared from the water-in-oil emulsion of polyethylenimine, was characterized. The investigation of scanning electron microscopy showed that the polyamine microsphere is a regular ball with a smooth surface. The diameter distribution of the microsphere is 0.37–4.29 μm. The isoelectric point of the microsphere is 10.6. The microsphere can adsorb proteins through the co-effect of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Among the proteins te...

  11. Estimation of the tritium production and inventory in beryllium

    Beryllium has been proposed as a candidate material for the neutron multiplier in fusion blanket designs. Tritium will be produced and will accumulate in beryllium under neutron irradiation. The tritium production and inventories under 1.5 and 3.0GW fusion power operation were calculated for a layered pebble bed blanket with lithium oxide (Li2O) breeder and beryllium (Be) multiplier. Neutronics calculations were carried out using the one-dimensional transport code ANISN, and the tritium production due to direct reaction of 9Be(n,T)7Li and the two-step reactions 9Be(n,α)6Li(n,α)Twas taken into account. The tritium production due to the two-step reaction was calculated to be 50% of the total tritium production after 1 year full power operation (FPY). The tritium inventory was estimated by considering three kinetic parameters, the permeability from the breeder region, diffusivity in a beryllium matrix, and solubility. Tritium permeation from the breeder region to the beryllium region through a 316SS wall was as much as 3gh-1, which is 30% of the tritium production (9.6gh-1) in the breeder region. Using the diffusion coefficient of beryllium with no oxide layer on its surface, the total tritium inventory was calculated to be 7gFPY-1, mainly owing to solubility. The content of beryllium oxide significantly affects the effective diffusion coefficient. Using a diffusion coefficient for beryllium with beryllium oxide layer on its surface, the tritium inventory was found to be equal to the amount produced. (orig.)

  12. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade

  13. Development of Beryllium Vacuum Chamber Technology for the LHC

    Veness, R; Dorn, C

    2011-01-01

    Beryllium is the material of choice for the beam vacuum chambers around collision points in particle colliders due to a combination of transparency to particles, high specific stiffness and compatibility with ultra-high vacuum. New requirements for these chambers in the LHC experiments have driven the development of new methods for the manufacture of beryllium chambers. This paper reviews the requirements for experimental vacuum chambers. It describes the new beryllium technology adopted for the LHC and experience gained in the manufacture and installation.

  14. Analysis of surface contaminants on beryllium and aluminum windows

    An effort has been made to document the types of contamination which form on beryllium windows surfaces due to interaction with a synchrotron radiation beam. Beryllium windows contaminated in a variety of ways (exposure to water and air) exhibited surface powders, gels, crystals and liquid droplets. These contaminants were analyzed by electron diffraction, electron energy loss spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and wet chemical methods. Materials found on window surfaces include beryllium oxide, amorphous carbon, cuprous oxide, metallic copper and nitric acid. Aluminum window surface contaminants were also examined. (orig.)

  15. Beryllium Health and Safety Committee Data Reporting Task Force

    MacQueen, D H

    2007-02-21

    On December 8, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) published Title 10 CFR 850 (hereafter referred to as the Rule) to establish a chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP) to: {sm_bullet} reduce the number of workers currently exposed to beryllium in the course of their work at DOE facilities managed by DOE or its contractors, {sm_bullet} minimize the levels of, and potential for, expos exposure to beryllium, and {sm_bullet} establish medical surveillance requirements to ensure early detection of the disease.

  16. Cosmis Lithium-Beryllium-Boron Story

    Vangioni-Flam, E.; Cassé, M.

    Light element nucleosynthesis is an important chapter of nuclear astrophysics. Specifically, the rare and fragile light nuclei Lithium, Beryllium and Boron (LiBeB) are not generated in the normal course of stellar nucleosynthesis (except Lithium-7) and are, in fact, destroyed in stellar interiors. This characteristic is reflected in the low abundance of these simple species. Up to recently, the most plausible interpretation was that galactic cosmic rays (GCR) interact with interstellar CNO to form LiBeB. Other origins have been also identified, primordial and stellar (Lithium-7) and supernova neutrino spallation (Lithium-7 and Boron-11). In contrast, Beryllium-9, Boron-10 and Lithium-6 are pure spallative products. This last isotope presents a special interest since the Lithium-7/Lithium-6 ratio has been measured in a few halo stars offering a new constraint on the early galactic evolution. However, in the nineties, new observations prompted astrophysicists to reassess the question. Optical measurements of the beryllium and boron abundances in halo stars have been achieved by the 10 meters KECK telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope. These observations indicate a quasi linear correlation between Be and B vs Fe, at least at low metallicity, unexpected on the basis of GCR scenario, predicting a quadratic relationship. As a consequence, the origin and the evolution of the LiBeB nuclei has been revisited. This linearity implies the acceleration of C and O nuclei freshly synthesized and their fragmentation on the the interstellar Hydrogen and Helium. Wolf-Rayet stars and supernovae via the shock waves induced, are the best candidates to the acceleration of their own material enriched into C and O; so LiBeB is produced independently of the Interstellar Medium chemical composition. Moreover, neutrinos emitted by the newly born neutron stars interacting with the C layer of the supernova could produce specifically Lithium-7 and Boron-11. This process is supported by the

  17. An AzTEC 1.1 mm survey of the GOODS-N field -- II. Multi-wavelength identifications and redshift distribution

    Chapin, E L; Scott, D; Aretxaga, I; Austermann, J E; Chary, R-R; Coppin, K; Halpern, M; Hughes, D H; Lowenthal, J D; Morrison, G E; Perera, T A; Scott, K S; Wilson, G W; Yun, M S

    2009-01-01

    We present results from a multi-wavelength study of 29 sources (false detection probabilities <5%) from a survey of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North field at 1.1mm using the AzTEC camera. Comparing with existing 850um SCUBA studies in the field, we examine differences in the source populations selected at the two wavelengths. The AzTEC observations uniformly cover the entire survey field to a 1-sigma depth of ~1mJy. Searching deep 1.4GHz VLA, and Spitzer 3--24um catalogues, we identify robust counterparts for 21 1.1mm sources, and tentative associations for the remaining objects. The redshift distribution of AzTEC sources is inferred from available spectroscopic and photometric redshifts. We find a median redshift of z=2.7, somewhat higher than z=2.0 for 850um-selected sources in the same field, and our lowest redshift identification lies at a spectroscopic redshift z=1.1460. We measure the 850um to 1.1mm colour of our sources and do not find evidence for `850um dropouts', which can be exp...

  18. An AzTEC 1.1 mm Survey of the GOODS-N Field I: Maps, Catalogue, and Source Statistics

    Perera, T A; Austermann, J E; Scott, K S; Wilson, G W; Halpern, M; Pope, A; Scott, D; Yun, M S; Lowenthal, J D; Morrison, G; Aretxaga, I; Bock, J J; Coppin, K; Crowe, M; Frey, L; Hughes, D H; Kang, Y; Kim, S; Mauskopf, P D

    2008-01-01

    We have conducted a deep and uniform 1.1 mm survey of the GOODS-N field with AzTEC on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Here we present the first results from this survey including maps, the source catalogue, and 1.1 mm number-counts. The results presented here were obtained from a 245 sq-arcmin region with near uniform coverage to a depth of 0.96-1.16 mJy/beam. Our robust catalogue contains 28 source candidates detected with S/N >= 3.75, only 1-2 of which are expected to be spurious detections. Of these source candidates, 8 are also detected by SCUBA at 850 um in regions where there is good overlap between the two surveys. The major advantage of our survey over that with SCUBA is the uniformity of coverage. We calculate number counts using two different techniques: the first using a frequentist parameter estimation, and the second using a Bayesian method. The two sets of results are in good agreement. We find that the 1.1 mm differential number counts are well described in the 2-6 mJy range by the fu...

  19. Nuclear fuel microsphere gamma analyzer

    Valentine, Kenneth H.; Long, Jr., Ernest L.; Willey, Melvin G.

    1977-01-01

    A gamma analyzer system is provided for the analysis of nuclear fuel microspheres and other radioactive particles. The system consists of an analysis turntable with means for loading, in sequence, a plurality of stations within the turntable; a gamma ray detector for determining the spectrum of a sample in one section; means for analyzing the spectrum; and a receiver turntable to collect the analyzed material in stations according to the spectrum analysis. Accordingly, particles may be sorted according to their quality; e.g., fuel particles with fractured coatings may be separated from those that are not fractured, or according to other properties.

  20. Solvothermal synthesis of three-dimensional microspherical bismuth oxychloride self-assembled by microspheres

    Li, Tengfei; Lin, Liyang; Wei, Hongmei; Liang, Guoqiang; Kuang, Xinliang; Liu, Tianmo

    2016-02-01

    Uniform BiOCl microspheres have been synthesized via a facile solvothermal route. The structural features of the as-prepared BiOCl samples were systematically characterized by the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The SEM characterization results indicated that BiOCl microspheres possessed a superstructure composed of several hierarchical microspheres, which were assembled by numerous two dimensional nanosheets. This kind of special BiOCl 3D microstructure exhibited a large BET surface area of about 14.24 m2 g-1. Besides, the photocatalytic properties of BiOCl hollow microsphere sample and sheet-like sample were investigated in detail. Significantly, BiOCl hollow microsphere sample presented faster degradation rate toward RhB even under visible light, which should be attributed to the unique BiOCl nanosheets self-assembled hollow microspheres.

  1. Bisphosphonate release profiles from magnetite microspheres.

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Inoue, Tatsuya; Shirosaki, Yuki; Kawashita, Masakazu; Matsubara, Takao; Matsumine, Akihiko

    2014-10-01

    Hyperthermia has been suggested as a novel, minimally invasive cancer treatment method. After implantation of magnetic nano- or microparticles around a tumour through blood vessels, irradiation with alternating magnetic fields facilitates the efficient in situ hyperthermia even for deep-seated tumours. On the basis of this idea, if the microspheres are capable of delivering drugs, they could be promising multifunctional biomaterials effective for chemotherapy as well as hyperthermia. In the present study, magnetite microspheres were prepared by aggregation of the iron oxide colloid in water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion. The release behaviour of alendronate, a typical bisphosphonate, from the microspheres was examined in vitro as a model of the bone tumour prevention and treatment system. The alendronate was successfully incorporated onto the porous magnetite microspheres in vacuum conditions. The drug-loaded microspheres maintained their original spherical shapes even after shaking in ultrapure water for 3 days, suggesting that they have sufficient mechanical integrity for clinical use. It was attributed to high aggregation capability of the magnetite nanoparticles through van der Waals and weak magnetic attractions. The microspheres showed slow release of the alendronate in vitro, resulting from tight covalent or ionic interaction between the magnetite and the alendronate. The release rate was diffusion-controlled type and well controlled by the alendronate concentration in drug incorporation to the microspheres. PMID:24854985

  2. Deep 1.1mm-wavelength imaging of the GOODS-S field by AzTEC/ASTE - I. Source catalogue and number counts

    Scott, K. S.; Yun, M. S.; Wilson, G. W.; Austermann, J. E.; Aguilar, E.; Aretxaga, I.; Ezawa, H.; Ferrusca, D.; Hatsukade, B.; Hughes, D. H.; Iono, D.; Giavalisco, M.; Kawabe, R.; Kohno, K.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Oshima, T.; Perera, T. A.; Rand, J.; Tamura, Y.; Tosaki, T.; Velazquez, M.; Williams, C. C.; Zeballos, M.

    2010-07-01

    We present the first results from a confusion-limited map of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) taken with the AzTEC camera on the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment. We imaged a field to a 1σ depth of 0.48-0.73 mJybeam-1, making this one of the deepest blank-field surveys at mm-wavelengths ever achieved. Although by traditional standards our GOODS-S map is extremely confused due to a sea of faint underlying sources, we demonstrate through simulations that our source identification and number counts analyses are robust, and the techniques discussed in this paper are relevant for other deeply confused surveys. We find a total of 41 dusty starburst galaxies with signal-to-noise ratios S/N >= 3. 5 within this uniformly covered region, where only two are expected to be false detections, and an additional seven robust source candidates located in the noisier (1σ ~ 1 mJybeam-1) outer region of the map. We derive the 1.1 mm number counts from this field using two different methods: a fluctuation or ``P(d)'' analysis and a semi-Bayesian technique and find that both methods give consistent results. Our data are well fit by a Schechter function model with . Given the depth of this survey, we put the first tight constraints on the 1.1 mm number counts at S1.1mm = 0.5 mJy, and we find evidence that the faint end of the number counts at from various SCUBA surveys towards lensing clusters are biased high. In contrast to the 870μm survey of this field with the LABOCA camera, we find no apparent underdensity of sources compared to previous surveys at 1.1mm the estimates of the number counts of SMGs at flux densities >1mJy determined here are consistent with those measured from the AzTEC/SHADES survey. Additionally, we find a significant number of SMGs not identified in the LABOCA catalogue. We find that in contrast to observations at λ ~ 3 dust-obscured galaxies that are unaccounted for at these shorter wavelengths potentially contribute to a

  3. Stellar abundances of beryllium and CUBES

    Smiljanic, R

    2014-01-01

    Stellar abundances of beryllium are useful in different areas of astrophysics, including studies of the Galactic chemical evolution, of stellar evolution, and of the formation of globular clusters. Determining Be abundances in stars is, however, a challenging endeavor. The two Be II resonance lines useful for abundance analyses are in the near UV, a region strongly affected by atmospheric extinction. CUBES is a new spectrograph planned for the VLT that will be more sensitive than current instruments in the near UV spectral region. It will allow the observation of fainter stars, expanding the number of targets where Be abundances can be determined. Here, a brief review of stellar abundances of Be is presented together with a discussion of science cases for CUBES. In particular, preliminary simulations of CUBES spectra are presented, highlighting its possible impact in investigations of Be abundances of extremely metal-poor stars and of stars in globular clusters.

  4. Beryllium reflector elements for PARR-1

    The LEU fuel of PARR-1 was designed for a discharge burnup of 35% of initial /sup 235/U loading. Recently some of the fuel elements have been discharged from the PARR-1 core after attaining the burnup closed to the design value. These fuel elements were discharged due to diminished excess reactivity although they were physically intact. After satisfactory performance of these fuel elements there has been a desire to explore the possibility of enhancing the discharge burnup by boosting up the core reactivity. Use of better reflector elements is one of the methods to obtain this goal. In this report properties of various reflector elements have been compared and it is found that use of Beryllium metal reflector elements may be a promising choice for this purpose. (author)

  5. Investigation of the ion beryllium surface interaction

    Guseva, M.I.; Birukov, A.Yu.; Gureev, V.M. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The self -sputtering yield of the Be was measured. The energy dependence of the Be self-sputtering yield agrees well with that calculated by W. Eckstein et. al. Below 770 K the self-sputtering yield is temperature independent; at T{sub irr}.> 870 K it increases sharply. Hot-pressed samples at 370 K were implanted with monoenergetic 5 keV hydrogen ions and with a stationary plasma (flux power {approximately} 5 MW/m{sup 2}). The investigation of hydrogen behavior in beryllium shows that at low doses hydrogen is solved, but at doses {ge} 5x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} the bubbles and channels are formed. It results in hydrogen profile shift to the surface and decrease of its concentration. The sputtering results in further concentration decrease at doses > 10{sup 25}m{sup -2}.

  6. Advances in beryllium powder consolidation simulations

    A fuzzy logic based multiobjective genetic algorithm (GA) is introduced and the algorithm is used to optimize micromechanical densification modeling parameters for warm isopressed beryllium powder, HIPed copper powder and CIPed/sintered and HIPed tantalum powder. In addition to optimizing the main model parameters using the experimental data points as objective functions, the GA provides a quantitative measure of the sensitivity of the model to each parameter, estimates the mean particle size of the powder, and determines the smoothing factors for the transition between stage 1 and stage 2 densification. While the GA does not provide a sensitivity analysis in the strictest sense, and is highly stochastic in nature, this method is reliable and reproducible in optimizing parameters given any size data set and determining the impact on the model of slight variations in each parameter

  7. Seeing is believing, PLGA microsphere degradation revealed in PLGA microsphere/PVA hydrogel composites.

    Gu, Bing; Sun, Xuanhao; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Burgess, Diane J

    2016-04-28

    The aim of this study was to understand the polymer degradation and drug release mechanism from PLGA microspheres embedded in a PVA hydrogel. Two types of microspheres were prepared with different molecular weight PLGA polymers (approximately 25 and 7kDa) to achieve different drug release profiles, with a 9-day lag phase and without a lag phase, respectively. The kinetics of water uptake into the microspheres coincided with the drug release profiles for both formulations. For the 25kDa microspheres, minimal water uptake was observed in the early part of the lag phase followed by substantial water uptake at the later stages and in the drug release phase. For the 7kDa microspheres, water uptake occurred simultaneously with drug release. Water uptake was approximately 2-3 times that of the initial microsphere weight for both formulations. The internal structure of the PLGA microspheres was evaluated using low temperature scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). Burst drug release occurred followed by pore forming from the exterior to the core of both microspheres. A well-defined hydrogel/microsphere interface was observed. For the 25kDa microspheres, internal pore formation and swelling occurred before the second drug release phase. The surface layer of the microspheres remained intact whereas swelling, and degradation of the core continued throughout the drug release period. In addition, microsphere swelling reduced glucose transport through the coatings in PBS media and this was considered to be a as a consequence of the increased thickness of the coatings. The combination of the swelling and microdialysis results provides a fresh understanding on the competing processes affecting molecular transport of bioanalytes (i.e. glucose) through these composite coatings during prolonged exposure in PBS. PMID:26965956

  8. Combustion synthesis of porous titanium microspheres

    The synthesis of titanium porous microspheres by a combustion technique was studied under an argon atmosphere by using a TiO2 − 2.5Mg reactive mixture. The precursor, a fine TiO2 powder, was thermally treated in the range 600–1300 °C prior to the combustion experiments. TiO2 microspheres whose diameters were between 10 and 50 μm were obtained from precursor particles annealed in the range 900–1100 °C. A biphase product consisting of Ti and MgO phases was obtained when the TiO2 microspheres were reduced with Mg. The spherical morphology of the final particles was retained despite the relatively high combustion temperatures (1630–1670 °C) used in this study. Moreover, porous titanium microspheres were obtained when the MgO particles were dissolved using acid leaching. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the microspheres suggested that the spherical structure contained ∼0.5–2.0-μm-diameter porous windows. The Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area of the Ti microspheres was determined to be 2.8 m2 g−1. - Highlights: • TiO2 + 2.5Mg mixture was combusted under argon pressure to produce titanium microspheres. • Microspheres with a porous framework structure were obtained at 1630–1670 °C. • The microspheres exhibited 10–50 μm average diameters with porous window of ∼0.5–2.0 μm and BET surface area of 2.8 m2 g−1. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted

  9. Geochemistry of beryllium in Bulgarian coals

    Eskenazy, Greta M. [Geology Department, University of Sofia ' St. Kl. Ohridski' , Tzar Osvoboditel 15, Sofia 1504 (Bulgaria)

    2006-04-03

    The beryllium content of about 3000 samples (coal, coaly shales, partings, coal lithotypes, and isolated coalified woods) from 16 Bulgarian coal deposits was determined by atomic emission spectrography. Mean Be concentrations in coal show great variability: from 0.9 to 35 ppm for the deposits studied. There was no clear-cut relationship between Be content and rank. The following mean and confidence interval Be values were measured: lignites, 2.6+/-0.8 ppm; sub-bituminous coals, 8.2+/-3.3 ppm; bituminous coals, 3.0+/-1.2 ppm; and anthracites, 19+/-9.0 ppm. The Be contents in coal and coaly shales for all deposits correlated positively suggesting a common source of the element. Many samples of the coal lithotypes vitrain and xylain proved to be richer in Be than the hosting whole coal samples as compared on ash basis. Up to tenfold increase in Be levels was routinely recorded in fusain. The ash of all isolated coalified woods was found to contain 1.1 to 50 times higher Be content relative to its global median value for coal inclusions. Indirect evidence shows that Be occurs in both organic and inorganic forms. Beryllium is predominantly organically bound in deposits with enhanced Be content, whereas the inorganic form prevails in deposits whose Be concentration approximates Clarke values. The enrichment in Be exceeding the coal Clarke value 2.4 to 14.5 times in some of the Bulgarian deposits is attributed to subsynchronous at the time of coal deposition hydrothermal and volcanic activity. (author)

  10. Electron microscope study of irradiated beryllium oxide

    The beryllium oxide is studied first by fractography, before and after irradiation, using sintered samples. The fractures are examined under different aspects. The higher density sintered samples, with transgranular fractures are the most interesting for a microscopic study. It is possible to mark the difference between the 'pores' left by the sintering process and the 'bubbles' of gases that can be produced by former thermal treatments. After irradiation, the grain boundaries are very much weakened. By annealing, it is possible to observe the evolution of the gases produced by the reaction (n, 2n) and (n. α) and gathered on the grain boundaries. The irradiated beryllium oxide is afterwards studied by transmission. For that, a simple method has been used: little chips of the crushed material are examined. Clusters of point defects produced by neutrons are thus detected in crystals irradiated at the three following doses: 6 x 1019, 9 x 1019 and 2 x 1020 nf cm-2 at a temperature below 100 deg. C. For the irradiation at 6 x 1019 nf cm-2, the defects are merely visible, but at 2 x l020 nf cm-2 the crystals an crowded with clusters and the Kikuchi lines have disappeared from the micro-diffraction diagrams. The evolution of the clusters into dislocation loops is studied by a series of annealings. The activation energy (0,37 eV) calculated from the annealing curves suggests that it must be interstitials that condense into dislocation loops. Samples irradiated at high temperatures (650, 900 and 1100 deg. C) are also studied. In those specimens the size of the loops is not the same as the equilibrium size obtained after out of pile annealing at the same temperature. Those former loops are more specifically studied and their Burgers vector is determined by micro-diffraction. (author)

  11. Age hardening in beryllium-aluminum-silver alloys

    Three different alloys of beryllium-aluminum-silver were processed to powder by centrifugal atomization in a helium atmosphere. Alloy compositions were, by weight percent, Be-47.5Al-2.5Ag, Be-47Al-3Ag, and Be-46Al-4Ag. Due to the low solubility of both aluminum and silver in beryllium, the silver was concentrated in the aluminum phase, which separates from the beryllium in the liquid phase. A fine, continuous composite beryllium-aluminum microstructure was formed, which did not significantly change after hot isostatic pressing. Samples of hot isostatically pressed material were solution treated at 550 C for 1 h, followed by a water quench. Aging temperatures were 150, 175, 200, and 225 C for times ranging from half an hour to 65 h. Results indicate that peak hardness was reached in 36--40 h at 175 C and 12--16 h at 200 C aging temperature, relatively independent of alloy composition

  12. Design alternatives for cryogenic beryllium windows in an ICF cryostat

    We propose three backup design options for the cryogenic beryllium windows in a cryostat. The first, a beryllium flange option, reduces peak tensile stresses to 1/3 of that in the original design. The second, a fiberglass flange option, reduces peak tensile stresses to 1/2 of that in the original design and is also low cost. A third option, replacing the beryllium windows with spherical Mylar caps, would require a development program. Even though Mylar has been used previously at cryogenic temperature, this option is still considered unreliable. The near-zero ductility of beryllium at cryogenic temperature makes the reduction of peak tensile stresses particularly desirable. The orginal window design did function satisfactorily and the backup options were not needed. However, these options remain open for possible incorporation in future cryostat designs

  13. New facility for post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi [Oarai Research Establishment, Ibaraki-Ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium is expected as a neutron multiplier and plasma facing materials in the fusion reactor, and the neutron irradiation data on properties of beryllium up to 800{degrees}C need for the engineering design. The acquisition of data on the tritium behavior, swelling, thermal and mechanical properties are first priority in ITER design. Facility for the post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium was constructed in the hot laboratory of Japan Materials Testing Reactor to get the engineering design data mentioned above. This facility consist of the four glove boxes, dry air supplier, tritium monitoring and removal system, storage box of neutron irradiated samples. Beryllium handling are restricted by the amount of tritium;7.4 GBq/day and {sup 60}Co;7.4 MBq/day.

  14. Development of Biomarkers for Chronic Beryllium Disease in Mice

    Gordon, Terry

    2013-01-25

    Beryllium is a strategic metal, indispensable for national defense programs in aerospace, telecommunications, electronics, and weaponry. Exposure to beryllium is an extensively documented occupational hazard that causes irreversible, debilitating granulomatous lung disease in as much as 3 - 5% of exposed workers. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships has been severely limited by a general lack of a sufficient CBD animal model. We have now developed and tested an animal model which can be used for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new diagnostic and treatment paradigms. We have created 3 strains of transgenic mice in which the human antigen-presenting moiety, HLA-DP, was inserted into the mouse genome. Each mouse strain contains HLA-DPB1 alleles that confer different magnitude of risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD): HLA-DPB1*0401 (odds ratio = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (odds ratio = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (odds ratio = 240). Our preliminary work has demonstrated that the *1701 allele, as predicted by human studies, results in the greatest degree of sensitization in a mouse ear swelling test. We have also completed dose-response experiments examining beryllium-induced lung granulomas and identified susceptible and resistant inbred strains of mice (without the human transgenes) as well as quantitative trait loci that may contain gene(s) that modify the immune response to beryllium. In this grant application, we propose to use the transgenic and normal inbred strains of mice to identify biomarkers for the progression of beryllium sensitization and CBD. To achieve this goal, we propose to compare the sensitivity and accuracy of the lymphocyte proliferation test (blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) with the ELISPOT test in the three HLA-DP transgenic mice strains throughout a 6 month treatment with beryllium particles. Because of the availability of high-throughput proteomics, we will also identify

  15. Beryllium nitride thin film grown by reactive laser ablation

    G. Soto; Diaz, J.A.; Machorro, R.; Reyes-Serrato, A.; de la Cruz, W.

    2001-01-01

    Beryllium nitride thin films were grown on silicon substrates by laser ablating a beryllium foil in molecular nitrogen ambient. The composition and chemical state were determined with Auger (AES), X-Ray photoelectron (XPS) and energy loss (EELS) spectroscopies. A low absorption coefficient in the visible region, and an optical bandgap of 3.8 eV, determined by reflectance ellipsometry, were obtained for films grown at nitrogen pressures higher than 25 mTorr. The results show that the reaction ...

  16. Beryllium foils for windows in counter of nuclear radiation

    Based on the optimization of the main structural characteristics (grain structure, texture, dislocation substructure) are defined modes of deformation and heat treatment of beryllium foils (purity > 99.95%), providing their excellent mechanical properties and optimized modes of deformation and heat treatment. Analyzed various technological methods rolling foils to their rational use for the practical implementation of the results of the study. It is shown that the strength and plastic properties of the foils beryllium higher than that of similar foils foreign manufacture

  17. The beryllium production at Ulba metallurgical plant (Ust-Kamenogrsk, Kazakhstan)

    Dvinskykh, E.M.; Savchuk, V.V.; Tuzov, Y.V. [Ulba Metallurgical Plant (Zavod), Ust-Kamenogorsk, Abay prospect 102 (Kazakhstan)

    1998-01-01

    The Report includes data on beryllium production of Ulba metallurgical plant, located in Ust-Kamenogorsk (Kazakhstan). Beryllium production is showed to have extended technological opportunities in manufacturing semi-products (beryllium ingots, master alloys, metallic beryllium powders, beryllium oxide) and in production of structural beryllium and its parts. Ulba metallurgical plant owns a unique technology of beryllium vacuum distillation, which allows to produce reactor grades of beryllium with a low content of metallic impurities. At present Ulba plant does not depend on raw materials suppliers. The quantity of stored raw materials and semi-products will allow to provide a 25-years work of beryllium production at a full capacity. The plant has a satisfactory experience in solving ecological problems, which could be useful in ITER program. (author)

  18. Beryllium pressure vessels for creep tests in magnetic fusion energy

    Beryllium has interesting applications in magnetic fusion experimental machines and future power-producing fusion reactors. Chief among the properties of beryllium that make these applications possible is its ability to act as a neutron multiplier, thereby increasing the tritium breeding ability of energy conversion blankets. Another property, the behavior of beryllium in a 14-MeV neutron environment, has not been fully investigated, nor has the creep behavior of beryllium been studied in an energetic neutron flux at thermodynamically interesting temperatures. This small beryllium pressure vessel could be charged with gas to test pressures around 3, 000 psi to produce stress in the metal of 15,000 to 20,000 psi. Such stress levels are typical of those that might be reached in fusion blanket applications of beryllium. After contacting R. Powell at HEDL about including some of the pressure vessels in future test programs, we sent one sample pressure vessel with a pressurizing tube attached (Fig. 1) for burst tests so the quality of the diffusion bond joints could be evaluated. The gas used was helium. Unfortunately, budget restrictions did not permit us to proceed in the creep test program. The purpose of this engineering note is to document the lessons learned to date, including photographs of the test pressure vessel that show the tooling necessary to satisfactorily produce the diffusion bonds. This document can serve as a starting point for those engineers who resume this task when funds become available

  19. Impurities effect on the swelling of neutron irradiated beryllium

    Donne, M.D.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F. [Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    An important factor controlling the swelling behaviour of fast neutron irradiated beryllium is the impurity content which can strongly affect both the surface tension and the creep strength of this material. Being the volume swelling of the old beryllium (early sixties) systematically higher than that of the more modem one (end of the seventies), a sensitivity analysis with the aid of the computer code ANFIBE (ANalysis of Fusion Irradiated BEryllium) to investigate the effect of these material properties on the swelling behaviour of neutron irradiated beryllium has been performed. Two sets of experimental data have been selected: the first one named Western refers to quite recently produced Western beryllium, whilst the second one, named Russian refers to relatively old (early sixties) Russian beryllium containing a higher impurity rate than the Western one. The results obtained with the ANFIBE Code were assessed by comparison with experimental data and the used material properties were compared with the data available in the literature. Good agreement between calculated and measured values has been found.

  20. Brain-targeted nasal clonazepam microspheres

    Shaji J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gelatin-chitosan mucoadhesive microspheres of clonazepam were prepared using the emulsion cross linking method. Mirospheres were evaluated using the in vitro and ex vivo drug release patterns. In vivo CNS drug distribution studies were carried out in rats by administering the clonazepam microspheres intra-nasally and clonazepam solution intravenously. From the drug levels in plasma and CSF, drug targeting index and drug targeting efficiency were calculated. Results obtained indicated that intranasally administered clonazepam microspheres resulted in higher brain levels with a drug targeting index of 2.12. Gelatin-chitosan cross linked mucoadhesive microspheres have the potential to be developed as a brain-targeted drug delivery system for clonazepam.

  1. Uniform and Robust Peptoid Microsphere Coatings

    Shannon L. Servoss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Peptoids that are helical and partially water soluble have been shown to self-assemble into microspheres when the peptoid solution is dried on a silicon substrate. Such microsphere coatings have great potential for use in biosensor technologies, specifically to increase the surface area for binding. However, in order to be useful, the peptoids must consistently form uniform coatings. In this study we investigated the effects of various coating protocol parameters on the uniformity of the resulting peptoid microsphere coatings, including (i solvent, (ii administration technique, and (iii drying environment. In addition, we investigated the robustness of the coatings as well as the potential for using a glass substrate. These studies show that uniform, robust peptoid microsphere coatings can be formed using protic solvents, a full coverage administration technique, and drying in open air on silicon or glass substrates.

  2. Brain-Targeted Nasal Clonazepam Microspheres

    Shaji J; Poddar A; Iyer S

    2009-01-01

    Gelatin-chitosan mucoadhesive microspheres of clonazepam were prepared using the emulsion cross linking method. Mirospheres were evaluated using the in vitro and ex vivo drug release patterns. In vivo CNS drug distribution studies were carried out in rats by administering the clonazepam microspheres intra-nasally and clonazepam solution intravenously. From the drug levels in plasma and CSF, drug targeting index and drug targeting efficiency were calculated. Results obtained indicated that int...

  3. Hydrogen transport and storage in engineered microspheres

    Rambach, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hendricks, C. [W.J. Schafer Associates, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This project is a collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and W.J. Schafer Associates (WJSA). The authors plan to experimentally verify the performance characteristics of engineered glass microspheres that are relevant to the storage and transport of hydrogen for energy applications. They will identify the specific advantages of hydrogen transport by microspheres, analyze the infrastructure implications and requirements, and experimentally measure their performance characteristics in realistic, bulk storage situations.

  4. Uniform and Robust Peptoid Microsphere Coatings

    Servoss, Shannon L.; Phillip Blake; Melissa L. Hebert; Dhaval S. Shah

    2013-01-01

    Peptoids that are helical and partially water soluble have been shown to self-assemble into microspheres when the peptoid solution is dried on a silicon substrate. Such microsphere coatings have great potential for use in biosensor technologies, specifically to increase the surface area for binding. However, in order to be useful, the peptoids must consistently form uniform coatings. In this study we investigated the effects of various coating protocol parameters on the uniformity of the resu...

  5. Atomic entanglement near a realistic microsphere

    Dung, Ho Trung; Scheel, S.; Welsch, D-G; Knöll, L

    2001-01-01

    We study a scheme for entangling two-level atoms located close to the surface of a dielectric microsphere. The effect is based on medium-assisted spontaneous decay, rigorously taking into account dispersive and absorptive properties of the microsphere. We show that even in the weak-coupling regime, where the Markov approximation applies, entanglement up to 0.35 ebits between two atoms can be created. However, larger entanglement and violation of Bell's inequality can only be achieved in the s...

  6. Germanium Microsphere High-Q Resonator

    Wang, Pengfei; Lee, Timothy; Ding, Ming; Dhar, Anirban; Hawkins, Thomas; Foy, Paul; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang; Sahu, Jayanta; Farrell, Gerald; Ballato, John; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter, the fabrication and characterization of a microsphere resonator from the semiconductor germanium is demonstrated. Whispering gallery modes are excited in a 46 μm diameter germanium microsphere resonator using evanescent coupling from a tapered silica optical fiber with a waist diameter of 2 μm. Resonances with Q factors as high as 3.8×104 at wavelengths near 2 μm are observed. Because of their ultrahigh optical nonlinearities and extremely broad transparency window, germanium ...

  7. Aptamer Based Microsphere Biosensor for Thrombin Detection

    Xudong Fan; White, Ian M.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Hongying Zhu

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an optical microsphere resonator biosensor using aptamer as receptor for the measurement of the important biomolecule thrombin. The sphere surface is modified with anti-thrombin aptamer, which has excellent binding affinity and selectivity for thrombin. Binding of the thrombin at the sphere surface is monitored by the spectral position of the microsphere's whispering gallery mode resonances. A detection limit on the order of 1 NIH Unit/mL is demonstrated. Control experiments...

  8. Carbon microsphere-filled Pyrrone foams.

    Kimmel, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    Syntactic foam formulations were prepared from mixtures of Pyrrone prepolymers and hollow carbon microspheres. Very low curing shrinkages were obtained for high volume loadings of microspheres. The resulting syntactic foams were found to be remarkably stable over a wide range in temperature. A technique was developed for the emplacement of these foam formulations in polyimide-fiberglass, titanium alloy and stainless steel honeycomb without sacrificing low curing shrinkage or thermal stability.

  9. Beryllium data base for in-pile mockup test on blanket of fusion reactor, (1)

    Beryllium has been used in the fusion blanket designs with ceramic breeder as a neutron multiplier to increase the net tritium breeding ratio (TBR). The properties of beryllium, that is physical properties, chemical properties, thermal properties, mechanical properties, nuclear properties, radiation effects, etc. are necessary for the fusion blanket design. However, the properties of beryllium have not been arranged for the fusion blanket design. Therefore, it is indispensable to check and examine the material data of beryllium reported previously. This paper is the first one of the series of papers on beryllium data base, which summarizes the reported material data of beryllium. (author)

  10. Albumin microspheres for oral delivery of iron.

    Shivakumar, H N; Vaka, Siva Ram Kiran; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2010-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) microspheres of ferric pyrophosphate (FPP) intended for passive targeting to the Peyer's patches has been proposed for oral iron supplementation. Microspheres prepared by emulsification chemical cross linking method were characterized for surface topography, entrapment efficiency, particle size, particle charge and in vitro drug release. Microspheres of batch C with FPP to BSA ratio of 1:5 were found to be most suitable for targeting as they exhibited high entrapment (83.88 +/- 4.31), high monodispersity (span = 1.24 +/- 0.01), and least particle size (d(vm) = 4.40 +/- 0.01). In addition the amount of iron retained in these microspheres despite exposure to simulated gastrointestinal conditions for 5 h was found to be 83.72 +/- 4.22%, the highest in the three batches. The in vivo serum iron profiles in normal rats following oral administration displayed a reduced T(max) (2 h), elevated C(max) (106.06 +/- 12.18 mug/dL) and increased AUC (0-16 h) (647.44 +/- 52.33 mug.h/dL) for these microspheres which significantly differed (P <0.05) from FPP solution indicating a higher iron repletion potential of the BSA microspheres. PMID:19635031

  11. PLGA/alginate composite microspheres for hydrophilic protein delivery

    Zhai, Peng [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, S7N5E5 (Canada); Division of Biomedical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, S7N5A9 (Canada); Chen, X.B. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, S7N5A9 (Canada); Division of Biomedical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, S7N5A9 (Canada); Schreyer, David J., E-mail: david.schreyer@usask.ca [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, S7N5E5 (Canada); Division of Biomedical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, S7N5A9 (Canada)

    2015-11-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres and PLGA/alginate composite microspheres were prepared by a novel double emulsion and solvent evaporation technique and loaded with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or rabbit anti-laminin antibody protein. The addition of alginate and the use of a surfactant during microsphere preparation increased the encapsulation efficiency and reduced the initial burst release of hydrophilic BSA. Confocal laser scanning microcopy (CLSM) of BSA-loaded PLGA/alginate composite microspheres showed that PLGA, alginate, and BSA were distributed throughout the depths of microspheres; no core/shell structure was observed. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that PLGA microspheres erode and degrade more quickly than PLGA/alginate composite microspheres. When loaded with anti-laminin antibody, the function of released antibody was well preserved in both PLGA and PLGA/alginate composite microspheres. The biocompatibility of PLGA and PLGA/alginate microspheres were examined using four types of cultured cell lines, representing different tissue types. Cell survival was variably affected by the inclusion of alginate in composite microspheres, possibly due to the sensitivity of different cell types to excess calcium that may be released from the calcium cross-linked alginate. - Highlights: • A double emulsion technique is used to prepare protein-loaded PLGA or PLGA/alginate microspheres. • PLGA, alginate and protein are distributed evenly within microsphere structure. • Addition of alginate improves loading efficiency and slows degradation and protein release. • PLGA/alginate microspheres have favorable biocompatibility.

  12. PLGA/alginate composite microspheres for hydrophilic protein delivery

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres and PLGA/alginate composite microspheres were prepared by a novel double emulsion and solvent evaporation technique and loaded with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or rabbit anti-laminin antibody protein. The addition of alginate and the use of a surfactant during microsphere preparation increased the encapsulation efficiency and reduced the initial burst release of hydrophilic BSA. Confocal laser scanning microcopy (CLSM) of BSA-loaded PLGA/alginate composite microspheres showed that PLGA, alginate, and BSA were distributed throughout the depths of microspheres; no core/shell structure was observed. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that PLGA microspheres erode and degrade more quickly than PLGA/alginate composite microspheres. When loaded with anti-laminin antibody, the function of released antibody was well preserved in both PLGA and PLGA/alginate composite microspheres. The biocompatibility of PLGA and PLGA/alginate microspheres were examined using four types of cultured cell lines, representing different tissue types. Cell survival was variably affected by the inclusion of alginate in composite microspheres, possibly due to the sensitivity of different cell types to excess calcium that may be released from the calcium cross-linked alginate. - Highlights: • A double emulsion technique is used to prepare protein-loaded PLGA or PLGA/alginate microspheres. • PLGA, alginate and protein are distributed evenly within microsphere structure. • Addition of alginate improves loading efficiency and slows degradation and protein release. • PLGA/alginate microspheres have favorable biocompatibility

  13. AzTEC 1.1 mm images of 16 radio galaxies at 0.5

    Humphrey, A; Aretxaga, I; Hughes, D H; Yun, M S; Cybulski, R; Wilson, Grant W; Austermann, J; Ezawa, H; Kawabe, R; Kohno, K; Perera, T; Scott, K; Sánchez-Arguelles, D; Gutermuth, R

    2011-01-01

    We present 1.1 mm observations for a sample of 16 powerful radio galaxies at 0.51 mm flux density is anticorrelated with the largest angular size of the radio source. We also present new Spitzer imaging observations of several active galax...

  14. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Gokalp, Gokhan, E-mail: drgokhangokalp@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Demirag, Burak, E-mail: bdemirag@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Nas, Omer Fatih, E-mail: omerfatihnas@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Aydemir, Mehmet Fatih, E-mail: fatiha@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Yazici, Zeynep, E-mail: zyazici@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p < 0.001). No significant difference was detected for oblique coronal images when compared with arthroscopy results (p = 0.180). Sensitivity and specificity values for ACL tear diagnosis were 37.04% and 95.65% for sagittal images; 74.07% and 91.30% for oblique coronal images. There was no significant difference between arthroscopy and oblique coronal MR images in grading AMB and PLB injuries (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade.

  15. Deep 1.1 mm-wavelength imaging of the GOODS-S field by AzTEC/ASTE - I. Source catalogue and number counts

    Scott, K S; Wilson, G W; Austermann, J E; Aguilar, E; Aretxaga, I; Ezawa, H; Ferrusca, D; Hatsukade, B; Hughes, D H; Iono, D; Giavalisco, M; Kawabe, R; Kohno, K; Mauskopf, P D; Oshima, T; Perera, T A; Rand, J; Tamura, Y; Tosaki, T; Velazquez, M; Williams, C C; Zeballos, M

    2010-01-01

    [Abridged] We present the first results from a 1.1 mm confusion-limited map of the GOODS-S field taken with AzTEC on the ASTE telescope. We imaged a 270 sq. arcmin field to a 1\\sigma depth of 0.48 - 0.73 mJy/beam, making this one of the deepest blank-field surveys at mm-wavelengths ever achieved. Although our GOODS-S map is extremely confused, we demonstrate that our source identification and number counts analyses are robust, and the techniques discussed in this paper are relevant for other deeply confused surveys. We find a total of 41 dusty starburst galaxies with S/N >= 3.5 within this uniformly covered region, where only two are expected to be false detections. We derive the 1.1mm number counts from this field using both a "P(d)" analysis and a semi-Bayesian technique, and find that both methods give consistent results. Our data are well-fit by a Schechter function model with (S', N(3mJy), \\alpha) = (1.30+0.19 mJy, 160+27 (mJy/deg^2)^(-1), -2.0). Given the depth of this survey, we put the first tight con...

  16. Origins of the extragalactic background at 1mm from a combined analysis of the AzTEC and MAMBO data in GOODS-N

    Penner, Kyle; Chapin, Edward L; Greve, Thomas R; Bertoldi, Frank; Brodwin, Mark; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Conselice, Christopher J; Coppin, Kristen; Giavalisco, Mauro; Hughes, David H; Ivison, Rob J; Perera, Thushara; Scott, Douglas; Scott, Kimberly; Wilson, Grant

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of the cosmic infrared background, which is a measure of the dust obscured activity in all galaxies in the Universe. We venture to isolate the galaxies responsible for the background at 1mm; with spectroscopic and photometric redshifts we constrain the redshift distribution of these galaxies. We create a deep 1.16mm map (sigma ~ 0.5mJy) by combining the AzTEC 1.1mm and MAMBO 1.2mm datasets in GOODS-N. This combined map contains 41 secure detections, 13 of which are new. By averaging the 1.16mm flux densities of individually undetected galaxies with 24um flux densities > 25uJy, we resolve 31--45 per cent of the 1.16mm background. Repeating our analysis on the SCUBA 850um map, we resolve a higher percentage (40--64 per cent) of the 850um background. A majority of the background resolved (attributed to individual galaxies) at both wavelengths comes from galaxies at z > 1.3. If the ratio of the resolved submillimeter to millimeter background is applied to a reasonable scenario for the origins o...

  17. Helium ion distributions in a 4 kJ plasma focus device by 1 mm-thick large-size polycarbonate detectors

    Helium ion beam profile, angular and iso-ion beam distributions in 4 kJ Amirkabir plasma focus (APF) device were effectively observed by the unaided eyes and studied in single 1 mm-thick large-diameter (20 cm) polycarbonate track detectors (PCTD). The PCTDs were processed by 50 Hz–HV electrochemical etching using a large-size ECE chamber. The results show that helium ions produced in the APF device have a ring-shaped angular distribution peaked at an angle of ∼±60° with respect to the top of the anode. Some information on the helium ion energy and distributions is also provided. The method is highly effective for ion beam studies. - Highlights: • Helium iso-ion beam profile and angular distributions were studied in the 4 kJ APF device. • Large-area 1 mm-thick polycarbonate detectors were processed by 50 Hz-HV ECE. • Helium ion beam profile and distributions were observed by unaided eyes in a single detector. • Helium ion profile has ring-shaped distributions with energies lower at the ring location. • Helium iso-ion track density, diameter and energy distributions are estimated

  18. The unusual properties of beryllium surfaces

    Be is a ''marginal metal.'' The stable phase, hcp-Be, has a low Fermi-level density of states and very anisotropic structural and elastic properties, similar to a semiconductor's. At the Be(0001) surface, surface states drastically increase the Fermi-level density of states. The different nature of bonding in bulk-Be and at the Be(0001) surface explains the large outward relaxation. The presence of surface states causes large surface core-level shifts by inducing a higher electrostatic potential in the surface layers and by improving the screening at the surface. The authors experimental and theoretical investigations of atomic vibrations at the Be(0001) surface demonstrate clearly that Be screening of atomic motion by the surface states makes the surface phonon dispersion fundamentally different from that of the bulk. Properties of Be(0001) are so different from those of the bulk that the surface can be considered a new ''phase'' of beryllium with unique electronic and structural characteristics. For comparison they also study Be(11 bar 20), a very open surface without important surface states. Be(11 bar 20) is the only clean s-p metal surface known to reconstruct (1 x 3 missing row reconstruction)

  19. Beryllium Abundances of Solar-Analog Stars

    Takeda, Yoichi; Honda, Satoshi; Kawanomoto, Satoshi; Ando, Hiroyasu; Sakurai, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    An extensive beryllium abundance analysis was conducted for 118 solar analogs (along with 87 FGK standard stars) by applying the spectrum synthesis technique to the near-UV region comprising the Be II line at 3131.066 A, in an attempt to investigate whether Be suffers any depletion such as the case of Li showing a large diversity. We found that, while most of these Sun-like stars are superficially similar in terms of their A(Be) (Be abundances) around the solar value within ~ +/- 0.2dex, 4 out of 118 samples turned out strikingly Be-deficient (by more than ~2 dex) and these 4 stars belong to the group of lowest v_e sin i (projected rotation velocity). Moreover, even for the other majority showing an apparent similarity in Be, we can recognize a tendency that A(Be) gradually increases with an increase in v_e sin i. These observational facts suggest that any solar analog star (including the Sun) generally suffers some kind of Be depletion during their lives, where the rotational velocity (or the angular momentu...

  20. Interaction of beryllium and hydrogen isotopes

    It has been considered that in the plasma nuclear fusion experimental devices of magnetic field confinement type, in order to reduce the energy loss due to bremsstrahlung, the use of the plasma-facing materials (PFM) of low atomic number like carbon is indispensable at present. Attention is paid to beryllium which is one of the PFMs, and its effectiveness was rocognized by the practical use in JET. When Be is considered as a PFM, it is necessary to accumulate many data on the diffusion, dissolution, permeation and surface recoupling of hydrogen isotopes, which regulate the recycling and inventory of deuterium and tritium fuel, and the relation of these factors with the physical and chemical states of Be. In this research, as the first phase of understanding the characteristics of Be as a PFM, the change of the surface condition by heating Be was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the chemical form of the Be-related substances emitted from the surface by argon or deuterium ion sputtering and their thermal behavior were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The sample, the measurement and the results are reported. The diversified secondary ions of Be, Be cluster, Be oxide, hydroxide, hydride and deuteride were observed by the measurement, and their features are shown. (K.I.)

  1. Electronic band structure of beryllium oxide

    Sashin, V A; Kheifets, A S; Ford, M J

    2003-01-01

    The energy-momentum resolved valence band structure of beryllium oxide has been measured by electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS). Band dispersions, bandwidths and intervalence bandgap, electron momentum density (EMD) and density of occupied states have been extracted from the EMS data. The experimental results are compared with band structure calculations performed within the full potential linear muffin-tin orbital approximation. Our experimental bandwidths of 2.1 +- 0.2 and 4.8 +- 0.3 eV for the oxygen s and p bands, respectively, are in accord with theoretical predictions, as is the s-band EMD after background subtraction. Contrary to the calculations, however, the measured p-band EMD shows large intensity at the GAMMA point. The measured full valence bandwidth of 19.4 +- 0.3 eV is at least 1.4 eV larger than the theory. The experiment also finds a significantly higher value for the p-to-s-band EMD ratio in a broad momentum range compared to the theory.

  2. Development of Interatomic Potentials for Beryllium

    Full text of publication follows: To be able to benefit from fusion as a clean and safe power source, we need a comprehensive understanding of the dynamic region of a fusion reactor. Knowing the interplay between the fuel plasma and the reactor components, such as the first wall and the divertor, one can minimize the resulting degradation. The atom-level mechanisms behind the reactions, (e.g. erosion and redeposition) are, however, not accessible to experiments. Hence, computational methods, including molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, are needed. The interactions in a system of particles are within MD described by an interatomic potential. The study of reactor processes requires models for the mixed interaction between the first wall and divertor materials beryllium, carbon and tungsten, as well as for the interaction of these with hydrogen. The absence of proper models for the Be system motivated us to develop potentials for pure Be, Be-C, Be-W and Be-H. We present a Tersoff-like bond order potential for pure Be and the same formalism applied to Be-C and Be-H. The performance of the potentials is discussed and an outlook for the remaining potential is also given. (authors)

  3. Lightweight beryllium wins wings as real heavyweight

    Development of Be materials with improved strength and ductility levels is possible by exploitation of new consolidation techniques, such as cold and hot isostatic pressing and plasma spraying followed by sintering. Working the vacuum hot pressed billet by cross-rolling or extruding and by forging improves the mechanical properties. The valuable contributions of Be in aerospace and nuclear applications are considered. SNAP-8 and SNAP-10A applications, replacement of an Al alloy on the Minuteman spacer ring by Be, aircraft (flight testing of F-4 Phantom with a Be rudder and actual structural application of Be wrought mill product in F-14 Tomcat) and communication satellite (despin platforms, spinning arms, russ structures) applications are discussed together with instrument applications (guidance systems for Saturn V, Minuteman and the Boeing 747, proportional counters for space-oriented x-ray experiments), Be applications in lunar explorations, expanding use of Be in space applications as a mirror blank material and Be disks for the brakes of giant aircraft. Beryllium has the highest specific heat of all structural metals and it shows chemical inertness to many of the common ocket propellants and their combustion products. Its handicaps are high cost and poor impact behavior. (U.S.)

  4. Steam-chemical reactivity for irradiated beryllium

    Anderl, R.A.; McCarthy, K.A.; Oates, M.A.; Petti, D.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Smolik, G.R. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental investigation to determine the influence of neutron irradiation effects and annealing on the chemical reactivity of beryllium exposed to steam. The work entailed measurements of the H{sub 2} generation rates for unirradiated and irradiated Be and for irradiated Be that had been previously annealed at different temperatures ranging from 450degC to 1200degC. H{sub 2} generation rates were similar for irradiated and unirradiated Be in steam-chemical reactivity experiments at temperatures between 450degC and 600degC. For irradiated Be exposed to steam at 700degC, the chemical reactivity accelerated rapidly and the specimen experienced a temperature excursion. Enhanced chemical reactivity at temperatures between 400degC and 600degC was observed for irradiated Be annealed at temperatures of 700degC and higher. This reactivity enhancement could be accounted for by the increased specific surface area resulting from development of a surface-connected porosity in the irradiated-annealed Be. (author)

  5. Beryllium abundances in stars hosting giant planets

    Santos, N C; Israelian, G; Mayor, M; Rebolo, R; García-Gíl, A; Pérez de Taoro, M R; Randich, S

    2002-01-01

    We have derived beryllium abundances in a wide sample of stars hosting planets, with spectral types in the range F7V-K0V, aimed at studying in detail the effects of the presence of planets on the structure and evolution of the associated stars. Predictions from current models are compared with the derived abundances and suggestions are provided to explain the observed inconsistencies. We show that while still not clear, the results suggest that theoretical models may have to be revised for stars with Teff<5500K. On the other hand, a comparison between planet host and non-planet host stars shows no clear difference between both populations. Although preliminary, this result favors a ``primordial'' origin for the metallicity ``excess'' observed for the planetary host stars. Under this assumption, i.e. that there would be no differences between stars with and without giant planets, the light element depletion pattern of our sample of stars may also be used to further investigate and constraint Li and Be deple...

  6. Hierarchical bismuth phosphate microspheres with high photocatalytic performance

    Pei, Lizhai; Wei, Tian; Lin, Nan; Yu, Haiyun [Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan (China). Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province

    2016-05-15

    Hierarchical bismuth phosphate microspheres have been prepared by a simple hydrothermal process with polyvinyl pyrrolidone. Scanning electron microscopy observations show that the hierarchical bismuth phosphate microspheres consist of nanosheets with a thickness of about 30 nm. The diameter of the microspheres is about 1 - 3 μm. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the microspheres are comprised of triclinic Bi{sub 23}P{sub 4}O{sub 44.5} phase. The formation of the hierarchical microspheres depends on polyvinyl pyrrolidone concentration, hydrothermal temperature and reaction time. Gentian violet acts as the pollutant model for investigating the photocatalytic activity of the hierarchical bismuth phosphate microspheres under ultraviolet-visible light irradiation. Irradiation time, dosage of the hierarchical microspheres and initial gentian violet concentration on the photocatalytic efficiency are also discussed. The hierarchical bismuth phosphate microspheres show good photocatalytic performance for gentian violet removal in aqueous solution.

  7. Intra-arterial injection of radioactive microspheres in neoplasm treatment

    A laboratory methods to obtain microspheres with 90Y was developed. In the experiment on animals a possibility of the microspheres application for intraarterial injection for radiation treatment of highly vascularized neoplasms was shown

  8. Micropositioning of microsphere resonators on planar optical waveguides

    Murugan, Ganapathy Senthil; Panitchob, Yuwapat; Tull, Elizabeth J.; Bartlett, Philip N.; Wilkinson, James S.

    2006-01-01

    Topographical structures to position microsphere resonators accurately upon planar optical waveguides have been designed and fabricated. The methods being employed to assemble the microspheres on the patterned planar waveguides are discussed.

  9. A Report on the Validation of Beryllium Strength Models

    Armstrong, Derek Elswick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-05

    This report discusses work on validating beryllium strength models with flyer plate and Taylor rod experimental data. Strength models are calibrated with Hopkinson bar and quasi-static data. The Hopkinson bar data for beryllium provides strain rates up to about 4000 per second. A limitation of the Hopkinson bar data for beryllium is that it only provides information on strain up to about 0.15. The lack of high strain data at high strain rates makes it difficult to distinguish between various strength model settings. The PTW model has been calibrated many different times over the last 12 years. The lack of high strain data for high strain rates has resulted in these calibrated PTW models for beryllium exhibiting significantly different behavior when extrapolated to high strain. For beryllium, the α parameter of PTW has recently been calibrated to high precision shear modulus data. In the past the α value for beryllium was set based on expert judgment. The new α value for beryllium was used in a calibration of the beryllium PTW model by Sky Sjue. The calibration by Sjue used EOS table information to model the temperature dependence of the heat capacity. Also, the calibration by Sjue used EOS table information to model the density changes of the beryllium sample during the Hopkinson bar and quasi-static experiments. In this paper, the calibrated PTW model by Sjue is compared against experimental data and other strength models. The other strength models being considered are a PTW model calibrated by Shuh- Rong Chen and a Steinberg-Guinan type model by John Pedicini. The three strength models are used in a comparison against flyer plate and Taylor rod data. The results show that the Chen PTW model provides better agreement to this data. The Chen PTW model settings have been previously adjusted to provide a better fit to flyer plate data, whereas the Sjue PTW model has not been changed based on flyer plate data. However, the Sjue model provides a reasonable fit to

  10. Erosion of beryllium under ITER – Relevant transient plasma loads

    Kupriyanov, I.B., E-mail: igkupr@gmail.com [A.A. Bochvar High Technology Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Rogova St. 5a, 123060 Moscow (Russian Federation); Nikolaev, G.N.; Kurbatova, L.A.; Porezanov, N.P. [A.A. Bochvar High Technology Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Rogova St. 5a, 123060 Moscow (Russian Federation); Podkovyrov, V.L.; Muzichenko, A.D.; Zhitlukhin, A.M. [TRINITI, Troitsk, Moscow reg. (Russian Federation); Gervash, A.A. [Efremov Research Institute, S-Peterburg (Russian Federation); Safronov, V.M. [Project Center of ITER, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We study the erosion, mass loss/gain and surface structure evolution of Be/CuCrZr mock-ups, armored with beryllium of TGP-56FW grade after irradiation by deuterium plasma heat load of 0.5 MJ/m{sup 2} at 250 °C and 500 °C. • Beryllium mass loss/erosion under plasma heat load at 250 °C is rather small (no more than 0.2 g/m{sup 2} shot and 0.11 μm/shot, correspondingly, after 40 shots) and tends to decrease with increasing number of shots. • Beryllium mass loss/erosion under plasma heat load at 500 °C is much higher (∼2.3 g/m{sup 2} shot and 1.2 μm/shot, correspondingly, after 10 shot) and tends to decrease with increasing the number of shots (∼0.26 g/m{sup 2} pulse and 0.14 μm/shot, correspondingly, after 100 shot). • Beryllium erosion value derived from the measurements of profile of irradiated surface is much higher than erosion value derived from mass loss data. - Abstract: Beryllium will be used as a armor material for the ITER first wall. It is expected that erosion of beryllium under transient plasma loads such as the edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions will mainly determine a lifetime of the ITER first wall. This paper presents the results of recent experiments with the Russian beryllium of TGP-56FW ITER grade on QSPA-Be plasma gun facility. The Be/CuCrZr mock-ups were exposed to up to 100 shots by deuterium plasma streams (5 cm in diameter) with pulse duration of 0.5 ms and heat loads range of 0.2–0.5 MJ/m{sup 2} at different temperature of beryllium tiles. The temperature of Be tiles has been maintained about 250 and 500 °C during the experiments. After 10, 40 and 100 shots, the beryllium mass loss/gain under erosion process were investigated as well as evolution of surface microstructure and cracks morphology.

  11. Albumin microspheres as carriers for the antiarthritic drug celecoxib

    Thakkar, Hetal; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Mishra, Anil Kumar; Chuttani, Krishna; Murthy, Rayasa Ramchandra

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigates the preparation of celecoxib-loaded albumin microspheres and the biodistribution of technetium-99m (99mTc)-labeled celecoxib as well as its microspheres after intravenous administration. Microspheres were prepared using a natural polymer BSA using emulsification chemical cross-linking method. The prepared microspheres were characterized for entrapment efficiency, particle size, and in vitro drug release. Surface morphology was studied by scanning electron micros...

  12. Fluorescent Microspheres as Point Sources: A Localization Study

    Chao, Jerry; Lee, Taiyoon; Ward, E Sally; Ober, Raimund J.

    2015-01-01

    The localization of fluorescent microspheres is often employed for drift correction and image registration in single molecule microscopy, and is commonly carried out by fitting a point spread function to the image of the given microsphere. The mismatch between the point spread function and the image of the microsphere, however, calls into question the suitability of this localization approach. To investigate this issue, we subject both simulated and experimental microsphere image data to a ma...

  13. Controlling Beryllium Contaminated Material And Equipment For The Building 9201-5 Legacy Material Disposition Project

    Reynolds, T. D.; Easterling, S. D.

    2010-10-01

    This position paper addresses the management of beryllium contamination on legacy waste. The goal of the beryllium management program is to protect human health and the environment by preventing the release of beryllium through controlling surface contamination. Studies have shown by controlling beryllium surface contamination, potential airborne contamination is reduced or eliminated. Although there are areas in Building 9201-5 that are contaminated with radioactive materials and mercury, only beryllium contamination is addressed in this management plan. The overall goal of this initiative is the compliant packaging and disposal of beryllium waste from the 9201-5 Legacy Material Removal (LMR) Project to ensure that beryllium surface contamination and any potential airborne release of beryllium is controlled to levels as low as practicable in accordance with 10 CFR 850.25.

  14. Validation of cleaning method for various parts fabricated at a Beryllium facility

    Davis, Cynthia M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-15

    This study evaluated and documented a cleaning process that is used to clean parts that are fabricated at a beryllium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The purpose of evaluating this cleaning process was to validate and approve it for future use to assure beryllium surface levels are below the Department of Energy’s release limits without the need to sample all parts leaving the facility. Inhaling or coming in contact with beryllium can cause an immune response that can result in an individual becoming sensitized to beryllium, which can then lead to a disease of the lungs called chronic beryllium disease, and possibly lung cancer. Thirty aluminum and thirty stainless steel parts were fabricated on a lathe in the beryllium facility, as well as thirty-two beryllium parts, for the purpose of testing a parts cleaning method that involved the use of ultrasonic cleaners. A cleaning method was created, documented, validated, and approved, to reduce beryllium contamination.

  15. Beryllium processing technology review for applications in plasma-facing components

    Materials research and development activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), i.e., the next generation fusion reactor, are investigating beryllium as the first-wall containment material for the reactor. Important in the selection of beryllium is the ability to process, fabricate and repair beryllium first-wall components using existing technologies. Two issues that will need to be addressed during the engineering design activity will be the bonding of beryllium tiles in high-heat-flux areas of the reactor, and the in situ repair of damaged beryllium tiles. The following review summarizes the current technology associated with welding and joining of beryllium to itself and other materials, and the state-of-the-art in plasma-spray technology as an in situ repair technique for damaged beryllium tiles. In addition, a review of the current status of beryllium technology in the former Soviet Union is also included

  16. The structure, properties and performance of plasma-sprayed beryllium for fusion applications

    Plasma-spray technology is under investigation as a method for producing high thermal conductivity beryllium coatings for use in magnetic fusion applications. Recent investigations have focused on optimizing the plasma-spray process for depositing beryllium coatings on damaged beryllium surfaces. Of particular interest has been optimizing the processing parameters to maximize the through-thickness thermal conductivity of the beryllium coatings. Experimental results will be reported on the use of secondary H2 gas additions to improve the melting of the beryllium powder and transferred-arc cleaning to improve the bonding between the beryllium coatings and the underlying surface. Information will also be presented on thermal fatigue tests which were done on beryllium coated ISX-B beryllium limiter tiles using 10 sec cycle times with 60 sec cooldowns and an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) relevant divertor heat flux slightly in excess of 5 MW/m2

  17. Beryllium processing technology review for applications in plasma-facing components

    Castro, R.G.; Jacobson, L.A.; Stanek, P.W.

    1993-07-01

    Materials research and development activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), i.e., the next generation fusion reactor, are investigating beryllium as the first-wall containment material for the reactor. Important in the selection of beryllium is the ability to process, fabricate and repair beryllium first-wall components using existing technologies. Two issues that will need to be addressed during the engineering design activity will be the bonding of beryllium tiles in high-heat-flux areas of the reactor, and the in situ repair of damaged beryllium tiles. The following review summarizes the current technology associated with welding and joining of beryllium to itself and other materials, and the state-of-the-art in plasma-spray technology as an in situ repair technique for damaged beryllium tiles. In addition, a review of the current status of beryllium technology in the former Soviet Union is also included.

  18. The results of medical surveillance of beryllium production personnel

    The report presents results of surveillance of 1836 workers of beryllium production of Ulba Metallurgical Plant JSC with the acute and chronic forms of occupation diseases for 52 years of its operation. The dependence of acute and chronic occupation lesions on the protection degree is shown. It has been found out that, the risk of getting an occupation disease increases sharply at the moments of experimental works and at the time of reconstruction and some other extreme conditions in the production, that is supported by fixed lesions of eye mucous coat, skin and lung lesions. In this case, the readiness of people for their work in deleterious conditions and their personal responsibility for following the regulations of safety occupational standards plays a definite role. Therefore, the issues of protection are of paramount importance in prophylaxis both of acute and chronic exposure to beryllium. An influence of duration of service and occupation on chronic beryllium diseases is shown. A parallel between the lung beryllium disease and skin lesions by insoluble beryllium compounds is drawn for the first time. (author)

  19. Preparation of copper-beryllium alloys from Indian beryl

    The report presents the results of laboratory scale investigations on the preparation of copper-beryllium and aluminium-beryllium master alloys starting from Indian beryl and adopting the fluoride process. The flow-sheet involves : (1) conversion of the Be-values in beryl into water soluble sodium beryllium fluoride (2) preparation of beryllium hydroxide by alkali treatment of aqueous Na2BeF4 (3) conversion of Be(OH)2 to (NH4)2BeF4 by treatment with NH4HF2 (4) thermal decomposition of (NH4)2BeF4 to BeF2 and (5) magnesium reduction of BeF2 (with the addition of copper/aluminium) to obtain beryllium alloys. The method has been successfully employed for the preparation of Cu-Be master alloys containing about 8% Be and free of Mg on a 200 gm scale. An overall Be-recovery of about 80% has been achieved. Al-8% Be master alloys have also been prepared by this method. Toxicity and health hazards associated with Be are discussed and the steps taken to ensure safe handling of Be are described. (author)

  20. Preparation of Beryllium Targets by Vacuum Evaporation

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus is shown in Fig.1, which is mounted within a conventional metal bell jar 45 cm in diameter and 70 cm high. The boat source could be seen through the windows of the appratus and the bell jar.There was no straight-line exit from the apparatus to the interor of the bell jar for Be vapor originating at the boat.Tantalum boat, 13 mm wide, 28 mm long, and 0.1 mm thick, was used as evaporation source. The distance from the boat to the substrate was 15 cm. Microscope glass slide coated with betaine as substrate.The Be foils produced by resistance heating were removed from the glass by dissolving the

  1. Preparation of microstructured hydroxyapatite microspheres using oil in water emulsions

    T S Pradeesh; M C Sunny; H K Varma; P Ramesh

    2005-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) microspheres with peculiar spheres-in-sphere morphology were prepared by using oil-in-water emulsions and solvent evaporation technique. Ethylene vinyl acetate co-polymer (EVA) was used as the binder material. Preparation of HAP/EVA microspheres was followed by the thermal debinding and sintering at 1150°C for 3 h to obtain HAP microspheres. Each microsphere of 100–1000 m was in turn composed of spherical hydroxyapatite granules of 2–15 m size which were obtained by spray drying the precipitated HAP. The parameters such as percentage of initial HAP loading, type of stabilizer, concentration of stabilizer, stirring speed and temperature of microsphere preparation were varied to study their effect on the particle size and geometry of the microspheres obtained. It was observed that these parameters do have an effect on the size and shape of the microspheres obtained, which in turn will affect the sintered HAP microstructure. Of the three stabilizers used viz. polyoxyethylene(20) sorbitan monopalmitate (Tween-40), sodium laurate and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), only PVA with a concentration not less than 0.1 wt% showed controlled stabilization of HAP granules resulting in spherical microspheres of required size. Morphologically better spherical microspheres were obtained at 20°C. Increasing the stirring speed produced smaller microspheres. Smaller microspheres having size < 50 m were obtained at a stirring speed of 1500 ± 50 rpm. A gradual decrease in pore size was observed in the sintered microspheres with increase in HAP loading.

  2. Preparation of polymer microspheres by radiation-induced polymerization

    Cross-liking monomer, diethylene glycol dimethacrylate gives microspheres from organic solution by radiation-induced polymerization. /One of the remarkable result is that the number of the microspheres is not changing during the polymerization. Ethyl methacrylate, maleic anhydride, styrene and acrylamide are used as comonomers. These comonomers give the microspheres in the range of 0 to 0.4 as mol fractions. (author)

  3. Report of a technical evaluation panel on the use of beryllium for ITER plasma facing material and blanket breeder material

    Beryllium because of its low atomic number and high thermal conductivity, is a candidate for both ITER first wall and divertor surfaces. This study addresses the following: why beryllium; design requirements for the ITER divertor; beryllium supply and unirradiated physical/mechanical property database; effects of irradiation on beryllium properties; tritium issues; beryllium health and safety; beryllium-coolant interactions and safety; thermal and mechanical tests; plasma erosion of beryllium; recommended beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components; proposed manufacturing methods to produce beryllium parts for ITER; emerging beryllium materials; proposed inspection and maintenance techniques for beryllium components and coatings; time table and costs; and the importance of integrating materials and manufacturing personnel with designers

  4. Report of a technical evaluation panel on the use of beryllium for ITER plasma facing material and blanket breeder material

    Ulrickson, M.A. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Manly, W.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Beryllium because of its low atomic number and high thermal conductivity, is a candidate for both ITER first wall and divertor surfaces. This study addresses the following: why beryllium; design requirements for the ITER divertor; beryllium supply and unirradiated physical/mechanical property database; effects of irradiation on beryllium properties; tritium issues; beryllium health and safety; beryllium-coolant interactions and safety; thermal and mechanical tests; plasma erosion of beryllium; recommended beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components; proposed manufacturing methods to produce beryllium parts for ITER; emerging beryllium materials; proposed inspection and maintenance techniques for beryllium components and coatings; time table and costs; and the importance of integrating materials and manufacturing personnel with designers.

  5. Experimental studies and modeling of processes of hydrogen isotopes interaction with beryllium

    Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Chikhray, Y.V.; Romanenko, O.G.; Klepikov, A.Kh.; Shestakov, V.P.; Kulsartov, T.V. [Science Research Inst. of Experimental and Theoretical Physics of Kazakh State Univ., Almaty (Kazakhstan); Kenzhin, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this work was to clarify the surface beryllium oxide influence on hydrogen-beryllium interaction characteristics. Analysis of experimental data and modeling of processes of hydrogen isotopes accumulation, diffusion and release from neutron irradiated beryllium was used to achieve this purpose as well as the investigations of the changes of beryllium surface element composition being treated by H{sup +} and Ar{sup +} plasma glowing discharge. (author)

  6. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's beryllium control program for high-explosive test firing bunkers and tables

    This report on the control program to minimize beryllium levels in Laboratory workplaces includes an outline of beryllium surface, soil, and air levels and an 11-y summary of sampling results from two high-use, high-explosive test firing bunkers. These sampling data and other studies demonstrate that the beryllium control program is functioning effectively

  7. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry.

  8. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems.

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry. PMID:26871188

  9. Estimation of beryllium ground state energy by Monte Carlo simulation

    Quantum Monte Carlo method represent a powerful and broadly applicable computational tool for finding very accurate solution of the stationary Schrödinger equation for atoms, molecules, solids and a variety of model systems. Using variational Monte Carlo method we have calculated the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom. Our calculation are based on using a modified four parameters trial wave function which leads to good result comparing with the few parameters trial wave functions presented before. Based on random Numbers we can generate a large sample of electron locations to estimate the ground state energy of Beryllium. Our calculation gives good estimation for the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom comparing with the corresponding exact data

  10. Ab Initio Simulation Beryllium in Solid Molecular Hydrogen: Elastic Constant

    Guerrero, Carlo L.; Perlado, Jose M.

    2016-03-01

    In systems of inertial confinement fusion targets Deuterium-Tritium are manufactured with a solid layer, it must have specific properties to increase the efficiency of ignition. Currently there have been some proposals to model the phases of hydrogen isotopes and hence their high pressure, but these works do not allow explaining some of the structures present at the solid phase change effect of increased pressure. By means of simulation with first principles methods and Quantum Molecular Dynamics, we compare the structural difference of solid molecular hydrogen pure and solid molecular hydrogen with beryllium, watching beryllium inclusion in solid hydrogen matrix, we obtain several differences in mechanical properties, in particular elastic constants. For C11 the difference between hydrogen and hydrogen with beryllium is 37.56%. This may produce a non-uniform initial compression and decreased efficiency of ignition.

  11. Measurement of the ultracold neutron loss coefficient in beryllium powder

    The ultracold neutron (UCN) reflection from beryllium powder at different slab thicknesses and different packing densities is measured. The reduced UCN loss coefficient η=(1.75±0.35)x10-4 for thermally untreated beryllium is extracted from experimental data. The formerly obtained experimental results on UCN reflection from beryllium after high temperature annealing are reconsidered. The loss coefficient η at room temperature in this case is obtained to be (6.4±2.5)x10-5, which is an order of magnitude higher than the theoretical one. The extraction of the loss coefficient from the experimental data is based on the modified diffusion theory where albedo reflection depends on packing density

  12. Estimation of beryllium ground state energy by Monte Carlo simulation

    Kabir, K. M. Ariful [Department of Physical Sciences, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Independent University, Bangladesh (IUB) Dhaka (Bangladesh); Halder, Amal [Department of Mathematics, University of Dhaka Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2015-05-15

    Quantum Monte Carlo method represent a powerful and broadly applicable computational tool for finding very accurate solution of the stationary Schrödinger equation for atoms, molecules, solids and a variety of model systems. Using variational Monte Carlo method we have calculated the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom. Our calculation are based on using a modified four parameters trial wave function which leads to good result comparing with the few parameters trial wave functions presented before. Based on random Numbers we can generate a large sample of electron locations to estimate the ground state energy of Beryllium. Our calculation gives good estimation for the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom comparing with the corresponding exact data.

  13. Elemental composition in sealed plutonium–beryllium neutron sources

    Five sealed plutonium–beryllium (PuBe) neutron sources from various manufacturers were disassembled. Destructive chemical analyses for recovered PuBe materials were conducted for disposition purposes. A dissolution method for PuBe alloys was developed for quantitative plutonium (Pu) and beryllium (Be) assay. Quantitation of Be and trace elements was performed using plasma based spectroscopic instruments, namely inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Pu assay was accomplished by an electrochemical method. Variations in trace elemental contents among the five PuBe sources are discussed. - Highlights: • A destructive chemical analysis of the PuBe neutron sources includes the solubilization and digestion of the PuBe alloy material. • Plutonium was assayed by an electrochemical method. • Beryllium assay and trace elemental contents were determined by ICP instruments. • A large variation in trace elemental composition was observed among the five PuBe source materials

  14. Extraction of beryllium sulfate by a long chain amine

    The extraction of sulfuric acid in aqueous solution by a primary amine in benzene solution, 3-9 (diethyl) - 6-amino tri-decane (D.E.T. ) - i.e., with American nomenclature 1-3 (ethyl-pentyl) - 4-ethyl-octyl amine (E.P.O.) - has made it possible to calculate the formation constants of alkyl-ammonium sulfate and acid sulfate. The formula of the beryllium and alkyl-ammonium sulfate complex formed in benzene has next been determined, for various initial acidity of the aqueous solution. Lastly, evidence has been given of negatively charged complexes of beryllium and sulfate in aqueous solution, through the dependence of the aqueous sulfate ions concentration upon beryllium extraction. The formation constant of these anionic complexes has been evaluated. (author)

  15. Photochemical Behavior of Beryllium Complexes with Subporphyrazines and Subphthalocyanines.

    Montero-Campillo, M Merced; Lamsabhi, Al Mokhtar; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel

    2016-07-14

    Structures of beryllium subphthalocyanines and beryllium subporphyrazines complexes with different substituents are explored for the first time. Their photochemical properties are studied using time-dependent density functional theory calculations and compared to boron-related compounds for which their photochemical activity is already known. These beryllium compounds were found to be thermodynamically stable in a vacuum and present features similar to those of boron-containing analogues, although the nature of bonding between the cation and the macrocycle presents subtle differences. Most important contributions to the main peak in the Q-band region arise from HOMO to LUMO transitions in the case of subphthalocyanines and alkyl subporphyrazine complexes, whereas a mixture of that contribution and a HOMO-2 to LUMO contribution are present in the case of thioalkyl subporphyrazines. The absorption in the visible region could make these candidates suitable for photochemical devices if combined with appropriate donor groups. PMID:26812068

  16. Beryllium Abundances in Solar Mass Stars

    Krugler, J. A.; Boesgaard, A. M.

    2008-08-01

    Light element abundance analysis allows for a deeper understanding of the chemical composition of a star beneath its surface. Beryllium provides a probe down to 3.5×106 K, where it fuses with protons. In this study, Be abundances were determined for 52 F and G dwarfs selected from a sample of local thin disc stars. These stars were selected by mass to range from 0.9 to 1.1 M⊙. They have effective temperatures from 5600 to 6400 K, and their metallicities [Fe/H]=-0.65 to +0.11. The data were taken with the Keck HIRES instrument and the Gecko spectrograph on the Canada France Hawaii Telescope. The abundances were calculated via spectral synthesis and were analyzed to investigate the Be abundance as a function of age, temperature, metallicity, and its relation to the lithium abundance for this narrow mass range. Be is found to decrease linearly with metallicity down to [Fe/H]˜-4.0 with slope 0.86 ± 0.02. The relation of the Be abundance to effective temperature is dependent upon metallicity, but when metallicity effects are taken into account, there is a spread ˜1.2 dex. We find a 1.5 dex spread in A(Be) when plotted against age, with the largest spread occurring from 6-8 Gyr. The relation with Li is found to be linear with slope 0.36 ± 0.06 for the temperature regime of 5900-6300 K.

  17. Neutron irradiation behavior of ITER candidate beryllium grades

    Kupriyanov, I.B.; Gorokhov, V.A.; Nikolaev, G.N. [A.A.Bochvar All-Russia Scientific Research Inst. of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), Moscow (Russian Federation); Melder, R.R.; Ostrovsky, Z.E.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium is one of the main candidate materials both for the neutron multiplier in a solid breeding blanket and for the plasma facing components. That is why its behaviour under the typical for fusion reactor loading, in particular, under the neutron irradiation is of a great importance. This paper presents mechanical properties, swelling and microstructure of six beryllium grades (DshG-200, TR-30, TshG-56, TRR, TE-30, TIP-30) fabricated by VNIINM, Russia and also one - (S-65) fabricated by Brush Wellman, USA. The average grain size of the beryllium grades varied from 8 to 25 {mu}m, beryllium oxide content was 0.8-3.2 wt. %, initial tensile strength was 250-680 MPa. All the samples were irradiated in active zone of SM-3 reactor up to the fast neutron fluence (5.5-6.2) {center_dot} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} (2.7-3.0 dpa, helium content up to 1150 appm), E > 0.1 MeV at two temperature ranges: T{sub 1} = 130-180degC and T{sub 2} = 650-700degC. After irradiation at 130-180degC no changes in samples dimensions were revealed. After irradiation at 650-700degC swelling of the materials was found to be in the range 0.1-2.1 %. Beryllium grades TR-30 and TRR, having the smallest grain size and highest beryllium oxide content, demonstrated minimal swelling, which was no more than 0.1 % at 650-700degC and fluence 5.5 {center_dot} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. Tensile and compression test results and microstructure parameters measured before and after irradiation are also presented. (author)

  18. CHAPTER 7. BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS BY NON-PLASMA BASED METHODS

    Ekechukwu, A

    2009-04-20

    The most common method of analysis for beryllium is inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). This method, along with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), is discussed in Chapter 6. However, other methods exist and have been used for different applications. These methods include spectroscopic, chromatographic, colorimetric, and electrochemical. This chapter provides an overview of beryllium analysis methods other than plasma spectrometry (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry or mass spectrometry). The basic methods, detection limits and interferences are described. Specific applications from the literature are also presented.

  19. The uses and adverse effects of beryllium on health

    Cooper, Ross G.; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2009-01-01

    the current review for selecting articles were adopted from proposed criteria in The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. Articles were classified based on acute and chronic exposure and toxicity of beryllium. Results: The proportions of utilized and nonutilized...... articles were published in sources unobtainable through requests at the British Library, and some had no impact factor and were excluded. Conclusion: Beryllium has some useful but undoubtedly harmful effects on health and well-being. Measures needed to be taken to prevent hazardous exposure to this element...

  20. Method for removal of beryllium contamination from an article

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Hollenbeck, Scott M.

    2012-12-25

    A method of removal of beryllium contamination from an article is disclosed. The method typically involves dissolving polyisobutylene in a solvent such as hexane to form a tackifier solution, soaking the substrate in the tackifier to produce a preform, and then drying the preform to produce the cleaning medium. The cleaning media are typically used dry, without any liquid cleaning agent to rub the surface of the article and remove the beryllium contamination below a non-detect level. In some embodiments no detectible residue is transferred from the cleaning wipe to the article as a result of the cleaning process.

  1. Radiation Damage of Beryllium Reflector for Research Reactor Application

    Kang, Suk Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Beryllium is considered as a reflector material for the research reactor. The neutron fluence results in significant damage of material structure and corresponding degradation of physical.mechanical properties. In this study, the proton radiation damage of the beryllium grade manufactured by hot extrusion was investigated to emulate the effect of neutron radiation. The samples were irradiated by protons at room temperature; the acceleration voltage, and the proton amounts were 120keV, and 2.0 Χ 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The neutron irradiation experiment also have been conducted in HANARO, their results will be discussed in terms of swelling, and microstructure evolution.

  2. Biosensing by WGM Microspherical Resonators

    Righini, Giancarlo C.; Soria, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) microresonators, thanks to their unique properties, have allowed researchers to achieve important results in both fundamental research and engineering applications. Among the various geometries, microspheres are the simplest 3D WGM resonators; the total optical loss in such resonators can be extremely low, and the resulting extraordinarily high Q values of 108–109 lead to high energy density, narrow resonant-wavelength lines and a lengthy cavity ringdown. They can also be coated in order to better control their properties or to increase their functionality. Their very high sensitivity to changes in the surrounding medium has been exploited for several sensing applications: protein adsorption, trace gas detection, impurity detection in liquids, structural health monitoring of composite materials, detection of electric fields, pressure sensing, and so on. In the present paper, after a general introduction to WGM resonators, attention is focused on spherical microresonators, either in bulk or in bubble format, to their fabrication, characterization and functionalization. The state of the art in the area of biosensing is presented, and the perspectives of further developments are discussed. PMID:27322282

  3. Acrolein Microspheres Are Bonded To Large-Area Substrates

    Rembaum, Alan; Yen, Richard C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Reactive cross-linked microspheres produced under influence of ionizing radiation in aqueous solutions of unsaturated aldehydes, such as acrolein, with sodium dodecyl sulfate. Diameters of spheres depend on concentrations of ingredients. If polystyrene, polymethylmethacrylate, or polypropylene object immersed in solution during irradiation, microspheres become attached to surface. Resulting modified surface has grainy coating with reactivity similar to free microspheres. Aldehyde-substituted-functional microspheres react under mild conditions with number of organic reagents and with most proteins. Microsphere-coated macrospheres or films used to immobilize high concentrations of proteins, enzymes, hormones, viruses, cells, and large number of organic compounds. Applications include separation techniques, clinical diagnostic tests, catalytic processes, and battery separators.

  4. Nasal administration of ondansetron using a novel microspheres delivery system.

    Mahajan, Hitendra S; Gattani, Surendra G

    2009-01-01

    Gellan gum microspheres of ondansetron hydrochloride, for intranasal delivery, were prepared to avoid the first pass metabolism as an alternative therapy to parentral, and to improve therapeutic efficiency in treatment of nausea and vomiting. The microspheres were prepared using conventional spray-drying method. The microspheres were evaluated for characteristics like particle size, incorporation efficiency, swelling ability, zeta potential, in-vitro mucoadhesion, thermal analysis, XRD study and in-vitro drug release. Treatment of in-vitro data to different kinetic equations indicated diffusion controlled drug delivery from gellan gum microspheres. The results of DSC and XRD studies revealed molecular amorphous dispersion of ondansetron into the gellan gum microspheres. PMID:19519195

  5. Biologically formed hollow cuprous oxide microspheres

    Hollow cuprous oxide (Cu2O) microspheres with a diameter of ca. 1.8 μm are prepared by using yeast as template. The possible mechanism for the formation of the hollow Cu2O spheres is revealed. The biotemplated sample is investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra. The sample consists of the crystalline Cu2O microspheres with diameters of about 59.5 nm and lattice parameter of 4.264 A. The observed optical band gap of the product indicates that the blue-shift effect occurs, which is attributed to the hollow Cu2O microspheres.

  6. Improving photoprotection: 4-methylbenzylidene camphor microspheres.

    Centini, Marisanna; Miraglia, Giovanna; Quaranta, Valeria; Buonocore, Anna; Anselmi, Cecilia

    2014-05-22

    Abstract We propose a new approach for photoprotection. 4-Methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC), one of the most widely used UV filters, was encapsulated in microspheres, with a view to overcoming problems (percutaneous absorption, photodegradation and lack of lasting effect) arising with organic sunscreens, and to achieve safe photoprotection. We focused on this filter in the light of the Cosmetics Europe opinion concerning its possible effects on the thyroid gland. Microspheres were prepared by emulsification-solvent evaporation, using different amounts of 4-MBC and characterized for morphology, encapsulation efficiency and particle size. The particles were then mixed in O/W emulsions. The in vitro sun protection factors, in vitro release and photostability were investigated and compared with emulsions containing the free sunscreen. The new microspheres offer good morphology and loading (up to 40%), and the same photoprotection as the free filter while at the same time protecting it from photodegradation. The systems also give a slower release from the emulsions. PMID:24854342

  7. Albumin microspheres labeled with Ga-67 by chelation: concise communication

    Albumin microspheres have been synthesized with EDTA and DTPA chelating groups covalently bound to their surface. The microspheres may be labeled with Ga-67 at high yield (97 +- 2%) by transcomplexation from a 0.1 M Ga-67 acetate solution. With EDTA microspheres the resulting label dissociates only slightly after 24 hr in 50% plasma at 370C, whereas with DTPA microspheres the label shows no detectable dissociation over this period. By contrast, microspheres without chelating groups lose their label virtually completely under these conditions. Following intravenous administration of sized Ga-67 DTPA microspheres in mice, about (84 +- 16)% of the activity localizes in the lungs at 5 min, with (60 +- 7)% remaining after 2 h. Since labeling is by chelation, the microspheres may also be tagged with other metallic radionuclides

  8. Preparation of hollow silver microspheres and their characterization

    Hollow silver microspheres have been prepared using modified polystyrene microspheres as hard template. The process of preparation is as follows: polystyrene microspheres with a layer of silver coated on their surface by the chemical planting method were dissolved in tetrahydrofuran, then the hollow silver microspheres were prepared. The properties of silver microspheres were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The optical properties of silver microspheres were studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The inside diameter of silver hollow microspheres is 250 nm, the shell thickness is 15 nm, and the absorption peak of nanoparticles can red-shift from 600 nm to 900 nm at the range of UV-Vis spectra. These routes realize a facile method that tuning of the absorption band of Ag nanostructures within the visible-near-infrared region. (authors)

  9. Variance in multiplex suspension array assays: microsphere size variation impact

    Cheng R Holland

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Luminex suspension microarray assays are in widespread use. There are issues of variability of assay readings using this technology. Methods and results Size variation is demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. Size variations of microspheres are shown to occur in stepwise increments. A strong correspondence between microsphere size distribution and distribution of fluorescent events from assays is shown. An estimate is made of contribution of microsphere size variation to assay variance. Conclusion A probable significant cause of variance in suspended microsphere assay results is variation in microsphere diameter. This can potentially be addressed by changes in the manufacturing process. Provision to users of mean size, median size, skew, the number of standard deviations that half the size range represents (sigma multiple, and standard deviation is recommended. Establishing a higher sigma multiple for microsphere production is likely to deliver a significant improvement in precision of raw instrument readings. Further research is recommended on the molecular architecture of microsphere coatings.

  10. Formulation and evaluation of nasal mucoadhesive microspheres of sumatriptan succinate.

    Jain, Snehal A; Chauk, Dheeraj S; Mahajan, Hitendra S; Tekade, Avinash R; Gattani, Surendra G

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of present research work was to develop mucoadhesive microspheres for nasal delivery with the aim to avoid hepatic first-pass metabolism, improve therapeutic efficacy and enhance residence time. For the treatment of migraine, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) K4M and K15M based microspheres containing sumatriptan succinate (SS) were prepared by spray-drying technique. The microspheres were evaluated with respect to the yield, particle size, incorporation efficiency, swelling property, in vitro mucoadhesion, in vitro drug release, histological study and stability. Microspheres were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction study. It was found that the particle size, swelling ability and incorporation efficiency of microspheres increases with increasing drug-to-polymer ratio. HPMC-based microspheres show adequate mucoadhesion and do not have any destructive effect on nasal mucosa. On the basis of these results, SS microspheres based on HPMC may be considered as a promising nasal delivery system. PMID:19888880

  11. Minimizing acylation of peptides in PLGA microspheres

    Zhang, Ying; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to characterize and find mechanisms to prevent acylation of therapeutic peptides encapsulated in glucose-star poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres. The effect of addition of divalent cation salts CaCl2, MnCl2 as well as carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) on inhibition of acylation of octreotide (Oct), salmon calcitonin (sCT), and human parathyroid hormone (hPTH) was evaluated. Peptide content and integrity inside the degrading microspheres was ...

  12. Quantum Magnetomechanics with Levitating Superconducting Microspheres

    Romero-Isart, O; Navau, C; Sanchez, A; Cirac, J I

    2011-01-01

    We show that by magnetically trapping a superconducting microsphere close to a quantum circuit, it is experimentally feasible to perform ground state cooling and to prepare quantum superpositions of the center-of-mass motion of the microsphere. Due to the absence of clamping losses and time dependent electromagnetic fields, the mechanical motion of micrometer-sized metallic spheres in the Meissner state is predicted to be extremely well isolated from the environment. Hence, we propose to combine the technology of magnetic mictrotraps and superconducting qubits to bring relatively large objects to the quantum regime.

  13. A taper-fused microspherical laser source

    Jonathan M. Ward; Féron, Patrice; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2008-01-01

    We report on the realization of an integrated lasing device consisting of a microsphere optical resonator fused to a tapered optical fiber. A microsphere fabricated from Er: Yb-codoped phosphate glass is heated above its glass transition temperature of 375degC by pumping it at 977 nm with 70 mW via a tapered optical fiber. The onset of thermal stress in the glass at a maximum pumping power results in the sphere melting and fusing to the taper coupler, without inhibition of whispering gallery ...

  14. Polymer-functionalised microspheres for immunosensing applications

    Soria, S.; Baldini, F.; Berneschi, S.; Brenci, M.; Cosi, F.; Giannetti, A.; Nunzi conti, G.; Pelli, S.; Righini, G. C.; Tiribilli, B.

    2010-02-01

    Homogeneous polymeric thin layers have been used as functionalising agents on silica microresonators in view of immunosensing applications. We have characterised the microspheres functionalised with poly-L-lactic acid and Eudragit® L100, as an alternative to the commonly used silanes. It is shown that after polymeric functionalization the quality factor of the silica microspheres remains around 107, and that the Q factor is still about 3x105 after chemical activation and covalent binding of immunogammaglobulin. This functionalising process of the microresonator constitutes a promising step towards the achievement of a highly sensitive immunosensor.

  15. Continuous conversion of U3O8 microspheres into UO2 microspheres using a rotary reduction unit

    The paper describes details of rotary reduction unit and the optimization of conditions used for the conversion of U3O8 microspheres to UO2 microspheres and its subsequent stabilization to UO2+x. The product obtained is suitable for pelletization. Under the optimised conditions, continuous conversion of U3O8 microspheres into soft UO2 microspheres has been achieved with a throughput of ∼1 kg of UO2 microspheres/hour. The continuous conversion operation has overcome the limitations encountered in the batch type reduction and resulted in good quality UO2 product. (author)

  16. Preparation of ratio-therapeutical glass microspheres for curing malignant tumor. Pt.4: The study on properties of glass microspheres

    The density and chemical resistance of medical glass microspheres produced through Sol-Gel process are measured. The results shown that the densities value of there microspheres in small, and the both of them are 2.6 g/cm3 and 2.0 g/cm3 for yttrium-contained and phosphorous-contained microspheres respectively. Beside, chemical resistance of glass microspheres is moderate. The dissolution rates in physiological simulation solution are within the medical permitting limit of nuclide. Therefore the glass microspheres carrying radio-isotope produced through Sol-Gel process can be used for medical in tervenient treatment

  17. Automatic CT-SPECT registration of livers treated with radioactive microspheres

    We have developed an automated technique to accurately register the CT and SPECT scans of the liver of patients treated with radioactive microspheres for tumour targeting assessment. An anthropomorphic phantom was used to validate the accuracy of the registration algorithm. The phantom liver and three fiducial markers placed on its surface were filled with 99mTc. The phantom was scanned with CT and SPECT scanners in different positions. The liver volume was contoured on the CT scans from which a three-dimensional liver mask was created. By constraining the liver volume to the volume obtained from the CT scans, another liver mask was automatically created from the SPECT images. An adaptive simulated annealing algorithm was used to minimize the difference between the two volumes formed by the two sets of masks. The algorithm involved rigid transformation of the SPECT mask to reach the optimization goal. The accuracy of the algorithm was evaluated by the superposition of the fiducial markers on the CT and SPECT. The registered SPECT overlaid on the CT scan of the phantom showed congruence of the fiducial markers on CT and SPECT images within 1 mm. The technique was applied to a patient image set who received the microsphere infusion procedure. The registered CT and SPECT images of the patient showed that the majority of the activity was concentrated in the tumour, indicating a successful tumour targeting. (note)

  18. High Resolutions Obtained by Microspheres, and Phase Contrast Microscope with a Microsphere

    Ben-Aryeh, Y

    2015-01-01

    High resolutions obtained in optical systems with microspheres are studied by Helmholtz equation and boundary conditions for the EM fields. The large lateral spatial wave vectors of the evanescent waves, which include information on the fine structures of the object, are converted at the microsphere surface to smaller spatial wave vectors. Due to reduction in the magnitudes of these spatial wave vectors a part of the EM waves propagate in the microsphere without decay, but preserve the fine structures which can be recovered in the image plane. A new method for measuring phase objects, like those of semi-transparent biological tissues, with high resolutions is described by an optical system composed of a combination of the microsphere with an interferometer.

  19. Status of the beryllium replacement project

    Currently, beryllium (Be) is used as the filler metal for brazing appendages on the sheaths of CANDU® fuel elements. Because of its toxicity, occupational exposure limits for Be are being reduced to very low levels, resulting in significant challenges to CANDU® fuel fabricators. The CANDU® Owners Group (COG) initiated a test program to identify a filler material to replace Be and confirm that the brazed joints meet the established technical requirements for CANDU® fuel. Together with eliminating health risks associated with the use of Be, the industry needs to be assured that continuation of fuel supply remains unaffected and that fuel fabrication processes continue to comply with health and safety standards. A literature survey of studies on brazing and joining of Zircaloy identified potential filler materials that can meet or exceed existing design requirements of the brazed joint, including the required mechanical, microstructural, corrosion resistance, and irradiation properties equivalent to those obtained with Be as braze material. Candidate materials were evaluated against several criteria, including manufacturability, melting point, wettability, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, effect on neutron economy, potential activation products, and interaction with fuel channels and other related disciplines. This exercise resulted in a list of promising candidate materials that were recommended for the first phase of testing. These materials include stainless steel (304 or 316), Al-Si, Ni-P, and Zr-Mn alloys. To allow a CANDU® utility have sufficient confidence in considering implementation of a different braze filler material, a Be Replacement Test Program, involving out-reactor and in-reactor tests, is being undertaken as a collaborative endeavour by the Canadian nuclear industry. The out-reactor tests consist of: a constructability assessment to determine the material’s suitability with current fuel manufacturing methods; evaluation of

  20. Irradiation effects on aluminium and beryllium

    .6%. Besides, due to the effects of embrittlement and swelling induced by irradiation, the HFR beryllium reflector elements had to be replaced after more than 25 years of operation. Operational and practical experiences with these reflector elements are commented, as well as main engineering features of the new reflector elements: upper-end fittings of both filler element and insert in stainless steel, no radially drilled holes and no roll pins

  1. Preparation of Micron-size Functional Fluorescent Microspheres

    WANG Di-qiang; LIU Bai-ling; LI He; HU Jie

    2004-01-01

    As a kind of special functional microspheres, fluorescent polymer microspheres could be used in cell label and separation, blood flow assay, flow cytometer marking, chemical reaction assay,and in analyst of the transform and diffusion of particles in soil 1. However, one of the most important applications of fluorescent microspheres is in the high-throughput screening of drugs (HTS) 2. Through affinity interaction, radioactive ligands (latent drugs) are bound to fluorescent microspheres covered by receptor, and luminescence is produced by radioactivity, so ligands can be assayed and screened.In this study, we developed a technique for preparing micron-size fluorescent microspheres with different functional groups. The methods included the synthesis of micron-size polystyrene microspheres through the dispersion polymerization of styrene in different media such as ethanol,ethanol-water, and isopropanol; the functional polystyrene microspheres were prepared by introduction of functional monomers into the reaction system of styrene; the functional fluorescent microspheres were obtained by the way of dying functional microspheres in the fluorescent material's ethanol solvent.The average diameter of microspheres was in the range of 1~10 μm, and the distribution was normal distribution. The functional groups included -OH, -CHO, -COOH, -CONH2, and SO3H. The absorbing spectrum and exciting spectrum were tested, the results showed that the maximal absorbance of fluorescent microsphere was near 306.5 nm, and its maximal excitation was near 362 nm. The excitation spectrum of fluorescent material (DPO) and fluorescent microspheres were shown in figure 1, and it indicated that the developed fluorescent microspheres showed the same excitation behavior like DPO, which related to the fluorescent microspheres had stable luminescence property.

  2. Preparation of biodegradable porous poly(butylene succinate microspheres

    Pepić Dragana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the optimal conditions for the fabrication of porous microspheres based on poly(butylene succinate, PBS. The biodegradable non-porous PBS microspheres were prepared by the oil-in-water (o/w emulsion solvent evaporation method using poly(vinyl alcohol, PVA, as the surfactant. Fabrication conditions, such as stirring rate, organic/aqueous ratio, PBS concentration and surfactant (PVA concentration, which have an important influence on both the particle size and the morphology of the microspheres, were varied. Scanning electron microscopy, SEM, observations confirmed the size, size distribution and surface morphology of the microspheres. The optimal conditions for the preparation of the non-porous microspheres were found to be: concentration the PBS solution, 10 mass%; PVA concentration, 1 mass%; the organic/ aqueous ratio CHCl3/H2O = 1/20 and stirring rate 800 rpm. Porous PBS microspheres were fabricated under the optimal conditions using various amounts of hexane and poly(ethylene oxide, PEO, as porogens. The influence of the amount of porogen on the pore size and the particle size was investigated using SEM and the apparent density. The microspheres exhibited various porosities and the pore sizes. The average particle size of the microspheres with PEO as the porogen was from 100 to 122μm and that of the microspheres with hexane as the porogen was from 87 to 97μm. The apparent density of the porous microspheres with PEO as the porogen, from 0.16 to 0.23 g/cm3, was much smaller than the non-porous microspheres, 0.40 g/cm3. In the in vitro degradation experiments, the porous microspheres were incubated in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7 at 37°C. After incubating for one month, the microspheres showed significant extent of the hydrolytic degradation of the porous PBS microspheres.

  3. High-contrast X-ray radiography using hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors with 1 mm thick Si sensor as a tool for monitoring liquids in natural building stones

    For the preservation of buildings and other cultural heritage, the application of various conservation products such as consolidants or water repellents is often used. X-ray radiography utilizing semiconductor particle-counting detectors stands out as a promising tool in research of consolidants inside natural building stones. However, a clear visualization of consolidation products is often accomplished by doping with a contrast agent, which presents a limitation. This approach causes a higher attenuation for X-rays, but also alters the penetration ability of the original consolidation product. In this contribution, we focus on the application of Medipix type detectors newly equipped with a 1 mm thick Si sensor. This thicker sensor has enhanced detection efficiency leading to extraordinary sensitivity for monitoring consolidants and liquids in natural building stones even without any contrast agent. Consequently, methods for the direct monitoring of organosilicon consolidants and dynamic visualization of the water uptake in the Opuka stone using high-contrast X-ray radiography are demonstrated. The presented work demonstrates a significant improvement in the monitoring sensitivity of X-ray radiography in stone consolidation studies and also shows advantages of this detector configuration for X-ray radiography in general

  4. AzTEC/ASTE 1.1 mm survey of SSA22: Counterpart identification and photometric redshift survey of submillimeter galaxies

    Umehata, H; Kohno, K; Hatsukade, B; Scott, K S; Kubo, M; Yamada, T; Ivison, R J; Cybulski, R; Aretxaga, I; Austermann, J; Hughes, D H; Ezawa, H; Hayashino, T; Ikarashi, S; Iono, D; Kawabe, R; Matsuda, Y; Matsuo, H; Nakanishi, K; Oshima, T; Perera, T; Takata, T; Wilson, G W; Yun, M S

    2014-01-01

    We present the results from a 1.1 mm imaging survey of the SSA22 field, known for having an overdensity of z=3.1 Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs), taken with the AzTEC camera on the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). We imaged a 950 arcmin$^2$ field down to a 1 sigma sensitivity of 0.7-1.3 mJy/beam to find 125 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) with a signal to noise ratio >= 3.5. Counterpart identification using radio and near/mid-infrared data was performed and one or more counterpart candidates were found for 59 SMGs. Photometric redshifts based on optical to near-infrared images were evaluated for 45 SMGs of these SMGs with Spitzer/IRAC data, and the median value is found to be z=2.4. By combining these estimation with estimates from the literature we determined that 10 SMGs might lie within the large-scale structure at z=3.1. The two-point angular cross-correlation function between LAEs and SMGs indicates that the positions of the SMGs are correlated with the z=3.1 protocluster. These resu...

  5. An AzTEC 1.1-mm Survey for ULIRGs in the field of the Galaxy Cluster MS 0451.6-0305

    Wardlow, J L; Wilson, G W; Yun, M S; Coppin, K E K; Cybulski, R; Geach, J E; Ivison, R J; Aretxaga, I; Austermann, J E; Edge, A C; Fazio, G G; Huang, J; Hughes, D H; Kodama, T; Kang, Y; Kim, S; Mauskopf, P D; Perera, T A; Scott, K S

    2009-01-01

    We have undertaken a deep (sigma~1.1 mJy) 1.1-mm survey of the z=0.54 cluster MS 0451.6-0305 using the AzTEC camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. We detect 36 sources with S/N>3.5 in the central 0.10 deg^2 and present the AzTEC map, catalogue and number counts. We identify counterparts to 18 sources (50%) using radio, mid-infrared, Spitzer IRAC and Submillimeter Array data. Optical, near- and mid-infrared spectral energy distributions are compiled for the 14 of these galaxies with detectable counterparts, which are expected to contain all likely cluster members. We then use photometric redshifts and colour selection to separate background galaxies from potential cluster members and test the reliability of this technique using archival observations of submillimetre galaxies. We find two potential MS 0451-03 members, which, if they are both cluster galaxies have a total star-formation rate (SFR) of ~100 solar masses per year -- a significant fraction of the combined SFR of all the other galaxies in MS 0...

  6. The ALMA Frontier Fields Survey I: 1.1 mm Continuum Detections in Abell 2744, MACSJ0416.1-2403 and MACSJ1149.5+2223

    González-López, J; Romero-Cañizales, C; Kneissl, R; Villard, E; Carvajal, R; Kim, S; Laporte, N; Anguita, T; Aravena, M; Bouwens, R J; Bradley, L; Carrasco, M; Demarco, R; Ford, H; Ibar, E; Infante, L; Messias, H; Arancibia, A M Muñoz; Nagar, N; Padilla, N; Treister, E; Troncoso, P; Zitrin, A

    2016-01-01

    Dusty star-forming galaxies are among the most prodigious systems at high redshift (z>1), characterized by high star formation rates and huge dust reservoirs. The bright end of this population has been well characterized in recent years, but considerable uncertainties remain for fainter dusty star-forming galaxies, which are responsible for the bulk of star formation at high redshift and thus play a key role in galaxy growth and evolution. In this first paper of our series, we describe our methods for finding high redshift faint dusty galaxies using millimeter observations with ALMA. We obtained ALMA 1.1 mm mosaic images for three strong-lensing galaxy clusters from the Frontier Fields survey. The 2'x2' mosaics overlap with the deep HST WFC3/IR footprints and encompass the high magnification regions of each cluster. The combination of extremely high ALMA sensitivity and the magnification power of these clusters allows us to systematically probe the sub-mJy population of dusty star-forming galaxies over a larg...

  7. Tritium release from beryllium discs and lithium ceramics irradiated in the SIBELIUS experiment

    The SIBELIUS experiment was designed to obtain information on the compatibility between beryllium and ceramics, as well as beryllium and steel, in a neutron environment. This experiment comprised irradiation of eight capsules, seven of which were independently purged with a He/0.1% H2 gas mixture. Four capsules were used to examine beryllium/ceramic (Li2O, LiAlO2, Li4SiO4, and Li2ZrO3) and beryllium/steel (Types 316L and 1.4914) compacts. Isothermal anneal experiments have been run on representative beryllium and ceramic disks from each of the four capsules at 550 degrees C to 850 degrees C in steps of 100 degrees C. The results indicate that tritium release from the beryllium did not exhibit burst release behavior, as previously reported, but rather a progressive release with increasing temperature. Generally, ∼99% of the tritium was released by 850 degrees C. Tritium release from the ceramic discs was quite similar to the behavior shown in other dynamic tritium release experiments on lithium ceramics. The tritium content in beryllium discs adjacent to a steel sample was found to be significantly lower than that found in a beryllium disc adjacent to a ceramic sample. Recoil of tritium from the ceramic into the beryllium appears to be the source of tritium entering the beryllium, probably residing in the beryllium oxide layer

  8. Beryllium solubility in occupational airborne particles: Sequential extraction procedure and workplace application.

    Rousset, Davy; Durand, Thibaut

    2016-01-01

    Modification of an existing sequential extraction procedure for inorganic beryllium species in the particulate matter of emissions and in working areas is described. The speciation protocol was adapted to carry out beryllium extraction in closed-face cassette sampler to take wall deposits into account. This four-step sequential extraction procedure aims to separate beryllium salts, metal, and oxides from airborne particles for individual quantification. Characterization of the beryllium species according to their solubility in air samples may provide information relative to toxicity, which is potentially related to the different beryllium chemical forms. Beryllium salts (BeF(2), BeSO(4)), metallic beryllium (Bemet), and beryllium oxide (BeO) were first individually tested, and then tested in mixtures. Cassettes were spiked with these species and recovery rates were calculated. Quantitative analyses with matched matrix were performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Method Detection Limits (MDLs) were calculated for the four matrices used in the different extraction steps. In all cases, the MDL was below 4.2 ng/sample. This method is appropriate for assessing occupational exposure to beryllium as the lowest recommended threshold limit values are 0.01 µg.m(-3) in France([) (1) (]) and 0.05 µg.m(-3) in the USA.([ 2 ]) The protocol was then tested on samples from French factories where occupational beryllium exposure was suspected. Beryllium solubility was variable between factories and among the same workplace between different tasks. PMID:26327570

  9. Comparison of elevated temperature properties of HIP'd impact ground beryllium (S-65-H) and HIP'd gas atomized (GA) beryllium

    Fusion designers have been limited to simple tensile properties and physical properties for modern beryllium grades. The work reported here expands the elevated temperature database to more complicated mechanical tests. The elevated temperature (ambient to 648 C) thermomechanical properties of two beryllium grades made by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) are compared: S-65H (made from impact ground powder) and GA (made from gas atomized powder). Successful measurements of elevated temperature smooth and notched fatigue were made for the first time on modern beryllium grades. Valid beryllium KIC fracture toughness results were obtained for the first time at temperatures above room temperature. Elevated temperature creep, and tensile are also presented. (orig.)

  10. Reducing the cost of S-65C grade beryllium for ITER first wall applications

    Beryllium is the current material of choice for plasma-facing components in ITER. The present design is for 10 mm thick beryllium tiles bonded to an actively cooled copper substrate. Brush Wellman grade S65C beryllium is preferred grade off beryllium for these tiles. S65C has the best resistance to low-cycle thermal fatigue than any other beryllium grad in the world. S65C grade beryllium has been successfully deployed in fusion reactors for more than two decades, most recently in the JET reactor. This paper will detail a supply chain to produce the most cost-effective S65C plasma facing components for ITER. This paper will also propose some future work too demonstrate the best technology for bonding beryllium to copper. (author)

  11. Estimation on tritium production and inventory in beryllium

    Beryllium has been proposed as a candidate material for neutron multiplier on fusion blanket design, tritium will be produced and accumulated in beryllium during neutron irradiation. It is very important to estimate the tritium inventory on blanket design. Tritium production and inventory under 3.0 GW fusion power were calculated for the layered pebble bed blanket, with Li2O breeder and beryllium multiplier. Neutronics calculations were carried out by one-dimensional transport code, ANISN and tritium production was calculated by direct reaction of 9Be(n,T)7Li and two-step reactions of 9Be(n,α)6Li(n,α)T. At the position near first wall, the direct reaction occupied the majority of tritium production. However, at the position of the mid-depth, contribution of the two-step reaction was included the production from neutron slow down by beryllium itself. The ratio accounting for 50% of total tritium production of two-step reaction production over whole blanket for one year full power operation (FPY) was resulted

  12. Beryllium abundances in stars with planets:Extending the sample

    Gálvez-Ortiz, M C; Hernández, J I González; Israelian, G; Santos, N C; Rebolo, R; Ecuvillon, A

    2011-01-01

    Context: Chemical abundances of light elements as beryllium in planet-host stars allow us to study the planet formation scenarios and/or investigate possible surface pollution processes. Aims: We present here an extension of previous beryllium abundance studies. The complete sample consists of 70 stars hosting planets and 30 stars without known planetary companions. The aim of this paper is to further assess the trends found in previous studies with less number of objects. This will provide more information on the processes of depletion and mixing of light elements in the interior of late type stars, and will provide possible explanations for the abundance differences between stars that host planets and "single" stars. Methods: Using high resolution UVES spectra, we measure beryllium abundances of 26 stars that host planets and 1 "single" star mainly using the \\lambda 3131.065 A Be II line, by fitting synthetic spectra to the observational data. We also compile beryllium abundance measurements of 44 stars hos...

  13. Influence of impurities in Beryllium on tritium breeding ratio

    Several neutronics experiments simulating fusion blankets have been conducted with 14 MeV neutron source to assess the reliability of nuclear analysis codes. However, the analyses have not always presented good agreements so far between calculated and measured tritium production rates. One of the reasons was considered as impurities in beryllium which has negligibly small neutron absorption cross section in low energy range. Chemical compositions of beryllium were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) method, and a pulsed neutron decay experiment discovered that the macroscopic neutron absorption cross section for beryllium medium may be about 30% larger than the value calculated by the data specified by manufacturing company. The influence of the impurities on the calculations was studied on the basis of the fusion DEMO-reactor blanket design. As a result of the study, it was made clear that the impurities affect the local tritium production rates when the size of beryllium medium is more than 20-30 mean free paths (30-40 cm) in thickness. In case of some blanket designs that meet the above condition, the effect on tritium breeding ratio may become as large as about 4%. (author)

  14. Thermal cycling tests of actively cooled beryllium copper joints

    Screening tests (steady state heating) and thermal fatigue tests with several kinds of beryllium-copper joints have been performed in an electron beam facility. Joining techniques under investigation were brazing with silver containing and silver-free braze materials, hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and diffusion bonding (hot pressing). Best thermal fatigue performance was found for the brazed samples. (author)

  15. Extraction of lead and beryllium from a firing site soil

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) program is being implemented at LANL to conduct tests for evaluating the stability of the nation's aging nuclear stockpile. In order to reduce impact on the environment, containment of the non-fissile explosives tests is being phased in. The resulting shot debris can contain a mix of depleted uranium, lead, and beryllium. We are developing a treatment scheme to separate the radioactive and RCRA-hazardous components in order to recover the uranium, re-use some materials in future shots, and minimize waste for disposal. Our experience using a proprietary water soluble polymer to extract lead from contaminated soil to below TCLP levels has been extended to a surrogate soil from an open-air firing site that contains both lead and beryllium. Results for lead removal from this soil by dendrimers and molecular chelators will also be shown. Because of the potentially severe inhalation hazard associated with beryllium, the fate of this metal in our treatment scheme has been investigated, as well as extraction of beryllium using a variety of chemical agents

  16. Correlation of acoustic emission and dislocation damping in beryllium

    In a study of the acoustic emission generated in beryllium during tensile deformation, there is substantial evidence showing that the burst rate peak at yield is due to the generation of new dislocations and the burst rate peak at higher strains is due to the breakaway of dislocation line segments from deformation produce pins

  17. Biogeochemistry of beryllium in a forested catchment, Czech Republic

    Navrátil, Tomáš; Skřivan, Petr; Vach, Marek; Filippi, Michal

    Edinburg : University of Edinburg, 2003. s. 94. [International Symposium on Environmental Geochemistry.. 07.09.2003-11.09.2003, Edinburg] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB3013203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Keywords : biogeochemistry * experimental catchment * beryllium Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry

  18. Thermal cycling tests of actively cooled beryllium copper joints

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Linke, J.; Schuster, A.; Wiechers, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    Screening tests (steady state heating) and thermal fatigue tests with several kinds of beryllium-copper joints have been performed in an electron beam facility. Joining techniques under investigation were brazing with silver containing and silver-free braze materials, hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and diffusion bonding (hot pressing). Best thermal fatigue performance was found for the brazed samples. (author)

  19. Beryllium Wipe Sampling (differing methods - differing exposure potentials)

    Kerr, Kent

    2005-03-09

    This research compared three wipe sampling techniques currently used to test for beryllium contamination on room and equipment surfaces in Department of Energy facilities. Efficiencies of removal of beryllium contamination from typical painted surfaces were tested by wipe sampling without a wetting agent, with water-moistened wipe materials, and by methanol-moistened wipes. Analysis indicated that methanol-moistened wipe sampling removed about twice as much beryllium/oil-film surface contamination as water-moistened wipes, which removed about twice as much residue as dry wipes. Criteria at 10 CFR 850.30 and .31 were established on unspecified wipe sampling method(s). The results of this study reveal a need to identify criteria-setting method and equivalency factors. As facilities change wipe sampling methods among the three compared in this study, these results may be useful for approximate correlations. Accurate decontamination decision-making depends on the selection of appropriate wetting agents for the types of residues and surfaces. Evidence for beryllium sensitization via skin exposure argues in favor of wipe sampling with wetting agents that provide enhanced removal efficiency such as methanol when surface contamination includes oil mist residue.

  20. Identification of an abnormal beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test

    The potential hazards from exposure to beryllium or beryllium compounds in the workplace were first reported in the 1930s. The tritiated thymidine beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) is an in vitro blood test that is widely used to screen beryllium exposed workers in the nuclear industry for sensitivity to beryllium. The clinical significance of the BeLPT was described and a standard protocol was developed in the late 1980s. Cell proliferation is measured by the incorporation of tritiated thymidine into dividing cells on two culture dates and using three concentrations of beryllium sulfate. Results are expressed as a 'stimulation index' (SI) which is the ratio of the amount of tritiated thymidine (measured by beta counts) in the simulated cells divided by the counts for the unstimulated cells on the same culture day. Several statistical methods for use in the routine analysis of the BeLPT were proposed in the early 1990s. The least absolute values (LAV) method was recommended for routine analysis of the BeLPT. This report further evaluates the LAV method using new data, and proposes a new method for identification of an abnormal or borderline test. This new statistical-biological positive (SBP) method reflects the clinical judgment that: (i) at least two SIs show a 'positive' response to beryllium; and (ii) that the maximum of the six SIs must exceed a cut-point that is determined from a reference data set of normal individuals whose blood has been tested by the same method in the same serum. The new data is from the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge (Y-12) and consists of 1080 workers and 33 non-exposed control BeLPTs (all tested in the same serum). Graphical results are presented to explain the statistical method, and the new SBP method is applied to the Y-12 group. The true positive rate and specificity of the new method were estimated to be 86% and 97%, respectively. An electronic notebook that is accessible via the Internet was used in

  1. Some features of beryllium corrosion behavior in Be-liquid Li-V-4Ti-4Cr alloy system

    Recent experimental results on beryllium corrosion behavior in a V-4Ti-4Cr alloy, liquid lithium static system during testing for 200-500 h at temperatures from 600 to 800 deg. C are presented. The influence of test conditions (temperature, duration and lithium purity) and beryllium characteristics (microstructure, grain size and chemical composition) on weight loss of beryllium and penetration of lithium into beryllium are discussed. Results of compressive tests for beryllium specimens before and after corrosion testing are also introduced

  2. Hanford Site Beryllium Program: Past, Present, and Future - 12428

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a long history of beryllium use because of the element's broad application to many nuclear operations and processes. At the Hanford Site beryllium alloy was used to fabricate parts for reactors, including fuel rods for the N-Reactor during plutonium production. Because of continued confirmed cases of chronic beryllium disease (CBD), and data suggesting CBD occurs at exposures to low-level concentrations, the DOE decided to issue a rule to further protect federal and contractor workers from hazards associated with exposure to beryllium. When the beryllium rule was issued in 1999, each of the Hanford Site contractors developed a Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) and initial site wide beryllium inventories. A new site-wide CBDPP, applicable to all Hanford contractors, was issued in May, 2009. In the spring of 2010 the DOE Headquarters Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) conducted an independent inspection to evaluate the status of implementation of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP). The report identified four Findings and 12 cross-cutting Opportunities for Improvement (OFIs). A corrective action plan (CAP) was developed to address the Findings and crosscutting OFIs. The DOE directed affected site contractors to identify dedicated resources to participate in development of the CAP, along with involving stakeholders. The CAP included general and contractor-specific recommendations. Following initiation of actions to implement the approved CAP, it became apparent that additional definition of product deliverables was necessary to assure that expectations were adequately addressed and CAP actions could be closed. Consequently, a supplement to the original CAP was prepared and transmitted to DOE-HQ for approval. Development of the supplemental CAP was an eight month effort. From the onset a core group of CAP development members were identified to develop a mechanism for

  3. Design and evaluation of niacin microspheres

    Maravajhala Vidyavathi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study aims to prepare and evaluate niacin microspheres. Niacin-ethyl cellulose microspheres were prepared by water-in-oil-in-oil double emulsion solvent diffusion method. Spherical, free flowing microspheres having an entrapment efficiency of 72% were obtained. The effect of polymer-drug ratio, surfactant concentration for secondary emulsion process and stirring speed of emulsification process were evaluated with respect to entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release behavior and particle size. FT-IR and DSC analyses confirmed the absence of drug-polymer interaction. The in vitro release profile could be altered significantly by changing various processing and formulation parameters to give a controlled release of drug from the microspheres. The percentage yield was 85%, particle size range was 405 to 560 µm. The drug release was controlled for 10 h. The in vitro release profiles from optimized formulations were applied on various kinetic models. The best fit with the highest correlation coefficient was observed in Higuchi model, indicating diffusion controlled principle. The in vitro release profiles of optimized formulation was studied and compared with commercially available niacin extended release formulation.

  4. Arabinoxylan Microspheres: Structural and Textural Characteristics

    Yolanda López-Franco

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study the structural and textural characteristics of maize bran arabinoxylan (MBAX microspheres. The laccase-induced cross-linking process was monitored by storage (G' and loss (G'' moduli changes in a 4% (w/v MBAX solution. The G' and G'' values at the plateau region were 215 and 4 Pa, respectively. After gelation, the content of ferulic acid dimers decreased from 0.135 to 0.03 µg/mg MBAX, suggesting the formation of ferulated structures unreleased by mild alkaline hydrolysis. MBAX microspheres presented an average diameter of 531 µm and a swelling ratio value (q of 18 g water/g MBAX. The structural parameters of MBAX microspheres were calculated from equilibrium swelling experiments, presenting an average mesh size of 52 nm. Microstructure and textural properties of dried MBAX microspheres were studied by scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, respectively, showing a heterogeneous mesoporous and macroporous structure throughout the network.

  5. Structuring of diamond films using microsphere lithography

    Domonkos, Mária; Ižák, Tibor; Štolcová, L.; Proška, J.; Demo, Pavel; Kromka, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 5 (2014), s. 320-324. ISSN 1210-2709 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanostructuring * diamond thin films * polystyrene microspheres * reactive ion etching * scanning electron microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  6. Beat-Frequency/Microsphere Medical Ultrasonic Imaging

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Pretlow, Robert A., III

    1995-01-01

    Medical ultrasonic imaging system designed to provide quantitative data on various flows of blood in chambers, blood vessels, muscles, and tissues of heart. Sensitive enough to yield readings on flows of blood in heart even when microspheres used as ultrasonic contrast agents injected far from heart and diluted by circulation of blood elsewhere in body.

  7. Encapsulated PDMS microspheres with reactive handles

    Gonzalez, Lidia; Ma, Baoguang; Li, Li;

    2014-01-01

    stabilizers (sodium dodecyl sulphate and polyvinylalcohol). The temperature is subsequently increased to accelerate the rate of cross-linking and prevent the prepolymer droplets from coalescing. The particle size distribution of cured PDMS microspheres is determined by Mastersizer (laser diffraction). Finally...

  8. Bilayer Tablet via Microsphere: A Review

    Piyushkumar Vinubhai Gundaraniya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is to develop bilayer tablets containing sustained release microspheres as one layer and immediate release as another layer. The proposed dosage form is intended to decrease the dosing frequency and the combined administration of an anti-diabetic agent. Several pharmaceutical companies are currently developing bi-layer tablets, for a variety of reasons: patent extension, therapeutic, marketing to name a few. To reduce capital investment, quite often existing but modified tablet presses are used to develop and produce such tablets. One such approach is using microspheres as carriers for drugs also known as micro particles. It is the reliable means to deliver the drug to the target site with specificity, if modified, and to maintain the desired concentration at the site of interest. Microspheres received much attention not only for prolonged release, but also for targeting of anti-diabetic drugs. Bilayer tablet via microsphere is new era for the successful development of controlled release formulation along with various features to provide a way of successful drug delivery system. Especially when in addition high production output is required. An attempt has been made in this review article to introduce the society to the current technological developments in bilayer and floating drug delivery system.

  9. Preparation of Hollow Porous HAP Microspheres as Drug Delivery Vehicles

    WANG Qing; HUANG Wenhai; WANG Deping

    2007-01-01

    Hollow HAP microspheres in sub-millimeter size were prepared and investigated as a drug delivery vehicle. The LCB (lithium-calcium borate) glass microspheres, which were made through flame spray process, were chosen as precursor for hollow HAP microspheres. The LCB glass microspheres reacted with phosphate buffer (K2HPO4) solution for 5 days at 37 ℃. During the reaction the Ca-P-OH compound precipitated on the surface of LCB glass microspheres and formed porous shells. Then the microspheres turned to be hollow ones with the same diameter as the glass microspheres after LCB glass run out in the chemical reaction. After heat-treated at 600 ℃ for 4 h, the Ca-P-OH compound became HAP, thus the hollow HAP microspheres were produced. The mechanism of forming hollow HAP microspheres through the chemical reaction between phosphate buffer and LCB glass was confirmed by the XRD analysis. The microstructure characteristics of the hollow, porous microspheres were observed by SEM.

  10. Assembly of functional gold nanoparticle on silica microsphere.

    Wang, Hsuan-Lan; Lee, Fu-Cheng; Tang, Tse-Yu; Zhou, Chenguang; Tsai, De-Hao

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a controlled synthesis of silica microsphere with the surface-decorated functional gold nanoparticles. Surface of silica microsphere was modified by 3-aminopropypltriethoxysilane and 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane to generate a positive electric field, by which the gold nanoparticles with the negative charges (unconjugated, thiolated polyethylene glycol functionalized with the traceable packing density and conformation) were able to be attracted to the silica microsphere. Results show that both the molecular conjugation on gold nanoparticle and the uniformity in the amino-silanization of silica microsphere influenced the loading and the homogeneity of gold nanoparticles on silica microsphere. The 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane-functionalized silica microsphere provided an uniform field to attract gold nanoparticles. Increasing the ethanol content in aminosilane solution significantly improved the homogeneity and the loading of gold nanoparticles on the surface of silica microsphere. For the gold nanoparticle, increasing the molecular mass of polyethylene glycol yielded a greater homogeneity but a lower loading on silica microsphere. Bovine serum albumin induced the desorption of gold nanoparticles from silica microsphere, where the extent of desorption was suppressed by the presence of high-molecular mass polyethylene glycol on gold nanoparticles. This work provides the fundamental understanding for the synthesis of gold nanoparticle-silica microsphere constructs useful to the applications in chemo-radioactive therapeutics. PMID:26874272

  11. Investigations of the ternary system beryllium-carbon-tungsten and analyses of beryllium on carbon surfaces; Untersuchung des ternaeren Systems Beryllium-Kohlenstoff-Wolfram und Betrachtungen von Beryllium auf Kohlenstoffoberflaechen

    Kost, Florian

    2009-05-25

    Beryllium, carbon and tungsten are planned to be used as first wall materials in the future fusion reactor ITER. The aim of this work is a characterization of mixed material formation induced by thermal load. To this end, model systems (layers) were prepared and investigated, which give insight into the basic physical and chemical concepts. Before investigating ternary systems, the first step was to analyze the binary systems Be/C and Be/W (bottom-up approach), where the differences between the substrates PG (pyrolytic graphite) and HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) were of special interest. Particularly X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy ion scattering (ISS) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) were used as analysis methods. Beryllium evaporated on carbon shows an island growth mode, whereas a closed layer can be assumed for layer thicknesses above 0.7 nm. Annealing of the Be/C system induces Be{sub 2}C island formation for T{>=}770 K. At high temperatures (T{>=}1170 K), beryllium carbide dissociates, resulting in (metallic) beryllium desorption. For HOPG, carbide formation starts at higher temperatures compared to PG. Activation energies for the diffusion processes were determined by analyzing the decreasing beryllium amount versus annealing time. Surface morphologies were characterized using angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments were performed to study processes in the Be/W system in the temperature range from 570 to 1270 K. Be{sub 2}W formation starts at 670 K, a complete loss of Be{sub 2}W is observed at 1170 K due to dissociation (and subsequent beryllium desorption). Regarding ternary systems, particularly Be/C/W and C/Be/W were investigated, attaching importance to layer thickness (reservoir) variations. At room temperature, Be{sub 2}C, W{sub 2}C, WC and Be{sub 2}W formation at the respective interfaces was observed. Further Be{sub 2}C is forming with increasing annealing temperatures

  12. Fallout beryllium-7 as a soil and sediment tracer in river basins: current status and needs

    Taylor, Alex; Blake, Will H.; Smith, Hugh G.; Mabit, Lionel; Keith-Roach, Miranda J.

    2013-04-01

    Beryllium-7 is a cosmogenic radionuclide formed in the upper atmosphere by cosmic ray spallation of nitrogen and oxygen. Its constant natural production and fallout via precipitation coupled with its ability to bind to soil particles have underpinned its application as a sediment tracer. The short half-life of beryllium-7 (53.3 days) lends itself to tracing sediment dynamics over short time periods, thus, enabling assessment of the effect of land use change upon soil redistribution. Although beryllium-7 has been widely applied as a tracer to date, there remain crucial gaps in understanding relating to the assumptions for its use. To further support the application of beryllium-7 as a tracer across a range of environments requires consideration of both the current strengths and shortcomings of the technique to direct research needs. Here we review research surrounding the assumptions underpinning beryllium-7 use as a tracer and identify key knowledge gaps relating to i) the effects of rain shadowing and vegetation interception upon beryllium-7 fallout uniformity at the hillslope-scale; ii) the effect of preferential flow pathways upon beryllium-7 depth distribution in soil and overland flow upon beryllium-7 inventory uniformity and iii) the potential for beryllium-7 desorption in saline and reducing environments. To provide continued support for the use of beryllium-7 as a hillslope and catchment-scale tracer, there is an urgent need to undertake further research to quantify the effect of these factors upon tracer estimates.

  13. Albumin microspheres labeled with Ga-67 by chelation: concise communication

    Albumin microspheres have been synthesized eith EDTA and DTPA chelating groups covalently bound to their surface. The microspheres may be labeled with Ga-67 at high yield (97 +/- 2%) by transcomplexation from a 0.1 M Ga-67 acetate solution. With EDTA microspheres the resulting label dissociates only slightly after no detectable dissociation over this period. By contrast, microspheres without chelating groups lose their label virtually completely under these conditions. Following intravenous administration of sized Ga-67 DTPA microspheres in mice, about (84 +/- 16)% of the activity localizes in the lungs at 5 min, with (60 +/- 7)% remaining after 2 hr. Since labeling is by chelation, the microspheres may also be tagged with other metallic radionuclides

  14. PLGA and PHBV Microsphere Formulations and Solid-State Characterization

    Yang, Chiming; Plackett, David; Needham, David;

    2009-01-01

    To develop and characterize the solid-state properties of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-3-hydroxyvaleric acid) (PHBV) microspheres for the localized and controlled release of fusidic acid (FA). The effects of FA loading and polymer composition on the mean...... diameter, encapsulation efficiency and FA released from the microspheres were determined. The solid-state and phase separation properties of the microspheres were characterized using DSC, XRPD, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, laser confocal and real time recording of single microspheres formation. Above a loading...... of 1% (w/w) FA phase separated from PLGA polymer and formed distinct spherical FA-rich amorphous microdomains throughout the PLGA microsphere. For FA-loaded PLGA microspheres, encapsulation efficiency and cumulative release increased with initial drug loading. Similarly, cumulative release from FA-loaded...

  15. Method of detecting luminescent target ions with modified magnetic microspheres

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Kaminski, Michael D

    2014-05-13

    This invention provides methods of using modified magnetic microspheres to extract target ions from a sample in order to detect their presence in a microfluidic environment. In one or more embodiments, the microspheres are modified with molecules on the surface that allow the target ions in the sample to form complexes with specific ligand molecules on the microsphere surface. In one or more embodiments, the microspheres are modified with molecules that sequester the target ions from the sample, but specific ligand molecules in solution subsequently re-extract the target ions from the microspheres into the solution, where the complexes form independent of the microsphere surface. Once the complexes form, they are exposed to an excitation wavelength light source suitable for exciting the target ion to emit a luminescent signal pattern. Detection of the luminescent signal pattern allows for determination of the presence of the target ions in the sample.

  16. Optically Levitated Microspheres as a Probe for New Interactions

    Rider, Alexander; Moore, David; Blakemore, Charles; Lu, Marie; Gratta, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    We are developing novel techniques to probe new interactions at micron distances using optically levitated dielectric microspheres. Levitated microspheres are an ideal probe for short-range interactions because they are suspended using the radiation pressure at the focus of a laser beam, which means that the microspheres can be precisely manipulated and isolated from the surrounding environment at high vacuum. We have performed a search for unknown charged particles bound within the bulk of the microspheres. Currently, we are searching for the presence of a Chameleon field postulated to explain the presence of dark energy in the universe. In the future we plan to use optically levitated microspheres to search for micron length-scale gravity like interactions that could couple between a microsphere and another mass. We will present resent results from these experiments and plans for future searches for new interactions.

  17. Locomotion of microspheres for super-resolution imaging

    Krivitsky, Leonid A.; Jia Jun Wang; Zengbo Wang; Boris Luk'yanchuk

    2013-01-01

    Super-resolution imaging using sub-diffraction field localization by micron sized transparent beads (microspheres) was recently demonstrated [1]. Practical applications in microscopy require control over the positioning of the microspheres. We present a simple method of positioning and controllable movement of a microsphere by using a glass micropipette. This allows sub-diffraction imaging at arbitrary points in three dimensions, as well as the ability to track moving objects. The results are...

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF FLOATING MICROSPHERES OF GLICLAZIDE

    Shardendu Prakash; Akanksha Bhandari; Raghav Mishra; Pramod Kumar Sharma

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop floating microspheres of Gliclazide in order to achieve an extended retention in the upper gastrointestinal tract, which may result in enhanced absorption and thereby improved bioavailability. The present study involves preparation and evaluation of floating microspheres using Gliclazide as a model drug for prolongation of the gastric retention time. As gliclazide is mainly absorbed from stomach, thus using floating microspheres as a mode o...

  19. Liquid-crystal tunable filter based on sapphire microspheres.

    Gilardi, Giovanni; Donisi, Domenico; Serpengüzel, Ali; Beccherelli, Romeo

    2009-11-01

    We design an integrated optoelectronic device based on the whispering-gallery modes of a sapphire microsphere integrated with a liquid-crystal tuning medium to produce a narrowband, electrically tunable, channel-dropping filter. The sapphire microsphere is glued over a diffused waveguide in a glass substrate. At the base of the microsphere, a small volume of liquid crystal is infiltrated. We numerically evaluate the performance of the device and demonstrate a voltage tuning of the narrowband resonances. PMID:19881558

  20. Variance in multiplex suspension array assays: microsphere size variation impact

    Cheng R Holland; Xing Li; Hanley Brian P

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Luminex suspension microarray assays are in widespread use. There are issues of variability of assay readings using this technology. Methods and results Size variation is demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. Size variations of microspheres are shown to occur in stepwise increments. A strong correspondence between microsphere size distribution and distribution of fluorescent events from assays is shown. An estimate is made of contribution of microsphere size va...

  1. Microspheres for drug-delivery to the colon

    Watts, Peter James

    1992-01-01

    The work described in this thesis is concerned with the design and evaluation of microsphere-based systems for drug delivery into the colon. In initial experiments, techniques were devised for the preparation of microspheres from two sustained-release acrylic polymers, Eudragits RL and RS, using emulsification-solvent evaporation techniques. For Eudragit RS microspheres containing the drug 5-aminosalicylic acid, the rate of drug release could be controlled by the type and concentration of...

  2. Measurements of extrinsic fluorescence in Intralipid and polystyrene microspheres

    Du Le, Vinh Nguyen; Nie, Zhaojun; Hayward, Joseph E.; Farrell, Thomas J.; Fang, Qiyin

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescence of Intralipid and polystyrene microspheres with sphere diameter of 1 µm at a representative lipid and microsphere concentration for simulation of mucosal tissue scattering has not been a subject of extensive experimental study. In order to elucidate the quantitative relationship between lipid and microsphere concentration and the respective fluorescent intensity, the extrinsic fluorescence spectra between 360 nm and 650 nm (step size of 5 nm) were measured at different lipid ...

  3. Clickable Poly(ethylene glycol)-Microsphere-Based Cell Scaffolds

    Nguyen, Peter K.; Snyder, Christopher G.; Shields, Jason D.; Smith, Amanda W.; Elbert, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Clickable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) derivatives are used with two sequential aqueous two-phase systems to produce microsphere-based scaffolds for cell encapsulation. In the first step, sodium sulfate causes phase separation of the clickable PEG precursors and is followed by rapid geleation to form microspheres in the absence of organic solvent or surfactant. The microspheres are washed and then deswollen in dextran solutions in the presence of cells, producing tightly packed scaffolds that ...

  4. Super-resolution optical microscopy using a glass microsphere nanoscope

    Hui Yang; Gijs, Martin A.M.

    2014-01-01

    A technique that allows direct optical imaging of nanostructures and determines quantitatively geometric nanofeatures beyond the classical diffraction limit by using high-refractive index glass microspheres is introduced. The glass microsphere is put on the nanostructure that is immersed in oil. When illuminated by conventional oil-immersion microscope objective, a magnified virtual image of the sample is projected by the microsphere and recorded by the same objective. The image reveals the s...

  5. Preparation and evaluation of delayed release aceclofenac microspheres

    Radhika Parasuram; Luqman Moidutty; Borkhataria Chetan

    2008-01-01

    Delayed release microspheres of aceclofenac were formulated using an enteric polymer, cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP) prepared by solvent evaporation technique. The effects of various other modern enteric polymers such as hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose phthalate (HPMCP), Eudragit L 100, and Eudragit S -100 on the release of aceclofenac from the CAP microspheres have been evaluated. The microspheres were characterized for particle size, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), percentage yield,...

  6. Preparation and characterization of microspheres of albumin-heparin conjugates

    Kwon, Glen S.; Bae, You Han; Kim, Sung Wan; Cremers, Harry; Feijen, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Albumin-heparin microspheres have been prepared as a new drug carrier. A soluble albumin-heparin conjugate was synthesized by forming amide bonds between human serum albumin and heparin. After purification the albumin-heparin conjugate was crosslinked in a water-in-oil emulsion to form albumin-heparin microspheres. The composition of the conjugate was determined by amino acid analysis. The swelling properties of albumin-heparin microspheres were investigated as a function of pH and ionic stre...

  7. Analysis of the distribution of intra-arterial microspheres in human liver following hepatic yttrium-90 microsphere therapy

    The microscopic distribution of microspheres in human liver following hepatic infusion of 32 μm diameter resin microspheres labelled with 90Y as treatment for an 80 millimetre diameter liver cancer has been investigated. Microspheres were found to deposit inhomogeneously in tissues, preferentially lodging in a region approximately 6 mm wide around the periphery of the tumour. A relative concentration of microspheres of 50 to 70 times that of normal hepatic parenchyma and 65 to 94 times that in the tumour centre was measured in this region. The deposition of spheres in the tumour periphery was not uniform, and cluster analysis showed that the spheres could be classified into clusters. The number of microspheres in a cluster was skewed towards low numbers and cluster sizes varied from 20 to 1500 μm. The observed deposition patterns indicate that the vascular tumour periphery will receive much greater radiation doses from radioactive microspheres than both normal tissue and the avascular tumour centre. (author)

  8. Preparation of polystyrene microsphere with emulsion microencapsulation method

    The preparation of hollow polystyrene microspheres that are used as inner shell of multi-shell plastic microspheres in the ICF experiments is focused on. The effects of surfactants, water-soluble polymer and electrolyte on the properties of resultant microspheres are studied. Based on these experiments, a fabricating procedure was established with which hollow microspheres were prepared with diameter about 150-3000 μm, wall thickness 0.8-15 μm and toughness Ra less than 4 nm. (authors)

  9. Controlled Delivery of Gentamicin Using Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate Microspheres

    Ipsita Roy

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate, P(3HB, produced from Bacillus cereus SPV using a simple glucose feeding strategy was used to fabricate P(3HB microspheres using a solid-in-oil-water (s/o/w technique. For this study, several parameters such as polymer concentration, surfactant and stirring rates were varied in order to determine their effect on microsphere characteristics. The average size of the microspheres was in the range of 2 µm to 1.54 µm with specific surface areas varying between 9.60 m2/g and 6.05 m2/g. Low stirring speed of 300 rpm produced slightly larger microspheres when compared to the smaller microspheres produced when the stirring velocity was increased to 800 rpm. The surface morphology of the microspheres after solvent evaporation appeared smooth when observed under SEM. Gentamicin was encapsulated within these P(3HB microspheres and the release kinetics from the microspheres exhibiting the highest encapsulation efficiency, which was 48%, was investigated. The in vitro release of gentamicin was bimodal, an initial burst release was observed followed by a diffusion mediated sustained release. Biodegradable P(3HB microspheres developed in this research has shown high potential to be used in various biomedical applications.

  10. Experimental Investigations on Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Welding of C17300 Copper-Beryllium and 49Ni-Fe Soft Magnetic Alloys

    Copper-beryllium and soft magnetic alloys must be joined in electrical and electro-mechanical applications. There is a high difference in melting temperatures of these alloys which cause to make the joining process very difficult. In addition, copper-beryllium alloys are of age hardenable alloys and precipitations can brittle the weld. 49Ni-Fe alloy is very hot crack sensitive. Moreover, these alloys have different heat transfer coefficients and reflection of laser beam in laser welding process. Therefore, the control of welding parameters on the formation of adequate weld puddle composition is very difficult. Laser welding is an advanced technique for joining of dissimilar materials since it can precisely control and adjust the welding parameters. In this study, a 100W Nd:YAG pulsed laser machine was used for joining 49Ni-Fe soft magnetic to C17300 copper-beryllium alloys. Welding of samples was carried out autogenously by changing the pulse duration, diameter of beam, welding speed, voltage and frequency. The spacing between samples was set to almost zero. The ample were butt welded. It was required to apply high voltage in this study due to high reflection coefficient of copper alloys. Metallography, SEM analysis, XRD and microhardness measurement was used for survey of results. The results show that the weld strength depends upon the chemical composition of the joints. To change the wells composition and heat input of the welds, it was attempted to deviate the laser focus away from the weld centerline. The best strength was achieved by deviation of the laser beam away about 0.1mm from the weld centerline. The result shows no intermetallic compounds if the laser beam is deviated away from the joint.

  11. Experimental Investigations on Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Welding of C17300 Copper-Beryllium and 49Ni-Fe Soft Magnetic Alloys

    Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; Ebrahimzadeh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Copper-beryllium and soft magnetic alloys must be joined in electrical and electro-mechanical applications. There is a high difference in melting temperatures of these alloys which cause to make the joining process very difficult. In addition, copper-beryllium alloys are of age hardenable alloys and precipitations can brittle the weld. 49Ni-Fe alloy is very hot crack sensitive. Moreover, these alloys have different heat transfer coefficients and reflection of laser beam in laser welding process. Therefore, the control of welding parameters on the formation of adequate weld puddle composition is very difficult. Laser welding is an advanced technique for joining of dissimilar materials since it can precisely control and adjust the welding parameters. In this study, a 100W Nd:YAG pulsed laser machine was used for joining 49Ni-Fe soft magnetic to C17300 copper-beryllium alloys. Welding of samples was carried out autogenously by changing the pulse duration, diameter of beam, welding speed, voltage and frequency. The spacing between samples was set to almost zero. The ample were butt welded. It was required to apply high voltage in this study due to high reflection coefficient of copper alloys. Metallography, SEM analysis, XRD and microhardness measurement was used for survey of results. The results show that the weld strength depends upon the chemical composition of the joints. To change the wells composition and heat input of the welds, it was attempted to deviate the laser focus away from the weld centerline. The best strength was achieved by deviation of the laser beam away about 0.1mm from the weld centerline. The result shows no intermetallic compounds if the laser beam is deviated away from the joint.

  12. Proceedings of the 8th specialist meeting on recycling of irradiated Beryllium

    This report summarizes the documents presented in the 8th Specialist Meeting on Recycling of Irradiated Beryllium, which was held on October 28, 2013, in Bariloche, Río Negro, Argentina, hosted by INVAP and CNEA (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica). The objective of the meeting is to exchange the information of current status and future plan for beryllium study in the Research/Testing reactors, and to make a discussion of “How to cooperate”. There were 20 participants from USA, Japan, Korea, Austria and Argentina. In this meeting, information exchange of current status and future plan for beryllium study was carried out for the Research/Testing reactor fields, and evaluation results of beryllium materials were discussed based on new irradiated beryllium data such as swelling, deformation, gas release and so on. The subject of the used beryllium recycling was also discussed for the enforcement of demonstration recycling tests. (author)

  13. JET-ISX-B beryllium limiter experiment safety analysis report and operational safety requirements

    An experiment to evaluate the suitability of beryllium as a limiter material has been completed on the ISX-B tokamak. The experiment consisted of two phases: (1) the initial operation and characterization in the ISX experiment, and a period of continued operation to the specified surface fluence (1022 atoms/cm2) of hydrogen ions; and (2) the disassembly, decontamination, or disposal of the ISX facility. During these two phases of the project, the possibility existed for beryllium and/or beryllium oxide powder to be produced inside the vacuum vessel. Beryllium dust is a highly toxic material, and extensive precautions are required to prevent the release of the beryllium into the experimental work area and to prevent the contamination of personnel working on the device. Details of the health hazards associated with beryllium and the appropriate precautions are presented. Also described in appendixes to this report are the various operational safety requirements for the project

  14. Beryllium coating produced by evaporation-condensation method and some their properties

    Pepekin, G.I.; Anisimov, A.B.; Chernikov, A.S.; Mozherinn, S.I.; Pirogov, A.A. [SRI SIA Lutch., Podolsk (Russian Federation)

    1998-01-01

    The method of vacuum evaporation-condensation for deposition of beryllium coatings on metal substrates, considered in the paper, side by side with a plasma-spray method is attractive fon ITER application. In particular this technique may be useful for repair the surface of eroded tiles which is operated in a strong magnetic field. The possibility of deposition of beryllium coatings with the rate of layer growth 0.1-0.2 mm/h is shown. The compatibility of beryllium coating with copper or stainless steel substrate is provided due to intermediate barrier. The results of examination of microstructure, microhardness, porosity, thermal and physical properties and stability under thermal cycling of beryllium materials are presented. The value of thermal expansion coefficient and thermal conductivity of condensed beryllium are approximately the same as for industrial grade material produced by powder mettalurgy technique. However, the condensed beryllium has higher purity (up to 99.9-99.99 % wt.). (author)

  15. 5. IEA International workshop on beryllium technology for fusion. Book of abstracts

    The collection includes the abstracts of reports presented to the 5-th IEA international workshop on beryllium technology for fusion. The themes of reports are as follows: status of beryllium technology for fusion in Russia; manufacturing and testing of Be armoured first wall mock-up for ITER; development of the process of diffusion welding of metals stainless steel-copper-beryllium into a single composite; some features of beryllium-laser beam interaction; the effect of irradiation dose on tritium and helium release from neutron irradiated beryllium; thermal properties of neutron irradiated Be12Ti. The results of investigating the mechanical properties variation and swelling of beryllium under high temperature neutron irradiation are presented

  16. Quantum-chemical approach to cohesive properties of metallic beryllium

    Calculations based upon the incremental approach, i.e. an expansion of the correlation energy in terms of one-body, two-body, and higher-order contributions from localized orbital groups, have been performed for metallic beryllium. We apply an embedding scheme which has been successfully applied recently to ground-state properties of magnesium and group 12 elements. This scheme forces localization in metallic-like model systems and allows for a gradual delocalization within the incremental approach. Quantum-chemical methods of the coupled-cluster and multi-reference configuration interaction type are used for evaluating individual increments. Results are given for the cohesive energy and lattice constants of beryllium, and it is shown that further development of the approach is needed for this difficult case

  17. Effects of beryllium-compounds on the hen. 2. Comm

    After oral application of 7Be2+ this cation is relative slowly absorbed from the intestine. The highest proportion of 7Be appeared in the feces. The absorbed 7Be has been found in the feathers, the bones and in the muscles as well as in the mucosa of the stomach and the intestine. Relative low is the accumulation in the liver and the kidneys as well as in the brain and the spinal cord. After i.v. application a high proportion of 7Be has been observed in the eggs. The rest of the applied radio-beryllium has been accumulated 7Be in the metabolically active tissues is removed very slowly. In contrast to this observation radio-beryllium disappeared relatively rapidly from the blood. (orig.)

  18. A charge-density study of crystalline beryllium

    The X-ray structure factors for crystalline beryllium measured by Brown [Phil. Mag. (1972), 26, 1377] have been analyzed with multipole deformation functions for charge-density information. Single exponential radial functions were used for the valence charge density. A valence monopole plus the three harmonics, P35(cos theta) sin 3phi, P6(cos theta) and P37(cos theta) sin 3phi, provide a least-squares fit to the data with Rsub(w)=0.0081. The superposition of these density functions describes a bonding charge density between Be atoms along the c axis through the tetrahedral vacancy. The results reported here are in qualitative agreement with a recent pseudo-potential calculation of metallic beryllium. The final residuals in the analysis are largest at high sin theta/lambda values. This suggests that core charge deformation is present and/or anharmonic motion of the nuclei is appreciable. (Auth.)

  19. Fabrication methods for beryllium spacecraft components (Series 2)

    The aims of this paper are to conserve and yet promote the use of one of the most versatile metal elements available to the practising engineer. The scope of the work described involves the selection of candidate components suitable for manufacture in beryllium. Evaluation by mathematical modelling using finite element techniques is used as an aid in determining the principal load paths in a structural component. Cost effective techniques which are objectively analysed suggest that the conservation of raw beryllia can best be achieved using recently developed plasma spray methods. The British Aircraft Corporation have been investigating methods of plasma spraying beryllium with A.W.R.E. and current developments are giving clear indications that for certain future space applications plasma spray is the technique which most nearly meets the conservation objective. (author)

  20. Fabrication of beryllium spheres and its validation tests

    A sphere-pack blanket concept using small size spheres of beryllium is one of the promising design concept of the ITER blanket, because the sphere-pack can accommodate the size deformation due to neutron irradiation damage, helium swelling and cyclic temperature changes. Preliminary R and D for an industrial fabrication technology of beryllium spheres (1.0 ± 0.3 mm in diameter) has been started as part of feasibility study of Japanese blanket concept of layered sphere-pack configuration. The following tests were performed in the several demo-fabrications; feasibility of size distribution control, material characterization such as macroscopic and microscopic structure analysis, impurity analysis, and attainable packing density, mechanical integrity under various thermal cycling conditions. (author)

  1. Low-energy electronic stopping for boron in beryllium

    The range distribution for 50-keV boron bombarding beryllium was measured by an energetic ion-beam backscattering technique using helium ions. This distribution was compared with the range calculated with computer code EDEP1, with the result k 0.101 ± 0.013 for the electronic-stopping k-value. This value is compared with the results of recent interpolations from measurements of other elements. (author)

  2. Thermal fatigue behavior of US and Russian grades of beryllium

    A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 KW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ''spike'' of 750 degrees C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stress in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m2. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S-65H, S-200F, S-300F-H, Sr-200, I-400, extruded high purity. HIP'd sperical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe12. Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be(SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis

  3. Impact of HFIR LEU Conversion on Beryllium Reflector Degradation Factors

    Ilas, Dan [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    An assessment of the impact of low enriched uranium (LEU) conversion on the factors that may cause the degradation of the beryllium reflector is performed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The computational methods, models, and tools, comparisons with previous work, along with the results obtained are documented and discussed in this report. The report documents the results for the gas and neutronic poison production, and the heating in the beryllium reflector for both the highly enriched uranium (HEU) and LEU HFIR configurations, and discusses the impact that the conversion to LEU may have on these quantities. A time-averaging procedure was developed to calculate the isotopic (gas and poisons) production in reflector. The sensitivity of this approach to different approximations is gauged and documented. The results show that the gas is produced in the beryllium reflector at a total rate of 0.304 g/cycle for the HEU configuration; this rate increases by ~12% for the LEU case. The total tritium production rate in reflector is 0.098 g/cycle for the HEU core and approximately 11% higher for the LEU core. A significant increase (up to ~25%) in the neutronic poisons production in the reflector during the operation cycles is observed for the LEU core, compared to the HEU case, for regions close to the core s horizontal midplane. The poisoning level of the reflector may increase by more than two orders of magnitude during long periods of downtime. The heating rate in the reflector is estimated to be approximately 20% lower for the LEU core than for the HEU core. The decrease is due to a significantly lower contribution of the heating produced by the gamma radiation for the LEU core. Both the isotopic (gas and neutronic poisons) production and the heating rates are spatially non-uniform throughout the beryllium reflector volume. The maximum values typically occur in the removable reflector and close to the midplane.

  4. Analysis of features of the deformation of auxetic beryllium

    Гунько, Михаил Николаевич; Олейнич-Лысюк, Алла Васильевна; Раранский, Николай Дмитриевич; Тащук, Александр Юрьевич

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of the linear elasticity theory using the experimentally obtained elastic stiffness modules, temperature dependences of the elastic compliance modules and tensor components of Poisson's ratios    of beryllium in a wide range of temperatures and directions in the crystal lattice were calculated, and it was shown that with increasing temperature, the value and signs of Poisson's ratios  change differently in various temperature intervals. In the interval 0-300K,  become negativ...

  5. Dose Rates from Plutonium Metal and Beryllium Metal in a 9975 Shipping Container

    A parametric study was performed of the radiation dose rates that might be produced if plutonium metal and beryllium metal were shipped in the 9975 shipping package. These materials consist of heterogeneous combinations plutonium metal and beryllium. The plutonium metal content varies up to 4.4 kilograms while the beryllium metal varies up to 4 kilograms. This paper presents the results of that study

  6. Neutron transmission measurements on hydrogen filled microspheres

    Hollow microspheres are promising candidates for future hydrogen storage technologies. Although the physical process for hydrogen diffusion through glass is well understood, measurements of static quantities (e.q. hydrogen pressure inside the spheres) as well as dynamic properties (e.g. diffusion rate of hydrogen through glass) are still difficult to handle due to the small size of the spheres (d≈15μm). For diffusion rate measurements, the long-term stability of the experiment is also mandatory due to the relatively slow diffusion rate. In this work, we present an accurate and long-term stable measurement technique for static and dynamic properties, using neutron radiography. Furthermore, possible applications for hydrogen filled microspheres within the scope of radiation issues are discussed

  7. Optical Microspherical Resonators for Biomedical Sensing

    Giancarlo C. Righini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical resonators play an ubiquitous role in modern optics. A particular class of optical resonators is constituted by spherical dielectric structures, where optical rays are total internal reflected. Due to minimal reflection losses and to potentially very low material absorption, these guided modes, known as whispering gallery modes, can confer the resonator an exceptionally high quality factor Q, leading to high energy density, narrow resonant-wavelength lines and a lengthy cavity ringdown. These attractive characteristics make these miniaturized optical resonators especially suited as laser cavities and resonant filters, but also as very sensitive sensors. First, a brief analysis is presented of the characteristics of microspherical resonators, of their fabrication methods, and of the light coupling techniques. Then, we attempt to overview some of the recent advances in the development of microspherical biosensors, underlining a number of important applications in the biomedical field.

  8. Fluorescence dynamics of microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens

    Krishnan, R.

    2005-03-01

    Sunscreens are generally oily substances which are prepared in organic solvents, emulsions or dispersions with micro- or nanoparticles. These molecules adsorb to and integrate into skin cells. In order to understand the photophysical properties of the sunscreen, we compare steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence in organic solvent of varying dielectric constant ɛ and adsorbed to polystyrene microspheres and dispersed in water. Steady-state fluorescence is highest and average fluorescence lifetime longest in toluene, the solvent of lowest ɛ. However, there is no uniform dependence on ɛ. Sunscreens PABA and padimate-O show complex emission spectra. Microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens exhibit highly non-exponential decay, illustrative of multiple environments of the adsorbed molecule. The heterogeneous fluorescence dynamics likely characterizes sunscreen adsorbed to cells.

  9. Elastic, micro- and macroplastic properties of polycrystalline beryllium

    Kardashev, B. K.; Kupriyanov, I. B.

    2011-12-01

    The Young's modulus and the internal friction of beryllium polycrystals (size grain from 6 to 60 μm) prepared by the powder metallurgy method have been studied as functions of the amplitude and temperature in the range from 100 to 873 K. The measurements have been performed using the composite piezoelectric vibrator method for longitudinal vibrations at frequencies about 100 kHz. Based on the acoustic measurements, the data have been obtained on the elastic and inelastic (microplastic) properties as functions of vibration stress amplitudes within the limits from 0.2 to 30-60 MPa. The microplastic deformation diagram is shown to become nonlinear at the amplitudes higher than 5 MPa. The beryllium mechanical characteristics (the yield strength σ 0.2, the ultimate strength σ u , and the conventional microscopic yield strength σ y ) obtained with various grain sizes are compared. At room temperature, all the parameters satisfactorily obey the Hall-Petch relationship, although there is no complete similarity. The temperature dependences are quite different, namely: σ 0.2( T) and σ u ( T) decrease monotonically during heating from room temperature to higher temperatures; however, σ y ( T) behaves unusually, and it has a minimum near 400 K. The different levels of stresses and the absence of similarity indicate that the scattering of the ultrasound energy and the formation of a level of the macroscopic flow stresses in beryllium occur on dislocation motion obstacles of different origins.

  10. Electron microscope study of thin beryllium lamellae (1963)

    Thin SR beryllium lamellae are examined by electron microscopy after various treatments, together with other samples made up of Be - Fe at 1 per cent and 0.2 per cent iron. The SR beryllium is examined after annealing at 750 deg C and 900 deg C, strongly cold-worked and quenched at 900 deg C. At 950 deg C the metal is perfectly annealed; at 750 deg C the polygonisation is almost complete, the dislocations are arranged either is dislocation walls in the prismatic planes, or in hexagonal lattices with non-dissociated nodes suggesting a high stacking defect energy. The cold-worked structure has a high dislocation density and already existing crystal walls. In the quenched state, the few dislocations are very straight and are aligned in the crystallographic directions. Iron-precipitation is studied in two alloys during tempering at 660 deg after quenching in salt water. The precipitate appears at the grain boundaries and then spreads through the matrix leaving a depleted zone in the neighbourhood of the joints. These precipitates, in the form of platelets parallel to the base planes of the beryllium lattice have been identified as the inter metallic phase Be11 Fe oriented in relation to the matrix (0 0 0 1)//(0 0 0 1) (1 0 1-bar 0)//(1 1 2-bar 0). (authors)

  11. Optimization of microfluidic microsphere-trap arrays

    Xu, Xiaoxiao; Sarder, Pinaki; Li, Zhenyu; Nehorai, Arye

    2013-01-01

    Microarray devices are powerful for detecting and analyzing biological targets. However, the potential of these devices may not be fully realized due to the lack of optimization of their design and implementation. In this work, we consider a microsphere-trap array device by employing microfluidic techniques and a hydrodynamic trapping mechanism. We design a novel geometric structure of the trap array in the device, and develop a comprehensive and robust framework to optimize the values of the...

  12. Preparation and application of magnetic microsphere carriers

    ZHANG Bo; XING Jianmin; LIU Huizhou

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic microsphere carriers have received considerable attention,primarily because of their wide applications in the fields of biomedicine and bioengineering.In this paper,preparation methods,surface modification and application of magnetic carriers are reviewed.Emphasis will be placed on recent biological and biomedical developments and trends such as enzyme immobilization,cell isolation,protein purification,target drugs and DNA separation.

  13. Improved bioavailability through floating microspheres of lovastatin

    Kumar, S.; K Nagpal; Singh SK; DN Mishra

    2011-01-01

    "n Background and the purpose of the study: Lovastatin is an antihyperlipidemic agent which has low bioavailability due to the extensive first pass metabolism. It was sought to increase gastric retention of lovastatin by development of a sustained release gastroretentive drug delivery system leading to reduced fluctuation in the plasma concentration and improved bioavailability. "nMethods: Floating microspheres were prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion technique, using va...

  14. Sputter coating of microspherical substrates by levitation

    Lowe, A.T.; Hosford, C.D.

    Microspheres are substantially uniformly coated with metals or nonmetals by simltaneously levitating them and sputter coating them at total chamber pressures less than 1 torr. A collimated hole structure comprising a parallel array of upwardly projecting individual gas outlets is machined out to form a dimple. Glass microballoons,, which are particularly useful in laser fusion applications, can be substantially uniformly coated using the coating method and apparatus.

  15. Beryllium Science: US-UK agreement on the use of Atomic Energy for mutual defense

    Hanafee, J.E. (ed.)

    1988-02-19

    Twenty-seven papers are presented on beryllium supply, production, fabrication, safe handling, analysis, powder technology, and coatings. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (DLC)

  16. The impact of beryllium chloride and oxide on sexual function and offspring development in female rats

    The comparative study of the action of soluble chloride and difficultly soluble beryllium oxide on sexual cycle in female rats and their conception capability, revealing of embryotoxic and teratogenic effect of these compounds and determination of significance of terms of their impact on pregnant female as well as beryllium capability to penetrate through the placenta and accumulate in the offspring organism have been performed. A great potential danger of impact on animal reproductive function of soluble (chloride) beryllium compounds as compared with low soluble ones (oxide). In the genesis of embryotoxic teratonic effect probably along with beryllium impact on progeny through the maternal organism there occurs its direct impact on the offspring

  17. Vacuum Brazing of Beryllium Copper Components for the National Ignition Facility

    A process for vacuum brazing beryllium copper anode assemblies was required for the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell System, or PEPC, a component for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Initial problems with the joint design and wettability of the beryllium copper drove some minor design changes. Brazing was facilitated by plating the joint surface of the beryllium copper rod with silver 0.0006 inch thick. Individual air sampling during processing and swipe tests of the furnace interior after brazing revealed no traceable levels of beryllium

  18. Beryllium Science: US-UK agreement on the use of Atomic Energy for mutual defense

    Twenty-seven papers are presented on beryllium supply, production, fabrication, safe handling, analysis, powder technology, and coatings. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers

  19. Problems and future plan on material development of beryllium in materials testing reactors

    Beryllium has been utilized as a moderator and/or reflector in a number of material testing reactors. The attractive nuclear properties of beryllium are its low atomic number, low atomic weight, low parasitic capture cross section for thermal neutrons, readiness to part with one of its own neutrons, and good neutron elastic scattering characteristics. However, it is difficult to reprocess irradiated beryllium because of high induced radioactivity. Disposal has also been difficult because of toxicity issues and special nuclear material controls. In this paper, problems and future plans of beryllium technology are introduced for nuclear reactors. (author)

  20. Yttrium-90 microsphere induced gastrointestinal tract ulceration

    Rikabi Ali A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiomicrosphere therapy (RT utilizing yttrium-90 (90Y microspheres has been shown to be an effective regional treatment for primary and secondary hepatic malignancies. We sought to determine a large academic institution's experience regarding the extent and frequency of gastrointestinal complications. Methods Between 2004 and 2007, 27 patients underwent RT for primary or secondary hepatic malignancies. Charts were subsequently reviewed to determine the incidence and severity of GI ulceration. Results Three patients presented with gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent upper endoscopy. Review of the pretreatment angiograms showed normal vascular anatomy in one patient, sclerosed hepatic vasculature in a patient who had undergone prior chemoembolization in a second, and an aberrant left hepatic artery in a third. None had undergone prophylactic gastroduodenal artery embolization. Endoscopic findings included erythema, mucosal erosions, and large gastric ulcers. Microspheres were visible on endoscopic biopsy. In two patients, gastric ulcers were persistent at the time of repeat endoscopy 1–4 months later despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. One elderly patient who refused surgical intervention died from recurrent hemorrhage. Conclusion Gastrointestinal ulceration is a known yet rarely reported complication of 90Y microsphere embolization with potentially life-threatening consequences. Once diagnosed, refractory ulcers should be considered for aggressive surgical management.

  1. STRUCTURING OF DIAMOND FILMS USING MICROSPHERE LITHOGRAPHY

    Mária Domonkos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the structuring of micro- and nanocrystalline diamond thin films is demonstrated. The structuring of the diamond films is performed using the technique of microsphere lithography followed by reactive ion etching. Specifically, this paper presents a four-step fabrication process: diamond deposition (microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition, mask preparation (by the standard Langmuir-Blodgett method, mask modification and diamond etching. A self-assembled monolayer of monodisperse polystyrene (PS microspheres with close-packed ordering is used as the primary template. Then the PS microspheres and the diamond films are processed in capacitively coupled radiofrequency plasma  using different plasma chemistries. This fabrication method illustrates the preparation of large arrays of periodic and homogeneous hillock-like structures. The surface morphology of processed diamond films is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscope. The potential applications of such diamond structures in various fields of nanotechnology are also briefly discussed.

  2. Phase equilibria, compatibility studies and thermal properties of beryllium systems

    The quality control of commercial beryllium, the examinations of the phase equilibria in beryllium systems as well as the broad field of incompatibility and the reaction kinetics of beryllium with other materials necessitate a sophisticated method for the analysis of this element in micrometer areas. A powerful tool is the wavelength dispersive X-ray microanalyser. Therefore, a commercial synthetic Mo-B4C multilayer X-ray diffracting device with 2 d = 22.2 nm periodicity was used to extend X-ray microanalysis to the ultra-light elements Be and B in an existing instrument. The spectrometer covers a wavelength range between 5.2 and 13 nm. The wavelength of the Be Kα emission line from elemental Be is λ = 11.35 nm and the full width at half maximum is ΔE = 7.2 eV. The optimum working voltage Uo is 10 kV for moderate X-ray mass absorption of the targets. The determination of Be in oxides is less favourable owing to the high mass absorption. Uo has to be reduced to 5 kV. The chemical shift of the Be Kα line in BeO is Δλ = + 0.3 nm relative to pure Be. Beryllium pebbles are foreseen as neutron multipliers in future fusion reactor blanket concepts. Industrial intermediate Be products which had been produced by a modified Kroll process and subsequent reduction of BeF2 using Mg were investigated by X-ray microanalysis. The following precipitates in the Be matrix of 2 mm pebbles partially annealed up to 790 C could be detected: (Mg, Zr, U) Be13, MgBe13, Mg2Si, Al2Mg3 and (Fe, Cr) alloys. The maximum solubility of selected metallic impurities in beryllium annealed at 800 C is: 0.06 mass % Fe, 0.03 mass % Al, 0.02 mass % Si, 5Fe2, Be2C and Cr-Fe-Si were observed in specimens annealed between 870 and 690 C. It is interesting that Al5Fe2 precipitates were observed; however, the phase AlFeBe4 that would have been expected according to the phase diagram of the ternary Al-Be-Fe system was not found. Probably the Fe/Al ratio is too low for AlFeBe4 formation. The high annealing

  3. The clearance of albumin microspheres from an intramuscular injection site

    Human serum albumin microspheres of three different diameters were radiolabelled with indium-111, and a suspension injected into rabbit thigh muscle. Clearance from the intramuscular site was monitored for 2 weeks using gamma scintigraphy. The clearance rates were compared with the injection site clearance of non-biodegradable polystyrene microspheres. (U.K.)

  4. MAGNETIC MICROSPHERES: A LATEST APPROACH IN NOVEL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Mukherjee S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic microspheres are at the forefront of the rapidly developing field of pharmaceutical technology with several potential applications in drug delivery, clinical medicine and research as well as in other varied sciences. Due to their unique size-dependent properties, magnetic microspheres offer the possibility to develop new therapeutics. The ability to incorporate drugs into carriers offers a new prototype in drug delivery that could be used for secondary and tertiary levels of drug targeting. Hence, magnetic microspheres hold great promise for reaching the goal of controlled and site specific drug delivery and hence have attracted wide attention of researchers. This review presents a broad treatment of magnetic microspheres discussing their advantages, limitations and their possible remedies. Different production methods which are suitable for large scale production and applications of magnetic microspheres are described. Appropriate analytical techniques for characterization of magnetic microspheres like Photon correlation spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry are highlighted. Aspects of magnetic microspheres route of administration and their biodistribution are also incorporated. If appropriately investigated, magnetic microspheres may open new vistas in therapy of complex diseases.

  5. Controlling silk fibroin microspheres via molecular weight distribution

    Zeng, Dong-Mei; Pan, Jue-Jing; Wang, Qun; Liu, Xin-Fang; Wang, Hui [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, College for Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Zhang, Ke-Qin, E-mail: kqzhang@suda.edu.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, College for Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Research Center of Cooperative Innovation for Functional Organic/Polymer Material Micro/Nanofabrication, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Silk fibroin (SF) microspheres were produced by salting out SF solution via the addition of potassium phosphate buffer solution (K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}–KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}). The morphology, size and polydispersity of SF microspheres were adjusted by changing the molecular weight (MW) distribution and concentration of SF, as well as the ionic strength and pH of the buffer solution. Changing the conditions under which the SF fiber dissolved in the Lithium Boride (LiBr) solution resulted in altering the MW distribution of SF solution. Under optimal salting-out conditions (ionic strength > 0.7 M and pH > 7) and using a smaller and narrower SF MW distribution, SF microspheres with smoother shapes and more uniform sizes were produced. Meanwhile, the size and polydispersity of the microspheres increased when the SF concentration was increased from 0.25 mg/mL to 20 mg/mL. The improved SF microspheres, obtained by altering the distribution of molecular weight, have potential in drug and gene delivery applications. - Highlights: • MW distribution was changed by applying different dissolving methods of SF fiber. • Smaller and narrower MW distribution improves the quality of SF microspheres. • Size and polydispersity of microspheres increase as SF concentration increases. • Improved SF microspheres have potential in drug and gene delivery applications.

  6. DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF FLOATING MICROSPHERES OF GLICLAZIDE

    Shardendu Prakash

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to develop floating microspheres of Gliclazide in order to achieve an extended retention in the upper gastrointestinal tract, which may result in enhanced absorption and thereby improved bioavailability. The present study involves preparation and evaluation of floating microspheres using Gliclazide as a model drug for prolongation of the gastric retention time. As gliclazide is mainly absorbed from stomach, thus using floating microspheres as a mode of drug delivery helps in increasing its residence time and hence increasing the bioavailability of drug. The microspheres were prepared by the Ionic gelation method. The average diameter and surface morphology of the prepared microspheres were characterized by optical microscope and scanning electron microscopic methods respectively. The prepared microspheres were evaluated for particle size, micromeritic study, drug entrapment efficiency, in vitro buoyancy, swelling index and in vitro release. The effect of various formulation variables on the size and drug release was also investigated. All the formulated microspheres were found to possess good flow properties. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed spherical structure of the prepared microspheres. The best formulation F3 drug release kinetics were evaluated using Zero order, First order, Higuchi model, Korsmeyer - Peppas model. After the interpretation of data that was based on the value of a resulting regression coefficient, it was observed that the Korsmeyer- Peppas model has a highest regression coefficient values indicating that the drug release was based on the erosion of polymeric chain matrix.

  7. Microsphere laser developments for potential gas sensing applications

    This paper presents preliminary results obtained from research into the development of a microsphere fibre laser designed for use in a compact gas sensor system. In this paper the focus is on achieving the optimum coupling between the microsphere and the tapered fibre used and obtaining the potential ultra-low threshold of the laser system

  8. Formulation, optimization and evaluation of sustained release microsphere of ketoprofen

    V Chirag Prajapati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to formulate ketoprofen loaded microspheres of Acrycoat S100 by an o/w emulsion solvent evaporation method. It potently inhibits the enzyme cyclooxygenase resulting in prostaglandin synthesis inhibition. Ketoprofen causes an irritation in the gastrointestinal mucous membrane and possesses a bitter taste and aftertaste. The half-life in plasma is about 1-2hrs. This makes ketoprofen a very good candidate for the formulation of controlled release dosage forms. Ketoprofen microspheres help to protect the gastric mucous membrane from drug irritation and to mask its taste. The prepared microspheres were evaluated for micromeritic properties, particle size, effect of surfactant concentration, percentage yield, incorporation efficiency, drug polymer compatibility (IR and DSC study, scanning electron microscopy and in vitro drug release. The microspheres produced exhibited good encapsulation efficiencies and micromeritic properties. Encapsulation efficiency of microsphere is around 78%. The mean diameters of microspheres were found in required micrometer range. The results of optimized formulations showed a narrow size distribution and smooth surface. The DSC and the FTIR analysis showed the absence of any potent incompatibility between the drug and the polymer. In-vitro release showed 86.4% drug release after 12 hours. Results of present study suggest that Acrycoat S100 loaded microsphere of ketoprofen can be successfully designed to develop sustained drug delivery system. The solvent evaporation method is a suitable technique for the preparation of Acrycoat S100 microspheres for controlling the release of Ketoprofen for a prolonged duration.

  9. Controlling silk fibroin microspheres via molecular weight distribution

    Silk fibroin (SF) microspheres were produced by salting out SF solution via the addition of potassium phosphate buffer solution (K2HPO4–KH2PO4). The morphology, size and polydispersity of SF microspheres were adjusted by changing the molecular weight (MW) distribution and concentration of SF, as well as the ionic strength and pH of the buffer solution. Changing the conditions under which the SF fiber dissolved in the Lithium Boride (LiBr) solution resulted in altering the MW distribution of SF solution. Under optimal salting-out conditions (ionic strength > 0.7 M and pH > 7) and using a smaller and narrower SF MW distribution, SF microspheres with smoother shapes and more uniform sizes were produced. Meanwhile, the size and polydispersity of the microspheres increased when the SF concentration was increased from 0.25 mg/mL to 20 mg/mL. The improved SF microspheres, obtained by altering the distribution of molecular weight, have potential in drug and gene delivery applications. - Highlights: • MW distribution was changed by applying different dissolving methods of SF fiber. • Smaller and narrower MW distribution improves the quality of SF microspheres. • Size and polydispersity of microspheres increase as SF concentration increases. • Improved SF microspheres have potential in drug and gene delivery applications

  10. Pectin/zein microspheres as a sustained drug delivery system

    A series of microspheres were prepared from pectins and corn proteins from various sources in the presence of the divalent ions calcium or zinc. The results showed that the yield of microsphere and the efficiency of drug incorporation were dependent on the type and ratio of biopolymers, the size of ...

  11. Optically switchable molecular device using microsphere based junctions

    Faramarzi, V.; Raimondo, C.; Reinders, F.; Mayor, M.; Samorı, P.; Doudin, B.

    2011-12-01

    Metallic planar electrodes are bridged using microspheres coated with chemisorbed azobenzene self-assembled monolayers. The circuit exhibits light-induced switching, with reproducibility over 90%, as statistically determined and compared to junctions incorporating photo-insensitive alkanethiol layers. Microsphere interconnects provide direct access to molecular transport properties, with reliability and stability, making multifunctional molecular electronics devices possible.

  12. Antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin-loaded zein microsphere films

    Fu Jianxi [Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 354 Fenglin Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Henan Normal University, 46 East Construction Road, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Wang Huajie [College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhou Yanqing [Henan Normal University, 46 East Construction Road, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Wang Jinye, E-mail: jywang@mail.sioc.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 354 Fenglin Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2009-05-05

    Our aim was to produce an antibiotic-emitting coating composed of zein microspheres for the prevention of bacterial infection on implanted devices. Ciprofloxacin-loaded zein microspheres were prepared using a phase separation procedure, with particle sizes between 0.5 and 2 {mu}m. Drug encapsulation and drug loading varied with the amount of both zein and ciprofloxacin, and the highest encapsulation efficiency was 8.27% (2 mg/ml ciprofloxacin and 20 mg/ml zein; n = 3). A ciprofloxacin-loaded zein microsphere film (CF-MS film) was generated via solvent evaporation. Continuous drug release from a trypsin-degraded microsphere film was observed for up to 28 days. The liberation of ciprofloxacin from the trypsin-degraded film and the biodegradation of the microsphere film were highly correlated. Proliferation assay of the growth of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by the MTT method showed that the microsphere film had no toxicity when compared with cells grown on Corning culture plates alone and plates with a zein film alone. Quantification of bacteria adhesion showed that adhesion on the microsphere film is significantly suppressed. In addition, according to the results of bacterial growth tests, ciprofloxacin-loaded microsphere films maintained antibacterial activity for more than 6 days. In contrast, a control medium containing a zein film allowed constant bacterial growth. These results indicate that CF-MS films might be useful as antibacterial films on implanted devices.

  13. Antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin-loaded zein microsphere films

    Our aim was to produce an antibiotic-emitting coating composed of zein microspheres for the prevention of bacterial infection on implanted devices. Ciprofloxacin-loaded zein microspheres were prepared using a phase separation procedure, with particle sizes between 0.5 and 2 μm. Drug encapsulation and drug loading varied with the amount of both zein and ciprofloxacin, and the highest encapsulation efficiency was 8.27% (2 mg/ml ciprofloxacin and 20 mg/ml zein; n = 3). A ciprofloxacin-loaded zein microsphere film (CF-MS film) was generated via solvent evaporation. Continuous drug release from a trypsin-degraded microsphere film was observed for up to 28 days. The liberation of ciprofloxacin from the trypsin-degraded film and the biodegradation of the microsphere film were highly correlated. Proliferation assay of the growth of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by the MTT method showed that the microsphere film had no toxicity when compared with cells grown on Corning culture plates alone and plates with a zein film alone. Quantification of bacteria adhesion showed that adhesion on the microsphere film is significantly suppressed. In addition, according to the results of bacterial growth tests, ciprofloxacin-loaded microsphere films maintained antibacterial activity for more than 6 days. In contrast, a control medium containing a zein film allowed constant bacterial growth. These results indicate that CF-MS films might be useful as antibacterial films on implanted devices.

  14. PREPARATION AND ADSORBABILITY OF DEXTRAN MICROSPHERES WITH UNIFORM DIAMETER

    Ri-sheng Yao; Wen-xia Gao; Jing Sun; Ya-hua You

    2005-01-01

    The method of preparing uniform dextran microspheres with a narrow diameter distribution was introduced and the adsorbability of these microspheres was evaluated. The microspheres were prepared in W/O microemulsion using 0.5% dextran solution as the aqueous phase and n-hexane as the oil phase. Characteristics of the prepared dextran microspheres were examined with laser light blocking technique, optical microscope and ultraviolet spectrometer. The results show that the prepared dextran microspheres have uniform morphology and narrow diameter distribution, nearly 92% of them having a diameter of 56.6 μm. In vitro evaluation of adsorbability, wet dextran microspheres have good adsorption of 98.32 mg/g of model drug methylene blue in 20.86 mg/L methylene blue solution at 25℃. The adsorption of dried dextran microspheres under the same condition is 132.15 mg/g, which is even higher. And the adsorbability of dextran microspheres has significant relationship with the concentration of methylene blue and temperature. The adsorbability is better at lower temperature and higher concentration of methylene blue.

  15. Optimization of sustained release aceclofenac microspheres using response surface methodology

    Polymeric microspheres containing aceclofenac were prepared by single emulsion (oil-in-water) solvent evaporation method using response surface methodology (RSM). Microspheres were prepared by changing formulation variables such as the amount of Eudragit® RS100 and the amount of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by statistical experimental design in order to enhance the encapsulation efficiency (E.E.) of the microspheres. The resultant microspheres were evaluated for their size, morphology, E.E., and in vitro drug release. The amount of Eudragit® RS100 and the amount of PVA were found to be significant factors respectively for determining the E.E. of the microspheres. A linear mathematical model equation fitted to the data was used to predict the E.E. in the optimal region. Optimized formulation of microspheres was prepared using optimal process variables setting in order to evaluate the optimization capability of the models generated according to IV-optimal design. The microspheres showed high E.E. (74.14 ± 0.015% to 85.34 ± 0.011%) and suitably sustained drug release (minimum; 40% to 60%; maximum) over a period of 12 h. The optimized microspheres formulation showed E.E. of 84.87 ± 0.005 with small error value (1.39). The low magnitudes of error and the significant value of R2 in the present investigation prove the high prognostic ability of the design. The absence of interactions between drug and polymers was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) revealed the dispersion of drug within microspheres formulation. The microspheres were found to be discrete, spherical with smooth surface. The results demonstrate that these microspheres could be promising delivery system to sustain the drug release and improve the E.E. thus prolong drug action and achieve the highest healing effect with minimal gastrointestinal side effects. - Highlights: • Aceclofenac microspheres were

  16. Optimization of sustained release aceclofenac microspheres using response surface methodology

    Deshmukh, Rameshwar K.; Naik, Jitendra B., E-mail: jitunaik@gmail.com

    2015-03-01

    Polymeric microspheres containing aceclofenac were prepared by single emulsion (oil-in-water) solvent evaporation method using response surface methodology (RSM). Microspheres were prepared by changing formulation variables such as the amount of Eudragit® RS100 and the amount of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) by statistical experimental design in order to enhance the encapsulation efficiency (E.E.) of the microspheres. The resultant microspheres were evaluated for their size, morphology, E.E., and in vitro drug release. The amount of Eudragit® RS100 and the amount of PVA were found to be significant factors respectively for determining the E.E. of the microspheres. A linear mathematical model equation fitted to the data was used to predict the E.E. in the optimal region. Optimized formulation of microspheres was prepared using optimal process variables setting in order to evaluate the optimization capability of the models generated according to IV-optimal design. The microspheres showed high E.E. (74.14 ± 0.015% to 85.34 ± 0.011%) and suitably sustained drug release (minimum; 40% to 60%; maximum) over a period of 12 h. The optimized microspheres formulation showed E.E. of 84.87 ± 0.005 with small error value (1.39). The low magnitudes of error and the significant value of R{sup 2} in the present investigation prove the high prognostic ability of the design. The absence of interactions between drug and polymers was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) revealed the dispersion of drug within microspheres formulation. The microspheres were found to be discrete, spherical with smooth surface. The results demonstrate that these microspheres could be promising delivery system to sustain the drug release and improve the E.E. thus prolong drug action and achieve the highest healing effect with minimal gastrointestinal side effects. - Highlights: • Aceclofenac microspheres

  17. Resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging by microsphere digital holography

    Wang, Yunxin; Guo, Sha; Wang, Dayong; Lin, Qiaowen; Rong, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Microsphere has shown the superiority of super-resolution imaging in the traditional 2D intensity microscope. Here a microsphere digital holography approach is presented to realize the resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging. The system is designed by combining the microsphere with the image-plane digital holography. A microsphere very close to the object can increase the resolution by transforming the object wave from the higher frequency to the lower one. The resolution enhancement amplitude and phase images can be retrieved from a single hologram. The experiments are carried on the 1D and 2D gratings, and the results demonstrate that the observed resolution has been improved, meanwhile, the phase-contrast image is obtained. The proposed method can improve the transverse resolution in all directions based on a single exposure. Furthermore, this system has extended the application of the microsphere from the conventional 2D microscopic imaging to 3D phase-contrast microscopic imaging.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres

    Horák, Daniel; Petrovský, Eduard; Kapička, Aleš; Frederichs, Theodor

    2007-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres were prepared and their detailed structural and magnetic characteristics given. Iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by chemical coprecipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts and stabilized with dextran, (carboxymethyl)dextran or tetramethylammonium hydroxide. The microspheres were prepared by emulsion or dispersion polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate in the presence of ferrofluid. The microspheres were uniform both in shape and usually also in size; their size distribution was narrow. All the magnetic parameters confirm superparamagnetic nature of the microspheres. Blocking temperature was not observed, suggesting the absence of magnetic interactions at low temperatures. This is most probably caused by complete encapsulation and the absence of agglomeration. Such microspheres can be used in biomedical applications.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres

    Horak, Daniel [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovskeho Sq. 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: horak@imc.cas.cz; Petrovsky, Eduard [Geophysical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Bocni II/1401, 141 31 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Kapicka, Ales [Geophysical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Bocni II/1401, 141 31 Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Frederichs, Theodor [University of Bremen, Department of Geosciences, GEO I, Klagenfurter Strasse, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated in poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres were prepared and their detailed structural and magnetic characteristics given. Iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by chemical coprecipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts and stabilized with dextran, (carboxymethyl)dextran or tetramethylammonium hydroxide. The microspheres were prepared by emulsion or dispersion polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate in the presence of ferrofluid. The microspheres were uniform both in shape and usually also in size; their size distribution was narrow. All the magnetic parameters confirm superparamagnetic nature of the microspheres. Blocking temperature was not observed, suggesting the absence of magnetic interactions at low temperatures. This is most probably caused by complete encapsulation and the absence of agglomeration. Such microspheres can be used in biomedical applications.

  20. Computational dynamics of acoustically-driven microsphere systems

    Glosser, Connor A; Dault, Daniel L; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2015-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the inter-particle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of non-dissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities, and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation ...

  1. Novel sustained release microspheres for pulmonary drug delivery.

    Cook, Robert O; Pannu, Rupi K; Kellaway, Ian W

    2005-05-01

    A novel process for generating sustained release (SR) particles for pulmonary drug delivery is described. High purity nanoparticles of a hydrophilic, ionised drug are entrapped within hydrophobic microspheres using a spray-drying approach. Sustained release of the model drug, terbutaline sulphate (TS), from the microspheres was found to be proportional to drug loading and phospholipid content. Microspheres with a 33% drug loading exhibited sustained release of 32.7% over 180 min in phosphate buffer. Release was not significantly different in simulated lung fluids. No significant burst release was observed which suggested that nanoparticles were coated effectively during spray-drying. The absence of nanoparticles at the microsphere surface was confirmed with confocal microscopy. The sustained release microspheres were formulated as a carrier-free dry powder for inhalation, and exhibited a favourable Fine Particle Fraction (FPF) of 46.5+/-1.8% and Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameter (MMAD) of 3.93+/-0.12 microm. PMID:15866336

  2. Study on the Degradation of Polylactide Microsphere In Vitro

    HeYing; WeiShuli

    2001-01-01

    This report concentrated on the rules and mechanism of the degradation of polylactide and the microspheres. The rate of degradation was assessed with five methods: observation of microsphere surface morphology by SEM, determination of the weight loss of the microspheres, determination of the molecular mass of the polymers by GPC, determination of pH and determination of the contents of lactic acid by UV spectrophotometry. The degradation of polylactide microspheres showed two-phase characteristics. At the early stage of the degradation, the high molecular mass polymers were cleaved into lower molecular mass fractions and at the late stage, there was a period of erosion and weight loss of the microspheres. The degradation was much slower for polymers with a higher molecular mass. The polylactide degradation showed good regularity.

  3. Microwire formation based on dielectrophoresis of electroless gold plated polystyrene microspheres

    Jiang Hong-Yuan; Ren Yu-Kun; Tao Ye

    2011-01-01

    Microspheres coated with a perfectly conductive surface have many advantages in the applications of biosensors and micro-electromechanical systems. Polystyrene microspheres with the diameter of 10 μm were coated with a 50 nmthick gold layer using an electroless gold plating approach. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) for bare microspheres and shelled microspheres was theoretically analysed and the real part of the Clausius-Mossotti factor was calculated for the two kinds of microspheres. The experiments on the dielectrophoretic characterisation of the uncoated polystyrene microspheres and gold coated polystyrene microspheres (GCPMs) were carried out. Experimental results showed that the gold coated polystyrene microspheres were only acted by a positive dielectrophoretic force when the frequency was below 40M Hz,while the uncoated polystyrene microspheres were governed by a negative dielectrophoretic force in this frequency range.The gold coated polystyrene microspheres were exploited to form the microwire automatically according to their stable dielectrophoretic and electric characterisations.

  4. Incorporation of drug-resin complex to improve microsphere performance

    Namdeo R Jadhav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present work was to incorporate drug-resin complex (DRC to microspheres to achieve improved drug loading, less leakage, and extended zero order release. Ondensetron hydrochloride (ODH, a model drug was complexed with Indion 244, and incorporated to microspheres of hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC, and ethyl cellulose (EC. A 32 full factorial design was used to prepare microspheres using HPMC and EC as independent variables, X1 and X2 respectively. The microspheres obtained were evaluated for yield, topology, micromeritics, drug entrapment, and drug release kinetics. Complexation of ODH with Indion 244 was found to be 28% wt/wt. The incorporation efficiency of DRC to microspheres (DRC1-DRC9 was in the range of 70.41 ΁ 2.18 to 95.08 ΁ 0.76% wt/wt. The trend of increase in the drug entrapment (DRC with high amounts of HPMC and EC was noted for all microspheres. Yield of DRC9 was maximum (84.87% wt/wt, and was lowest for DRC1. Acceptable Hausner′s ratio, Carr′s compressibility index and angle of repose demonstrated the excellent flowability of microspheres (DRC1 to DRC9. Drug release kinetic studies showed that, ODH dissociation from DRC, and its diffusion through HPMC and EC, both, have contributed for extended zero order release. Especially, from DRC2, maximum extended release was noted up to 19.10 hrs (zero order, R2 = 0.9239. Hence, it can be concluded that, incorporation of DRC to microspheres can overcome poor drug loading, high drug leakage, and poor drug sustainability problems of microspheres. Especially, the zero order release can be achieved by incorporation of DRC to microspheres.

  5. Proceedings of the third IEA international workshop on beryllium technology for fusion

    This report is the Proceedings of the Third International Energy Agency International Workshop on Beryllium Technology for Fusion. The workshop was held on October 22-24, 1997, at the Sangyou Kaikan in Mito City with 68 participants who attended from the Europe, the Russian Federation, the Kazakstan, the United States and Japan. The topics for papers were arranged into 9 sessions; beryllium applications for ITER, production and characterization, chemical compatibility and corrosion, forming and joining, plasma/tritium interactions, beryllium coating, first wall applications, neutron irradiation effects, health and safety. To utilize beryllium in the pebble type blanket, a series of discussions were intensified in multiple view points such as the swelling, He/T release from beryllium pebble irradiated up to high He content, effective thermal conductivity, tritium permeation and coating, and fabrication cost, and so on. As the plasma facing material, life time of beryllium and coated beryllium, dust and particle production, joining, waste treatment, mechanical properties and deformation by swelling were discussed as important issues. Especially, it was recognized throughout the discussions that the comparative study by the different researchers should be carried out to establish the reliability of the data reported in the workshop and in others. To enhance the comparative study, the world wide collaboration for the relative evaluation of the beryllium was proposed by the International Organization Committee and the proposal was approved by all of the participants. The 45 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  6. Theoretical Chemistry to assess the risk from the Beryllium in ITER

    The Bestair project was recently awarded the IRSN prize for creativity in exploratory research. The objective of this study was to assess the potential release of beryllium, an extremely toxic element, into the environment in the event of an accident through improved knowledge of the beryllium-based chemical forms present inside the ITER containment. (author)

  7. Reduction evaporation of BeO to provide a beryllium metal sample for accelerator radiometric dating

    A technique is described for preparing beryllium metal samples from beryllium oxide for use in accelerator ion sources. These samples are used to measure minute 10Be/9Be ratios for radiometric dating at the University of Washington tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. (orig.)

  8. Analysis of the KANT experiment on beryllium using TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code

    Beryllium is an important material in fusion technology for multiplying neutrons in blankets. However, beryllium nuclear data are differently presented in modern nuclear data evaluations. Recent investigations with the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo simulation of the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) demonstrated that beryllium reaction data are the main source of the calculation uncertainties between ENDF/B-VII.0 and JEFF-3.1. To clarify the calculation uncertainties from data libraries on beryllium, in this study TRIPOLI-4 calculations of the Karlsruhe Neutron Transmission (KANT) experiment have been performed by using ENDF/B-VII.0 and new JEFF-3.1.1 data libraries. The KANT Experiment on beryllium has been used to validate neutron transport codes and nuclear data libraries. An elaborated KANT experiment benchmark has been compiled and published in the NEA/SINBAD database and it has been used as reference in the present work. The neutron multiplication in bulk beryllium assemblies was considered with a central D-T neutron source. Neutron leakage spectra through the 5, 10, and 17 cm thick spherical beryllium shells were calculated and five-group partial leakage multiplications were reported and discussed. In general, improved C/E ratios on neutron leakage multiplications have been obtained. Both ENDF/B-VII.0 and JEFF-3.1.1 beryllium data libraries of TRIPOLI-4 are acceptable now for fusion neutronics calculations.

  9. Proceedings of the third IEA international workshop on beryllium technology for fusion

    Kawamura, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Makoto [eds.

    1998-01-01

    This report is the Proceedings of the Third International Energy Agency International Workshop on Beryllium Technology for Fusion. The workshop was held on October 22-24, 1997, at the Sangyou Kaikan in Mito City with 68 participants who attended from the Europe, the Russian Federation, the Kazakstan, the United States and Japan. The topics for papers were arranged into 9 sessions; beryllium applications for ITER, production and characterization, chemical compatibility and corrosion, forming and joining, plasma/tritium interactions, beryllium coating, first wall applications, neutron irradiation effects, health and safety. To utilize beryllium in the pebble type blanket, a series of discussions were intensified in multiple view points such as the swelling, He/T release from beryllium pebble irradiated up to high He content, effective thermal conductivity, tritium permeation and coating, and fabrication cost, and so on. As the plasma facing material, life time of beryllium and coated beryllium, dust and particle production, joining, waste treatment, mechanical properties and deformation by swelling were discussed as important issues. Especially, it was recognized throughout the discussions that the comparative study by the different researchers should be carried out to establish the reliability of the data reported in the workshop and in others. To enhance the comparative study, the world wide collaboration for the relative evaluation of the beryllium was proposed by the International Organization Committee and the proposal was approved by all of the participants. The 45 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  10. Protection of beryllium metal against microbial influenced corrosion using silane self-assembled monolayers

    Vaidya, Rajendra U.; Deshpande, Alina; Hersman, Larry; Brozik, Susan M.; Butt, Darryl

    1999-08-01

    The effectiveness of a self-assembled silane monolayer as protection for beryllium against microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) was demonstrated. Four-point bend tests on coated and uncoated beryllium samples were conducted after microbiological exposures, and the effectiveness of these coatings as MIC protection was reported through mechanical property evaluations. Application of the silane monolayer to the beryllium surfaces was found to prevent degradation of the failure strength and displacement-to-failure of beryllium in bending. In contrast, the uncoated beryllium samples exhibited a severe reduction in these mechanical properties in the presence of the marine Pseudomonas bacteria. The potentiodynamic measurements showed that both the uncoated and coated samples pitted at the open-circuit potential. However, the size and distribution of the corrosion pits formed on the surface of the beryllium samples were significantly different for the various cases (coated vs uncoated samples exposed to control vs inoculated medium). This study demonstrates the following: (1) the deleterious effects of MIC on the mechanical properties of beryllium and (2) the potential for developing fast, easy, and cost-effective MIC protection for beryllium metal using silane self-assemblies.

  11. Reduction of surface erosion caused by helium blistering in sintered beryllium and sintered aluminum powder

    Studies have been conducted to find materials with microstructures which minimize the formation of blisters. A promising class of materials appears to be sintered metal powder with small average grain sizes and low atomic number Z. Studies of the surface erosion of sintered aluminum powder (SAP 895) and of aluminum held at 4000C due to blistering by 100 keV helium ions have been conducted and the results are compared to those obtained earlier for room temperature irradiation. A significant reduction of the erosion rate in SAP 895 in comparison to annealed aluminum and SAP 930 is observed. In addition results on the blistering of sintered beryllium powder (type I) irradiated at room temperature and 6000C by 100 keV helium ions are given. These results will be compared with those reported recently for vacuum cast beryllium foil and a foil of sintered beryllium powder (type II) which was fabricated differently, than type I. For room temperature irradiation only a few blisters could be observed in sintered beryllium powder type I and type II and they are smaller in size and in number than in vacuum cast beryllium. For irradiation at 6000C large scale exfoliation of blisters was observed for vacuum cast beryllium but much less exfoliation was seen for sintered beryllium powder, type I, and type II. The results show a reduction in erosion rate cast beryllium, for both room temperature and 6000C

  12. Optical method for measurement of magnetophoretic mobility of individual magnetic microspheres in defined magnetic field

    The magnetophoretic mobility of magnetic microspheres, nanospheres and particles depends not only on type and amount of encapsulated magnetic compound, but also on microsphere-internal distribution, solvent system, porosity and other factors. Using a microscopic setup with automated digital image processing, different magnetic microspheres were investigated for size, acceleration and velocity of each single microsphere in the suspension. The overall magnetophoretic mobility (responsiveness to an external magnetic field) was not directly proportional to the saturation magnetization of the magnetic microspheres

  13. Drug-loaded biodegradable microspheres for image-guided combinatory epigenetic therapy in cells

    Xu, Ronald X.; Xu, Jeff S.; Zuo, Tao; Shen, Rulong; Huang, Tim H.; Michael F. Tweedle

    2011-01-01

    We synthesize drug-loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres for image-guided combinatory epigenetic therapy in MCF-10A human mammary epithelial cells. LY294002 and Nile Red are encapsulated in microspheres for sustained drug release and fluorescence microscopic imaging. Drug-loaded microspheres target MCF-10A cells through a three-step binding process involving biotinylated antibody, streptavidin, and biotinylated microspheres. LY294002 loaded microspheres and 5-Aza-2-deoxycy...

  14. 20 CFR 30.207 - How does a claimant prove a diagnosis of a beryllium disease covered under Part B?

    2010-04-01

    ... this section), together with lung pathology consistent with chronic beryllium disease, including the...) Occupational or environmental history, or epidemiologic evidence of beryllium exposure; and (ii) Any three of...) Lung pathology consistent with chronic beryllium disease. (D) Clinical course consistent with a...

  15. Detection of beryllium treatment of natural sapphires by NRA

    Gutierrez, P.C., E-mail: carolina.gutierrez@uam.e [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ynsa, M.-D.; Climent-Font, A. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Dpto. Fisica Aplicada C-12, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Calligaro, T. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des musees de France C2RMF, CNRS-UMR171, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France)

    2010-06-15

    Since the 1990's, artificial treatment of natural sapphires (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals coloured by impurities) by diffusion of beryllium at high temperature has become a growing practice. This process permits to enhance the colour of these gemstones, and thus to increase their value. Detection of such a treatment - diffusion of tens of {mu}g/g of beryllium in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} crystals - is usually achieved using high sensitivity techniques like laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP/MS) or laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) which are unfortunately micro-destructive (leaving 50-100-{mu}m diameter craters on the gems). The simple and non-destructive alternative method proposed in this work is based on the nuclear reaction {sup 9}Be({alpha}, n{gamma}){sup 12}C with an external helium ion beam impinging on the gem directly placed in air. The 4439 keV prompt {gamma}-ray tagging Be atoms are detected with a high efficiency bismuth germanate scintillator. Beam dose is monitored using the 2235 keV prompt {gamma}-ray produced during irradiation by the aluminium of the sapphire matrix through the {sup 27}Al({alpha}, p{gamma}){sup 30}Si nuclear reaction. The method is tested on a series of Be-treated sapphires previously analyzed by LA-ICP/MS to determine the optimal conditions to obtain a peak to background appropriate to reach the required {mu}g/g sensitivity. Using a 2.8-MeV external He beam and a beam dose of 200 {mu}C, beryllium concentrations from 5 to 16 {mu}g/g have been measured in the samples, with a detection limit of 1 {mu}g/g.

  16. Detection of beryllium treatment of natural sapphires by NRA

    Gutiérrez, P. C.; Ynsa, M.-D.; Climent-Font, A.; Calligaro, T.

    2010-06-01

    Since the 1990's, artificial treatment of natural sapphires (Al 2O 3 crystals coloured by impurities) by diffusion of beryllium at high temperature has become a growing practice. This process permits to enhance the colour of these gemstones, and thus to increase their value. Detection of such a treatment - diffusion of tens of μg/g of beryllium in Al 2O 3 crystals - is usually achieved using high sensitivity techniques like laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP/MS) or laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) which are unfortunately micro-destructive (leaving 50-100-μm diameter craters on the gems). The simple and non-destructive alternative method proposed in this work is based on the nuclear reaction 9Be(α, nγ) 12C with an external helium ion beam impinging on the gem directly placed in air. The 4439 keV prompt γ-ray tagging Be atoms are detected with a high efficiency bismuth germanate scintillator. Beam dose is monitored using the 2235 keV prompt γ-ray produced during irradiation by the aluminium of the sapphire matrix through the 27Al(α, pγ) 30Si nuclear reaction. The method is tested on a series of Be-treated sapphires previously analyzed by LA-ICP/MS to determine the optimal conditions to obtain a peak to background appropriate to reach the required μg/g sensitivity. Using a 2.8-MeV external He beam and a beam dose of 200 μC, beryllium concentrations from 5 to 16 μg/g have been measured in the samples, with a detection limit of 1 μg/g.

  17. Preliminary irradiation test for new material selection on lifetime extension of beryllium reflector

    Beryllium has been utilized as a moderator and/or reflector in Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), because of nuclear properties of beryllium, low neutron capture and high neutron scattering cross sections. At present, the amount of irradiated beryllium frames in JMTR is about 2 tons in the JMTR canal. In this study, preliminary irradiation test was performed from 162nd to 165th operation cycles of JMTR as irradiation and PIE technique development for lifetime expansion of beryllium frames. The design study of irradiation capsule, development of dismount device of irradiation capsule and the high accuracy size measurement device were carried out. The PIEs such as tensile tests, metallurgical observation, and size change measurement were carried out with two kinds of irradiated beryllium metals (S-200F and S-65C)

  18. Preliminary irradiation test for new material selection on lifetime extension of beryllium reflector

    Beryllium has been utilized as a moderator and/or reflector in Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), because of nuclear properties of beryllium, low neutron capture and high neutron scattering cross sections. At present, the amount of irradiated beryllium frames in JMTR is about 2 tons in the JMTR canal. In this study, preliminary irradiation test was performed from 162nd to 165th operation cycles of JMTR as irradiation and PIE technique development for lifetime expansion of beryllium frames. The design study of irradiation capsule, development of dismount device of irradiation capsule and the high accuracy size measurement device were carried out. The PIEs such as tensile tests, metallurgical observation, and size change measurement were also carried out with two kinds of irradiated beryllium metals (S-200F and S-65C). (author)

  19. HEINBE; the calculation program for helium production in beryllium under neutron irradiation

    HEINBE is a program on personal computer for calculating helium production in beryllium under neutron irradiation. The program can also calculate the tritium production in beryllium. Considering many nuclear reactions and their multi-step reactions, helium and tritium productions in beryllium materials irradiated at fusion reactor or fission reactor may be calculated with high accuracy. The calculation method, user's manual, calculated examples and comparison with experimental data were described. This report also describes a neutronics simulation method to generate additional data on swelling of beryllium, 3,000-15,000 appm helium range, for end-of-life of the proposed design for fusion blanket of the ITER. The calculation results indicate that helium production for beryllium sample doped lithium by 50 days irradiation in the fission reactor, such as the JMTR, could be achieved to 2,000-8,000 appm. (author)

  20. Deformation behaviour of fine grained high purity beryllium - influence of fabrication parameters, temperature and copper additions

    The deformation behaviour of high-purity beryllium was tested on hot isostatically pressed samples of different initial grain size and compared with material manufactured commercially from pure beryllium and with beryllium-copper alloys containing 0.44, 1.1 and 2.1 at.% copper. Initial grain size of these high purity material was 0C. Grain structure of the samples was subsequently analysed by light, rastor and transmission electron microscopy. The influence of copper additions on deformation of high-purity beryllium was analysed. A further aim of this study was to investigate, by suitable methods, the mode of action of relevant impurities and to throw light on their influence on grain formation. This should enable reliable information to be provided for the manufacture of high-purity beryllium which, in turn, will lead to an improvement in ductility. (orig./IHOE)

  1. Use of notched beams to establish fracture criteria for beryllium

    The fracture of an improved form of pure beryllium was studied under triaxial tensile stresses. This state of stress was produced by testing notched beams, which were thick enough to be in a state of plane strain at the center. A plane strain, elastic-incremental plasticity finite element program was then used to determine the stress and strain distributions at fracture. A four-point bend fixture was used to load the specimens. It was carefully designed and manufactured to eliminate virtually all of the shear stresses at the reduced section of the notched beams. The unixial properties were obtained

  2. Technique of beryllium determination using an (α,n) reaction

    The possibility of detecting small amounts of 9Be using the (α, n) reaction has been investigated. It is shown that at a 210Po α-particle source intensity of 3x108 s-1 for limit of the detectable amount of beryllium is equal to 0.1 μg in the case of recording neutron-gamma (>= 3.6 MeV) coincidences. Other light elements (B, F, Al, Mg, Si etc.) do not produce a noticeable background under such conditions

  3. Accumulation of tritium in beryllium material under neutron irradiation

    In the present work the programming code is created on the basis of which the accumulation kinetics of tritium and isotope of He4 in the Be9 sample is analyzed depending on the time. The program is written in C++ programming language and for the calculations Monte Carlo method was applied. This program scoped on the calculation of concentration of helium and tritium in beryllium samples depending on the spectrum of the neutron flux in different experimental reactors such as JMTR, JOYO and IPEN/MB. The processes of accumulation of helium and tritium for each neutron energy spectrum of these reactors were analyzed. (author)

  4. Atomic, Crystal, Elastic, Thermal, Nuclear, and Other Properties of Beryllium

    Goldberg, A

    2006-02-01

    This report is part of a series of documents that provide a background to those involved in the construction of beryllium components and their applications. This report is divided into five sub-sections: Atomic/Crystal Structure, Elastic Properties, Thermal Properties, Nuclear Properties, and Miscellaneous Properties. In searching through different sources for the various properties to be included in this report, inconsistencies were at times observed between these sources. In such cases, the values reported by the Handbook of Chemistry and Physics was usually used. In equations, except where indicated otherwise, temperature (T) is in degrees Kelvin.

  5. Double K-shell photoionization of atomic beryllium

    Yip, F. L. [Departamento de Quimica, Modulo 13, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Martin, F. [Departamento de Quimica, Modulo 13, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Madrilen(tilde sign)o de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); McCurdy, C. W. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Chemical Sciences, and Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Rescigno, T. N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Chemical Sciences, and Ultrafast X-ray Science Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Double photoionization of the core 1s electrons in atomic beryllium is theoretically studied using a hybrid approach that combines orbital and grid-based representations of the Hamiltonian. The {sup 1} S ground state and {sup 1} P final state contain a double occupancy of the 2s valence shell in all configurations used to represent the correlated wave function. Triply differential cross sections are evaluated, with particular attention focused on a comparison of the effects of scattering the ejected electrons through the spherically symmetric valence shell with similar cross sections for helium, representing a purely two-electron target with an analogous initial-state configuration.

  6. Electromagnetic properties of the Beryllium-11 nucleus in Halo EFT

    Hammer H.-W.; Phillips D.R.

    2010-01-01

    We compute electromagnetic properties of the Beryllium-11 nucleus using an effective field theory that exploits the separation of scales in this halo system. We fix the parameters of the EFT from measured data on levels and scattering lengths in the 10Be plus neutron system. We then obtain predictions for the B(E1) strength of the 1/2+ to 1/2− transition in the 11Be nucleus. We also compute the charge radius of the ground state of 11Be. Agreement with experiment within the expected accurac...

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties of neutron irradiated beryllium

    Ishitsuka, E.; Kawamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Terai, T.; Tanaka, S.

    1998-01-01

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of the neutron irradiated beryllium with total fast neutron fluences of 1.3 - 4.3 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E>1 MeV) at 327 - 616degC were studied. Swelling increased by high irradiation temperature, high fluence, and by the small grain size and high impurity. Obvious decreasing of the fracture stress was observed in the bending test and in small grain specimens which had many helium bubbles on the grain boundary. Decreasing of the fracture stress for small grain specimens was presumably caused by crack propagation on the grain boundaries which weekend by helium bubbles. (author)

  8. On solid-phase interaction of beryllium oxide with mullite

    The interaction of beryllium oxide with mullite has been analyzed thermodynamically. It is shown that the reaction between the above substances must proceed with separation of chrysoberyl but without yielding phenacite, which is inconsistent with some data published. It has been found experimentally that the interaction of pure BeO and mullite is described by equation 3Al2Ox2SiO2+3BeO→3BeAl2O4+2SiO2

  9. Dosage of boron traces in graphite, uranium and beryllium oxide

    The problem of the dosage of the boron in the materials serving to the construction of nuclear reactors arises of the following way: to determine to about 0,1 ppm close to the quantities of boron of the order of tenth ppm. We have chosen the colorimetric analysis with curcumin as method of dosage. To reach the indicated contents, it is necessary to do a previous separation of the boron and the materials of basis, either by extraction of tetraphenylarsonium fluoborate in the case of the boron dosage in uranium and the beryllium oxide, either by the use of a cations exchanger resin of in the case of graphite. (M.B.)

  10. Fabrication of self-assembled microsphere monolayers

    Domonkos, Mária; Ižák, Tibor; Kromka, Alexander

    Bratislava: Slovenská vákuová spoločnosť, 2014 - (Michalka, M.; Vincze, A.; Veselý, M.), s. 125-128 ISBN 978-80-971179-4-8. [School of Vacuum Technology /17./. Štrbské Pleso (SK), 02.10.2014-05.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : self-assembly * monolayer * microspheres * spin-coating Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  11. Reactive ion etching of polystyrene microspheres

    Domonkos, Mária; Ižák, Tibor; Štolcová, L.; Proška, J.; Kromka, Alexander

    Praha: ČVUT, 2013 - (Nežerka, V.; Rácová, Z.; Ryparová, P.; Tesárek, P.), s. 24-28 ISBN 978-80-01-05334-8. [Nanomateriály a nanotechnologie ve stavebnictví 2013. Praha (CZ), 12.06.2013-12.06.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanosphere lithography * reactive ion etching * polystyrene microspheres * Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer s Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  12. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF TRAMADOL HYDROCHLORIDE MICROSPHERES

    Patel Keyur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tramadol HCl was microencapsulated with Ethylcellulose using multiple emulsion solvent evaporation method. A 32 factorial design employed to study the effect of drug: polymer ratio and volume of External phase (1% PVA on % yield, % encapsulation efficiency, particle size, % drug release rate. The drug: polymer ratio and volume of continuous phase were significant effect on % yield, % entrapment efficiency, particle size, % drug release rate. % drug release was Biphasic system first initially bursting effect and finally sustained. Higher Percentage yield (77.4% and Higher Percentage Encapsulation Efficiency(31.1% were observed in Batch EC3. All the microspheres were spherical in nature its surface was smooth observed in SEM report.

  13. Improvement of diagnostic confidence for detection of multiple myeloma involvement of the ribs by a new CT software generating rib unfolded images: Comparison with 5- and 1-mm axial images

    Homann, Georg; Mustafa, Deedar Farhad; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Horger, Marius [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Weisel, Katja [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Internal Medicine II, Tuebingen (Germany); Ditt, Hendrik [Healthcare Sector Imaging and Therapy Division, Siemens AG, Forchheim (Germany)

    2015-04-02

    To investigate the performance of a new CT software generating rib unfolded images for improved detection of rib osteolyses in patients with multiple myeloma. One hundred sixteen patients who underwent whole-body reduced-dose multidetector computed tomography (WBRD-MDCT) for multiple myeloma diagnosis and during follow-up were retrospectively evaluated. Nonenhanced CT scans with 5- and 1-mm slice thickness were interpreted by two readers with focus on detection of rib involvement (location, number, fracture). Image analysis of ''unfolded,'' 1-mm-based CT rib images was subsequently undertaken. We classified the number of lytic bone lesions into 0, 1, 2, <5, <10 and ≥10. For all three data sets the reading time was registered. An approximated sum of 6,727 myeloma-related rib lesions was found. On a patient-based analysis, CT (5 mm), CT (1 mm) and CT (1 mm ''unfolded rib'') yielded a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 79.7/94.7/87.1, 88.1/93/90.5 and 98.3/96.5/97.4, respectively. In a lesion-based analysis, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the three evaluations were 69.7/87.2/70.5, 79.8/55.9/78 and 96.5/89.7/96.1. Mean reading time for 5 mm/1 mm axial images and unfolded images was 178.7/215.1/90.8 s, respectively. The generation of ''unfolded rib'' images improves detection of rib involvement in patients with multiple myeloma and significantly reduces reading time. (orig.)

  14. Improvement of diagnostic confidence for detection of multiple myeloma involvement of the ribs by a new CT software generating rib unfolded images: Comparison with 5- and 1-mm axial images

    To investigate the performance of a new CT software generating rib unfolded images for improved detection of rib osteolyses in patients with multiple myeloma. One hundred sixteen patients who underwent whole-body reduced-dose multidetector computed tomography (WBRD-MDCT) for multiple myeloma diagnosis and during follow-up were retrospectively evaluated. Nonenhanced CT scans with 5- and 1-mm slice thickness were interpreted by two readers with focus on detection of rib involvement (location, number, fracture). Image analysis of ''unfolded,'' 1-mm-based CT rib images was subsequently undertaken. We classified the number of lytic bone lesions into 0, 1, 2, <5, <10 and ≥10. For all three data sets the reading time was registered. An approximated sum of 6,727 myeloma-related rib lesions was found. On a patient-based analysis, CT (5 mm), CT (1 mm) and CT (1 mm ''unfolded rib'') yielded a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 79.7/94.7/87.1, 88.1/93/90.5 and 98.3/96.5/97.4, respectively. In a lesion-based analysis, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the three evaluations were 69.7/87.2/70.5, 79.8/55.9/78 and 96.5/89.7/96.1. Mean reading time for 5 mm/1 mm axial images and unfolded images was 178.7/215.1/90.8 s, respectively. The generation of ''unfolded rib'' images improves detection of rib involvement in patients with multiple myeloma and significantly reduces reading time. (orig.)

  15. Measurement of thermal diffusivity of depleted uranium metal microspheres

    Humrickhouse-Helmreich, Carissa J.; Corbin, Rob; McDeavitt, Sean M.

    2014-03-01

    The high void space of nuclear fuels composed of homogeneous uranium metal microspheres may allow them to achieve ultra-high burnup by accommodating fuel swelling and reducing fuel/cladding interactions; however, the relatively low thermal conductivity of microsphere nuclear fuels may limit their application. To support the development of microsphere nuclear fuels, an apparatus was designed in a glovebox and used to measure the apparent thermal diffusivity of a packed bed of depleted uranium (DU) microspheres with argon fill in the void spaces. The developed Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA) recorded radial temperature changes due to an initial heat pulse from a central thin-diameter cartridge heater. Using thermocouple positions and time-temperature data, the apparent thermal diffusivity was calculated. The thermal conductivity of the DU microspheres was calculated based on the thermal diffusivity from the CHTA, known material densities and specific heat capacities, and an assumed 70% packing density based on prior measurements. Results indicate that DU metal microspheres have very low thermal conductivity, relative to solid uranium metal, and rapidly form an oxidation layer even in a low oxygen environment. At 500 °C, the thermal conductivity of the DU metal microsphere bed was 0.431 ± 0.0560 W/m-K compared to the literature value of approximately 32 W/m-K for solid uranium metal.

  16. Microsphere radio embolization of liver malignancies: current developments

    The worldwide incidence of hepatic malignancies, both primary and secondary, exceeds 1 000 000 new cases each year. The poor prognosis of patients suffering from hepatic malignancies has lead to the development of a liver directed therapy which consists of intra-arterial administration of radioactive particles through a catheter. Yttrium-90 (90Y) microspheres are increasingly applied for this purpose, and up to now nearly all clinical experience with radio embolization has been obtained with these microspheres. The response rate is very promising in both patients with primary and metastatic liver malignancies. Currently, two commercially available 90Y microsphere devices are in use clinically, both as a first-line treatment and in a salvage setting. Unfortunately, the use of a pure β-emitter like 90Y hampers acquisition of high quality nuclear images for pre-treatment work-up and follow-up. This issue was addressed by the development of holmium-166 (166Ho) and rhenium-188 (188Re) microspheres, which emit both b-particles for therapeutic purposes and g-photons for nuclear imaging. Moreover, since holmium is paramagnetic it allows for magnetic resonance imaging. 166Ho loaded poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres have been thoroughly investigated in a preclinical setting, and recently the first clinical results for 188Re microspheres were reported. This review provides an overview of the current status and (pre-)clinical developments of radioactive microspheres for treatment of liver malignancies.

  17. A novel chemistry for conjugating pneumococcal polysaccharides to Luminex microspheres.

    Schlottmann, Sonela A; Jain, Neil; Chirmule, Narendra; Esser, Mark T

    2006-02-20

    Here we describe a novel method to conjugate pneumococcal polysaccharides (PnPS) to Luminex microspheres for use in serological assays. 4-(4,6-dimethoxy[1,3,5]triazin-2-yl)-4-methyl-morpholinium (DMTMM) modification of PnPS and conjugation to carboxyl functional groups on Luminex microspheres (COOH-DMTMM method) was shown to be a reproducible chemistry that efficiently conjugated PnPS to Luminex microspheres without affecting the antigenicity of a broad set of PnPS. The COOH-DMTMM method was compared to three other methods for robustness, reproducibility and effect on PnPS antigenicity in a multiplexed assay format. The other methods examined included adsorption of the unmodified PnPS to Luminex microspheres, oxidation of the PnPS to conjugate them to amino-modified microspheres using carbodiimide chemistry and poly-l-lysine modification of the PnPS before conjugating to carboxy Luminex microspheres using carbodiimide chemistry. Of the four methods, the COOH-DMTMM chemistry was shown to be a robust methodology, producing stable PnPS coupled microspheres with a 4-log dynamic range and low cross-reactivity when used in a PnPS-specific IgG serology assay. This novel chemistry should be useful for developing serological assays to measure antibodies to polysaccharides for use in vaccine and epidemiology studies. PMID:16448665

  18. Measurement of thermal diffusivity of depleted uranium metal microspheres

    The high void space of nuclear fuels composed of homogeneous uranium metal microspheres may allow them to achieve ultra-high burnup by accommodating fuel swelling and reducing fuel/cladding interactions; however, the relatively low thermal conductivity of microsphere nuclear fuels may limit their application. To support the development of microsphere nuclear fuels, an apparatus was designed in a glovebox and used to measure the apparent thermal diffusivity of a packed bed of depleted uranium (DU) microspheres with argon fill in the void spaces. The developed Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA) recorded radial temperature changes due to an initial heat pulse from a central thin-diameter cartridge heater. Using thermocouple positions and time–temperature data, the apparent thermal diffusivity was calculated. The thermal conductivity of the DU microspheres was calculated based on the thermal diffusivity from the CHTA, known material densities and specific heat capacities, and an assumed 70% packing density based on prior measurements. Results indicate that DU metal microspheres have very low thermal conductivity, relative to solid uranium metal, and rapidly form an oxidation layer even in a low oxygen environment. At 500 °C, the thermal conductivity of the DU metal microsphere bed was 0.431 ± 0.0560 W/m-K compared to the literature value of approximately 32 W/m-K for solid uranium metal

  19. Physicochemical characteristics of aerosol particles generated during the milling of beryllium silicate ores: implications for risk assessment.

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Chipera, Steve J; Day, Gregory A; Sabey, Phil; Dickerson, Robert M; Sbarra, Deborah C; Duling, Mathew G; Lawrence, Robert B; Stanton, Marcia L; Scripsick, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation of beryllium dusts generated during milling of ores and cutting of beryl-containing gemstones is associated with development of beryllium sensitization and low prevalence of chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Inhalation of beryllium aerosols generated during primary beryllium production and machining of the metal, alloys, and ceramics are associated with sensitization and high rates of CBD, despite similar airborne beryllium mass concentrations among these industries. Understanding the physicochemical properties of exposure aerosols may help to understand the differential immunopathologic mechanisms of sensitization and CBD and lead to more biologically relevant exposure standards. Properties of aerosols generated during the industrial milling of bertrandite and beryl ores were evaluated. Airborne beryllium mass concentrations among work areas ranged from 0.001 microg/m(3) (beryl ore grinding) to 2.1 microg/m(3) (beryl ore crushing). Respirable mass fractions of airborne beryllium-containing particles were 80% in high-energy input areas (beryl melting, beryl grinding). Particle specific surface area decreased with processing from feedstock ores to drumming final product beryllium hydroxide. Among work areas, beryllium was identified in three crystalline forms: beryl, poorly crystalline beryllium oxide, and beryllium hydroxide. In comparison to aerosols generated by high-CBD risk primary production processes, aerosol particles encountered during milling had similar mass concentrations, generally lower number concentrations and surface area, and contained no identifiable highly crystalline beryllium oxide. One possible explanation for the apparent low prevalence of CBD among workers exposed to beryllium mineral dusts may be that characteristics of the exposure material do not contribute to the development of lung burdens sufficient for progression from sensitization to CBD. In comparison to high-CBD risk exposures where the chemical nature of aerosol

  20. Mucoadhesivity Characterization of Isabgol Husk Mucilage Microspheres Crosslinked by Glutaraldehyde.

    Sharma, Vipin Kumar; Sharma, Prince Prashant; Mazumder, Bhasker; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Singh, Thakuri

    2015-01-01

    The microspheres of Isabgol husk were prepared by emulsification-crosslinking technique and the gastrointestinal transition behavior of the formulation was studied by gamma scintigraphy. The impact of different process variables such as amount of glutaraldehyde, concentration of Isabgol husk and temperature was studied on surface morphology and mucoadhesion. In vitro mucoadhesive testing of formulations was performed by determination of zeta potential, mucus glycoprotein assay and mucus adsorption isotherms. The effect of feeding on retention of microspheres in the gastrointestinal track (GIT) was studied in albino rabbits by gamma scintigraphy study. The results indicated the formation of microspheres as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The smooth and round surfaces of microspheres were obtained on increasing Isabgol husk and glutaraldehyde amount. The positive zeta potential of all formulations indicated the electrostatic interaction as a mechanism of mucoadhesion between the mucus of GIT membranes and the microspheres surfaces. The influence of electrostatic interaction on mucoadhesion of microspheres was again ascertained when the mucin equilibrium adsorption on preparations indicated well fitness in Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. During gamma scintigraphy, the stability of (99m)Tc-sodium pertechnetate was found 98.82% at pH 6.8 and 96.78% at pH 7.2, respectively. It indicated the minimal leaching of bound radionuclide from microspheres during gastrointestinal transition as observed in gamma scintigraphic images of the rabbits. The microspheres retained in GIT even after 24 hrs of oral administration. The results indicated the applicability of Isabgol husk mucilage in the development of mucoadhesive microspheres. PMID:25675337

  1. Differential regulation of angiogenesis using degradable VEGF-binding microspheres.

    Belair, David G; Miller, Michael J; Wang, Shoujian; Darjatmoko, Soesiawati R; Binder, Bernard Y K; Sheibani, Nader; Murphy, William L

    2016-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) spatial and temporal activity must be tightly controlled during angiogenesis to form perfusable vasculature in a healing wound. The native extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates growth factor activity locally via sequestering, and researchers have used ECM-mimicking approaches to regulate the activity of VEGF in cell culture and in vivo. However, the impact of dynamic, affinity-mediated growth factor sequestering has not been explored in detail with biomaterials. Here, we sought to modulate VEGF activity dynamically over time using poly(ethylene glycol) microspheres containing VEGF-binding peptides (VBPs) and exhibiting varying degradation rates. The degradation rate of VBP microspheres conferred a differential ability to up- or down-regulate VEGF activity in culture with primary human endothelial cells. VBP microspheres with fast-degrading crosslinks reduced VEGF activity and signaling, while VBP microspheres with no inherent degradability sequestered and promoted VEGF activity in culture with endothelial cells. VBP microspheres with degradable crosslinks significantly reduced neovascularization in vivo, but neither non-degradable VBP microspheres nor bolus delivery of soluble VBP reduced neovascularization. The covalent incorporation of VBP to degradable microspheres was required to reduce neovascularization in a mouse model of choroidal neovascularization in vivo, which demonstrates a potential clinical application of degradable VBP microspheres to reduce pathological angiogenesis. The results herein highlight the ability to modulate the activity of a sequestered growth factor by changing the crosslinker identity within PEG hydrogel microspheres. The insights gained here may instruct the design and translation of affinity-based growth factor sequestering biomaterials for regenerative medicine applications. PMID:27061268

  2. Removal of chloroform from biodegradable therapeutic microspheres by radiolysis.

    Zielhuis, S W; Nijsen, J F W; Dorland, L; Krijger, G C; van Het Schip, A D; Hennink, W E

    2006-06-01

    Radioactive holmium-166 loaded poly(l-lactic acid) microspheres are promising systems for the treatment of liver malignancies. These microspheres are loaded with holmium acetylacetonate (HoAcAc) and prepared by a solvent evaporation method using chloroform. After preparation the microspheres (Ho-PLLA-MS) are activated by neutron irradiation in a nuclear reactor. It was observed that relatively large amounts of residual chloroform (1000-6000 ppm) remained in the microspheres before neutron irradiation. Since it is known that chloroform is susceptible for high-energy radiation, we investigated whether neutron and gamma irradiation could result in the removal of residual chloroform in HoAcAc-loaded and placebo PLLA-MS by radiolysis. To investigate this, microspheres with relatively high and low amounts of residual chloroform were subjected to irradiation. The effect of irradiation on the residual chloroform levels as well as other microsphere characteristics (morphology, size, crystallinity, molecular weight of PLLA and degradation products) were evaluated. No chloroform in the microspheres could be detected after neutron irradiation. This was also seen for gamma irradiation at a dose of 200 kGy phosgene, which can be formed as the result of radiolysis of chloroform, was not detected with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A precipitation titration showed that radiolysis of chloroform resulted in the formation of chloride. Gel permeation chromatography and differential scanning calorimetry showed a decrease in molecular weight of PLLA and crystallinity, respectively. However, no differences were observed between irradiated microsphere samples with high and low initial amounts of chloroform. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that neutron and gamma irradiation results in the removal of residual chloroform in PLLA-microspheres. PMID:16549282

  3. Protocell-like Microspheres from Thermal Polyaspartic Acid

    Bahn, Peter R.; Pappelis, Aristotel; Bozzola, John

    2006-12-01

    One of the most prominent amino acids to appear in monomer-generating origin-of-life experiments is aspartic acid. Hugo Schiff found in 1897 that aspartic acid polymerizes when heated to form polyaspartylimide which hydrolyzes in basic aqueous solution to form thermal polyaspartic acid which is a branched polypeptide. We recently reported at the ISSOL 2005 Conference that commercially made thermal polyaspartic acid forms microspheres when heated in boiling water and allowed to cool. In a new experiment we heated aspartic acid at 180°C for up to 100 h to form thermal polyaspartylimide which when heated in boiling water without addition of base hydrolyzed to form thermal polyaspartic acid which upon cooling formed microspheres. Thermal polyaspartic acid microspheres appear protocell-like in the sense of being prebiotically plausible lattices or containers that could eventually have been filled with just the right additions of primordial proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and metabolites so as to constitute protocells capable of undergoing further chemical and biological evolution. Thermal polyaspartic acid microspheres are extremely simple models of protocells that are more amenable to precise quantitative experimental investigation than the proteinoid microspheres of Sidney W. Fox. We present here scanning electron microscope images of such thermal polyaspartic acid microspheres. Figure 1 shows thermal polyaspartic acid microspheres from l-aspartic acid heated at 180°C for 50 h, at a magnification of 3,500×. Figure 2 shows thermal polyaspartic acid microspheres from the same sample at a magnification of 7,000×. The thermal polyaspartic acid microspheres have a diameter of approximately 1 μm These images were viewed with a Hitachi S2460N scanning electron microscope at 20 kV acceleration voltage. [Figure not available: see fulltext.][Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Effect of copper on crack propagation in beryllium single crystals

    The effect of copper additives on the fracture energy and the development of cracks parallel to the basal plane was studied in zone-refined single crystalline beryllium. At 770K the cleavage planes are very smooth, so the crack propagation energy, which is independent of copper content (less than 2 at. percent Cu) in the range of measurement accuracy, is only a little higher than the surface energy of the basal plane. At room temperature, due to intense plastic processes taking place in front of the crack tip, the fracture energy is an order of magnitude higher than at low temperatures. The effect of copper on the plastic processes can be divided into two regions. In region I (less than 1.2 at. percent Cu), in which the crack propagation energy increases sharply with increasing copper content, crack propagation is controlled by prism slips. The decrease in crack propagation energy in region II (greater than 1.2 at. percent Cu) can be attributed to a reduction of beryllium twinning energy with increasing copper content. (auth)

  5. A non-chemical spectroscopic determination of atmospheric beryllium

    Beryllium in the atmosphere is determined by emission spectroscopy using a non-chemical method of analysis. Long term effects of beryllium poisoning result in respiratory and skin disease, and this is partly reflected by the low threshold limits (0.002 mg/m3). In comparison the threshhold values for lead and cadmium are 0.2 and 0.16 mg/m3 respectively. Air samples are collected at 2 litres/ minute using cellulose filters, and sampling time is dependent on the individual process being monitored, but can be as short as five minutes, eg. dental laboratories. The filters are initially divided in two parts, and one portion is carefully pelletised using a steel press. The pellet is placed in an electrode cup and 'wetted' using isopropanol and ethylene glycol. Wetting is necessary because the pellets tended to explode out of the arcing zone. Calibration graphs were produced using an internal cobalt standard, and the 234.8 nm, 313.0 nm emission lines were used. No spectral and inter-element effects were observed, and the minimum detection limit was one nanogram. Under normal working conditions a 25% precision was obtained. (author)

  6. Steam chemical reactivity of plasma-sprayed beryllium

    Anderl, R.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Smolik, G.R. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Castro, R.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Plasma-spraying with the potential for in-situ repair makes beryllium a primary candidate for plasma facing and structural components in experimental magnetic fusion machines. Deposits with good thermal conductivity and resistance to thermal cycling have been produced with low pressure plasma-spraying (LPPS). A concern during a potential accident with steam ingress is the amount of hydrogen produced by the reactions of steam with hot components. In this study the authors measure the reaction rates of various deposits produced by LPPS with steam from 350 C to above 1,000 C. They correlate these reaction rates with measurements of density, open porosity and BET surface areas. They find the reactivity to be largely dependent upon effective surface area. Promising results were obtained below 600 C from a 94% theoretical dense (TD) deposit with a BET specific surface area of 0.085 m{sup 2}/g. Although reaction rates were higher than those for dense consolidated beryllium they were substantially lower, i.e., about two orders of magnitude, than those obtained from previously tested lower density plasma-sprayed deposits.

  7. Calculations for electron-impact excitation and ionization of beryllium

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Fursa, Dmitry V; Bray, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The B-spline R-matrix and the convergent close-coupling methods are used to study electron collisions with neutral beryllium over an energy range from threshold to 100 eV. Coupling to the target continuum significantly affects the results for transitions from the ground state, but to a lesser extent the strong transitions between excited states. Cross sections are presented for selected transitions between low-lying physical bound states of beryllium, as well as for elastic scattering, momentum transfer, and ionization. The present cross sections for transitions from the ground state from the two methods are in excellent agreement with each other, and also with other available results based on nonperturbative convergent pseudo-state and time-dependent close-coupling models. The elastic cross section at low energies is dominated by a prominent shape resonance. The ionization from the $(2s2p)^3P$ and $(2s2p)^1P$ states strongly depends on the respective term. The current predictions represent an extensive set o...

  8. Influence of neutron irradiation on the tritium retention in beryllium

    Rolli, R.; Ruebel, S.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Wu, C.H.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon-based materials and beryllium are the candidates for protective layers on the components of fusion reactors facing plasma. In contact with D-T plasma, these materials absorb tritium, and it is anticipated that tritium retention increases with the neutron damage due to neutron-induced traps. Because of the poor data base for beryllium, the work was concentrated on it. Tritium was loaded into the samples from stagnant T{sub 2}/H{sub 2} atmosphere, and afterwards, the quantity of the loaded tritium was determined by purged thermal annealing. The specification of the samples is shown. The samples were analyzed by SEM before and after irradiation. The loading and the annealing equipments are contained in two different glove boxes with N{sub 2} inert atmosphere. The methods of loading and annealing are explained. The separation of neutron-produced and loaded tritium and the determination of loaded tritium in irradiated samples are reported. Also the determination of loaded tritium in unirradiated samples is reported. It is evident that irradiated samples contained much more loaded tritium than unirradiated samples. The main results of this investigation are summarized in the table. (K.I.)

  9. Remarkable Hydrogen Storage on Beryllium Oxide Clusters: First Principles Calculations

    Shinde, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Since the current transportation sector is the largest consumer of oil, and subsequently responsible for major air pollutants, it is inevitable to use alternative renewable sources of energies for vehicular applications. The hydrogen energy seems to be a promising candidate. To explore the possibility of achieving a solid-state high-capacity storage of hydrogen for onboard applications, we have performed first principles density functional theoretical calculations of hydrogen storage properties of beryllium oxide clusters (BeO)$_{n}$ (n=2 -- 8). We observed that polar BeO bond is responsible for H$_{2}$ adsorption. The problem of cohesion of beryllium atoms does not arise, as they are an integral part of BeO clusters. The (BeO)$_{n}$ (n=2 -- 8) adsorbs 8--12 H$_{2}$ molecules with an adsorption energy in the desirable range of reversible hydrogen storage. The gravimetric density of H$_{2}$ adsorbed on BeO clusters meets the ultimate 7.5 wt% limit, recommended for onboard practical applications. In conclusion,...

  10. Preparation of paclitaxel-loaded microspheres with magnetic nanoparticles

    CUI Sheng; SHEN Xiaodong; SHI Ruihua; LIN Benlan; CHEN Ping

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to prepare paclitaxel-loaded microspheres,a kind of target-orientation anticancer drug.The paclitaxel-loaded microspheres were prepared with magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and taxo1.The morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy(SEM),and the average size and the size distribution were determined by a laser-size distributing instrument.High performance liquid chromatography(HPLC)was used to measure the paclitaxel content.Experimental results indicated that the effective drug loading and the entrapment ratio of paclitaxel-loaded microspheres were 1.83% and 92,62%,respectively.

  11. Locomotion of microspheres for imaging and light focusing applications

    Krivitsky, Leonid A; Wang, Zengbo; Lukiyanchuk, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Super-resolution imaging using sub-diffraction field localization by micron sized transparent beads (microspheres) was recently demonstrated [1]. Practical applications in microscopy require control over the positioning of the microspheres. We present a simple method of positioning and controllable movement of a microsphere by using a glass micropipette. This allows sub-diffraction imaging at arbitrary points in three dimensions, as well as the ability to track moving objects. The results are relevant to a broad scope of applications, including sample inspection, and bio-imaging.

  12. Locomotion of microspheres for super-resolution imaging

    Krivitsky, Leonid A.; Wang, Jia Jun; Wang, Zengbo; Luk'yanchuk, Boris

    2013-12-01

    Super-resolution virtual imaging by micron sized transparent beads (microspheres) was recently demonstrated by Wang et al. Practical applications in microscopy require control over the positioning of the microspheres. Here we present a method of positioning and controllable movement of a microsphere by using a fine glass micropipette. This allows sub-diffraction imaging at arbitrary points in three dimensions, as well as the ability to track moving objects. The results are relevant to a broad scope of applications, including sample inspection, microfabrication, and bio-imaging.

  13. Confocal epifluorescence detection for microspheres delivered on disposable microfluidic chip

    Honghua Hu; Xiyun Hou; Guoguang Yang

    2006-01-01

    @@ The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection system for 5-μm microspheres delivered on microfluidic chip is presented employing confocal optical scheme. The parameters of the optical system are specifically optimized for single microsphere detection. With the excitation laser spot size of 4.6 μm and optical sectioning power of 27 μm, the lowest concentration detection limit is 0.45 nmol/L, corresponding to only 122 molecules in probe volume. The microsphere detection is carried on successfully with the maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 55.7, which provides good detection sensitivity.

  14. Preparation and properties of polyvinyl alcohol microspheres

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) microspheres, having a size range of ∼150- to 250-μm diameter with 1- to 5-μm wall thickness, have been fabricated using a solution droplet technique. The spheres were developed for possible use on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. PVA, a polymer chosen based on earlier survey work carried out at KMS Fusion, Inc., has good strength, low hydrogen permeability, is optically transparent, and water soluble. The latter property makes it safe and easy to use in our droplet generator system. A unique dual-orifice droplet generator was used to prepare the spheres. The droplet generator operating conditions and the column processing parameters were chosen using results from our 1-D model calculations as a guide. The polymer microsphere model is an extension of the model we developed to support the glass sphere production. After preparation, the spheres were physically characterized for surface quality, sphericity, wall thickness (and uniformity), and size. We also determined the buckling pressure for both uncoated and CH-coated spheres. Radiation stability to beta decay (from tritium) was evaluated by exposing the spheres to a 7-keV electron beam. The results from these and other physical property measurements are presented in this report

  15. Improved bioavailability through floating microspheres of lovastatin

    S Kumar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available "n Background and the purpose of the study: Lovastatin is an antihyperlipidemic agent which has low bioavailability due to the extensive first pass metabolism. It was sought to increase gastric retention of lovastatin by development of a sustained release gastroretentive drug delivery system leading to reduced fluctuation in the plasma concentration and improved bioavailability. "nMethods: Floating microspheres were prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion technique, using various polymers and their blends. The in vitro performance was evaluated for drug-polymer compatibility, percent yield, particle size, drug entrapment efficiency, in vitro onset and duration of floatation, in vitro drug release as well as in vivo determination of serum cholesterol level. "nResults: The mean particle size of microspheres was observed to be between 6.9 to 9.5 μm and the maximum particle size was around 50 μm. In vivo studies of the selected batches indicated lower level of serum cholesterol compared to the marketed tablet at the same dose but was not significant. Major conclusion: The data obtained in this study suggested that a microparticulate floating dosage form of lovastatin can be successfully designed to yield controlled delivery with improved therapeutic efficacy.

  16. Reduction of surface erosion caused by helium blistering: comparison between vacuum-cast and sintered-beryllium

    The blister formation and the erosion associated with blistering in a vacuum cast beryllium foil and in a foil of sintered beryllium powder have been investigated for irradiation at room temperature and at 6000C with 100 keV 4He+ ions for total doses of 0.5 to 1.0 C cm-2. For room temperature irradiation the blisters in sintered beryllium powder are smaller in size than in vacuum cast beryllium. For irradiation at 6000C large scale exfoliation of blisters was observed for vacuum cast beryllium but only small amount of exfoliation was seen for sintered beryllium powder. The results show a reduction in erosion rate in sintered beryllium as compared to the erosion rate in vacuum cast beryllium. For room temperature irradiation no erosion rate could be determined for the sintered beryllium foil since no blister exfoliation was observed. For 6000C irradiation the erosion rate for sintered beryllium foil is more than an order of magnitude smaller than for vacuum cast beryllium

  17. Compatibility test between beryllium and ferritic stainless steel(F82H)

    In a fusion blanket, beryllium has been identified for use as neutron multiplier, where it will be in contact with the structural material. Austenitic stainless steel, 316SS has been considered as the structural material. However, from some studies, it is reported that beryllium reacts with 316SS above 600 C. In our investigations, we found that the reaction product between beryllium and nickel, BeNi was formed on 316SS side at 600 C. Therefore, the compatibility between beryllium and ferritic stainless steel without nickel, F82H(Fe - 8%Cr - 2%W - 0.2%V) as the new structural material in JAERI was investigated to determine if it was more compatible with beryllium. In this study, for clarifying the chemical interaction between beryllium and F82H, the out-of-pile compatibility test has been carried out with diffusion couples of beryllium and F82H which were inserted in the capsule filled with high purity helium gas. Annealing temperatures was 400, 600 and 800 C, and annealing periods was 100, 300 and 1000 h, respectively. From the results of this test, it is obvious that the thickness of reaction layer in F82H is 2/3 of that in 316SS in the case of annealing at 800 C for 1000 h. (orig.)

  18. Immobilisation of beryllium in solid waste (red-mud) by fixation and vitrification.

    Bhat, P N; Ghosh, D K; Desai, M V M

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain information on the immobilization of beryllium (Be) in solid waste generated in the extraction process of beryllium from its ore, Beryl. This solid waste, termed red-mud, contains oxides of iron, aluminium, calcium, magnesium and beryllium. The red-mud waste contains beryllium at levels above the permissible limit, which prevents its disposal as solid waste. The total beryllium content in the red-mud analysed showed value ranging from 0.39 to 0.59% Be The studies showed that 50% of the total beryllium in red-mud can be extracted by water by repeated leaching over a period of 45 days. The cement mix, casting into cement blocks, was subjected to leachability studies over a period of 105 days and immobilization factor (IF factor) was determined. These IF values, of the order of 102, were compared with those obtained by performing leachability study on vitrified red-mud masses produced at different temperature conditions. Direct heating of the red-mud gave the gray coloured, non-transparent vitreous mass (as 'bad glass') showed effective immobilisation factor for beryllium in red-mud of the order of 10(4). PMID:12092765

  19. New and Emerging Technologies for Real-Time Air and Surface Beryllium Monitoring; FINAL

    In this study, five emerging technologies were identified for real-time monitoring of airborne beryllium: Microwave-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (MIPS), Aerosol Beam-Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (ABFLIPS), Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Surfaced-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Spectroscopy, and Micro-Calorimetric Spectroscopy (CalSpec). Desired features of real-time air beryllium monitoring instrumentation were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies as well as their unique demonstrated capability to provide real-time monitoring of similar materials. However, best available technologies were considered, regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features. None of the five technologies have the capability to measure the particle size of airborne beryllium. Although reducing the total concentration of airborne beryllium is important, current literature suggests that reducing or eliminating the concentration of respirable beryllium is critical for worker health protection. Eight emerging technologies were identified for surface monitoring of beryllium. CalSpec, MIPS, SERS, LIBS, Laser Ablation, Absorptive Stripping Voltametry (ASV), Modified Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Spectroscopy, and Gamma BeAST. Desired features of real-time surface beryllium monitoring were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies. However, the best available technologies were considered regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features

  20. Development of radiation resistant grades of beryllium for nuclear and fusion facilities

    Kupriyanov, I.B.; Gorokhov, V.A.; Nikolaev, G.N. [Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    R&D results on beryllium with high radiation resistance obtained recently are described in this report. The data are presented on nine different grades of isotropic beryllium manufactured by VNIINM and distinguished by both initial powder characteristics and properties of billets, made of these powders. The average grain size of the investigated beryllium grades varied from 8 to 26 {mu}m, the content of beryllium oxide was 0.9 - 3.9 wt.%, the dispersity of beryllium oxide - 0.04 - 0.5 {mu}m, tensile strength -- 250 - 650 MPa. All materials were irradiated in SM - 2 reactor over the temperature range 550 - 780{degrees}C. The results of the investigation showed, that HIP beryllium grades are less susceptible to swelling at higher temperatures in comparison with hot pressed and extruded grades. Beryllium samples, having the smallest grain size, demonstrated minimal swelling, which was less than 0.8 % at 750{degrees}C and Fs = 3.7 {center_dot}10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV). The mechanical properties, creep and microstructure parameters, measured before and after irradiation, are presented.

  1. New and Emerging Technologies for Real-Time Air and Surface Beryllium Monitoring

    Phifer, B.E. Jr.; Churnetski, E.L.; Cooke, L.E.; Reed, J.J.; Howell, M.L.; Smith, V.D.

    2001-09-01

    In this study, five emerging technologies were identified for real-time monitoring of airborne beryllium: Microwave-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (MIPS), Aerosol Beam-Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (ABFLIPS), Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Surfaced-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Spectroscopy, and Micro-Calorimetric Spectroscopy (CalSpec). Desired features of real-time air beryllium monitoring instrumentation were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies as well as their unique demonstrated capability to provide real-time monitoring of similar materials. However, best available technologies were considered, regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features. None of the five technologies have the capability to measure the particle size of airborne beryllium. Although reducing the total concentration of airborne beryllium is important, current literature suggests that reducing or eliminating the concentration of respirable beryllium is critical for worker health protection. Eight emerging technologies were identified for surface monitoring of beryllium. CalSpec, MIPS, SERS, LIBS, Laser Ablation, Absorptive Stripping Voltametry (ASV), Modified Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Spectroscopy, and Gamma BeAST. Desired features of real-time surface beryllium monitoring were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies. However, the best available technologies were considered regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features.

  2. The development and advantages of beryllium capsules for the National Ignition Facility

    Capsules with beryllium ablators have long been considered as alternatives to plastic for the National Ignition Facility laser; now the superior performance of beryllium is becoming well substantiated. Beryllium capsules have the advantages of relative insensitivity to instability growth, low opacity, high tensile strength, and high thermal conductivity. 3-D calculation with the HYDRA code NTIS Document No. DE-96004569 (M. M. Marinak et.al. in UCRL-LR-105821-95-3) confirm 2-D LASNEX U. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasmas Phys. Controlled Thermonucl. Fusion, 2, 51(2975) results that particular beryllium capsule designs are several times less sensitive than the CH point design to instability growth from DT ice roughness. These capsule designs contain more ablator mass and leave some beryllium unablated at ignition. By adjusting the level of copper dopant, the unablated mass can increase or decrease, with a corresponding decrease or increase in sensitivity to perturbations. A plastic capsule with the same ablator mass as the beryllium and leaving the same unablated mass also shows this reduced perturbation sensitivity. Beryllium's low opacity permits the creation of 250 eV capsule designs. Its high tensile strength allows it to contain DT fuel at room temperature. Its high thermal conductivity simplifies cryogenic fielding

  3. Mechanical compression tests of beryllium pebbles after neutron irradiation up to 3000 appm helium production

    Chakin, V., E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institite for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R.; Moeslang, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institite for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/Josep Pla, no. 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Compression tests of highly neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles have been performed. • Irradiation hardening of beryllium pebbles decreases the steady-state strain-rates. • The steady-state strain-rates of irradiated beryllium pebbles exceed their swelling rates. - Abstract: Results: of mechanical compression tests of irradiated and non-irradiated beryllium pebbles with diameters of 1 and 2 mm are presented. The neutron irradiation was performed in the HFR in Petten, The Netherlands at 686–968 K up to 1890–2950 appm helium production. The irradiation at 686 and 753 K cause irradiation hardening due to the gas bubble formation in beryllium. The irradiation-induced hardening leads to decrease of steady-state strain-rates of irradiated beryllium pebbles compared to non-irradiated ones. In contrary, after irradiation at higher temperatures of 861 and 968 K, the steady-state strain-rates of the pebbles increase because annealing of irradiation defects and softening of the material take place. It was shown that the steady-state strain-rates of irradiated beryllium pebbles always exceed their swelling rates.

  4. Analysis of impurities in beryllium, affecting evaluation of the tritium breeding ratio

    In most conceptual fusion power reactor designs, it is proposed to use beryllium as a neutron multiplier in the blanket. Detailed chemical composition of beryllium is necessary for evaluation of the tritium breeding ratio, and estimating the activation and transmutation of beryllium in the fusion reactor. In the present report, special attention was paid to a detailed analysis of impurities in beryllium, relevant to the tritium breeding ratio evaluation. Two different methods were used for the study of impurities: an analysis of the local sample by the ICP-MS method, and an integral analysis of the beryllium assembly, using the pulsed neutron method. The latter method was proposed as the most effective way of analyzing the integral effect to impurities in beryllium on production of the tritium on the lithium-6. The evaluation of the integral effect was based on time behaviour observations of the thermal neutron flux, following the injection of a burst of D-T neutrons into the beryllium assembly. Structural beryllium grade (S-200-F, Brush Wellman Inc.) was used in the study. The influence of the impurities has resulted in a smaller experimental reaction rate for production of the tritium on lithium-6, due to an increase in the parasitic neutron absorption. Experimental data was compared with the reference data and the MCNP Monte Carlo calculations using the JENDL-3.2 data set. Results indicate, that the measured absorption cross section of thermal neutrons in beryllium blocks is approximately 30% larger than the calculated value, based on the data, specified by the manufacturing company. ICP-MS analysis indicated that the impurities include elements such as Li, B, Cd and others. These elements affect the absorption cross section even if the content of impurities is less than 10 ppm. (author)

  5. Isotopic Transmutations in Irradiated Beryllium and Their Implications on MARIA Reactor Operation

    Beryllium irradiated by neutrons with energies above 0.7 MeV undergoes (n,α) and (n,2n) reactions. The Be(n,α) reaction results in subsequent buildup of 6Li and 3He isotopes with large thermal neutron absorption cross sections causing poisoning of irradiated beryllium. The amount of the poison isotopes depends on the neutron flux level and spectrum. The high-flux MARIA reactor operated in Poland since 1975 consists of a beryllium matrix with fuel channels in cutouts of beryllium blocks. As the experimental determination of 6Li, 3H, and 3He content in the operational reactor is impossible, a systematic computational study of the effect of 3He and 6Li presence in beryllium blocks on MARIA reactor reactivity and power density distribution has been undertaken. The analysis of equations governing the transmutation has been done for neutron flux parameters typical for MARIA beryllium blocks. Study of the mutual influence of reactor operational parameters and the buildup of 6Li, 3H, and 3He in beryllium blocks has shown the necessity of a detailed spatial solution of transmutation equations in the reactor, taking into account the whole history of its operation. Therefore, fuel management calculations using the REBUS code with included chains for Be(n,α)-initiated reactions have been done for the whole reactor lifetime. The calculated poisoning of beryllium blocks has been verified against the critical experiment of 1993. Finally, the current 6Li, 3H, and 3He contents, averaged for each beryllium block, have been calculated. The reactivity drop caused by this poisoning is ∼7%

  6. Device for continuous control of beryllium content in atmosphere and on surfaces

    As known, beryllium and its compounds are characterized by high toxicity, therefore it is necessary to control constantly the content of beryllium and its compounds in the air and also on the surfaces of production areas and equipment to provide safety. The device for a quick measuring of beryllium content in the air, surface deposits and precipitations is described in the report. The mode of functioning of the device is based on nuclear reaction 9Be(αnγ)12C with the use of alpha-source based on plutonium-238, i.e. beryllium can be in any chemical state - metal, oxide, salt, etc. Gamma-quantums with energies 7,65 MeV (10%) and 4,43 MeV (90%), typical for beryllium, are generated as a result of interaction between alpha-particles and beryllium nuclei. The mentioned reaction with beryllium gives maximum release if comparing with another nuclides and along with high energy of gamma-quantums provides maximum sensibility of analysis without any disturbance from another elements. The number of generated gamma-quantums is in proportion to beryllium content in a probe. The device consists of the probe-preparation unit, control unit and two-way communication line. The unit of probe extraction can be placed in different points of an area, at a large distance - up to 30 meters. This device is compact and easy to transport by one person. The device control can be realized by operator via the remote control unit or automatically by the given program. The time of the probe data processing is 10-15 min. The use of the device allows to carry out beryllium content measuring in the mode of current time. (author)

  7. Polycrystalline metasurface perfect absorbers fabricated using microsphere photolithography.

    Qu, Chuang; Kinzel, Edward C

    2016-08-01

    Microsphere photolithography (MPL) is a practical, cost-effective nanofabrication technique. It uses self-assembled microspheres in contact with the photoresist as microlenses. The microspheres focus incident light to a sub-diffraction limited array of photonic jets in the photoresist. This Letter explores the MPL technique to pattern metal-insulator-metal metasurfaces with near-perfect absorption at mid-wave infrared (MWIR) frequencies. Experimental results are compared to electromagnetic simulations of both the exposure process and the metasurface response. The microsphere self-assembly technique results in a polycrystalline metasurface; however, the metal-insulator-metal structure is shown to be defect tolerant. While the MPL approach imposes geometric constraints on the metasurface design, once understood, the technique can be used to create functional devices. In particular, the ability to tune the resonant wavelength with the exposure dose raises the potential of hierarchical structures. PMID:27472578

  8. Strings of polymer microspheres stabilized by oxidized carbon nanotubes.

    Yin, Guannan; Zheng, Zheng; Wang, Haitao; Du, Qiangguo; Zhang, Hongdong

    2014-07-15

    Oxidized carbon nanotubes (CNTOs) with hydrophilic oxygen-containing functional groups and hydrophobic conjugated structure are prepared by the oxidation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). After the polymerization of styrene with CNTOs dispersed in aqueous phase, polystyrene (PS) microspheres with string-like structure are obtained. Thermogravimetic analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and Raman results indicate the strong interaction between the separated PS chains from the oil phase and CNTOs during the initial stage of the polymerization. These adsorbed PS chains on the surface of CNTOs are quickly swollen by the monomer and they grow in size during the further polymerization. The pH value and the ion strength of aqueous phase obviously affect the stability of PS microspheres. The particle size of microspheres is also determined by the pH. We demonstrate that the one-dimensional structure of CNTOs is responsible for the formation of polymer microspheres with special architecture. PMID:24863776

  9. Preparation and characterization of nickel hydroxide microspheres assembled by nanoribbons

    This article describes a facile green strategy for preparing the Ni(OH)2 microsphere assembled by nanoribbons by the template of the squama inner coat of onion at mild condition. The method is simple and effective. The results of SEM show the products are Ni(OH)2 microspheres with diameters in the range of 500-2,500 nm. The results of TEM show the microsphere is assembly by nanoribbons, with thickness in the range of 30-50 nm. The products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, IR, and thermogravimetric analysis. A possible formation mechanism was also proposed.Graphical AbstractThis paper describes a facile green strategy for preparing the Ni(OH)2 microspheres assembly by nanoribbons by the template of the squama inner coat of onion at mild condition.

  10. XPS analysis of aluminosilicate microspheres bioactivity tested in vitro

    Todea, M.; Vanea, E. [Faculty of Physics and Institute of Interdisciplinary Research on Bio-Nano-Sciences, Babes Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca 400084 (Romania); Bran, S. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Iuliu Haţieganu”, Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, 400029 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Berce, P. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Machine Building and National Centre of Rapid Prototyping, 400641 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Simon, S., E-mail: simons@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Physics and Institute of Interdisciplinary Research on Bio-Nano-Sciences, Babes Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca 400084 (Romania)

    2013-04-01

    The study aims to characterize surface properties of aluminosilicate microspheres incorporating yttrium, with potential biomedical applications. Micrometric particles of spherical shape were obtained by spray drying method. The behavior of aluminosilicate microspheres without yttrium and with yttrium was investigated under in vitro conditions, by seven days incubation in simulated body fluid (SBF). The surface elemental composition and the atomic environments on outermost layer of the microspheres, prior to and after incubation in SBF were evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to investigate their bioactivity. The results were analyzed to underline the effect of yttrium addition on surface properties of the aluminosilicate microspheres and implicitly on the behavior of the samples in simulated body environments.

  11. Silicon microspheres for near-IR communication applications

    Serpengüzel, Ali; Demir, Abdullah

    2008-06-01

    We have performed transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarized elastic light scattering calculations at 90° and 0° in the o-band at 1.3 µm for a 15 µm radius silicon microsphere with a refractive index of 3.5. The quality factors are on the order of 107 and the mode/channel spacing is 7 nm, which correlate well with the refractive index and the optical size of the microsphere. The 90° elastic light scattering can be used to monitor a dropped channel (drop port), whereas the 0° elastic scattering can be used to monitor the transmission channel (through port). The optical resonances of the silicon microspheres provide the necessary narrow linewidths that are needed for high-resolution optical communication applications. Potential telecommunication applications include filters, modulators, switches, wavelength converters, detectors, amplifiers and light sources. Silicon microspheres show promise as potential building blocks for silicon-based electrophotonic integration.

  12. BIOCOMPATIBLE FLUORESCENT MICROSPHERES: SAFE PARTICLES FOR MATERIAL PENETRATION STUDIES

    Farquar, G; Leif, R

    2009-07-15

    Biocompatible polymers with hydrolyzable chemical bonds have been used to produce safe, non-toxic fluorescent microspheres for material penetration studies. The selection of polymeric materials depends on both biocompatibility and processability, with tailored fluorescent properties depending on specific applications. Microspheres are composed of USFDA-approved biodegradable polymers and non-toxic fluorophores and are therefore suitable for tests where human exposure is possible. Micropheres were produced which contain unique fluorophores to enable discrimination from background aerosol particles. Characteristics that affect dispersion and adhesion can be modified depending on use. Several different microsphere preparation methods are possible, including the use of a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), a Sono-Tek atomizer, an emulsion technique, and inkjet printhead. Applications for the fluorescent microspheres include challenges for biodefense system testing, calibrants for biofluorescence sensors, and particles for air dispersion model validation studies.

  13. Development of biodegradable starch microspheres for intranasal delivery

    Yadav A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Domperidone microspheres for intranasal administration were prepared by emulsification crosslinking technique. Starch a biodegradable polymer was used in preparation of microspheres using epichlorhydrine as cross-linking agent. The formulation variables were drug concentration and polymer concentration and batch of drug free microsphere was prepared for comparisons. All the formulations were evaluated for particle size, morphological characteristics, percentage drug encapsulation, equilibrium swelling degree, percentage mucoadhesion, bioadhesive strength, and in vitro diffusion study using nasal cell. Spherical microspheres were obtained in all batches with mean diameter in the range of above 22.8 to 102.63 μm. They showed good mucoadhesive property and swelling behaviour. The in vitro release was found in the range of 73.11% to 86.21%. Concentration of both polymer and drug affect in vitro release of drug.

  14. Self-assembled microsphere gratings on rib waveguides

    Tai, Chao-Yi; Unal, Bayram; Wilkinson, James S.; Mohamed A. Ghanem; Bartlett, Philip N.

    2003-01-01

    We report the spectral transmission of a rib waveguide side-coupled to a self-assembled polystyrene microsphere array. A transmission stopband was observed at ? ~ 1590nm, showing the potential for realising wavelength-selective devices

  15. The HFR Petten high dose irradiation programme of beryllium for blanket application

    This paper reports the objectives of a high dose irradiation of beryllium in the High Flux Reactor in Petten. In addition, the nuclear parameters, irradiation parameters and the provisional test-matrix, i.e. Beryllium grades and pebbles is presented. The irradiation will be performed in the frame of the European Programme for the development of the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) to study the irradiation behaviour of Beryllium. Part of the materials will be provided by Japanese and Russian partners, for which cooperation through IEA agreements is being put into place. (author)

  16. Loading beryllium targets to extend the high flux isotope reactor's cycle length

    Various arrangements of beryllium loadings to create an internal neutron reflector in the flux trap region of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) have been investigated. In particular, the impact upon fuel cycle length has been studied by performing calculations using the HFIR MCNP-based model HFV4.0. This study included examining perturbations in reactivity, flux, and power distribution caused by the various beryllium loadings. The HFIR Cycle 400 core configuration was used as a reference to calculate the impact of beryllium loadings upon cycle length. Three different configurations of beryllium loadings were investigated and compared against the Cycle 400 benchmark calculations; Cases 1 through 3 modeled combinations of 12 and 18 beryllium rods loaded into unused experimental sites. Calculated eigenvalues have shown that potential increases in reactivity between 0.56 and 0.79 dollars are attainable, depending on the various beryllium configurations. These results correspond to possible increases in fuel cycle length ranging between 2.3% and 3.3%. On the basis of their practicality, cost versus benefit, and greater potential for implementation, Cases 2 and 3 (both with 18 beryllium rods) were studied further and are herein reported in greater detail. Neutron flux distributions for Cases 2 and 3 were calculated at the horizontal mid-plane of the flux trap region, which showed no significant changes in the thermal flux magnitude and radial profile in comparison to Cycle 400. Likewise, safety analysis related parameters were contrasted, revealing power increments of up to 2% near the inside edge of the inner fuel element, well below the maximum acceptable value of 9%, a standing guideline employed for experiments at the HFIR. Additionally, the average neutron heat generation rate in beryllium rods and the maximum heat generation rate were evaluated to confirm that the design provides adequate coolant flow inside the rod and around the

  17. Investigation of activation behind a beryllium slab under irradiation with 14 MeV neutrons

    Some concepts of a thermonuclear blanket include a neutron multiplier whose purpose is to breed tritium. The best neutron-multiplier is beryllium because the cross section (550 mb) of the (n,2n) reaction is large and the threshold energy (2.7 MeV) is low. The accuracy of the prediction of the tritium ratio depends strongly on the uncertainty of its (n,2n) reaction cross section. It is thus extremely important to check the consistency of the estimated data for beryllium, which are employed in theoretical investigations. The experimental results for beryllium assemblies disagree with the computational data. This makes it necessary to perform new experiments

  18. Conditions for preparation of ultrapure beryllium by electrolytic refining in molten alkali-metal chlorides

    Wohlfarth, Hagen

    1982-02-01

    Electrolytic refining is regarded as the most suitable process for the production of beryllium with impurity contents below 1 at.-ppM. Several parameters are important for electrolytic refining of beryllium in a BeCl/sub 2/-containing LiCl-KCl melt: current density, BeCl/sub 2/ content, electrolyte temperature, composition of the unpurified beryllium and impurity-ion concentrations in the melt, as well as apparatus characteristics such as rotation speed of the cathode and condition of the crucible material. These factors were studied and optimized such that extensive removal of the maximum number of accompanying and alloying elements was achieved.

  19. Spectrophotometric determination of beryllium in air by a sensitised chrome azurol S reaction

    Although many spectrophotometric reagents for beryllium are known, their sensitivities do not approach that provided by the fluorimetric method using morin. A spectrophotometric method of comparable sensitivity is reported wherein addition of cetylpyridinium bromide considerably enhances the colour intensity of the beryllium - Chrome Azurol S complex. EDTA serves as a suitable masking agent for eliminating interferences from commonly associated ions. The results obtained are compared with those obtained with the morin method. Similar sensitisation of the beryllium - Chrome Azurol S system by polyoxyethylene dodecylamine and poly(vinyl alcohol) has been reported. (author)

  20. Study of beryllium redeposition under bombardment by high intensity -low energy- hydrogen ion beams

    Gureev, V.M.; Guseva, M.I.; Danelyan, L.S. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1998-01-01

    The results of studying the erosion of beryllium under an effect of intense ion fluxes with the energy of 250 eV, at the fluences {approx}10{sup 2}1 cm{sup -2}, at the MAGRAS-stand are given. The operating conditions under which a practically-complete redeposition of the sputtered beryllium upon the target surface were experimentally-realized. A change in the microstructure of a beryllium target under sputtering and redeposition is analyzed. Some technological applications are considered. (author)